xt7kd50fvf9n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7kd50fvf9n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19230309  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  9, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  9, 1923 1923 2012 true xt7kd50fvf9n section xt7kd50fvf9n WELCOME VISITORS

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY MARCH

VOL XIII

No. 21

9. 1923

CLOSE SEASON

LITTLE THEATRE SEASON

GAME

TICKETS TO GO ON SALE

FIVE

STARTINGJXT MONDAY

Largest Crowd of Season Sees
Last Performance of Yearling Net Men.

Reduced Rates Are Offered For

VICTORY DUE TO PASSING

COMMISSION FOR SELLERS

Have
Freshmen
Undefeated
Gained Southern First Year
Championship

Prizes To Be Given to Those
Selling Set Number Of
Tickets

KITTENS
BY

TAKING HARD

FROM

VANDERBILT

freshBy defeating the
men 28 to 19, Saturday night in the
Kentucky gymnasium the Kentucky
freshmen basketball squad maintained
a perfect record for the season and
established an almost undisputable
claim to the Southern freshman basketball title. Vandy presented 'the
strongest team that the Kittens have
met on the home floor and it was not
until the second half that Kentucky
forged ahead, the first period ending
t

14-1- 4.

Probably the largest crowd that
ever witnessed a game in the small
Kentucky gym, was on hand to see
the Kittens play their last game it.
the freshman class, and although both
teams were hampered by the heat of
the gym, their supporters witnessed
one of the closest and best played
games ever seen here.
"Turkey" Hughes the only member
of the Kitten team who is not a former Blue Devil, started the scoring for
his tam, and his Ibasket was closely
followed by goals by Underwood and
Vandy
Captain Jimmy McFarland'.
soon found the hoops and tossed two
field goals. Another series of baskets
by the Kittens and the Kentucky score
stood at 14 and the Vandy tally at 7.
But the Tennessee players then hit
their stride and tied the count before
the half ended.
Starting the second period with a
jump ,the Kitten five got off to a lead
and continued to run their score up,
never allowing Vandy to seriously
In this hatf
threaten their lead.
Hughes and Underwood performed
brilliantly and sent the crowd into an
uproar with their fast work under the
(Continued on Page five)
--

FACULTY

K-

COMMITTEE

REPORTS ON LOAN FUND
More

Than Seventy Students
Provided For By This
Fund.

A little less than $11,000 is the total
of Loan Funds being administered for
the students by the Faculty Commit
tee. This fund provides for more
than seventy students annually, loans
rarging from $25 to $100.
Tasks ranging from financial aid
e
employ
and the finding of
ment to settling family differences
fall to the lot of this committee. The
loans are often repaid when the stu
dent is still in the University, chief
ly durir.-- the summer vacation. Not
a dollar has been lost in the handling
of the fund which has grown from
less than $3,000 two years ago.
n
Recent gifts are $500 by J. W.
'98; $57 by the class of '02;
$250, the balance on a pledge of $500
by Charles R. Brock '90, and the
George Clark Rogers Memorial fund
$500. The Alumni Fund has grown
to $2,000.
part-tim-

