xt7kh12v4p4w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7kh12v4p4w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19190123  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 23, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 23, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7kh12v4p4w section xt7kh12v4p4w THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY

VOL IX
GEORGETOWN TIGERS

SECOND UNIVERSITY
CAFETERIA TO OPEN

WIN FROM KENTUCKY

Thomas, Dishman and Burn-haForm Big Three
For Wildcats; Score is

m

32 to 30.

Home Economics Students
to Manage Cafeteria in
Basement of Main
Building

CENTRE AT DANVILLE TO ACCOMMODATE 250
Within the next few days the University will have a second cafeteria In
the attractive rooms, which are rapidly nearing completion in the basement of the Administration building.
This new venture will be in charge
of the Home Economics Department,
which for some time has served a
cafeteria lunch at the Experiment Station for the benefit of employes. After
the first of February three meals will
be served each day at moderate price's
by the fifteen girls who are taking
this course. They will receive credit
for almost entire preparation and serving of food. Since the Home Economics students are to be unusually busy
with the coming Farmer's Week, they
will only serve lunch for the present.
Two rooms formerly used by the
stenographic bureau of the University
have been renovated for use as dining
room and kitchen. Small tables have
been installed and the new cafeteria
will make a very pleasing appearance
when it is opened this week, with Its
newly painted woodwork and grey furniture. Plans are being made to accommodate 200 or 250 patrons at each
meal.
Each girl who Is taking work In the
department will be required to spend
six hours each week in the kitchen and
must serve some time behind the counter, for which she will be paid. Credit
for laboratory
work in the Home
Economics course will be given the
girls for the serving and preparation
of food and cafeteria management.
Meals will be served on the cafeteria
plan, and it is said that students will
be able to have breakfast for about 20
cents, a lunch for 25, and a good dinner for 45 cents. Placards suggesting
certain economical combination of
foods will be placed about the room
to assist patrons in selecting their
meals.
Any profits will be used to pay for
extra equipment of the rooms, and
when this is bought, will become a
fund for use of the department. The
cafeteria at the Experiment Station,
which is run for the same purpose and
at which only one meal is served has
yielded a steady profit, and it is
thought that the new one will do the
samo with no effort on the part of the
names grace the Centre lineup this
managers to make money.
year as did in 1918, when they won the
championship of Kentucky by defeatKITTENS WILL PLAY
ing the Wildcats in a deciding game

Coming from behind like a Derby
favorite, the Wildcat basketball team
succeeded in tieing the Tigers from
Georgetown in the last half of the
game played Saturday night on the
gymnasium floor, but lost a moment
later when the deciding goal was
chalked up for the visiting aggregation. The score was 32 to 30.
The game was one series of thrills.
Georgetown played better basketball,
perhaps, than did the Wildcats, but
the latter made up for any advantage
by showing that familiar old fighting
spirit by which teams representing
this ' University are known. The Tiger quintet was composed of five men
who are entitled to 1918 service chevrons in basketball.
Three of them
were regulars last year.
Thomas, Dishman and Burnham.
For the Wildcats, Thomas, Dishman
and Burnham showed up best. The
displayed a better class
of goal tossing than he did in the
game against Wesleyan last week. Another game and he will be the fast
forward he was in 1918. Kentucky is
especially fortunate, however, in the
ability of her guards. Dishman played
one of the best games ever played by
a guard on the local floor. He and Burnham were always after the ball and
came to the top in a mixup like a bar
of ivory soap. Thomas got three field
goals and six fouls; Dishman and
Burnham got two field goals apiece..
Adams, Siler and Dean played best
basket ball for the visitors. They knew
the baskets on the local floor like
old friends and were never at loss in
finding them. Adams looped four field
goals in the first half, while Slier, at
center, found the goal three times.
"Dean, the other Tiger forward, became
especially accurate In the second half,
shooting four from the floor and lopping in one free one. The entire team
was good in floorwork. Their passes
were swift and accurate and their eyes
for the basket good.
On to Danville
With one victory and one defeat to
their credit, the Wildcats will breeze
over to Danville Saturday night, where
they will play the star quintet of Centre College. Practically the same
first-name- d

