xt7kkw57dw68 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7kkw57dw68/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19291018  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 18, 1929 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 18, 1929 1929 2012 true xt7kkw57dw68 section xt7kkw57dw68 ANNUAL PICTURES
Last Kentuckian Photos
To Be Made Oct. 22, 23

"""irl Best Codv Available
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

KENTUCKY,

LEXINGTON,

VOLUME XX

OF

CLASS ELECTIONS
Will HcRln Monday,
October 21

KENTUCKY

NUMBER 5

OCTOHER 18, 1929

K.I.P.A. MEETS AT MURRAY TODAY
Wildcats Will Battle
GAME WILL BE Net

Artists Face

JOHN BENSON IS Educational Speaker

LAST NOCTURNAL
TILT OF SEASON

Tough Schedule PRESIDENT
Of 17 Games SENIOR CLASS

Is Expecting an
Easy Engagement With
Visitors

Cadet Colonel of University
R. 0. T. C. Is Unopposed

OF

Big Blue

Seventeen games, thirteen of them
arranged to be played on the home
floor, comprise the present schedule for Coach John Mauer and his
Wildcat basketball team. A two-gaPRAYING COLONELS
series to be played In LexingRECEIVE ATTENTION ton against the team representing
Crelghton University, the Notre
Dame of the basketball world, will
Varsity Machine Is Greatly bo one of the feature affairs on the
Weakened by Injury to
card.
Coach Mauer sounded the first
Spicer
call for varsity basketball practice of
the 1929-3- 0 season last Monday and
Coach Harry Gamage and 15 men responded. Facing the toughever attempted by the
his Wildcats settled down eas- est schedule White,
Mauer will
Blue and
ily this week to the task of attempt to get the jump on fundadeveloping
a high-powere- d
mental drilling insofar as It is posfootball team before Kentucky sible with the wok of coaching the
plunges deep into Southern ends of the football team also in line
of duty.
Conference waters November Coach Mauer has seven letter men
s a nucleus for this year's team.
con-- ,
2 with four 'consecutive
including They are Captain McBrayer, "Big"
ference
McGlnis, "Little" McGlnis, Spicer,
Clemson, Alabama, V. M. I., Combs, Trott, and Owens. Some of
the most likely prospects from the
At
and Tennessee.
o'clock Saturday night, the freshman team o last year are
Roberts, Yates, and Klelser.
Carson-Newman
Big Blue meets
Varsity practice Is being held in
College of Tennessee in the afternoons from two until four
the second and last night o'clock on Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, with the frosh squad
game of the season.
working out at the same hour on
The 'Wildcat mentor did not Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturtake the trouble to scout the
day. Four of the varsity candidates,
Tcnncsseans as this team is not
Yates, Spicer, Bronston, and Klelser,
expected to be strong enough
are members of the football squad.
to give Kentucky much of' a jolt,
Numbered on the tentative card are
even if it does prove to be a
some of the most formidable opsurprise package. The next stop
ponents In the Southern Conference
for the Kentucky machine will
as well as the strong Illinois team
be the Centre struggle in Danfrom the Big Ten circuit. If arrangeville, always a deadly battle
ments for this game are completed
since the start of this feud half
it will be played In Champaign.
a century ago. In Chicago ii
The schedule is as follows:
Is the saying that "Stag? fears
Dec. 14 Georgetown", here.
Purdue," and in Kentucky the
Dec. 20 Mtoay, here
state institution is well known
Dec. 31 Berea, here.
for its constant fear of the Geld
Jan. 3 Clemson, here.
an white threat from Centre.
Jan. 6 Illinois, there ( tenatlve).
WftshJngton .and Tar jmuob Ua;L, Jaa --MmaCrebte here: -. v1
"somewhat erratic sophomore team
T. to' 'TTl
for Gamage' with that 6 to 20 Jan. 5
Miss. A. &. M., here.
drubbing, from the Wldcats last
Jan. 31 Tennessee, there.
Saturday afternoon on Stoll field.
Feb. 1 Georgia, there.
Until that week-en- d
the Bine and Feb. 3 Clemson, there.
White was quite mysterious, practicFeb. 8 Georgia Tech., here.
ing behind closed doors and being
Feb. 14 Georgia, here.
seen only once In a comparatively
Feb. 18 Centre, here.
easy game against Maryvllle. Now
Feb. 21 W. & L., here.
Wildcat partisans
are .smelling
wonders ahead.
Spicer Is Injured
Carey Spicer, the star who played
U.
the leading role In the victory over
'Washington and Lee, has not been
in uniform this week on account of
a serious Injury to bis knee. Conny
The second meeting of Kappa
Rose, varsity guard, was not able to Delta Pi, honorary educational
game fraternity,
play in the Washington-Le- e
Monday,
was
held
and Is still on the sde lines with October 14, in room 202 of the Edu
an Injured ankle.
cation building. Mrs. Duncan presid
Dick Richards, one of the most ed at the election of officers for the
promising halfbacks, has not been ensuing year. They are: M. E.
able to play in a single game as yet Ligon, councillor; W. H. Arnold,
because of an Injury to his leg. Ken president; Paul Gard,
Andrews, varsity end, and Tom
Emma p. Peck, secretary; Dr.
Phipps, first string fullback, are suf- W. a. Taylor, treasurer.
fering from various minor Injuries.
Plans were formulated for a banIf Coach Gamage can nurse these quet to be given at the Phoenix hotel
ban-roa- n
at 6 o'clock Friday
men along and have them in shape
for his last five games, It Is possible evening, October 25.,-- This will be
that be will have enough reserve during the Educational Conference
material to continue through the and will be sponsored by Kappa
season undefeated. If not, he stands Delta Pi, Phi Delta Kappa, Lexingand the
ton City
'a good chance to lose any one of Bluegrass Teachers' Club, Executive
Teachers'
those games.
This week he has been devoting League. Dr. Frank L. McVey will
most of his time to the" reserves be act as toastmaster.
Tickets for the banquet are on
will have to use in the big games
ahead. Among his reserve backs are sale and may be bought from L. J.
Warner Ford, who beat V. M. I. 25 Horlacher, W. E. Freeman, Frank
J. P.
to 0 in 1927 with his long runs, Lewis Randall, E. F. Farquhar,
Toth, who saw action against Washin- Troxell, and J. E. Adams. Three
gton-Lee,
Cecil Urbanlak, Ken- hundred guests are expected.
tucky's "Stumpy Thomasson," "Bo"
SUKY THANKS STUDENTS
Meyers, diminutive quarterback, and
Jack Phipps, the Ashland fullback.
Brons-to- n,
The members of SuKy Circle take
In the line the Cat, have
Cavana, and Abley at ends; this method of thanking the stuMcElroy, Walters and Baughman at dents for their interest and cooperatackles: Howard Williams at cen- tion in making the Pep meeting and
ter; Johnson and Gentile, .guards. bonfire last Friday night- - a success.
This second team outfit has battled Especially do we thank the freshmen
the varsity to a standstill on several for the boxes they so generously
brought.
occasions.

