xt7kh12v5d8b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7kh12v5d8b/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1895 journals kaes_bulletins_055 English Lexington, Ky. : The Station, 1885- This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin n.55. text Bulletin n.55. 1895 2014 true xt7kh12v5d8b section xt7kh12v5d8b A   KENTUCKY  
A  ARRUIULLURAL LXPLRLAALNL SLALLUN A
  STATE 00LL11<;LU RAF KENTUUKY.  
      EXPER   AERA   A 

    
  KENT C] CKY
`  Ag] lt l E ‘ r Staten
1 E,
S » .
  — ' BOARD OF CONTROL. g
_ Mi·§M.-   J. T. GATHRIGHT, Chairman. ,
,   L DR. R. J. seuss.  
’ , DAVID H. JAMES.  
TY R. A. SPURR. V 
I ROBERT RIDDELL. `
‘. A J. K. PATTERSON, President oi the College.  ‘
L M. A. SCOVELL, Director, Secretary. »
i_ , STATION OFFICERS. i .
ih . ' -   M. A. SCOVELL, Director. V
lh ` A. M. PETER,
E Chemists. .
H. E. CURTIS, .
VI H. GARM AN, Entomologist and Botanist.  
€\— i
Ql C. W. MATHEWS, Horticulturist.  ·
    J. S. TERRILL, Assistant to Entomologist and Botanist.  .
I   I A. T. JORDAN, Assistant to Horticulturist.  YP
V. E. MUNCY, Weather Observer. ·
T. S. HAWKINS, Foreman of the Farm.  
Miss ALICE M. SHELBY, Stenographer.  ,
Q] Address of the Station, LEXINGTON, KY.
NOTICE. , I
i The bulletins of the Station will be mailed free to any citizen of O
‘ Kentucky who sends his name and address to the Station for that
purpose.
Correspondents will please notify the Directorfof changes in their
post-office address, or of any failure to receive the bulletins.
A Address:
Kssmfcm AGRICULNRAL Expsmmm Smmou,
Lsxrsoros, KY.
I · 38

  
. BULLETIN NO. SS. A
A ` I
J FIELD EXPERINIEN TS IVITH FERTILIZERS.
  I.*CORN. A
  _ 2.—PorAToEs.
V  3.—ToBAcco.
" 4.*HEMP.
 A Experiments in Detail. _ L
c THE SEASON.— The season of 1894 was unfavorable for
V all crops, with the exception of wheat, principally on ac-
c count of the dry weather and the very backward spring.
c f The following table gives the summary of rainfall, the i'
_ mean temperature and the average per cent. of sunshine ¤
A during the time specified: ·
 ii Rairifzrll. I1r·,n;r<·es Per cent  
 . LIONTH. Inches 'l`eu1g&ii1Iiu1‘e. Sunshine
 jV `        4.
  April. ........ . .......... . ..... 4.19 54.0 40
l I
 , May ......... . ................. 3.81 62.4 4I
 · june ......... . ........ . ....... 4.44 74.6 47  
l
_ V july ......... . ................. 0,8; I y5,6 45 `
August ......... . ..... . ....... 3,67 ;6. 4 52
· S€pt€lIlb€I'.........,........· 4,05 7],    
October ......, , ............... ;,4O 57.6   55
l .'l 11.12 SF)IL.—Tl1€ soil is derived from the Lower
Silurian limestone, and is rich in phosphoric acid. _ The l