s

JANUARY

No . 8

23, 1919

MISS CRANE GOES TO
EMBARKATION PORT UNIVERSITY TRAINS
Miss Adelaide E. Crane, who for the
past year and a half has been tho
Houso Director of Patterson Hall, left
Wednesday night at 6'clock for New
York. From that port she will sail
with the relief commission to Armenia, where she will probably be
placed in charge of an orphanage.
Miss Crane has been ready for her
call for some time, but her departure
was upon such short notification, it
came as a disappointment to the girls
of Patterson and Maxwell Halls, who
had hoped to have a farewell dinner
in her honor. As a memento of their
months together, the girls presented
e
Miss Crane with a leather
and a heavy silk dressing-robe- .
suit-cas-

STROLLERS. PLAN TO

"MAKE IT SNAPPY1
Officers Elected and Plans
For Year Made at Meeting of Dramatic Club.
TO PRODUCE

COMEDY

At a called meeting of the Strollers
held Friday, Gus Gay, of Lexington,
was elected president of the organization to succeed Grover Creech, who
resigned to accept the office of stage
manager.
Mr. Gay immediately assumed the chair and the following officers were elected:
Mary Turner; secretary-treasure- r
J.
P. Barnes; business manager, Lee
publicity chairman, Frederick
Jackson.
t,

It was agreed upon to produce this
year a iflrst claas modern comedy
which people would want to see not
merely because it was a University
affair, but because it was really worth
seeing.

Because of the. request made by
President McVey that the students of
the University refrain from any social
meetings or entertainments until after
the new term begins, the Strollers
were forced to abandon the
custom of holding amateur night
for the purpose of selecting new Strollers. For this year only they will resort to the plan of requesting all students desiring to become members of
the dramatic organization of the University to make application to tho
Strollers, stating tho experience they
have had in amateur production. It
Is needless to say that every student
Interested in dramatics should "try
to got in" as any one knowing the life
of tho University will agree that the
Strollors is among tho most popular
organizations on the campus. It is
purely a "University and student" orWESLEYAN SATURDAY ganization and in past years has sucplayed at Camp Zachary Taylor. Kencessfully played to crowded houses
The Kittens will play tho first gamo
tucky will probably start the game
splendid productions. It Is tho purwith the sumo lineup that was used in of tho season at Winchester Saturday pose of tho organization this year to bo
night, with Kentucky Wesleyan un
directed by a professional
tho Wesleyan game.
coach.
opponents. Tho line-uhas not been
(Continued on Pago SIxT)
(Continued on Page Six.)
announced.
d

ANNUAL

DISABLED SOLDIERS

STAFF SEEKS

SUPPORT

OF STUDENTS

Government Sends Her Men
To Us For Vocational
Long Delayed Work on 1919
Training; Ag. Courses
Kentuckian Begins To
Popular
Be Finished on Time
ONE

FOUR-YEA-

R

MAN PRIZE FOR BEST SNAPS

Three men are now enrolled In the
University of Kentucky sent by the
Federal Board of Education of the
United States under the provision of
the Federal Board of Vocational Training which gives training to disabled
soldiers, sailors and marines who received injuries while in line of duty.
John H. Atkerson, formerly of the
U. S. S. Montana, now enrolled in the
Department of Agriculture of the University, is the first man to be sent to
the University.
Mr. Atkerson was graduated from
the Franklin High School of Simpson
county in June 1917 and on the following day enlisted in the United States
Navy and was sent to Newport, R. I.,
where he received his "boot" training in three weeks. He was assigned
to the U. S. S. Montana after he had
been sent to the Concentration Camp
at Portsmouth and made two successful crossings as a convoy to transports.
While "standing by" outside the drill
grounds of the Navy at Norfolk, Va.,
he received the injury to his left eye
which placed him in the class of men
who had sacrificed for their country.
The men aboard ship on the eighteenth
of February, 1918, was engaged in target practice, when "thru the carelessness of the men," a three inch shell
exploded killing two men and seriously injuring eight. Atkerson was standing near the gun and was knocked
unconscious. After remaining in the
Naval Hospital at Norfolk, for several
months he was sent to his home, blind
in his left eye, but a bigger man since
ho had suffered for his country.