Four Productions On
Campus

The campaign for the sale of tickets for the Little Theatre season will
begin Monday, March 12, according
to a statement made by Professor
One seaFleischman, the director.
son ticket covering the four numbers
will be offered at a reduced price, $3
for adults and $2 for a special student
ticket.- On account of the fact that
two of the numbers are to be given
by a professional company, a Government tax of 30c and 20c, respectively, will be added to the above
amounts.
The four numbers are, first, "Gam
mer Gurton's Needle," an old English
Comedy, by the Coffer-MillPlayers,
March 22; second, "The Imaginary
Invalid," by Moliere, given by the
Coffer-MillPlayers,
March 23;
FRESHMEN BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS OF THE SOUTH
third, "Beyond the Horizon," by
Eugene O'Neill, the University Players, April 9 to 13; fourth, "A Mid
summer Night's Dream," by William
HIGH SCHOOLS OF STATE
KENTUCKIAN PAYMENTS
NOTICE OF MEETING
Shakespeare, the University Players,
DUE
May 18. The last number wilt be an
BEGIN TOURNAMENT FOR
outdoor performance produced with
full orchestration and music under the
The Patterson Literary SoThe last installment on the
direction of Professor Lampert.
SUPREMACY
pages in the 1923 Kentuckian
ciety will hold its regular
These four numbers offer one of
are due and all fraternities and
weekly meeting in room 304,
the best Little Theatre programs that
organizations which have not
300 Boys and Girls Flock to CamBuilding, FriAdministration
has
ever been
undertaken.
Aside
finished paying for their pages
pus to Try for Net
from the advantage of considerable
day evening at 6:50 o'clock.
are requested to see Charles
Title
saving in the purchase of the season
Graham, business manager, at
This will be an open discussion
ticket, it gives the holder the privionce and settle with him. The
of "The Proposed World Court,"
FINALS SATURDAY NIGHT
lege of first choice in the reserved
annual has gone to press and it
and three individual discussions
seat sale before each performance.
is necessary that all payments
Winners of Sectional Honors to
on "Things That Will Help Our
be collected before it can be
The tickets will be sold according
Display Ability on Local
Government."
to the following plan: Students of the
Floor.
class of Dramatic
Production, and
KKany other student who wishes, may
The fifth annual state interscholastic
have tickets to sell. Ten per cent of
began at 9
basketball tournament
VARSITY TRACK SEASON 9 o'clock this morning when the first BEREA TO DEBATE U. K. the actual value of the ticket will be
of twelve boys' games scheduled for
(Continued on Page Four)
OPENED AT CINCINNATI today, started. At the same time the HERE SATURDAY NIGHT
feminine quintets started operations
POLITICAL SCIENCE FRAT
in the Armory. The first and second
Cinder Men Make rounds in both boys and girls play are Brother Against Brother For
Kentucky
Fraternal Superiority Will Be GETS NATIONAL CHARTER
Good Showing at Indoor
in both divisions tomorrow afternoon
Added Attraction
Meet
to be run off today, with the semifinals
in the gym and the finals tomorrow
Berea College will invade the Blue Local Honorary Fraternity is
The Varsity Track Squad opened night
Granted Charter by Pi Sigma
Grass for the initial debate of the seaits 1923 season last Saturday at Cinvanguard of the 300 athletes son with the University of Kentucky,
The
Alpha
cinnati by a very satifsactory showing
in- the
Saturday night. March 10. The dein the indoor meet held at the Armory. that were expected to take part
fraternity in
The local honorary
With but five met: entered in the meet tourney, made its appearance in the bate is one of a triangle to he held on
morning and its in- the same night. The University of Political Science has 'beer.' granted a
the Cats finished fifth in team list, city Thursday
Kentucky affirmative team remains at charter by Pi Sigma Alpha, national
annexing two seconds and two thirds vasion was complete wh'eu the
and Frankfort qn'ntets came in home, while the negative team travels honorary political science fraternity.
for a total of eight points.
this morning Boys' teams from all of to Danville to debate Centre College.
The members of the active chapter
Of the five men entered in the meet the 16 districts are entered in the play At the same time, Berea and Centre are: Prof. J. C. Jones, Henry Taylor,
but three of the Cats brought medals but several of the
fives declined will mix at Berea.
A. V. McRee, Sarah
Anna
Captain "Red" the entry.
back to Lexington.
The question for debate is: "Re- Louise Connor, Ann Hickman, J. C.
secDavidson, Cat weight man, won
The rivalry between the prep solved, That the United States should Merz, Mabel Ruth Coates, James
ond place in the 16 pound shot put, schools of the state for the honor of adopt a Cabinet Parliamentary Form Darnell, S. B. Caldwell, Laura BenBob Porter, distance ace, contributed holding the State title is keener than of Government."
It is thought that nett, Roscoe Cross, S. B. Neal.
two thirds, in the mile and two mile, ever this year, assuring the spectators two of Berca's strongest
Glenn Tinsley,
Alumni members:
debaters.
finished second in the
while Gorman
of numerous fast tilts before the tour- Clayton Callihan- and H. O. Porter, Henrietta Rogers, James E. Wilhelm.
half.
ney closes Saturday night. Several of will uphold the negative, while rep- lima Thorpe, W. Hugh Peal, Gerald
The showing of Porter in the two' the quintets have scores to settle and resenting the University of Kentucky, Griffin.
It is the nurnose of this fratemitv
mile was better than his finish indi- are only waiting for the opportunity H. C. Johnson and C. M. C. Porter
cates for Watson, of the Illinois Ath- afforded them by the tournament to will maintain the affirmative. The to further the study of political science
letic Club lowered the track record get eves. While no one team appears two Porters on the rival teams are and to arouse new interest in the sub- seconds, in to outshine the rest of the quintets brothers, so that the debate will have ' ject. Delta chapter has been organfor the event 15 and
winning the race. The time was 4:34 Manual, Owensboro, Hazard, Fran'
the added attraction of a contest for ' ized or.1 the campus of the University
of Kentucky and pledging exercises
Porter's race was against heavy fort and Lexington seem to be the fraternal superiority.
Circle has promised for new members will be held within
The
odds and the Indiana lad was beaten best and should they not meet before
-