   40 K entne/cy Agricultural Experiment Station.
i land is worn, having been in cultivation many years. The
, l subsoil is a light-colored clay, so retentive as to make
Q i the soil deficient in natural drainage.
  i . l» Explanations- T/ze leading elements 0f plant feed are
°" _ nitrogen, p/zvsp/t0rz`e acid and petas/z Plants feed on other 1
’     soil-elements besides these, and they are just as essential  
_‘ >_; ” to plant life as these three, but generally speaking all but  i
., i these ingredients are furnished to plants in abundance, {
4 and therefore in studying what to put on our soils to  V`
._ make them more productive, we need concern ourselves  A
J t , with only these three. Commercial fertilizers are manu- j
I factured and sold for the purpose of supplying nitrogen,  »
  r phosphoric acid and potash, and the market prices de-  
li"   pend upon these ingredients. Some fertilizers contain  
xls ‘ one of these ingredients, some two, and some all. Gen- _
erally speaking, a commercial fertilizer is a mixture con- e
s taining two of these ingredients, and sometimes all ; the  _A
  - proportions varying greatly in the various brands and  
  often in the same brand. It is at once seen to be a very  s
  difficult, if not an impossible task, to test all the various i
l brands sold on a given soil in order to find out those that _
produce the best effect. It is an easy matter, however,  
to find out whether a given soil needs potash, phosphoric 5
Lt acid or nitrogen or any combination of these elements for [
  a given crop. Having found out this by experiment, we  .
Z have only to look to the analyses of the various fertilizers -
to‘tell which brands, if any, could be used to advantag€ j  i
l on the soil and crop tested. If the experiment proved {
i that potash was all that was needed on a given soil for
the corn crop, all those fertilizers whose analyses show .
little or no potash would not produce favorable results,
under whatever name sold.

 Fzé/zz' Experzhzwzls 20Zyh Ferz‘z7z2ers. 4I
l.—C01·u Experiments.
The field used for the fertilizer experiments was the
same as that used for the experiments heretofore. The
, plots receiving no fertilizers the past years received none i
this year, and likewise the plots receiving fertilizers dur- .
 , ing the past years received the same kind in each case
  this year. The field in question is nearly level, slightly
2 . sloping lengthwise of the plots. Size of plots, one—tenth
 ; of an acre. ‘
 ( The plots were treated exactly alike except as to ferti-
 p lizers, care being taken to plow the entire acre the same V
 - day at every working. The hills were thinned to two
'  i stalks, and were 3% feet each way.
L ` The following table shows the kind of fertilizers ap- .,
` i plied to the various plots, their amount calculated per ·
; ~ acre, the number of pounds of leading elements of plant `_
Q   food applied per acre, and the per cent. of these elements i
,  Y 111 the various fertilizers: S
s
i  _ T-
t, ·
C ‘  1
>r  
ie  i ·
is   _ ~
rs  ` l
fd
or
w - t

   A » ‘
  42 Kwzmc/ay Agricullm/al Experimmt Slaiimz.
  TABLE 1-Showing fertilizers applied and per cent of ingredients.
.   " P___é Number of pounds oi Per cent. of the lead-
. ; the leading elements ing eleruents of plant
_ ~ . of plant. {ood. food in fertilizers
; . ` g used.
*°?_v {I3 FERTILIZERS USED.   E 2
’ i”’i—; . Q 2   A ir EE. A it  
> J » s g :§< E 2 M E é 1
  , _’»§_ Z E 3 E E ri Z j
E 1 2 No Fertilizer ........... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ...... . ..... . 3
i Acid Phosphate ...... 140  
1 3 Muriate of Potash .... 160 57 80 25.6 12.4 17. 5.5 A
’ I Nitrate of Soda. ...... 160  
tu , Q i
·   ’] Acid Phosphate ...... 140 e
~ ` N 4 Muriate of Potash .... 160 57 80 0 12.4 17. 0 ·
Soil ........ . .............. 160
r _ . .
-5 Acid Phosphate ....... 140 1 ¤  
Qt ‘5 Nitrate of Soda .....   160 57 0 25.6 12.4 0 5.5  is
jg `—;,___ Soil ........ .. ............. 160 i
  Muriate of Potash .... 160  
6 Nitrate of Soda .....   16e 0 80 25.6 0 17. 5.5 .
Soil ........ . .... . ........ 140 ;
L] 7 N0 Fertilizer ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . .....     ...... . ....... ;i
  8 Muriate of Potash .... 160 A
· Soil ....... .. ..... . ........ 500 0 80 0 0 1 7. 0 2- 
• Acid Phosphate. ...... 140 A A
9*Soil ........ . .............. 2O 7 0 0 I2 4 0 0
\ 3 5/
_ l
IOlN1trate of Soda. ..... 160 l
Soil". ........ . ..... . .... 500 0 0 25.6 0 Ol 5-5
By reference to the table, it will be seen that acid phos- i
. _ phate containing 40.7 per cent. of available phosphoric
acid was used to supply that ingredient, muriate of