Work on the 1919 Kentuckian has
begun! In the continual change of the
S. A. T. C. regime last fall, there wan
no provision for annual staffs, nor time
for student activities. Even the "flu"
intervened to prevent the ever ready
s
from starting the work.
Now, however, with conditions almost back to normal again, it is possible to think of annuals and other
things which make up college life.
The task is a hard one and only the
of the entire
complete
student body will make a success of
the year book.
All copy must be in the hands of
the publishers by March 1. With little more than a month to work, and
not one picture taken nor one line of
copy written, this is quite a task. Work
on the pictures will begin Monday. If
every person will have his sitting at
the earliest opportunity, turn back
the proofs without delay, and get the
finished picture at once, much time
will be saved. Moreover, if every person will do what he is asked to do
without delay, the management will
be spared much worry and loss of
sleep. Contributions are invited from
anyone who feels inspired, whether
said contribution be in the nature of
a poem, a drawing, a kodak picture or
a joke.

by Eliza
and Frederick M. Jackson, business manager.
They are aided by an able corps of
artists, literary and business experts.
The complete staff will be published
later. It is enough to mention a few
.Three weeks ago he was notified by
members at present.
the Vocational Training Board of the
William Wallace is filling the imporUnited States that because of his scholtant office of art editor. Cartoons or
astic ability, he had been selected to
drawings of any kind should be subbe sent by tho Government to obtain
to him. Such material should
training to enable him "to overcome mitted
be left on tho Kentuckian desk in the
disability received in line of duty."
rooms, Main building.
Journalism
Mr. Atkerson has matriculated In
Kodak pictures should bo given to
tho Department of Agriculture workGrover Creech, snap shot editor. An
r
ing for a
course. He stated
annual is offered as a prize for the best
that ho thot tho offer of tho Govern- set
of six pictures. Thoso can be left
ment "very liberal and generous," and
at tho University postoffico for the
tho he has lost his eye, ho is glad ho
editor or given to him in person. The
was able to do his "bit" for his counprize winner will be announced as soon
try.
as the annual goes to press.
Forrest Milton, who was Injured
Mounted pictures, such as are arwhen a wagon overturned, is tho secranged by tho various organizations
ond to enroll under tho provision of
are to bo given to Todd Green, photothe Board of Vocational Training. He
graph editor. Information regarding
is taking n course in highway engithoso pictures is being sent all organineering to fit himself for tho position
zations this weok. Caro in mounting
of road overseer.
and speed in getting tho worlc In Is
Captain W. M. Phipps, last of tho
Checks for space should bo
149th U. S. Infantry, Is tho third dis- given or mailed to
Froderlck M. Jackabled soldier to bo assigned to the son, university postofilco.
University of Kentucky by the Federal
Tho featuro section will bo edited
by Leo McClaln. Tho contents of this
(Continued from Page Three.)
iThe 1919 staff is headed

M. Piggott,

editor-in-chie-

f,

well-know- n

-'

four-yea-

* PAGE 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Home of Paramount, Artcraft, Goldwyn
and ' Select Pictures
Rjemember, We Show Only The Best
In cTWoving Pictures
l
section will bo kept a dark Becret
tho book Is on the press. The
chuckles emanating from tho
Jokestcrs nnd cartoonists,
however, indicate that this section
alone, will bo worth tho price of an
annual.
Tho military section, giving a history of tho University's part in tho
war will bo a valuable part of the
book. This will be edited by John
Loman, of tho Army, and Rufus
of the Navy. Beginning with
May 5, 1918, when tho cadet battalion
went on guard duty on the campus,
and closing with the formation of the
new R. O. T. C. in 1919, every military venture of the University will be
shown. The Army and Navy are each
promised fair representation.
un-ti-

