xt7kh12v6t5q https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7kh12v6t5q/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19661108  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  8, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  8, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7kh12v6t5q section xt7kh12v6t5q Inside Today's Kernel
is
"Formalized"
termed
learning
alien to Head Start: Page Two.

the

Prestonsburg Community College
schedules a film festival: Page Three.

RuPP facts another year without a
front ,,ne: P9 Si"'
h'9 mon M

Student suicides are increasing.
editorial comments: Page Four.

bgte: Page Eigtlt

An

UK students have just returned from
picture story: Page Five.

"

etloTtdZ VT

Vol. 58, No. 49

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY, NOV. 8,

Eight

Iiics

Eyes On National Races

One Issue In Oregon

Default In California

By FRANK BROWNING
Kernel Associate Editor
Actor Ronald Reagan may well be California's
next governor in a triumph through default.

University political scientist Dr. Frank Marini
it's not that Reagan will really win; rather,
that incumbent Cov. Edmund (Pat) Brown will
says

lose.

Marini's colleague, Dr. Robert Prangcr, thinks
Brown may yet pull a political rabbit out of
the hat and carry off the election, but that if
not, he agrees Reagan cannot be credited with

a true

"win."

By PHIL SEMAS

Watching him speak on college campuses, it
is difficult to understand why Oregon Gov. Mark
Hatfield has not built up more of a rapport
with students during his eight years as governor.
Hatfield is young, handsome, engaging. He
speaks and acts much like a Charles Percy or
John Lindsay.
Yet the only college students in Oregon who
have become his strong supporters are Republicans and the more conservative. Campus liberals have tended to shy away from him, possible partly because of his lukewarm efforts to
improve higher education in Oregon.
But this year Hatfield has become the hero
of the liberals, as he campaigns against Congressman Robert B. Duncan for the United States
Senate in the only major race in the country
where Vietnam stands as the clear, overriding

Behind the paradox lies the determining factor
of the election not a battleof issues and ideologies,
but the result of time, events, and political finesse.
Both Marini and Pranger are familiar with the
California scene, each having studied at the University of California's Berkeley campus.
And both see the outcome of the election lying issue.
The governor has serious "concerns," as he
within the hands of a large number of undecided
Democratic voters who stand a good chance of likes to call them, about the war.
He puts his opposition in terms of questions.
not going to the polls at all.
Why is the United States in Vietnam? Why
Marini says "they're (Brown's forces) not going do we keep
escalating when past escalations
to get to the polls unless they work at it."
have not brought the Vietcong or the North
Plainly, he says, Brown's chances are de- Vietnamese to the conference table?
He argues that we must keep trying to negopendent upon Democratic precinct workers: the
men and women who ring doorbells, baby sit tiate a settlement, through any means possible.
for mothers to get them out, and then drive
Congressman Duncan doesn't ask those kinds
of questions.
them down and back from the polls.
Continued on Page 2

Continued on Page

2

'Incidents'
Reported
In Boycott
Leaders of the Lexington
Shoppers Revolt accused today
two employes in a Gardenside
supermarket of "knocking down
two of our ladies" Saturday while
the housewives secured signatures on petitions.
Store officials denied any
knowledge of the incidents.
The claim illustrates the growing tension between the housewives and the five food chains
boycotted because of high prices.
The shoppers have extended
their protest to petitioning shoppers at the stores six days a
week. Mrs. T. S. Budzinski,
president of the LSR who also
leveled the charge, said the housewives would be enlisting support
Monday through Saturday until

the boycott ends. Previously, the
petitioning took place only on
Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
The women who' allegedly
were knocked down were identified as Mrs. Thomas C. Barr,
a member of the organization's
executive committee, and Mrs.
Jo Ann Troy.

The incidents according to

Mrs. Budzincki, occured as separate times and in front of the
Kroger store. "They (two Kroger
employes) came up behind and
bumped into them with grocery
carts," she said.