 Fzbld Eycperzhzezz/s wzlé Ferldzécrs. 43
potash containing 5o per cent. of potash, for potash and i
nitrate of soda containing 16 per cent. of nitrogen to sup- l .
ply nitrogen. H P
_& Q
4 Field Notes. 4
  All plots were planted the same day, May 4. Observa-
. tions on May 14th showed the corn to be up in all plots.
i The snow storm of May 2oth retarded the growth of the
. corn for some time. ‘
 ` PLOT 2. june 1st, growth fair. july 15, very poor.
— july 24, beginning to tassel. August r, growth short.
 = September 15, poor. Cut October IOllll.
? PLOT 5. June 1, very good. july 24, tasseling. August
i 1, fair. September 15, ears rather large.
· PLOT 4. june 1, fair. july 24, tasseling. August 1, i‘
{Elf. 1
4 PLOT 5. juue 1, fair. july 24, tasseling. August 1, ·
 V. Short growth. September 15, poor. J
j PLOT 6. june 1, {air. july 24, tasseling. September J
 ? I5, looking well.
4  PLOT y. june 1, fair. july 24, barely tasseling. August I
  1, very small. September 15, not looking well, very small
i €3l`S. 1
[ PLOT 8. june 1, fair. july 24, tasseling. August 1,
5 height fair. September 15, very {air. ‘
PLOT9. june 1, looking well. july 15, pOOr. july *4
’  · 24, barely tasseling. September 15, very poor. °
· · PLOT IO. june r, very {air. july 15, poor. july 24,
) tasseling. August 1, very irregular in height. Septem-
ber 15, very small ears.
5
" .
C .
>f l

  hr P _
 { - A
  .
 
  44 Kmlucky Agrzku/iural Experzluzmt Stalion. it
ii TABLE 2.-Showing results 0f fertilizers 011 corn.
1   i I-: N0.of lbs Yield of\Yield of Increased Increased
‘ O qt Ferti- liar Corn Fodder in lxeld of ijield oi
2 » » Q FERTILIZER USED. $2% $E;l1?‘B..;i.%§‘; ...§¥’“il‘}.i·.°%.§;1.a;“ ‘32{}$¥i;“
= , _ acre. of 70 lbs. per Ac1·e.per Acre.
  O .
S <~ E. _._,,...____..-- __._.. _,... ...... .... .....
T   i 2»No Fertilizer ....... . ......... 13.3 1650 ......... . ....... .,  
if _ \Nitrate of Soda ....... 160  _
I 3 Acid. Phosphate. .... 140 35.4 2080 21.2 IZIO  .
· lMuriate of P0tash.. 160 A
  Muriate of Potaslr. 160 i  
l_ 1 4iAcid Phosphate ...... 140 301 2830 I5`9 1060 V?
v;A_` ' `  I
_ X   lNitrate of Soda. .... 160 A  I
5KAcid Phosphate . .... 140 I5'4 2030 I'2 260  3
5*3 ll\luriate of P0tash... 160  
  6lNitrate of Soda ..... . 160 35`I 3130 209 1368  
  7\N0 Fertilizer ......... . ...,.... 15,0 1800 ......... . .......,  ‘
I 8 Muriate of P0tash... 160 30.4 3630 16.2 1880-  ii
l {
Acid Phos hate ....... 1 0 1 .1 I"”O ` 0 0.  
9 P 4 3 /1  L
  IO Nitrate of Soda ...... 160 \ 17.6 \ 2220 3.4 \ 450 3
t \\7hile the yield of corn was materially reduced by the i
, unfavorable season, yet about the same proportionate “
yield is maintained on the several plots as in former
years.
The table below is given to illustrate this point. Unfor-
tunatel our records in 18 were lost by fire:
_ Y 93