Athletics will be handled by Thornton Connell, who promises to make
the most of the pathetic football season of 1918, to give all glory to the basketball Cats of 1919, and reflect the
spirit of the Blue and
White thruout the section.
never-say-di-

e

TEMPORARY OFFICERS
OF R. 0. T. C. NAMED
The following officers for the R. O.
T. C. cadet corps have been temporarily appointed:
Lt. Lee McClain.
Quartermaster
ComHeadquarters
Commander
pany Cadet First Lieutenant J. J.
Leman.
Commander Company B Lt. E. S.
Dabney.
Asst. Commanders Company B
Lts. J. R. Drummy, and R. D. Warth.
Company C Cadet
Commander
Captain R. L. David.
Asst. Commander Company C Lt,
Greene.
Commander Company D Lt. Fritz
De May.

Asst. Commander

Company D Lt

Walter Piper.
Company E i(Naval
Commander
Unit) Cadet Captain Belt.
Asst. Commander Company E
Cadet First Lt. Mose Smith.
Band Cadet Captain Grover Creech.
ATTEND MEETING OF
CONVERSATIONAL CLUB
President Frank L. McVey and Dean
Thomas P. Cooper, of the College of
Agriculture, University of Kentucky,
will go to Louisville today to attend
a meeting of the Conversational Club,
of which they are members. They will
be entertained at dinner by Reuben
Post Halleck.
President McVey has accepted an invitation to return to Louisville Tuesday, January 28, to address the members of tho Louisville Conference of
Social Workers at their regular meeting.
CLUB

ELECTS PRESIDENT.

Professor D. J. Healy was elected
president of tho Audubon Club at a
meeting held last week at tho homo of
Mrs. J. R. Morton, on North Mill street.
Professor Healy read a paper on Audubon, describing tho journey of the
famous ornithologist, when ho was an
old man, to Labrador, where he went
iu an attempt to learn why birds
went so far north in tho summer.

STRAND
OPEN

ADMISSION

Hint to the "Math" Faculty
The Crimson Rambler.
Studo: "Why does Professor Lloyd
close his eyes In tho class room?"
Ditto: "Becauso ho can't boar to see
us Buffer."

2

S. R. Griffith's

and 20c, War Tax Included

A

an

W. B. MARTIN'S

THE BIG VALUE

Tho Miami Student.
chapter of the Association
of Cosmopolitan Clubs now seems an
assured thing, sinco definite stops
wore taken in affecting this organization at a meeting held in the Erodcl-phiaHall, Thursday evening.
Tho purposo of tho organization is
to give the foreign students of the
college a clearer and more compre
hensive insight into the affairs of this
country and at the samo time to give
tho American students opportunity
of getting a better understanding of
the various countries represented here
in the student body.
The Association of Cosmopolitan
Clubs is an international organization
having chapters in the larger European and American universities. One of
its chief aims is the arousing in its
members of a greater interest in national and international affairs and to
afford opportunity for discussions upon
the vital questions of the day.

BARBER SHOP
CUT

HAIR

"GET IN" on it

Miami to have Cosmopolitan Club

28c

8HAVC

15c

SHAMPOO

25c

TONIC

A local

15c

153 3. Limestone St.

A Good Warm Over-

Lex., Ky.

coat at
PRESCRIPTIONS

n

W

$15, $18
or $20
They're

Good

Styles

they're worth
much more than this,
but it is a collection of
broken lot Overcoats
that are Big Values.

Everything a

complete

Drug

Store

Should Have.