games,

7:30

Officers for Year
Are Named By K.
Educational Frat

Big Taffy Pull for Effeminates

May Replace Algaean Tug of War
By MORTON WALKER
Aha! There's been dirty work
afoot, fellows. Call in Phllo Vance.
IN
SOMEBODY PUT ALGAE
CLIFTON POND!
Who did it, and when, and why,
and how, are questions baffling University officials. Some think the
Freshmen did; some blame the
Sophomores; and some even cast
acuslng eyes at the Liberal Club and
the Colonels of Centre College!
Nevertheless, there he is just as
same, big as life and twice as
natural, and as a consequence the
Frosh-Sop- h
contest
scheduled by the Student Council
Saturday afternoon, Is "all off,"
for
according to University heads.
That Algae's plight is only recent
seems evident.. Three years ago, the
date of the last tug of war at Clifton, no complaints of his presence
were reported. But for the last two

years University officials have kept
students away from the pond, giving
first one excuse and then another.
Say! Ssh! Maybe the faculty put
Algae in?
I
Anyway, there will be no tug of
war Saturday before the Carson-Newmgame, but IF the University
play
can borrow Transylvania's
ground ball (IF Transylvania has
one), or IF they can get one here
by Saturday from somewhere ( IF
they can find such a place), the
Frosh and Sophs will engage in a
game this week (or
big push-ba- ll
later)
IF the Student Council
agrees to this.
But don't get discouraged fellows
if this doesn't pan out .there's a
plan underfoot that ought to give
you a big kick, if It gets the Hygiene
Department's O. K. HOW WOULD
YOU LIKE TO HAVE
A BIG
TAFFY PULL?