Mrs. Budzinski said the boycott organization has consulted
an attorney on the matter and
decided "to let it ride this time.
The next incident we can't let
pass.
The claims were the first indications of any trouble between
the shoppers and the stores since
the boycott began some three
weeks ago.

"4

ft

!c

m7
Million Expected
To Vote In State

Nearly a million voters are expected at thepolls today to decide
two statewide questions one will be the decision of whether to
retain the 1891 state constitution or adopt a new charter written
by the Constitution Revision Assembly.
the second statewide issue
ney's replacement was incumis a U.S. Senate seat sought
bent Fourth District Rep. Frank
by incumbent Republican Sen.
Chelf who had planned to retire
John Sherman Cooper and Dembefore Moloney's death.
ocratic challenger John Young
Chelf does not live in the
Brown.
Fourth.
LexLocally residents of the
Although the Republicans
ington school district will choose
have grumbled about Chelf s restwo of five school board candithere
dates. Four candidates are also idence outside the district,
disseeking election from two
The Kernel will publish
tricts of the Fayette County
edition

Elections in five out of the
states seven congressional districts have commanded no public attention because incumbents
are expect to win easily.
In the new Ohio Valley Fourth
District, conservative Republican M. Gene Snyder of
is hoping to make a
He was
political comeback.
ousted from his freshman's seat
in the old Third District in the
1964 Democratic landslide.
The Democratic Party's plans
to deny Snyder that comeback
were altered by the death Sunday of their Fourth District candidate. State Sen. John J. Moloney of Covington, who collapsed
and died.
Entering the race as Molo
Jeffer-sontow-

Work And Vlny

lA

r

school systems.

The rigors of preregistration are legend. But students are adaptable
and these two Arts and Sciences students seemingly have mastered
the art of filling out cards and enjoying it. Preregistration continues
through this week.

k

i

11

The Collegiate Press Service

n

Wednesday
with complete
sults of todays elections.
mid-da- y

was little question that helegally
can run in the new Fourth Dis-

trict.
This decision was based on
the Federal Constitution, which
requires only that a candidate
for U.S. representative be a resident of the state.
The state Attorney General's
office has decided that votes
cast for Moloney on absentee
ballots will be credited to him
but that votes east for the straight
Democratic ticket will go to
Chelf.
Stickers shovvingChelf s name
have been put on the district's
voting machines.

Deans Differ On Grading System
By MARVA GAY
Kernel Staff Writer

A survey of University academic deans
indicates a general feeling that the grading
system presents "a real problem" but the
opinions vary on what might be done to

improve it.
Of seven deans interviewed three favored
the present system, three favored a change,
and one was uncertain. All seven deans
agreed that increased independent study
would help most students.
Dean Lyman Cinger of Education favors
a three grade system. Crades would be outstanding, passing, and failing. There would be
no curve. He maintained that this would
take undue pressureoff the students and allow
them to work more independently. He said
this would also help motivate the student
to learn for the sake of learning rather than
for grades.
Ginger also favors classes which would
meet only once a week and would include
much independent research.

at

re-

be fairer since it would not pit A and B
students against each other. "No grading
system is really fair," said Craves. He also
maintains that grades don't really affect
motivation to learn.
Craves feels that the amount of independent work that should be done depends
on the subject. He favors classes that hold
one large primary lecture once a week
then break down into small units for diseffect it.
cussions, where the subject is easily adapted
Drennon also favors classes which would to this.
meet once a week and would entail indeDean Chailcs H. Haywood of Business
pendent study.
Economies says the present system is
Dean Charles P. Graves of Architecture and
"all right ". Any grading system would indoes not think the present grading system
volve ranking people on a scale, said Hayis appropriate. However, he does not think
don't wood. If this creates pressure it isn't unfair.
number grading would beany better. "I
of grading is to put pressure
know what an 83 percent means," said The purpose
on students to make grades, he said. Under,
Graves.
some students would do
In technical courses numbers could be any grading system in school. Grades reinjust enough to stay
used, said Graves. For most courses he force the student's motivation to excell.
favors a looser grading system with fewer
Continued On Pate 8
grades. A system with fewer grades would