John's Drug store
The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT

too,

S. A. T. C. LOSS TO

Becker

Dry Geaning
Co.
C. R. McGoughey,

BE ADJUSTED SOON
Senator D. H. Peak, business agent
of the University of Kentucky, has returned from Chicago, where he attended a meeting of the National Associations of State Universities, which
was called by Dr. Frank L. McVey,
secretary-treasureto discuss the financial problems of institutions which
trained S. A. T. C. units during the
war. Thursday of last week there was
a conference of business agents of
state universities in Chicago, which
Senator Peak also attended to hear the
discussion of the terms of contracts
made with the different schools. The
meeting of the association began on
Friday.
Senator Peak said yesterday that the
University had a bill against the Government, the largest Item of which was
for the construction of the barracks at
Rose and Winslow streets. Bids will
be asked for the salvaging of these
buildings in the near future, and it is
thought that the business problems
brought about by the training of the
S. A. T. C. unit will be adjusted
The men of the naval section have not
yet been fully paid for subsistence,
and when army matters are disposed
of this matter will receive the attention of university authorities.

2

Orchestra
"3 Strand Hawaiian Concert Company
Hear Them! They Will Please You!

10 A. M. to 11 P. M.

10c.

Orchestras

Come

Down Today.

Proprietor

CopTticM IBIS
Ska Boat of Xuppanbtlmu

WE CLEAN, PRESS and REPAIR
ABSOLUTELY,

Phone

Graves, Cox & Co.

Cor. Lime and High

621--

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO

INCORPORATED.

INCORPORATED.

from Paris Island and Quantico; Ed
Dabney, lieutenant, who was stationed
at Hope College, Hollan, Michigan,
Lee McLain, lieutenant of artillery at
Columbus, S. C; Thornton Connell,
from the officers' training school in
Georgia; Bernard Moosinick, from the
same camp in Georgia; Henry Grehan,
from Camp Pike, Arkansas; Headley
Shouse, lieutenant of artillery at Camp
Taylor; Hugh Milton, lieutenant of artillery also.

COLLECTION OF GOOD
PICTURES STARTED
The beginning of an art collection in
the University of Kentucky is seen in

photographs of the paintings of Rheims
Cathedral, Durham Castle, Canterbury
Cathedral, and the Lincoln choir of
the Lincoln Cathedral.
In President McVey's office are two
steel engravings of George Washington and Henry Clay, by Rothermel,
also a group of paintings representing
Law, Justice and Wisdom, the original
of which is found in the Court of Appeals in New York City.
Another group represents George
Washington laying his commission of
general at the foot of Liberty. The
original is in the Baltimore City Hall..
There is a photograph of the statute of
Lincoln in Lincoln Park.
This collection which was brought
to the University was from A. B.
s
gallery of art, Cincinnati, O.; and
lt is expected to extend the collection
to all other buildings and offices in
tho near future.

PHONES

1

854-368-0

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
CITY RATES 50 CENTS

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

P. B, Rdbards
COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR
SUITS

AND

PRE88ED
Suit
Suit

?1.25
Cleaning,
11.50
Cleaning,
$0.50
Suits Pressed
ALTERATIONS A 8PECIALTY
ALL WORK GUARANTEED

PHONE

1550--

152 S. Lime.

Y

Lex., Ky.

Clos-son'-

UNIVERSITY FIGHTERS
RETURN TO CLASSES
"When Johnny comes marching
homo again," is now changed to "and
wo all feel gay for Johnny is already
homo." Tho Senior class is in tact
asaln, and tho freshmen of three and
four years ago are united after some
months of separation.
Tho campus
now Bees tho returned marines, signal
corps men and artillery men again
cramming for classes.
Among those returned to finish their
University course are: Walter Piper,
lieutenant In tho Signal Corps; Fred
erick Jackson, Marine, just returned

now pictures

recently

hung in tho

lower hall of the Administration building, and in President McVoy's office.
In tho main corridor are excellent

THE OPENING OF

oMiss Laura Spurr's

Every hing Good
to Eat

Call On Us

Warren Bros
GROCERS
Corner Limestone and High

NEW DANCING ACADEMY
WEDNESDAY NIGHT, JAN. 30.
Smith's Saxophone Quartette
Opp. Phoenix Hotel, over W. H. Thompson's Leather Store

Admission $1.00

"Get Acquainted With Us While In
Town."
Pay Kentucky's Noted Candy Shop
a Visit
HOME MADE CANDY EXCLUSIVELY
Made and Sold Only By

Schantre's Candy Kitchen

115 8. Upper 8t.,
Main Street.