t

KERNEL

on Stoll Field Saturday Night

Carson-Newm- an

CHARACTER

ROLE IS
SHIFTED BY FOWLER

OFFICER ELECTIONS
WILL BEGIN MONDAY

James Gates Conducts Sale of
Student Tickets for
Organization

Ballot Boxes Will Be Placed
In Colleges Where Every
Student Can Vole
John Benson, senior in the College
of Engineering and student colonel
of the University R. O. T. C. unit,
Is unopposed for the office of president of the senior class, according
to information obtained from the
Dean of Men Wednesday afternoon.
Maude Van Buskirk, a member of
Chi Omega, Mortar Board, Theta
Sigma Phi, Chi Delta Phi, and secretary of the Junior class last year;
Edith Literal, Delta Zeta, president
of the English Club, and member
of the Fleur de Lis club; and
Frances Baskett, a member of Alpha
Gamma Delta sorority, were nominated for the
of the
senior class. D'Allls Chapman, a
member of Alpha Gamma Delta
sorority Is unopposed for the office
of secretary.
Those nominated for the office of
junior class president were: Joseph
Allen, PI Kappa Alpha; L. G. For-que- r,
Sigma Chi; and S. M. Worth-ingto- n.
Mildred Little, Zeta Tau Alpha,
and Margaret Cundiff, Alpha Gamma Delta, were nominated for
Jane Clay Kenney, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Is unopposed for
the office of secretary.
John S. Kelly, Sigma Alpha
Epsllon; Stewart Augustus, Alpha
Tau" Omega; and E. T. Mofflt, were
nominated for the presidency of the
sophomore- - class. Ruby Rodgers.
a
Zeto Tau. Alpha,
Alpha Gamma Delta, and Georgetta
Walker, Kappa Kappa Gamma are
of
the nominees for
the sophomore class. Elolse Dickenson Is the only nominee for secretary.
Four men, the largest number
for any of the offices, were nominated for president of the freshmen
class. They Include: J. D. Alexander, Richard Nelser, Evans Treacy,
and Thornton Helm. Gay Lough-ridg- e,
Chi Omega pledge; Virginia
Huber, Chi Omega pledge; Dorothy
Compton, Delta Zeta pledge; and
Margaret Douglass, Delta Delta
Delta pledge, and Mary King
Montgomery was nominated
for
of the freshmen class.
Delta
Dyer, Alpha Gamma
Jane
pledge, is the only nominee for secretary.
The first election will be held
Monday, October21, when the officers for the senior class will be
chosen. Other election dates announced by the Student Council
are: juniors, Tuesday, October 22;
sophomores, Wednesday, October 23;
and freshmen, Thursday, October
24. Ballot boxes will be placed in the
different colleges, and every student will be entitled to vote in the
class of which he is a member.

DEANS OF WOMEN
MEET AT MURRAY
Miss Sarah Blanding and Mrs.
P. K. Holmes Represent
University a t Kentucky
Convention
Miss Olivia E. Orr, Dean of Women at Kentucky Wesleyan Colpresident of the
lege, was
Kentucky Association of Deans of
Women at the conclusion of their
two-da- y
convention held at Murray
State Teachers' College October 14
and 15. Danville, Ky., was selected
for the next convention which will
be held in the women's department
of Centre College.
The convention was attended bv
thirty deans from colleges and high
schools throughout Kentucky. Those
attending
from Lexington were:
Miss Sarah Blandlng, dean of wo- men at the University; Mrs. Pi K.
Holmes, assistant dean of .women at
the University; Miss Hilda Threl- keld, dean of women at Hamilton
college; and Miss Bertha Hamilton,
dean of women at Transylvania college. Deans of six women's colleges
In the state highly praised student
government organizations and their
officers.
Miss Blandlng delivered an interesting address on the "Needs of Girls
Socially," She gave a vivid picture
of a dance celebrating the collego
football victory. She told of the
girls and boys as they celebrated
and gentlemanly i
"In a lady-lik- e
manner," then said, " I remembered ,
the 'Needs of girls' and with a picture of the girls limping out on their
poor, tired feet clearly before me, I
concluded that the greatest need of
girls today is to get to bed."