er

BASKET

--

--

-

Clark-count-

Blan-ding- ,

co-e- d

-

Su-K- y

(Continued to Page Four)

(Continued on page 8.)

(Continued on page 8.)

I

(Continued on page 5.)

* THE

Page Two

Alunml Secretary
he among the guests at the dinner
which is expected to he the best attended in the history of the Club,

CALENDAR
Somerset, March 2. (First Fri- day Regular) evening meeting.
Frankfort, March 2. (Postpon- cd from Feb. 26) evening meet- -

'90

90 AND '22 LEAD

Membership of Association is
Above Average of South
membership
The average paid-u- p
of the graduates is 34 percent, an increase of 5 percent in six weeks. This
is equal to the average for the alumni
associations of the Wcstcrr.' Conference and well above that of the institutions in the Southern Comforencc.
All classes except '92 have incrcas-bc- r
1.
The classes that have not inare '91, '92,
creased since January
cd their paid membership since Decem-994, '98, '00, '02, '04 and '06, but
the classes of '98 and '06 are still
among the first five in the entire Association.
First honors amoi.'g the more recent
classes go to '22 with 48 percent paid-uThe class of '90, however, led by
Charles R. Brock, of Denver, heads
the list with a percentage of 62. The
standing follows:
Paid

Buffalo, March 10. (Second
Saturday Regular) luncheon at
the Ellicott Club.
Lexington, March 10. (Second
'Saturday Regular) luncheon at
the Lafayette Hotel, 12:15.
Philadelphia, March 10. Sec- ond Saturday Regular) evening
meeting.
March 24. (Fourth
Detroit,
Saturday Regular) dinner, Dix- icland Inn.
Frankfort, March 28. (Last
Monday Regular) evening meet- ing.
Somerset, April 6. (First Fri- day Regular) evening meeting.
New York, April 6. Annual

1

p.

e.

Louisville, April 20. Annual
K. E. A. banquet,
Watterson
Hotel.

Percent

Class

Percent

Class

Active

Active

27
20

1869-'8- 9

'91
-- '93
-- '95
-- '97
-- '99
-- '01
-- '03
-- '05
-- '07
-- '09
-- '11
-- '13
-- '15
-- '17
-- '19
-- '21

Try Postal Card Shower

--

No one ir.' the Alumni Office is
ing a birthday in March but a sug
gestion has ibeen offered for a postal
card shower on general principles.
Alumni are invited to send in news
about themselves or friends.
The Betwixt Us column has attracted more readers than any other department in the Kernel. Its interest
is in direct ratio to the contributions
of the members of the Association,
hav-

GET FACULTY SPEAKERS
Every Alumni
Club in Kentucky
Should Have One Feature Address Annually.
Speakers from the faculty are available for addressing local brarxhes of
the Alumni Association any week-en- d
in the year. Sometimes it is possible
k
appointments.
to arrange for
Former students keep in touch with
the Alma Mater through formal and
informal visits from those who are
doing things back on the campus. In
some instances the clubs arrange for
such meetings to be open to parents
of students and prospective students
.and to others interested in higher education.