Associate Dean Herbert Drennon of Arts
and Sciences favors an entirely mathematical
grading system. Instead of lumping students
into groups he wants each student to know
exactly where he stands. Drennon said this
would be fairer for it would show the "vast
difference between the 80 percent C student
and the 70 percent C student." However,
he said motivation to learn is set by the
student and grades do not significantly

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Nov. 8,

IWiCi,

Vietnam Is Issue In Close Oregon Race
four straight Senate elecand has made special efforts to tions, but he isn't much help
tie Hatfield to Sen. Wayne Morse, to a Republican like Hatfield,
one of the forenfost critics of the who must hold as much Repul)-lica- n
supiort as possible in a
war, who says he will vote for
state where Democrats hold a
Hatfield.
heavy registration edge.
Hatfield responds that ImpoHatfield has trietl to argue
is different than that of
sition
that there are other issues beMorse, which is true. Hatfield
has primarily been asking hard, sides Vietnam, yet it is difficult
reasonable questions about the to find issues on which the two
war, while Sen. Morse, as is his men radically disagree.
On education neither man
way, tends to waspishness and
has an outstanding record.
overstatement.
A member of the House ApToo close an association with
Duncan
Morse could hurt Hatfield. propriations Committee,
voted against the National
colosMorse's independence and
He has,
sal nerve have enabled him to Teacher Corps proposal.
however, supported most other
make

Continued From Paje 1
When he opened his campaign, he asserted, "I would
rather fight Communism on the
Mekong than on the Columbia."
His campaign has boon peppered with such phrases indicating support of the war.
He says he is "on the side
of my country's policy, because
I believe that, while we must
be unrelenting in our search for
peace, we must be unswerving
in our determination to prove
that Communism shall not take
over its neighbors
one-by-o-

around the world."
Duncan is doing his best to

it a

one-issu-

carip;rfn

e

'Formalised9 Learning Alien,
Head Start Director Says
now being
Structured, "formalized" learning for
talked across the nation, is wholly alien to the Head Start concept, Vivian Burke, regional Head Start training officer and the
course in the College of Education told
teacher of a
the Student NEA Monday.
In other SNEA business, Sus- gap between the impoverished
an Robertson asked for volun- and the more fortunate child,
teers to look into the quality of the federal program is concerned
instruction at the University. "not with the end result but
Miss Robertson said the how with what the child learns while
and when of the plan are yet doing, playing, painting," she
pre-scho- ol

to be defined.
The informal learning approachlike flexible teachers and
parent involvement is necessary
to helping Head Start youngsters
"come alive," Miss Burke said.
In seeking to close the culture

explained.

During the summer sessions
of about eight weeks, Head Starters are exposed, often for the
first time, to dramatization,
music, art, parties, trips. A hot
lunch, also frequently unfamiliar,
closes the day. The daily program must be pliable enough to
fit different groups of children
"according to community, environment, and personal needs."

oKnifei NOW
w.
rv
mr

mm

v.

hm

.Mrs fl

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UK was the site last summer

Mir the

2

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mcmpicius
DISIRIRU1I0N

vniirrT'
"TVk1

TOP
H,TS!

three intensified
training programs for Head Start
teachers. While other states have
one regular training officer and
one administrator, Kentucky has
one administrator for each of
seven sponsoring colleges and
universities.

of

tmM

one-wee-

k

strikes Back!

Woody alleN

IT'S ALL
ABOUT LIFE.