GUIGN0L
PLAY WILL HAVE
VERSATILE CAST
Number of Dress Rehearsals
Will Climax Preparation
For Opening Night

For Presidency

Dean M. E. Haggerty, of Minnesota, who will be one of the principal
speakers at the Sixth Annual Educational Conference which will convene here October 25 and 26. Dean
Haggerty Is a member of a group of
men that has done more work in
college administration
than any
other group in America.

KENTUCKY, BEREA
DEBATE TODAY
Three Members of University
Forensic Team Will Appear
Before Mt. Vernon High
School Audience
The University debating team will
engage In four forensic debates during the next few days. The first
debate will be held before a high
school audience' at Mt. Vernon, Ky.,
this morning with Berea College.
The subject will, be "Resolved that
ed

should own and operate all hydroelectric plants." The 'debate will be
repeated before the Academy assembly at Berea College
at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon.
Bruce Waters, H. C. Smith, and
Hugh Jackson will represent the
University In the first two debates
and maintain the affirmative of the
subject. Last summer the University engaged in a series of debates
with Berea In the only summer
school season for debating ever held
at the University.
Six members of the team will debate the same subject on Monday
morning at Maysllck, Ky. Hugh R.
Jackson, Kermit Pack and Clifford
Amyx will argue the affirmative
side and will oppose Sidney T.
Schell, William R Pearce and James
Porter who will argue negatively.
The fourth debate will be held at
Ferguson high school, at Lueltha,
Ky., Wednesday morning at 10
o'clock when H. C. Smith, Hugh R.
Jackson and Clifford Amyx meet
Alfred Naff, William R. Pearce and
James Porter in a debate on the
same subject.
Prof. W. R. Sutherland, University
debate coach, plans to hold several
debates before the high schools and
the Blue Grass In order to acquaint
high school students with the
te
method employed in
debate work. It will also give them
hearing a disan opportunity of
cussion of the question which they,
in all probability, will discuss the
ensuing year.
If arrangements can be made
Professor Sutherland intends to send
two teams, composed of University
debaters, to Somerset where a debate
will be held between themselves, on
question.
the hydro-electr- ic
The boys who will make the trip
to Berea are all experienced debaters. Pearce and Amyx have each
had one year experience In intercollegiate debate work having in
that time engaged in fifteen debates.
Waters became a member of the
team last summer, when the University conducted a summer school
debating team.

Gillis Announces

Application Date

Senior Candidates Must
File Petitions for Degrees
From Oct. 21 to 2G
Seniors expecting to complete
their work at the end of the first
semester or in June are requested
to make application for a degree
during
beginning
week
the
Dctober 21. As commencement
lists are made from these cards
it is very important to file application at this time.
No one will bo considered for
a degree who has not made application.
applications
These
should be made In the recordlng1
rice.

(Signed) EZRA L. GILLIS,
Registrar.

DELEGATES TO
PRESS

FIRST

Rehearsals at the Guignol theatre
for St. John Ervlnc's "Mary, Mary,
Quite
Contrary"
will
continue
throughout next week and will be
climaxed by a number of dress rehearsals before the Initial presentation of the play, which will be
staged for an entire week beginning
October 28. The production will contain one of the best casts of characters to ever perform In the campus
e.