 . Fzk/d Expcrzbzzeazls wzlb Fertzlzéem. 45
TABLE 3.——Sl10wing effect of fertilizers 0n corn. '
  (
li Yield 0f Ear Corn Per Acre in Bushels. ,
  I
§ ___"__ ___________.__  
Q *2 l
3 Q 1888. 1889. 1890 1891. 1892. 1894.
. Z I
 _ & "" —_—`!———— —— —` —&— —`—
 5 2 27. 31. { 40. 44. 38. 13.
  3 63. 84. { 72. 56. 61. 35. 2
  4 70. 81. 65. 51. 51. 30.
 J ' 5 I 29- 35- 33- 43 f 29- I5- i•
  6 60. 87. 76. 60. 62. 35. i
  7 32- 34- 34- i 39- 27· I5-  
 i` 8 ............ 79, 67. 54. 52. 30. l
  9   ............ 33, 36. 38. 25. I 13. e
  IO { ............ I 41, 35, 40. { 27. / IS. '
. I 1
5   I
{ · These results can, perhaps, be more forcibly exhibited _
· J 1H graphic {0rm as below: ‘l

  Y ,. V
 
  ·
iii ,
i‘
  46 Kmizrzcky Agrzcultural Experimmzt Sialimz.
I.
»
Y p Relative yield 0i Ear Corn.
i 5_ Plot2.—Noie1·tilizer. 1SSS ,.;;-1
v ism _..;-—-
Q . 5 1::210 1,...;--
Q ° mu  
_ . ‘ iseaz _1...--1·—
,;; iso-1 ...-- `
_ VQ _ - i P10t3—Ph0spl10ricaciduiitro-1SsS   ·
* *:2 _· ` gen and potash. lsrsiv   ,
‘, ‘_ mm   .
* ; 1>E»l  
J . lstvi    .
· lbill ,.,.....1-=¤—
,` Plgt .]_..Ph0SD]_\0mc acid and lgéys,   A
pomsb. user I   V
ism ·
mn  
·_ i IBHZ    _
ISEM ,,.,..-1- ·
~ P10'./5.—])il(lS[lllUl`lC acid und i#&S\ -11-** .
' nitrogen. msn  
Z 1-5211; _,,_._.1¢--·
, l>!ll    .
—_ i lwtri -,-..;-1-*-
UM. , , , im ...¤-· K
` "   P10; ;;_-Nm~0gQ,,_ N.5    
· issw   ,
` &]Q]_d 1JO+,&Sh ism? -
' 'Hir   ·
isn:  
· lvirl _,.,..i»--- _
F. 1’l0L7,—So fertilizer-. mw -an--•¤¤**'“""'*  ’
. lsstl   . ‘
@` lawn —-¤*’*'*-__  k
wu · ’ ·
· ¤_V lsv: .
;   N0. S.·1’oms1¤. 1~~n    »
; ]N‘Nl  
lssvl   ~. »
isn:   .
ism _,__,...·--- —
Plot E).-Phosplioric acid. hw _1..,.¤-—··-·*  i ·
DUO   .
_ mu ___,,...;--—-· .
‘ wo: ,,.;-1-  .
—`· . wi.; ...¤-
g 1’l0L10.~Nir¤·05.;eu. law   i
__ l‘¤£II\   _
' lsu!   _·
. wei  '
I .—J—·*———[r——~~»—»————·##-re ~ ~-—·—~ 
• C
]5`illi\ll€i2ll Results, 1894. 5
The Financial Results obtained by the use of the fer-
tilizers in various combinations may be seen in the foi-
·‘ lowing table. The acid phosphate costs at the rate of
$$3.30 per acre, the muriate of potash $3,.60 and nitrate of
soda $3,.60. In these estimates the corn is rated at 40
‘ cents per bushel: V
_ _ i i