10
41

29
45

30
24
34
42
39 ,
32
36
-- 32
28
39
38

62

'90
'92
'94
'96
'98
'00
'02
'04
'06
'08
'10
'12
'14
'16
'18
'20
'22

11

23
36
44
29
35
28
42
31

24
24
33
35
3

32
48
32

Graduates average 34 percent.
Many classes of other universities
have 60, 70 and 80 percent paid mem
bers. The Kentucky classes, however,
are more regular.

mid-wee-

Betwixt Us

Office.

ex-'l-

ex-2- 0,

FINN IS DELEGATE
New York Alumni Club Has Member
of Graduating Class For Gueat
William Finn, president of the class
of '23, will be the guest of the New
York Alumni Club at tis annual
to be hel dthis year at the
Waldorf Hotel April 6. This is considered the greatest prize offered to a
member of the graduating class. All
expenses are paid by the New York
alumni.
Irvine Cobb, the inimitable, will be
the principal speaker. Corbetft Franklin, a "wild mountaineer" is the entry
of President J. I. Lyle on the club's
Wives,
program.
entertainment
sweethearts and friends of alumni will
dinner-

-dance

To-pek- a,

Paige-Detro-

was
Kobinson ex-married to William Mac Elliott, Satur
day, March 3, at Lancaster, Ky. The
bnide is a member of Chi Omega fraternity. Mr. Elliott is a Transylvania
College man and a Kappa Alpha. Af
ter a wedding trip to New Orleans,
'hey wifl 'be at home at "The Maples,"
Lancaster.
was a visitor
Henry P Lewis,
He
in the Alumni office last week.
has just returned from the Philippines,
y
having resigned from the Army,
first. He was serving as CapHe is now at
tain 45th Infantry.
home at 26 Dudley street, Winchester.
Minnie

Kentucky
Primary
Approach
of
Brings Out Many U. K People

ex-9-

Dci.-vcr-

-

ALUMNI ENTER POLITICS

For

key-net-

g,

-.

The approach of the Kentucky pri- mary has brought out a number of
alumni of the University as candi
dates for public office. Among the
first reported candidates for the Leg8
islature are Arch L. Hamilton
and Harry B. Miller 14, both of Fay
ette county, but not opponents ; Jack
Howard '20, of Morgan county; J.
Simpson county,
V. McFarlin, '93,
and A. B. Cammack, '23 of Owen
county.
Mentioned for state office are Mrs.
ex- - (KenMary Elliott Flannery
tucky's first woman legislator), for
Secretary of State; Rufus Lisle
for Commissioner of Agriculture, and
Emery L. Frazier,
for Clerk of
the Court of Appeals.

Mr. Haswcll is edition of the Kernel very eagerly."
E. degree in 1912.
treasurer of the Birmingham Alumni W. S. Baugh.
Club, the one that is running a close
'20
second to Buffalo for 100 per cent
Marie Rodes Barkley received her
membership.
B. S. in the Home Economics in 1920.
She is a member of Alpha Gamma
13
So"State Supervisor Roy H. Thomas Delta, and the Home Economics
e
on for appendicitis at ciety.. The "Annual" struck the
was opcracd
when it said "salt of the earth is
Wafts Hospital in Durham, February
Marie says she will do
5. The operation was successful ar."d Marie. When
Mr. Thomas is recovering rapidly and a thing, you can be sure that it will
expects to be 'back on the job' in a be done, and you won't have to bothis why
short time." North Carolina Agricul- er any more about it." That
she made such a good secretary of
tural Education Monthly.
the Lexington Alumni Club for two
James Sory, Jr., "lost" since his dis- years. That is the reason too, probcharge from the army he served as ably, why she is now President of
the
Captain of Infantry during the World
Alumni AssociaHome Economics
War is now secretary, Kentucky Dis- tion. She is assistant manager of the
Men's Board, 707
abled
Woman's Exchange, 222 East Main
Louisville Trust Bldg., Louisville,
Street, Lexington, Ky.
Ky.