Prof. Frank C. Fowler, director,
has made a few changes in the original cast. Mrs. Virginia Durbln, a
graduate of Transylvania
College
and secretary of the Central Kentucky Women's Club, has been shifted to the role of Mrs. Westlake.
The character role of Mrs. Considlne
will be executed by Mrs. Helen C.
Krake who was formerly cast as
Mrs. Westlake. Mrs. Krake Is the
director of public school music at
Hamilton and Transylvania colleges
and starred In "The Rivals," by
Richard Brlnsley Sherridan,
in
Philadelphia.
Prof. E. J., Canady, instructor of
mathematics 'at the University, has
been selected to characterize the
part of Mr. Beeby, formerly played
by Clarence Rothenburg.
The role of Sir Henry Considlne
will be played by Prof. R. D. Mcln-tyr- e,
Instructor in the college of
commerce at the University, who
played In Glrdler Fitch's "Whip of
Fire."
Russell Duncan, of Covlnnrton. Kv..
a" freshmaVahdTiedge
of Ine Sigma
Nu fraternity, will make his debut
in campus dramatics under the title
of Jeoffrey Considlne. Mary Sidney
Hobson, of Ashland, Ky., a member
of the Chi Omega sorority, will also
make her first appearance here In
the role of Sheila Considlne.
Miss Margie McLaughlin, instructor in the department of journalism
at the University, will evoke much
mirth In her role of Miss Mimms.
Miss McLaughlin is a member of
the Strollers, dramatic organization
of the University, and is prominent
for her work in dramatics.
Robert Thompson, former student
at the University and former president of the Strollers, has been cast
as Mr. Hobbs, theatrical manager
for Mary Westlake. Miss Evelyn
Gall, student at the University and
instructor in elocution, and Claude
Walker, member of the Delta Tau
Delta fraternity, will play important
character roles.
The sale of""sudent tickets is in
charge of James Gates, graduate
student in the college of commerce.
A booth will be erected In front of
the administration building next
week and students may secure their
tickets there. The down town ticket
sale will be conducted under the
auspices of the Junior League of
Lexington.

STANLEY

HEARD

BY ENGINEERS
Former Governor and Senator
Speaks on "Traditions" at
Weekly Assembly in Memorial Hall
Six hundred students and faculty
of the College of Engineering heard
and former United
States Senator A. O. Stanley deliver
an address on "Traditions" in
Memorial hall Wednesday morning
at the regular weekly assembly of
Engineering College. Dean F. Paul
Anderson presided and introduced
the speaker as the third in the list
men whom Dean
of prominent
Anderson has procured to address
the students.
early
Senator Stanley
traced
civilization and showed its effect upon the pioneers of this country. He
traced the ancestry of Americans
through
Kentuckians
and
the
Angles, the Saxons, the English, and
the American Colonial settlements,
to the settlement and development
of Kentucky. He said that "Valor
In men and virtue In women" were
two of the greatest assets In the
heritage of Kentuckians and Americans1,

"The Pilgrims came to this country
the right to worship as
they desired," he declared. Customs
m the English gentry which pre
vailed In the early history or Virginia also were touched upon by the
speaker,
Dr. A. W. Kelley, of the University, gave several selections on the
new pipe organ at the opening of
the meeting.

Beauty Entrants
Must Be Named
By

SENDS
MEETING

Nine Collegiate Newspapers
Will be Represented at
Fall Convention
BANQUET AND GRID
TILT ARE FEATURES

Saturday

'Selecting a Staff" Will be
Topic Presented by

All petitions of nomination in the
1930 Kcntuckian
beauty contest
must be turned in at the Kentuck-ia- n
office by noon Saturday, October
19. Any number of nominations may
be made, but each nominating petition must bear the names of 50
male students.
Petitions will not be received after
noon Saturday. Next Tuesday, those
who have been nominated will appear at the Kcntuckian offices to
have another picture made, this
time especially for the beauty or
favorite sections, and at the expense
of the Kentuckian.
The Kentuckian has asked for
permission to stage the annual "K"
dance on Saturday night, November
2, and if the request is granted, the
co-enominated as the most beautiful on the campus will be the
guests of honor.
Later in the fall, the selection of
the most beautiful girl on the
campus will be made by two artists
of International reputation, who already have signified their willingness to be the Judges. The contest
director, however, believes he can
secure the aid of Cecil B. DeMille,
the noted motion picture producer,
and may do so.
In addition to the most beautiful
Kentucky co-eseven others will be
chosen as "Kentucky Beauties." The
high ranking nominees not placed
In the first eight will adorn the
1930
Kentuckian pages as "Kentucky Favorites."
This is the first time that an attempt has been made to select the
most beautiful girl on the campus,
eight as a group always having been
selected heretofore. The Judges will
be limited to selecting from among
those nominated, and therefore the
Kentuckian editors hope that every
girl who might be considered as
possibly the most beautiful will be
nominated.
The queen of beauty oijihe.Ken-tuckjT- campus- 'wKI ' be' nationally'
famous. Her picture and description
will appear on the front pages of
scores of American newspapers. She
may receive offers to take the blindfold test, enter the movies, fly the
Atlantic, climb the Woolworth building or get married.