Just around corner from

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Mrs. J. Tandy Hughes

PRIVATE EXHIBITION OF

Member of A. N. A. M. of D.
Weekly School Dances

Saturday Evenings In Phoenix
Hotel Ball Room
Hours 8 to 12
Smith's Saxophone Orchestra
Mrs. Hughes is teaching privately at her home and
oners reduced rates to students.
PHONE 547

THE PHOENIX HOTEL
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

A Metropolitan Hotel
Rsspsctfutly solicits ths patronage of University People

JOHN SKAIN, Manager

Venus
iOPEIClU
m
Ition

H E oerfec
of pencil
un

formity of grading
and durability.
17 black degrees
from 6B softest to
to 9H hardest, and
hard and medium
copy
(indelible)
tag.

tin VENUS finiaht

FREE!
This trial box
with fire VENUS
Drawls Peaclk.
fortt.

mmd
Eraser
Write

Try (A VENUS Era--r. (m. Math
m in 12 (m. $2.00 fur hex.

smoothest workmanship
u shape that makes
it mighty convenient to
have in your room.

Albert d'Scheu Haberstro
Birger Maximus Beausang
VIOLIN
Georges Vigneti
Mamie Morgan Miller.
VIOLA, CELLO
Georges Vigneti.
DRAMATIC ART
Sallle Bullock Cave.
HARP
Georges Vigneti.
BRASS INSTRUMENTS-WO- OD
WIND INSTRUMENTS- For Information phone or write
Miss Anna Chandler Goff,
Director
441 Second Street, West.
Lexington, Ky.
Phone 639--

Americas Lead Pencil Go.
Fifth Are., N.Y.
Dept.

Look nt thto one. A cork-iiipiece of fcenuine
French Hrlnr, sterling
rliur, vulcanite bit, thu

(13th Year of the Organization)

VOICE

Look for the disttne

Holder

COLLEGE OF MUSIC
FACULTY:
PIANOFORTE
Lewis G. Thomas
Anna Chandler Goff
Myrtle V. Kesheimer
Sylvia M. Vigneti.

equalled for
unimoothneM,

VENUS
Mat fro

THE LEXINGTON

YOU

will see WD

C

on every campus

in the country

American
pipes for American men,
and not bettered anywhere.

You can get any shape, size and
grade you want in a W D C.
The best shops carry them at $6
down to 75 cents.
WM. DEMUTH & CO., New York
World's Largest Pipe Manufacturer

Pictures Sent By British Bureau of Information Shown
at President McVey's
Home, January 16
A distinctive ovent of last week was
tho exhibit of pictures sent by the Brit
ish Bureau of Information, Now York
City, which was hold at Maxwell Place,
tho homo of President McVey, on
Thursday afternoon and evening from
3 to C and from 8 to 10 o'clock.
Tho following Invitations were is
sued:
"Tho British Government cordially
invites you and your friends to be pres
ent at tho formal opening and private
view of the Official Lithographs by
her foremost artists, depicting "Brit
ain's Efforts and Ideals in the Great
War," to be held at President's House,
University of Kentucky, Lexington, on
Thursday afternoon and evening, Jan
uary 1G, from three until six o'clock
and from eight until ten o'clock."
Explaining the exhibit was the of
ficial catalog of the British Govern
ment exhibition, having on the cover a
colored print of two figures represent
ing England and the United States
with their flags, shields and emblems
Intermingled.
Among the subjects were: "Making
Soldiers," Eric Kennington; "Making
Sailors,'' Frank Brangyn, A. R. A.;
"Making Guns," George Clarsen, R. A.;
"Building
Ships," Mirhead Bone;
"Making Aircraft," C. R. W. Nevinson;
"Transport by Sea," Charles Pears;
"Woman's Work," A. S. Hartrick, A.
R. W. S.; "Work on the Land," Wil
"Tending
liam
Rothensteln;
the
Wounded," Claude Shepperson, A. R
W. S. Other artists represented were
Ernest Jackson, Charles Ricketts, Wil
liam Nicholason, Maurice Griffenhagen, A. R. A., Edmund Dulas, R. W. S.,
Professor G. Novia, Augustus John,
Edmund Jr. Sullivan, A. R. W. S.
A large number viewed these pi&
tures, which were secured for Lexing
ton by President McVey.