regret that the distance between
the University at.-- myself renders it
almost impossible for constructive
suggestions to come from me. However, I am always with you in spirit
in any programme which looks to
the upbuilding of our beloved UniIt was my privilege last
versity.
week to act as the representative of
the University of Kentucky at the inauguration of the new Chancellor, Dr.
'14
Herbcr R. Harper, of the University
Chas. K. Brock, H.u
of Denver.'
Don-aiM. Gaither has been located
,
Colo.
Champa Street,
at Apartado 764, Mexico D. F., Mexico. He had been in the engineering
'96
business at Tampico, Mexico, since
Thomas R. Dean, who has been on his discharge from the Army. He
the "lost" list for several months, has served as Lieutenant of Engineers
been located, practicing law, at Spring- - during the World War. From July,
dale, Washington Coun'ty, Arkansas. 1914, until he entered the service, he
P. O. Box 315.
was in the employ of the Atchison,
John W. Woods has been practic- Topeka ar.-- Santa Fe Railway,
ing law in Ashland, Kentucky, for
Kansas.
several years and is president of the
He
15
Ashland Day and Night Bank.
served on the Board of Trustees of the
"I have been sent here to study the
University, his term expiring in 1916. plant of the National Carbon ComHe is treasurer of the Boyd County pany and am also assisting the act
Alumni Club. Residence, 730 East ing superintendent. Expect to be here
Bath Avenue.
all this year so please see that I get
my Kernels. I must not miss them."
99
R. Brooks Taylor, Hardy ApartBradley W. Young received his B. ments, Clarksburg, W. Va.
S. degree at the University of Ken
Herschel Scott, formerly with the
tucky in 1899, and his LL.B. m 1906 Union Sugar Refining Company,
at Harvard. He went west to practice
Calif., is now agriculturists
his profession and has been in Seattle, with the L. D. Waller Seed Co., Gaud- Wash., for several years. He is coun alupe, California.
sel and manager of the Netherlands
Horace Bird, who was county agent
American Mortgage Bank and mana in the Kentucky
service for some
ger of Holland Companybusiness
time, and for the past few months
address 937 Henry Bldg.
county agent, Sullivan county, Bristol,
Tenn., has very recently lost his wife
'02
by ptomaine poisoning. Mrs. Bird died
T. E. Warnock received his B. M. E within a few hours. They, have one
'02, and for one year did architecsmall boy.
tural work with Anderson & Faig,
Lexington, and then received his M
'16
P TWivo. Tune. 1903. He entered
Russell F. Albert, who is with the
Chicago & North
the employ of the
State Highway and Good Roads Dewestern Railway as draftsman, motor partment, formerly located at
1903.
in May,
power department,
Ky., now has headquarters
Since 1903 he has been with several in Frankfort.
manufacturers.
leading automobile
C. K. "Scrubby" Dunn entered the
Since July 1919, he has been- with the
Chicago TelMotor Car Co., and is traffic department of the
it
ephone Company immediately after
now chief truck engineer. He marand remained until he
graduating
ried Janet Wa'tes Singleton, June 28,
during the World War
live at 1392 Manistique entered service
1905.
They
Engineers.
of as First Lieutenant of
Mr. Warnock is president
Ave.
When he returned to civilian life, he
the newest alumni club, the very live
the employ of the company
organization at Detroit.
in December, 1919, as assistant district traffic chief. Since December,
'06
1921, he was been employed in the
was in the traffic department of the Illinois Bell
President Rodman Wiley
office last week,, on his way to Louis- Telephone Company and is now suville. The firm, Bil!etcr & Wiley, has pervisor of that department, 212 W.
removed headquarters from WinchesHe is
Washington street,
ter to 1012 Starks Bldg., Louisville.
president of the Chicago Alumni Club.
I

ing.

Dinner-Danc-

KERNEL

Committee of that body, in recognition of the best "Kentucky Day" celebration in the state, September 10,
1921.
He is a Pi Kappa Alpha. During the World War he served as Captain in the 159th Depot Brigade at
and was discharged
Camp Taylor
with the rank of Major, which com
mission he holds in the Officers' Reserve Corps.