 Fzbld Experzbuzezz/s wzbé £m‘lzYzéers. 47
TABLE :l.——Sllf)\Vlllg` Financial Results. 4
  i I
I_(‘0ts5_of V I e I\'a1ne oil P HE
‘0l` 1 IZGF El ll ll_Ql'C2lSUL 1`O Ol`
FERTILIZER USED- "i§‘.£.-EFY "‘i£E.-L?F"` ‘ttJ3.‘“ LOSS. p
‘ per Acre.
4¢  2 No Fertilizer ............. J ........... $5 32 ........... . ..........
if Nitrate of Soda ......... _
3 Acid Phosphate ......... 510.50 14.16 .58.48 $2.02*
 A Muriate of Potash ......
 1 Muriate of Potash ...... I ‘ X
Q 4 Acid Phosphate. ........ 690 I2'O4_ 6'36 *54
.   Nitrate of Soda ......... i ,. .
5 Acid Phosphate .......   6'QO 6'I6 '48 6'42i —'
 V Muriate of Potash ...... i _ 3 ·
  6Nitrate of Soda ......... i #20 1404 8'36 LI6 Q
A ¤ ’
A 7 No Fertilizer ...,........   ........... 6.00 ........... . ..-..·.·..
l .
 4 8 Muriate of Potash ...... A 3.60 12.16 6.48 2.88 ‘
s i
 { 9)Acid Phosphate. ........ i 3.30 5.24 ........... 3.30* .
j I0/Nitrate of Soda ......... ' 3.60 I 7.04 I 1.36   2.24* .
 . "` Loss. 4
: “ These results show that in an unfavorable season the
· chances of enhanced profits by the use of fertilizers are
greatly lessened or altogether wiped out. There is this
f- much to be said, however·—the greater portion of the
I? PllO$Pl1O1‘iC acid and potagh applied is retained lll the
if soil, and is available to future crops.
o
tO

 ;-7* .. `
  -
Eu., .
E}
iis; .
  48 lfezzlzwky Agrzkuimral Erpcrimevzl ,Staiz`0¢z.
  2.-Potato Experiments.
A The plots used in studying the effect of fertilizers on
g i potatoes in 1894 were the same as have been used for this
g , _ purpose heretofore.
  i The surface of the ground is comparatively level and , _
_ it ___ . the soil of the same general character as that on which 4
  yi  I the corn was grown. Size of plots one-tenth acre each. A
· ”’ Potatoes used for seed were Northern grown Early Rose,  A
Y and were planted I4 inches apart in the row, and rows  °
· three feet apart. After the ground was well prepared i
'~ I with plow and harrow, the rows were marked out with a T
1 small plow Fertilizers used were scattered in the row by `
> y hand and afterwards slightly mixed with the earth by a V
&_ ,   brush. The fertilizers were applied and the potatoes _
` X ll planted April 7th. The season was very unfavorable.  V
` The nitrate of soda, superphosphate, and muriate of [ .
ik potash were the same as used on corn. See table I on  ;
T  page 42.
!
D
\

 Fzkld Experzbzzezzziv wzih Fen‘z7zéers. 49
TABLE 5.—Field Notes. I
Date of Observation.
I
April May7. June Color June July July Aug.
25. 1. of 15. 1. 15. 1. l
  Vines.
Plot 1. Com’g Up. Look- Dark Lonk— Vines Vines Vines
 _ up. ing Green ing begin- nearly all
. well well. ning all dead.
· to die. dead.
Plot 2. iLiglit; Vines
-· do. do. do. {Green large do. do. do.
‘ and
. th’ifty
  . Pict 3- do. do. do. do. do. do. do do. .'
I
°               
 _ P1<>r4. lvmes vines Ne’rly ‘
< do. do. do. do. do. th’ifty begin- all  
· j Not [ning dead. i
, dyingfto die.
‘;  HMS- Vines Vines Vines iVines All .
‘ do. do. large. very most nearly dead. ·
  I good. ) all all
 .· i dead. dead.
 _   r
~  _ T-Fh€ following table gives the name and amount of {€f·
i tilizer used and the yield of potatoes, calculated to the ·
,_ E1C1‘€, for each plot: »
 is i
I