:

LOVE...FUN

j
:

...

and that

a.

thing we
a" crave
but can't
mention

?Sy

:

win

education legislation, but hasn't
had a major role in it, partly
because House leadership in that
area is held by another
Congresswoman Edith

n,

Green.
Although

he can point to a
record as governor,
Hatfield has not shown a great
deal of leadership in such areas
as higher education, even though
scandal-fre- e

he is a former college professor.
Neither man is particularly
enamored with student peace
groups.
Although he defends the right
to dissent, Hatfield questions
whether protest marchers are
making any real contribution to
meaningful discussion of the war.
He also dislikes being grouped
with them, just as he dislikes
being grouped with Morse, because they may cost him votes.

The protesters, concentrated at
the University of Oregon, Reed
College, and Portland State College, are not very popular in
Oregon, which is basically a
conservative, niral state.
Duncan has even less liking
for dissenters. Although he often
defends the right of people to
have their own views, he has
also branded such persons as
Hatfield and Morse as "Hamlets," saying the real problem
of the war "may not be in the
hamlets of Vietnam but in the
Hamlets here in the United
States."

Continued From Page 1
Prior to the election, at least,
these people have not done the
precinct work.
The reason? It may center

with an organization of private
citizens, party workers, who
usually count heavily in primary
election candidates called the
California Democratic Council

(CDC).
Brown and the CDC have
been in conflict this year. According to Marini, Brown "dis-

owned" CDC President Sy
who made statements that
the U.S. should get out of Vietnam. A leadership fight ensued
and Cassady was replaced by a
Cas-sad- y

close vote.

To some degree a rift may
have occurred between Brown
and some liberals in the CDC.
However, Pranger is quick to
add that after many Vietnam

Ml

;

doves lost in legislative primary
elections last spring, some indecision has developed in these

especially at San
Francisco and Los Angeles. No
where has this been more apparent than in Alameda County
where Robert Scheer lost a close
congressional primary to Jeffry
Cohelan, the Democratic incumbent.
As a result of the
districts

Scheer-Cohela- n

race, Marini says, Brown
lost Berkeley and whatever hope

he had of carrying the populous
"East Bay" region.
This primary further strained
Brown's relationship with North
California liberals attenuated by
his policies toward Berkeley student unrest and agricultural
unionization.
(Brown allowed state prisoners
to harvest grapes this summer
when vinyard employes went on
strike and refused to pick them.)
In Southern California, Brown
is no better off, Marini says.
At Los Angeles state speaker
of the house Jesse Unruh has
failed to "turn on his machine"
for Brown, to make the mammoth
effort for him he did in the
1962 gubernatorial race.
Pranger is more optimistic
about Brown's chances.
"The standard form of politics in California is coalition

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ROLL-AREN- A

AT SOX OFFICE

Vice-Preside-

Bobby Kennedy.
It seems likely that the race
will be close. The polls show
the men
Whoever wins, much will be
neck-and-nec- k.

made of the national significance
of the victory. Lyndon Johnson
plainly considers a Duncan victory a victory for his Asian policies. A Hatfield win would be
a defeat for LBJ, the pundits
have reasoned.

BELTUNE

politics," he explains, adding
that, "Brown is a master at'
coalition strategy. The only way.
he can be defeated is if the
coalition is defective."
On these grounds, he says,
Brown could be beaten. Admitting Brown's loss of favor
with both the liberals and the
footmen, Pranger
still wonders if they will finally
come back to Brown's support
in face of a Reagan victory.
The chance for this is good,
Pranger thinks given the large
number of undecided voters.
And he believes the lead pollsters give Reagan may well be
a catalyst in reuniting them with
door-to-do-

Brown.

Pranger thinks Mexicans, Negroes, and lower classes will turn
out a Brown vote, if their vote
is secured at all.
Although Marini thinks Reagan more likely to win, he says
"it's a short career he's in for."
Marini thinks Reagan only
man because he won't
a
be able to fulfill the promises
he has made about "cleaning
up the mess at Berkeley or keeping down riots.
According to Marini, the governor's hands are tied in either
situation to do more than Brown
has done, that the University of
California does not come closely
within the governor's realm, and
that a strong show of force in
a riot situation would ruin him
with the Negro vote he must
either have or not let his opponent have.
Marini further points out that
Reagan's state legislature would
be Democratic and that the Democratic party would be unified
by a defeat.
The total effect of today's election, then, may be to unify California's Democratic party, either
behind Brown, or in four years
Reas a result of a Reagan-lepublican victory.
one-ter-

m

d

Inc.