Roy Owsley
Roy H. Owsley, Lois
and Allie Mason

Pur-cel- l,

will

represent the Kernel at the
meeting of the
Kentucky Intercollegiate Press
Association which will be held
at Murray State Teachers'
College today and Saturday.
Plans for the entertainment
of delegates are in charge of
Miss Martha Kelley, editor of
the College News of Murray
of K. I. P.
and
semi-annu-

A.
Two or more representatives
from each of the following
papers will be present at the convention; Eastern Progress, Riche;
mond; Asbnry College,
Transylvania
Crimson
Rambler, Lexington; Wesleyan
Undercurrent, Winchester; College Heights Herald, Bowling
Georgetonian,
The
Green;
Georgetown; The Cento, Danville; College News, Murray;
and the Kentucky Kernel.
The association, which is made up
of college publications throughout
the state, meets at Murray for the
first K. I. P. A. convention In the
history of that college.
A banquet tonight and a football
game Saturday afternoon will be
important features of the meeting.
This morning the welcoming address will be delivered by Dr. Ralnqy
T. Wells, president of Murray. This
afternoon a round table discussion
will be held concerning phases of
collegiate journalism. A representa
tive of each school will speak.
At the banquet to be held in Wells
newspaperHall .tonlghtv-promine- nt
men In the vicinity orMurray will
speak. Duke Mayfleld, managing
editor of the College News, will act
The music and
as toastmaster.
dramatic department will give a pro
gram after the banquet.
Saturday morning, tne meeting
will be devoted to business, and the
organization will adjourn at noon.
The association will be the guest of
the College News in the afternoon at
the Eastern and Murray football
game.
Officers of the association are:
president, Patterson, Bowling Green;

Pitkin Club Holds
Initial Meeting of

Year in Armory

Manna

K.euey, Mur-

ray ; acting secretary, Roy Owsley,
Lexington; and treasurer, Fred Dial,
Richmond.
The K. I. P. A. program follows:
Friday, October 18
(Administra9:30 Registration
tion Building.)
10:00 Welcome address, Dr. Wells.
12:00 Luncheon.
Address, Mr.
1:45 President's
Patterson.
discussion. (10
2:15 Round-Tab- le
minutes each) ; How to Improve EdiRambler; College
torials, Crimson
Publicity, Eastern Progress; Selecting a Staff, Roy Owsley, Kentucky
Kernel; Are Athletics
in College Papers, The Undercurrent; Advertising in College Papers, College Heights Herald; Chain'
Newspapers, Asbury Collegian; Politics in College Papers, Georgetonian;
Do Modern Newspapers Do More
Harm Than Good?, Centre Cento;
Scoring Papers for Awards, College

The Pitkin Club held its first
meeting at 4 p. m. Wednesday in the
Y. M. C. A. room to determine the
definite date of the opening of the
club for the year.
The club Is sponsored by the Maxwell Presbyterian church, and the
Y. M and Y. W. C. A. of the University. For the past four years, Dr.
A. W. Fortune, pastor of the Central
Christian
church, has delivered
lectures, his topic last year being
"Jesus and the World Problem."
All wishing to join the club may
turn their names In to Margaret
Lewis, secretary of the Y. W. C. A.
or Bart Peak, secretary of the Y. M.
C. A. The maximum number admitted into the club is 75 members.
All who enter after the specified
number is admitted will have their
names turned over to the membership committee, who will place them
on the waiting list.