Alumni Notes
Editor

KENTUCKY

Mae

4,

ex-1-

j

Jar.-uar-

07

"Please have my Kernel sent to
Ky.
Marion, Ky., instead of Brandenburg
"I suppose iiie old saymg "better as I have been transferred and want
J. F.
late than never," holds true in refer- tn not the naoer reeularly."
State highway
ence to my dues for this year. I see Stigers, Engineer,
several U. K. people almost every day. Department.
I am working with Dave Campbell,
'11
'15, who is now secretary of the ComOscar Lee Day first entered the
pany. He was formerly buyer and
seller ir.1 the seed department, and has employment of the Western Electric
been with the company since his ar- Company at Chicago, but soon left
my servioe during the World War them to accept a teaching position in
the Industrial Department of the Al
ended." J. S. Yankey, Jr.,
salesman and analysist, Lewis Imple- legheny Schools. PJttsburgh, Penna.
Company, 315 W. In October, 1913, he entered the
ment and Seed
draftin-and engineering department
Main street, Louisville, Ky.
Refining Co..
one of of the Harbison-Walke- r
Presley T. Atkins,
the "tried and true" sons of the Alma of that city, and in December, 1919,
Mater, is editor ar.d owner of the entered the sales engineering departPineville Sun. During the Legislative ment. He is now representative of
Harbison-Walke- r
Refractories
campaign of last winter 'he was a tire- the
less worker. It is chiefly due to bf.s Co.. 1513 Kirby Building. Cleveland,
of the
efforts that Bell county and that cor- Ohio. He is secretary-treasurner of the State is so well organized. Cleveland Alumni Club.
went with
Arthur Board
their quoWhen they
ta on the Winn Coaching fund the the Atlanta Steel Company in August.
In October, 1912, he left them
first to reach the Alumni office, the 1911.
message that came with it was "there to accept a position in the .drafting
department of the Tennessee Coal,
is more here if you need it." Mr. Atkins is president of the Bell County Iron & Railway Company, at Ensley.
Alumni Club, and is a Life Member Ala., and is now chief engineer with
of the Alumni Association, an honor that company. Address, P. O. box
on him by the Executive 245, Ensley, Ala. He received his M.
ex-1-

ex-0-

Has-wel- l

21

Bruncr is practicing law,
Rawlings & Bruncr, at Harlan, Ky.
His wife, formerly Mary J. Gibson,
'22, is teaching in the .high school.
T. J. Asher, Jr., is mining engineer
with the Asher Coal Mining Company, Pineville, Ky.
The marriage of Herndon J. Evans,
'21 and Mary Elizabeth Downing
was solemnized Saturday evening,
March 3, at the home of the bride's
parents, 1712 S. Fourth St., in Louisville.
Mr. Evans is with the Associated Press at Frankfort. After a
short wedding trip they will be at
home on State Street, Frankfort.
Gits B.

ex-2- 3,

'22
The new address for the Kernel will
be, until another wrench gets in our
machinery, Y. M. C. A., Peoria, 111.
There's another Kentucky man in tlhe
State Highway office here, L. O. Coleman, '14, who is assistant district engineer." John W. Crenshaw.
Louis P. Gould is with the Miller
Rubber Company, at Akron, Ohio, address 816 Aberdeen St.
Silas T. "Difbie," Wilson is with
the State Highway iDepartment at
Frankfort. He is president of the
Franklin County Alumni Club.
Lattimer James McConnell, of Mt.
Olivet, Ky., and Gladys E. McCor- mick. were married in Cincinnati, O.,
February 24. After March 1 they
will be at home at Mt. Olivet, Ky.
--

K-

NEWSPAPER MAN GIVES 5
LECTURES AT U. K. CHAPEL
Faculty, Public Hear of
Students,
Conditions in Europe.

Mr. E. A. Jonas, editorial writer
,for the Louisville Herald, is delivering a series of very interesting lectures
this week, every afternoon at 3:30
.o'clock, to the students and staff of
(the University, and to 'the pulbilic. The
lectures are free.
Mr. Jonas is a brilliant speaker and
.his lectures have beew highly com-