MATINEES

Hubert
field.
Humphrey campaigned for Duncan and last week Robert Kennedy barnstormed through the
state for him. "I respect his
views," said Kennedy, a critic
of the war.
And there are nimors that
Lyndon Johnson himself may
come to Oregon before the campaign is over.
Hatfield has said he doesn't
plan to rely on outside help,
although Richard Nixon was in
Oregon a couple of days after

Reagan May Win By Default

unci sa

i40S

The Democrats arc sparing

no horses in trying to beat Hat-

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, sLexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-claspostage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
UK Post
of Student Publications.
Office Box 4986. Nick Pope, chairman,
and Patricia Ann Nickell. secretary.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894. became the Kecord in 1900, and the Idea
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$8.00
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files $.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
2320
Editor
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
2321
Socials
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TticMiay, Nov.

JL IL
"Cl

mm

A

-

8,

Preslonsburg
Schedules
Film Festival

l63

PHESTONSnUHC-Stars
as
diverse as the Beatlesand Jeanne
Morcau and directors as distinguished as DeSica and Bergman will be represented in the
International Film Festival running from November through
May at Prestonsburg Community

College.
Sam Bittman, president of
the Film Society organized by
several faculty members, says
the purpose of the endeavor is to
show the youth of the region

"that there are other worlds and

other cultures beyond the
as rich in heritage as
ours."
Thousand dollar rental fees
are being underwritten by patrons in Floyd, Pike and Johnson counties. If this plan is
immediately successful, the Festival will open the first week in
Cum-berlan-

y
Modern Art On Display

Artist Wayne Thicbaud's "Hors d'Oeuvres," u 1963 work, is one November.
of the examples of modern art on display at the University Art
British films to be shown are
Gallery during the present showing called "The Media ofi "I'm All Right, Jack," starring
Art: Now." The show runs through Nov. 13.
Peter Sellers and Margaret
Rutherford; "This Sporting
Life," judged one of the year's
ten best; and "A Hard Day's
Night," with the Beatles.
France and Russia each have
two entries in the Festival. Truf-fadirects and Moreau acts
in "Jules and Jim" while Yves
Montand and Simone Signoret
star in Sartre's adaptation of
Arthur Miller's "The Crucible."
"Alexander Nevsky" and "The
Road to Life" are the Russian
films.
1.

How come you've been getting
such swinging computer dates?
I guess you haven't
seen my personality

2. "Five foot two.
113 pounds.

Nearsighted."

questionnaire.

Army Band To Play
The U.S. Army Field Band,
under the direction of Maj.
VVilmont N. Trumbull, will give
a homecoming concert at 8:30
p.m. Wednesday in Memorial
.

Coliseum.
Admission will be free. The
l,
band will play classical,
and popular selections.
semi-classica-

SX

KENTUCKY
TYPEWRITER SERVICE
RENTAL
SERVICE
SALES
Olivetti Portable Typewriters and

Adding Machines; Carbons, Ribbons, Office Supplies.
Typewriter & Adding Machine
387

3. "Play the ocarina

HOUSE

7:30

NOV. 8

Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ

Rentals
PHONE

ROSE ST.

1967

4. "Like cucumber

sandwiches."

ENGINEERING AND MATH GRADUATES
FOR

SYSTEMS

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

PRODUCTION
RESEARCH

TEST ENGINEERING
FIELD ENGINEERING

QUALITY CONTROL

DESIGN
SALES

5. You mean to tell me
g
those
girls
great-lookin-

go for these things?
It's the last item that
really clinches it.

6. "Stepping into swell job with
Equitable Life. Good pay.
Fascinating work. Plenty of

chance to move up."
I think I'll sec
Jane tonight, Susie
tomorrow and Fran
the day after.