News.
6:00
8:30

Banquet, Wells Hall.
Dramatic Program.
Stroller try outs are being held in Saturday, October 19
9:30 Business Meeting.
the lecture room of McVey hall in12:00 Luncheon.
stead of Patterson hall as was
2:30 Football Game, Thorough--bred- s
originally announced by the organvs. Eastern Teachers College..
ization. Thomas L. Riley, director,
has set Wednesday afternoon as the
try outs and anyone
ROTARIAN DAUGHTERS
final date for
anxious for a trial must communicate with him at the Pi Kappa
The daughters of Rotarians are
Alpha house for an appointment. requested to leave their names and
Plans for Amateur Night will be an- addresses In the office of Dean
nounced next week.
Sarah Blandlng next week.
STROLLER TRY OUTS

University Broadcasting Station
Plans "Fraternity Night" Program
By MARTIN It. GLENN.
"Please stand by for station announcements!"
Grecian songsters of the University will have the opportunity to
tickle their tonsils and demonstrate
their vocal abilities on the evening
of October 30, when the University
broadcasting station will be given
over to "Fraternity Night." At that
time, each fraternity will be allowed
a few minutes to yodel respective
sweetheart sobs and hilarious ditties.
So, drag out the llsterlne and
brothers, and prepare
to win fame and fortune via the
microphone.
will not have the
The fair co-eopportunity to exercise their delicate
vocal chords until November 2G,
when sororities will perform In like
manner for the great common people who ore fortunate enough' to

j

possess a loudspeaker and a "B"
battery.
Of course therewlll be choruses,
quartets, duets, and delicious tenor
solos, all of which will portray the
amorous "whoopee' life of "rah-rah- "
boys. Such
popular numbers as
"Drunk Last Night" and "Tight Like
That" will bo barred from the program.
Rehearsals have been continuing
for Into the night and persons living near fraternity
houses were
about to summon tho faithful Lexington Police Department when a
number of the aspiring young Caru-s- os
enrolled in the United States
School of Music. The complaints
of the neighbors have now been
changed to crys of joy and delight
as the crooning troubadours hold
their audiences spell-bouwith the
thundering chords of "Sweet

MSL'

* Best Copy
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE TWO
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Society

B. B. SMITH & CO.
CORRECT APPAREL FOR WOMEN AND MISSES

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Woodland Drug Co.
Corner Woodland and Maxwell Sts.
Phone Ashland 1581

"We Deliver Anything But Stamps"
Give Our Sandwiches

A Trial

1

J

F YOU KNOW
YOUR BANDS- you'llpick this one!
Ted Lewis and His Band have turned out a new Columbia
Record that you'll vote for the minute you hear itl Inscribed on it are all the qualities you expect to find in a
Ted Levis record moanin' melody, rollickin' rhythm, and
that something else that only Lewis gives!
And when you get this great Ted Lewis record, hear these
other hits too. . .
Record No. 1916-D- ,
75c
I Lovi: You (Incidental Singing "pox
(
jrots . . . ,
Ted Lewis and His Band
Lkwisada Blues

j

Record No.
Bkale Street Bums) yucah
Haiilem Blues
Record No.

19J6-D-

)
Indiana
I ox Trots
Fiitu House Blues I

75c
.
,

Willard Robiaon and
His Deep River Orchestra
.

i,

.

.

75c

Vrva

tigs

A GOAL

The Alpha XI Delta sorority entertained Thursday of last week with a
fcautlful afternoon tea at the
chapter house on Aylcsford Place,
In honor of the new house mother,
Mrs. Charles Dcnman, Nlcholasvlllc.
The guests were the mothers and
patronesses of the sorority.

DENTISTS
Drs. Slaton & Slaton
204-- 7

Guaranty Bank Building
Phone 3916

MICHLER,

Impressions start from the feet
up. The College Man's Shoes need
not only sturdy construction but
it must have style.

FLORIST, Inc
417 E. Maxwell St.
LEXINGTON,

KY.