mended.
The subjects are as follows:
Monday, March 5 "Europe Before
the War."
'17
Tuesday, March 6 "The England
Ashe-vill- e
.Which Drifted Into the War and
. Roy C. Scott, who returned to
i
i
for treatment a few weeks ago, ri i
Diuiiucrcu i ir:t
lu vikiuijr.
Wednesday, March 7 ''France Af
"is feeling fine," according to his own
words. He will 'be glad to hear from ter Sedan."
Thursday,
March 8 ''Germany;
his old U. K. friends address 41
Road, Asheville, N. C.
Industrious, Arrogant, Sullen."
Friday, March 9 "The Next Chapter and America's Place."
'II
"By chance an issue of the 'Kentucky Kernel' fell into my hands and
ULUMNIDIBECTOfiY
I noticed that my name (Frances
Boyle Spencer) was on the lost list.
I am married and living in Georgia
NOTE Alumni in business and in
now. I am always po interested in any
encouraged to inUniversity news and would be glad the professions are
Kernel. I have two sert cards here for the convenience of
to receive the
Write the Business
alumni.
sens, Robert Jr., and Norman, whom fellow
Manager for rates:
I hope to send to the University some
day. May the University continue to
grow and succeed in its work as never
WM. S. HAMILTON '07
before." Mrs. Robert S. Dennis,
LAWYER
Ga.
717 Marion E. Taylor Bldg.
Louisville, Ky.
Oak-Par- k

n,

'19

"Please change my address from
500 North Emporia Avenue, Wichita,
to 501 West Fifth Street, Pittsburg,
Kansas. I am in a new place but
with the same company, Kansas Gas
and Electric Co., 103 East Seventh St.
I am very much interested in the progress of the University and read each

DUES AND THE KERNEL
ONE YEAR 12.00.
Herbert Graham,
Secretary.

"

* Ik

MMlBxf.t wwe)M'

tt

ww

THE

BAPTISTS ARE

LEADING

SUNDAY SCHOOL LEAGUE
Presbyterians, Baptists Both Win
In Fifth Round of
Tournament
In the fifth

roui.'d

of the Univer-

CAMPUS

KENTUCKY
FIVE

FRESHMAN

CHATTER

All desiring lo teach next year call
at once at the Registrar's office and
fill out application blanks.
Professor J. Morton Davis has just
returned from Jackson, Ky., where he
has been attending to some business
for 'the Lees Collegiate Institute.

SWAMP

GEORGETOWN FIRST YEAR
MEN WITH

40--

6

Page Thre

KERNEL

SCORE

Fast Passing Too Much for Baby
Tigers Who Score But Two
Field Goals

The Lafayette Drug Store
Lafayette

Hotel

Building

OPERATED BY STUDENTS
We handle a complete line of domestic and imported Perfumes and Toilet Articles.
OUR SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE IS THE BEST IN
TOWN.