  i A `
144;
  50 Kenmc/cy Ag7Z·C2¢Z[Z¢7dZ Experimezzt Siatimz.
if TABLE 6 —-Effect of Fertilizers on Potatoes.
F
  ` { (Un GJ"
i P *6 *6 »
2 » 1 . °" vi °" ui _
j t “5 FER11L1zE1< USED gj",2 {GE Comparative Scale.
i QJ/iii   L,-‘ {J Q4 E 5 1
f F   TA Z E gl J3
_, `A l E _________...,. ___ -,_ ..4....%..,-..
i _ 1 No Fertilizer. . ...... . .... 30.5..-¤· A
  l 2 Nitrate of Soda ...... 160 66.1 -11***  
  i 3 Acid Phosphate ...... 140 48.4_  T
in rk i   4 Muriate of Potash... 160 82.7 -1--·*'  V
5 No Fertilizer .....   ...... 48,6 —··-"
i= Nitrate of Soda ...... \ 160 Y
  6 Acid Phosphate. .... 140 75'6 '
  ,_ Nitrate of Soda. .... \ 160 2
* / Muriate of Potash.4 160 9 7 ·r
Acid Phosphate ...... 140 I.  y
  8 Muriate of Potash.. I 160 IZI'4  Y
  Nitrate of Soda, ..... I60\
>     PllOSpll3t€ ...... 140} 126.7   ;
- Muriate of Potash... I60\  _
i IO No Fertilizer .......... . ..... 4 65-2i ........-....  
The yield of potatoes on these plots for the past live
years is given in the table which follows:

 Fzkld Experz)m·7zZs if/19% Fe7*izYz2ers. 5I i
TABLE 7.—EH`ect of Fertilizers on Potatoes. '
I Yield of Potatoes Per Acre in Bushels.
L? I ’
¤-4 —__—._—;_ _...__—_
I `8
6 1888. 1889. 1891. 1892. 1894.
_ Z
  I 72 87 76 72 4<>
‘ 2 82 104 85 72 66 `
 - 3 86 87 96 61 ` 48
I 4 127 158 144 102 83 I 4
 ’ 5 89 I43 U3 77 49 i i
’ 6 73 161 130 66 76 ~ Q
I a
7 II7 268 173 110 93 2
 7 8 I I33 287 195 125 121 i'
 I 9 I26 319 210 165 ' 127 ¤
IO I ........ . ..... . 136 II4 86 I 65 -_
I    _  
  3.—T0buee0 Experiments.
: I fN}€ €Xperiment was made on five 1-10 acre plots. The
Soil 1S ofthe same character as the other soil. In 1888
we the land was sown to timothy. In 1889 it received a top
dressing ot` tobacco stems at the rate of one ton per acre.
In the spring of 1891 the timothy was ploughed up and
the .gronnd was sown to millet. In the fall of 1891 it was
again sown to timothy. In 1892 tobacco stems were put

 gh' _ Y
  ‘
  -
 
  52 Km/zwky Ag'7Z·[2l[fZlVdl Experimerzt ,S!czii01z. ‘
T on at the rate of 1,000 lbs per acre. In the fall of 1803,
, l the timothy sod was broken.
é _ The object of selecting this particular piece of ground
Q · was to try the effect of the fertilizers on the richest ground
il., T we had.
’ ri 4; 3
; { »
,, ‘ Field Notes.
; Experiments on w. % of acre G.
Y· T Each plot 1-10 acre, except 5a. and 5b., which were
, 1-20 each, plot 5 being divided through the middle cross- '
* ways.
?*-— \ .   Tobacco plants set out May 23,.  .
{ l june 1. All plots looking well. »
july 1. All plots looking about alike and in fine con-
23 dition. -
Q— August 1. Fireing somewhat for want of rain, plot 1 V
L-   being affected more than any of the other plots in this  3
,‘.;· respect. E 
{ September 7. All plots cut. ` 
Here follows a table showing the kind and amount of  e
  fertilizer used and the yield of tobacco, calculated to the  
  acre, for each plot: 3 
. . . \

 _ F2?/d £iZr_z§erz'mezz!s wzlb Ferizlzizers. 53
TABLE 8.—EfFect of Fertilizers on Tobacco.  
 