The Inland Steel Company, East Chicago, Indiana, invites you
to investigate our many career opportunities. Consult the specific
job descriptions in the pocket of our brochure. Our representatives will be on your campus on Friday, November 18th. Contact
Mrs. Kathcrinc Kemper for an appointment.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
In the Plans for Progress Program

Make an appointment through your Placement Office to see Equitable 's employment representative on November 9 or write to Patrick
Scollard, Manpower Development Division, for further Information.
The EQUITADIE Life Assurance Society of the United States
Horn

Office: 1285 Ave. of the Americas. New Yoik, N. Y. 10019

An Equal Opportunity Employer,

MF

Equitable 1966

INLAND

STEEL

INDIANA HARBOR

EAST CHICAGO.

COMPANY
WORM

INDIANA

* Unlike Alias, The Student Can No!
Stand Too Much Weight

The 'Pressu re Cookers'
Additional proof that there must
be a better way of evaluating students than by grades is made evident by a conservative estimate
of 10,000 attempted suicides among
college students each year.
Moderator magazine, in a recent
issue, listed the major cause of
suicide as the "pressure cooker"
environment of the college students, or more simply, the pressure
for grades.
It is evident that this pressure becomes greater each year.
For example, as more students
clamor to enter the doors of graduate schools, these schools in turn
raise admission standards so as to
have the "cream of the crop.
The same trend is noticeable
in professional schools, such as
those of law and medicine.

Are Grades Essential?
This prompted the Minnesota
Daily to pose the following question in an editorial: "Are grades
an essential part of the education process? Some educators hold
that grades hinder learning, others
do not. But all experts agree that
grades are chiefly an administrative convenience and are necessary for some types of student

...

A lot of us arc
this to say: "
really hung up over close personal
and sexual relationships. I know
students here who seek professional
help because they are very conmafused about the future-th- eir
even their reajors, their careers,
sons for staying in college.
"A lot of others have pretty
deep personal problems which
make it difficult to study or to be
motivated about anything. Some
of my friends really feel the tension and get depressed easily."
The problem of student suicide
becomes even more apparent at
this time of year as final examinations draw nearer, and pressures

mount.

Preventative Measures
There are a number of things
that can be done by the University to help prevent such a tragic
happening:
Examine the possibility of
relieving student pressure by abolishing our present grading system
and replace it with a pass-fa- il
system by which knowledge not
grades, becomes important.

Provide a necessary number
of mental health experts on campus
and encourage students to make
use of their services. '
evaluations."
Provide additional seminars
The Kernel has editorially enthe UK Administration for men and women students recouraged
to closely examine the possibility garding the proper use of sex and
of disposing of grades. Presently, point out all moral, legal and physionly pass or fail grades are planned cal issues of abortion.
Make even greater efforts to
for the College of Medicine, on an
basis. We would like match roommates in dormitories
experimental
to see the other colleges examine and allow students to change roomthe possibility of such a plan. mates whenever possible. AddiModerator reports that "a re- tional single rooms might be proAbove
cent survey at the University of vided.
all, dormitories
California at Berkeley found that should not be overcrowded; this
between 1952 and 1961 there was is no answer to the University's
almost one suicide for every 5,000 housing dilemma.
Allow the students to have
students. At Yale, examinations of
longer periods of time disclosed a greater role in decision-makin- g
that out of 208 deaths between functions of the University, thus
1920 and 1955, some 25 were known giving them a greater motivation.
suicides. Over a similar period of
Students, on the other hand,
time at Harvard there was one have responsibilities to each other.
suicide for every 5,000 students." They should realize that 75 percent of persons who commit suiSecond Greatest Cause
cide have threatened it, and that
The magazine also reports that one student out of 10 threatening
"suicide is the second greatest suicide attempts it.
cause of death among college stuBy both Administrations and
student bodies taking preventative
dents." (Accidents rank first).
It must be admitted that all measures, possibly the predicted
student stress does not come from 1,000 student suicides this year
the pressure to earn better grades. can be lessened.
Numerous emotional and sexual
problems are certainly contributors. As UK's dormitories become
more crowded, more students share
Were it not for the presence
rooms, and often with students
with whom they suffer personality of the unwashed and the
the formless, queer and
conflicts.
Women students particularly incomplete, the unreasonable and
have problems as an increasing absurd, the infinite shapes of the
number of pregnancies develop out delightful human tadpole, the horiof marriage and more illegal abor- zon would not wear so wide a
tions are performed than the dean grin.
Frank Moore Colby
of women would like to admit.
While this is not the fault of the
Every time a child is bom into
University, the problem neverthethe world it's Nature's attempt to
less develops within its framework,
and therefore the Administration make a perfect human being. Well,
should constantly strive to deter- we've seen Nature pushing and contriving for some time now. We all
mine a solution.
know she's interested in quantity;
Many Confused
but I think she's interested in
A William and Mary College
quality, too.
Thornton Niven Wilder
for Moderator had
correspondent
--