Candies
Phone 3309 "We Deliver."
Stationery
sity Sunday School played at the University Gymnasium Monday night,
ENTIRE SQUAD SENT IN.
March 5, the Second Presbyterian
Professor J. D. McCready gave a
defeated the Calvary Baptist five very interesting lecture last week on Scrubs Pile Up Scores With Same
team
24 to 17 and the Immanucl Baptists James Lane Allen's literary carcor, to
Precision Shown by Varsity
defeated the First Methodists 25 to 4. the Fortnightly Club in Winchester.
Five.
The first game of the evening was
by far the best and was closely conprincipal of the Pa- Walter Jetton,
In a game that proved largely a
tested from the start. The1 first half ducah High School, and a former good workout in preparation for the
i"HOME OF STUDENTS"
Prcsby-iterianei.'ded 10 to 8 in favor of the
University man, is being considered Vamlcrbilt scrap, the Kittens defeated
Bayless of the winners was for the supcrintcndcncy of the city the Georgetown ircshman five 40-high point man of the game with 10 schools. The present superintendent Thursday, March 1, at Georgetown.
Good Things to Eat at All Hours
points, he was closely followed by has resigned.
The Blue and White youngsters led
.Langford who made 8 points. Swearall the way, passing with ease around
inger and Morris also played a nice
MR. and MRS. W. M. POULIS, Props.
baskets
The Pioneer Writers Guild of Amer their opponents and tossir.-For the ica, 9 Charles Street, New York City, with machine-lik- e
game for the Presbyterians.
precision. The score
looscrs Langford and Molby were the will award prizes amounting to $600 at the end of the first period was 1
best.
experienced
their
to writers' and artists' whose work
The yearlings
The second game was both slow has never been published. The award usual hard luck at the start of the en
The Immanuel will be divided as follows: Four counter and several minutes passed
and uninteresting.
Baptists had it easy all through the prizes of $150.00 each for the best before the Kittens first counted. From
game. The first half ended 9 to 0 in short story, poem, play or cartoon. then on, however, goals rained irv, and
Asher and This contest closes June 30, 1923. For the end of the iperiod found the Ken
favor of the Baptists.
Hogg played besit for the winners. rules, address the Guild.
tucky five leading 23-- 1 and the Tiger
Gipson and Sawyer each made a goal
Cats unable to count even one field
for the Methodists.
History Club Meets
AND
goal.
The summary of the games:
The History Club had its regular
Daddy Boles sent his entire second
2nd Presbyterians 24 Cal. Baptists 17 meeting in room 203 Administration and third string mcr.- into the game
Langford 8 Building March 5, 4:UU p. m. A pro- in the second half, playing the reguF
Bayless 10
Rouse
F
W'lliamson
gram on the life and works of Francis lars the last five minutes only. All of
Mobley
C
Swearinger 6
Parkman was rendered. The club en the scrubs continued the attack with
Hill tertained, in honor of Mr. E. A. as much fervor as the regulars had
G
Powell
G
Welch 2 Jonas, editorial writer of the Louis- done, continuing to pile up points,
Neal
Morris ville Herald, at the home of Presi- and the final count was 40-Substitutes : Presbyterians
George8 for Swearinger.
dent McVey Thursday evening at 8 town's two field goals came in this
Second Game
p. m.
period and were both shots bordering
RATES:
1st Methodists 4
Em'l Baptists 26
on the miraculous.
Kir.-12c per mile
F
Hogg 9
Open Cars
in
Every Kitten that saw service
A novel and interesting feature was
Rousch inaugurated at the weekly meeting of the game starred, but the work of
F
Asher 13
15c per mile
Closed Cars
C
Gibson 2 the Patterson Literary Society last Underwood,
Lewis 4
McFarland,
Hughes,
G
Sawer 2 Friday evening. There was an open Helm and Carey stood out above that
Baugh
Plus 20c an Hour.
McVey discussion and exchange of opinion of the others. The Kittens passed
G
Walden
Baptists Moore for concerning the French Invasion of many times when they could have
Substitutes:
X CALLUS
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS
Hogg.
the Ruhr Valley. Much information shot and thus kept the score much
Standing of the Team
many opinions were voiced. Next lower than it might have been.
and
P W L Per Friday evening a ten minute discusThe summary:
541
800
Emmanuel Baptists
Georgetown 6
sion of the World Court will precede Kentucky 40
532
600
Presbyterians
2nd
RENT-A-FORShipp 4
F
McFarland 6
the regular program.
532
600
First Methodists
Morris
F
Hughes 10
50S
000
Calvary Baptists
C
12
McCracken 2
A request for statistics of a repreK
G
Rabe
134 E. SHORT STREET
sentative class has come to the Uni- Helm
PHONE 3656
General Ignorance. "I need a
Kemper
G
versity of Kentucky. A survey, to Carey
Kentucky
Alberts
Substituions:
M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M'
marks and I have no idea where show the percentage of elimination
tor nugnes,
of students from University classes tor Mcfrananu, urott
raise them."
I can
before the Senior class is to be made, Milward 4 for Underwood, Tracy 2
"Neither have I." Exchange.
at the University of Kentuckyy for the for Helm, Glenn for Carey, Neal 4 for
Board under Alberts, Adams for Croft, Davis for
General .Education
Abram Glenn, McFarland for Neal, Hughes
Foundation.
Rockefeller
M
Flexner, New York, orve of the secre- for Adams, Underwood for Milward,
taries of the Board, made the request. Helm for Tracy, Carey for Davis;
Georgetown
Tibbels
for Morris,
Mr. Pete Powell, representative of Morris for Tibbels.
Fouls McFarland 4 out of 6; Shipp
the New York Life Insurance Com::
FRATERNITY
2 out of 4.
g
pany, spoke at a Delta Pi
IMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
JEWELRY
Referee, Kenzler, of Purdue.
refresh- to the members of Delta SigK
ma Pi and other economics students
HEINTZ
recently. After his talk he answered
Judge (to familar drur.'k in court)
I
I
123 E. Main St
a number of questions pertaining to "Hmm. Drunk again. Ten dollars.
in