Yield of Tobacco in Pounds
FERTILIZERS USED. PCI Acre. !
.    
*5 S.
E NAME.   Long Short I _'
6 gg Rem Red. hash. Total.
· E _________ ;_ __ --- " -._
1None. 6IO 480 455 I545
 i ` HQQCEQETT Tc? " ` `
, ,. '|
2 Double Superphos- 640 540 SI5 I69¤ ‘_
- phate ......... ..   140 _ —__ l
, Carbonate of Pot- / ·
;   ash & Magnesiau 3,00 i
; · 3 Double Superphos 655 525 455 1635
 4 phate ................ 140 _ _ V
 14 Carbonate of Potash i
f Q 4 and Magnesra. .... 300 635 Sm 505 1650 I
e   Nitrate of Soda .... . I6O
A Carbonate of PotaE L ( I
__ and Magnesia ..... 00 ‘
 _ 5 Nitrate of Soda .... .. i560 740 440 620 1800 é
  ` Double Superph’ate 140
  Ill/]I_uriate of Potash... —T60—
· itrate of Soda ...... I6;)
· 56 Double Superphos- 790 470 550 ISIC
 

 ihr __ V
 ;
  ‘
  ` 54 Kcmfzwky Agrimllmfal Experz`me¢zt Smtiavz. _
Qi 4.—Hemp Experiments.
. The experiment was made on ten I-20 acre plots. The
  E 1 land had been in English blue-grass (Festuca elatior) in
i _ Q 1889-91, in 1892 in corn, 1893 potatoes. The hemp was
jr ~ planted April 19th.
`l‘‘   The following gives a summary of the field notes:
i       I
. V -
’. May 1. May 15 June 1. July 1. Aug. 1. Sept. 1.
l§ inch · i
I Plot 1. high- Ginch 2feet. 5 feet. 5i feet. Good. _
. T-”_*"' TT- f'- "T EEQQE "* W- ·
: Plot 2. Lcxgang Ginch. 15 inch. 5 feet. 5 feet. Good. .
ffi. ,   -——»—-—~ ---- -{J-—-— --—— ·--—- ·--—-·
’ il
X. ` Plot 3. do. Ginch. 28 inch 5% feet. 6§ feet. Fine. ·
i'. Plot 4. do. Binch. 15 inch 3i; feet. 4Q feet. . ....... j
Q )___.___,.é_, _,____   ___,__, _i,..- é.,-
. ~__ l
r’_/d+ Plot 5. do. Ginch. i21 inch. 5 feet. ...... , . Good. _
··’·1 ·~· ~·l··· ··· ··· M1  ;
Plot 6. do. Ginch. i\24 inch. 5§ feet. Bé feet. Good. `
;:_ """‘ """ "i"”’ "" "’“'" i
r Plot 7. \ do. Ginch. \22 inch. 5§ feet. 6-} feet. Good. j `
* Plot 8. do. Ginch. 21 inch. 5feet. GQ feet. G00d·  _
D K
Plot9. do. Ginch. 12 inch. —1§feet.\ 5 feet. Fair.
_-____‘—___-—* -’_-1     nd-/T `
· Plot 10. do. G inch. `23 inch \5§ feet \ ....,... Good-
. The following table gives the kind and amount of fer- I
` tilizer used and the yield of fiber: V

 • F2?/d Experbzzcrzls 202% FEFZZZZEKFA`. 55
TABLE 9.·—EfFect of Fertilizers on Hemp, 4
L5; V YIELD l
fl; FERTILMERS A11oUN*I* OF FIBER IN
0 —""—"" PER ACRE. PoUNDs !
:2 NAME PER ACRE.
1 Nome. ......... I ........ l 960
2 Nome. / .................. 6yo
 _ 3 Nitrate of Soda. ........ I I6O 1060
, "` """` " ````` ""— ‘<
Double Superp h os- 860 I
-  N 4 phate. ........ . ........... 140 l
_ I 5 Muriate of Potash. ....... 160 1130 l
_   6 Muriate of Potash ....... 160 Hm °
 · Nitrate of Soda. ...... , .... 160 /
l. j &_ __`____%%__ ______ __ ______ i
__  l Nitrate of Soda ........... 160
. 7 Double Superph os 1070 .
i· I \ phate. .................... { I6O _
-—  4 Muriate of Potash ....... 160 'l
d   8 Double Superph0s— I 1160
`   \" phate ............... . ..... I4O
ir. 9 lN0ue. .................. / 665
4 5 HEEIEFJ   "TQ ```` wh"
O°' I0 N1trate of Soda ........   160 1080
=‘ wie Superphosph’te 140
let   I
were needed on the plots for hemp.