SHORT MINING COURSE

BEGINS APRIL FIRST
The coal miners of Kentucky will
be interested to know that the Prac
tical Miners Course will be given at
the University of Kentucky this spring,
beginning April first and continuing
eight weeks, and that there will be no
charge for this course.
In addition to arithmetic, which will
be given thruout the course, according
to individual needs, instruction will
be given in the following subjects:
Coal Mining, Blasting, Timbering, the
Principles and Methods of Ventilation, Drainage, Mining Machinery, including haulage and hoisting, Mine
Gases, Safety Lamps and Testing, Explosions, Mine Fires, Rescue and Relief, Surveying and Map Drawing, and
Kentucky Mining Law.
Monday, May 2G, the Board of Ex
aminers of tho Stato Department of
Minos will bo in session.
This will
permit those who take the course to
enter tho Mine Forman examination,
if they so desiro, immediately after
tho closo of the session, thus avoiding
an extra trip to Loxington.
Tho Univorsity has Issued a special
circular giving detailed information
concerning this courso, which may bo
hud upon application.
"In UNION there is strength."

PAGE 8

CAMP TAYLOR ASKS
ED PARKE
FOR AG. LECTURERS
The Univorsity of Kentucky has
boon asked to furnish speakers for a
Herles of lectures to bo held at Camp
Taylor, Louisville, whero tho govern
ment Is conducting nn educational cam
These
paign among tho soldiers.
speakers will be furnished by tho Agricultural College.
The speakers whoso names and subjects follow aro: Jan. 20, "Farm Management," W. D. Nicholls; Jan. 21,
Proof Horticultural
"Production
ducts," N. R. Elliott; Jan. 23, "Poultry Management," J. H. Martin; Jan.
Rob24, "Soils and Crops," Georgo
erts.

ENGINEERING NOTES
visitor was Lieut. C. K
Dunn. Lieut. Dunn returned a short
time ago from active service over
seas.
The John Hays Hammond Engineer
ing Society was reorganized on Thurs
day afternoon. Mr. V .H. Barlow was
elected president for the ensuing scol
astic year. This society is composed
of sophomore engineers, having been
organized by the freshman engineering
class of 1917. Dean Anderson was
present at this meeting and, in add!
tlon to giving an interesting talk on
the future of engineering here and
elsewhere, suggested a plan for run
ning the society this year. The plan
is to obtain some professional or prac
tical man to speak at each meeting
Mr. R. M. Davis of the class of '18
stopped a short while this week with
friends at the "University. He was re
turning to his home at Utica, Ky. Mr
Davis has been in the Steam Engineer
ing School of Stevens Institute, Hobo
ken, N. J.
At the Sophomore class meeting, Mr
Earl Wallaco, a student in Engineer
ing, was elected president of the class
of the same col
Mr. F. Houston-Shalege was elected treasurer.
A recent

DOING THE DIFFICULT'
Y. M. C. A. SUBJECT
The first regular meeting of the Y
M. C. A. for this semester, was held
Sunday evening in the Y. M. C. A.
rooms on the second floor of the Gym

nasium building. The meeting was
attended by a large number of uni
versity men.
Dr. Benjamin Bush was speaker of
the evening and the title of his address
was, "Doing the Difficult." President
McVey was present, and gave a short
address.
Mr. Richard Duncan, president, pre
sided over the meeting.