Kernels

half-educate-

d,

Letter To The Editor

Anthropologist Defended
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I am one of over 300 students
in Physical Anthropology 100 who
is paying witness to one of the
most sickening things that I have
seen during my four years at UK.
Dr. Eddington is a new faculty
member in the anthropology department and came here from Berkeley, just having completed his
Ph.D. At mid-teralmost two-thirof this class was failing, and
it is the repercussions of this that
I find as degrading.
This faculty member has been
techexposed to the strong-arof the Dean of the College of
niques
Arts and Sciences, but what is
worse, he is daily confronted with
a class of immature and hostile
m

ds

m

students.
The implications of this whole
situation should be grounds for
investigation of some UK policies.
However, I am distressed with the
portion of the student body that
is represented here and insulted
that I am forced to be included in
this irresponsible group.
Eddington, in my opinion, is
an academic revolutionary on this
campus. He is an extremely well
qualified anthropologist and is a
concerned professor and a very
aware human being. The charges
against him have ranged from the

cussion on topics that do not
necessarily relate to anthropology,
but do relate to the continued
existence of the human species.

If every time a student at this
University failed a course because
he did not put forth enough time
in studying the material and then
sought to rationalize his shortcomings by making the professor a
scapegoat, then we would soon be
without a faculty.
....
I am among the majority who
failed at mid-terand my investment is very great at this point
considering I am a senior and plan
to do graduate work, but not enough
to distort the truth.
m

I urge Dr. Eddington to consider
to remain rt UK because he has the
sort of qualities that this place
needs, mainly professional ethic.
Lee Rathbone
Arts and Sciences Senior

.

fact he discusses sex as a factor
within animal groups to the fact
that he entertains open class dis- -

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

1894

The Smith's Outstanding College Daily
Univi:hsity of Kentucky

TUESDAY, NOV. 8,
Editorials represent the iqiinhnu of the Editor, not of the University.

Waltkh M. Chant,
Steve Hocco, Editorial Page Editor

.

.

Editor-I-

n

1966

Chief

VViii.iam

Knaw,

Business Mamger

,

* .Till;

KENTUCKY

KERNEL, T.icmI.i, Nov.

S,

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--

1

A U.N. Visit

..

4

University students returned Sunday from a
stay in New York where they participated in the
YMCA's annual United Nations Seminar.
Forty-seve- n

three-da- y

In addition to touring the U.N. building and the offices
of the Foreign Policy Association, they lunched in the delegates lounge and talked with the representatives from a number of nations.

(

On the return trip, they spent a few hours in Washington
where they toured the Smithsonian Institute.

THEY HAD A GUIDED TOUR OF THE UNITED NATIONS BUILDING

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IT WAS SNOWY AND UNPLEASANT WHEN THE GROUP LEFT

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STEVE GRAY, LEFT, AND