UNIVERSITY TRAINS
(Continued from Page One.)
Board of Vocational Training. Captain
Phipps, who saw service on the Mexican border and was accidentally shot
and permanently disabled when he was
on tho point of ombarking for France,
will arrive January 25 to take a course
in sclentflc agriculture to prepare himself for a position as county agent unAct. Ho will
der tho
be puH from $S0 to $95 a month, and
his expenses at tho University will
bo paid by tho Government.
Captain Phipps Is a nutlvo of
Magoffin county, and was
In tho Kentucky
National Guard
when It was nont to tho Mexican bor
der. Wltllo in a contingent preparing
to sail for Franco, ho was severely
wounded In tho foot when a gun which
a fellow soldier was cleaning became
discharged.
Smith-Hughe-

s

CI OSEN
OR

Mr. Owens Addresses Meeting on Behalf of the
Y. M. C. A.
The election of officers was tho
of tho Junior class meeting held
January 15,
In chapel Wednesday,
with Dorothy Mlddleton, former
presiding, in tho absence of
Marlon Lasloy, president.
Edward Parker, a Junior In tho
of Agriculture, and a member of
Kappa Alpha fraternity was elected
year.
president
for tho ensuing
Parker then took charge of tho meeting, with a short speech of gratification and of determination to hold tho
class up to the standard of excellence
which he declared had marked its history during the past two years.
The other officers are: Mary Van
Meter,
Jesse Tapp,
treasurer; Kathleen Brand, secretary;
and Edward Dabney, .orator.
Mr. Owens, tho new secretary in
chargo of Y. M. C. A. work on the campus, introduced himself, and extended
a cordial invitation to the members
of the class to visit frequently the Y.
M. C. A. rooms in the Alumni building.
fea-tur- o

Col-log- o

BRONZE TABLET IN
MEMORY OF PURSLEY
A bronze tablet in memory of E. R.
Pursley, who was killed In action with
the U. S. Marines in France, will be
put in the halls of some building of
the University of Kentucky by alumni,
who aro already taking steps to secure
the necessary funds. A photograph of
the young Pursley, who graduated from
the College of Engineering in the class
of 1916, has been received by Dean F.
Paul Anderson. It will be enlarged,
framed and hung in Mechanical Hall,
together with a recital of his gallantry
and the manner in which he met his
death.
So far as can be ascertained, Pursley and Howard Klnne, who was a
prominent figure in athletics and every
branch of University life, are the only
graduates of the College of Engineering who lost their lives in the war, o
a number of students and alumni of the college saw active service at
the front. Before entering the service
the former was with the Babcock-Wil-coCompany, Barberton, Ohio, engaged in making of water tube steam
boilers.
(

x

Y. M. C. A. PLANNING TO

EXTEND ACTIVITIES

Dr. R. H. Crossfleld, of Transylvania,
who returned Saturday from Louisville,
where he attended the regular quarterly meeting of the Board of Directors of the State Y. M. C. A., reports
that the governing board adopted a
program of activities to bo undertaken
by the State Association which Is sig
nificant in the history of Y. M. C. A.
work In America. The plan involves
tho organization of V. M. C. A. work
in tho one hundred and two counties
of tho Stnto not now cultivated by the
tion to bo used by young women.
"Y", and Includes tho direction of the
amusement and play Hfo in tho small
er towns of tho Stato.
Tho plan contemplates tho oporation
of pool rooms and moving plctttro theaters under Christian influences and
tho direction of tho recreational Hfo
of tho young people, it is quite probable that tho scopo of tho activities of
tho Association will bo so extended as
to permit tho faclltles of tho organiza- -

* V

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
WELCOME TO THE FARMERS.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

The farmers of the State will gather on the campus of
to take part in
SOUGHTJBYCOLLEGES
this University next week, January
the program tor Farmers' Week. This is an annual custom and Kentucky farmers declare invariably that they College Heads Meet to Disboth enjoy and profit by the various lectures, exhibits and
Means of Interesting
28-3-

Published ovory Thursday thruout tho College year by the student body
of the Univers