Prjone Ashland 1419

Illustrated above is a genuine
leather- oxford in black or brown
-

FOUNTAIN
SERVICE

medium or wide toes.

and

SHORT ORDERS

$5 and $6

OUR SPECIALTY
REGULAR BOARD
$4.00 and $5.00 Per Week

ROSE STREET
CONFECTIONERY

Brown Boot Shoppe

"Where Friends Meet"
L. E. GRIFFING, Prop.
351 Rose Street

139 West Main

Phone Ash. 4039

Mound City Blue Blowers

"ilagic

Columbia
- tonal

Mrs. Durham Is a graduate of
Oklahoma University where she was
a member of the Alpha XI
I wish we might go gypslng one dny sorority. Her home Is in Enid, Delta
Okla.
wlillc we're young
Mr. Durham Is a senior at the
On a blue October morning
University and Is the son of Mr. F.
Bcncnth n cloudless sky,
H. Durham, of Columbia, Ky.
When till the worlds vlbrtmt hnrp
mim tvlnrl nf cint hnvo strung
SuKy Dance
torches the
tosslnK
Anri env ns
The SuKy Circle entertained
mnn1n llirllt IIS bV!
Saturday night with the first dance
The rising sun before us, a golden
of the school year In the Men's
bauble swung
9 to 12 o'clock.
gymnasium
I wish we might go gypslng one day orchestras, from Masqucradcrs Two
and
the
young.
while we re
the Rhythm Kings furnished the
THEODOSIA GARRISON
music.
The chaperons for the occasion
were:
CALENDAR
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lundc, Mr,
Frlitav. October 18
and Mrs. Waller Rodcs, Mrs. J. W.
banquet at Smith, Mrs. M. O. Cundlff, Miss
Women's
Phoenix hotel.
Sarah Blandlng, Miss Marguerite
Saturday, October 19
McLaughlin, Dr. and Mrs. W. E.
Carson-Newma- n
and University Freeman, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Dicker,
Mrs. Eda Giles, Miss Dora Berkley,
football game at 7:30 p. m.
Sunday, October zo
Mrs. Frank L. McVcy, Mr. and Mrs.
Vesper Services at Memorial hall R. S. Robinson, Mrs. E. F. Farqu-ha- r.
at 4 o'clock In the afternoon.
Wednesday, Qctober 23
Several hundreds of guests were
Mrs. McVev's afternoon tea for present.
faculty.
the students and
Founder's Day Banquet
WEDDINGS
The Kentucky chapter of Delta
Chi fraternity entertained Saturday
Tapp-IIillc- n
night, October 12 with the 39th
The marriage of Miss Eleanor Founder's Day banquet in the Red
Ky., Room of the Lafayette hotel. Martin
Florence Tapp, of Springfield,
and Mr. Alvln George Hillcn, of Chi R. Glenn presided as toastmastcr.
cago, 111., took place Saturday after
The program was as follows:
noon, October 12 at the home or
Invocation.
Address, Toastmaster.
the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs.
History of Delta Chi, J. Owens
Thomas Dudley Tapp. The Reverend
Security
Doctor Homer Carpenter officiated Reynolds, Attorney-at-Laat the ceremony.
Trust building.
Music, Pledges.
Mrs. Hillen was graduated from
Why I Chose Delta Chi: Pledge
the University in the class of 1928
and was a popular member of the Stanley Kendall.
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority.
Presentation of Scholarship Cup:
Mr. Hillen was graduated from Leland Hanks "B. B." Treasurer
the University In class of 1927, where Smith-HaggaLumber Co., and di
he was a student of College
of rector of Commonwealth Bank &
Engineering. He was a member of Trust company.
the Sigma Chi fraternity.
Alumni Talks.
Fraternity Songs.
The couple will make their home
Alumni present: J. Owen Rey
in Chicago where Mr. Hillen is conKy.;
Leland
nected with the Carrier Heating and nolds, Lexington,
Ventilating company.
Hanks, Lexington, Ky.; James Kit- trell, Lexington, Ky.; Robert Embry,
Smith-DurhaLexington, Ky.; Bill Crouch, Cin
O.,
Mr. and Mrs. Delmar Smith an- cinnati,
and Roger Lanier,
nounce the marriage of their daugh- Louisville, Ky.
ter, Clarice Jeanne to Mr. Douglas
Active Chapter: Ed Cross, Robert
Durham, of Columbia, Ky. The cere- Reynolds, Tom Cross, Harold Shaw,
mony was performed by Dr. J. R. Glynn
Coryell, James
Wilson,
Savage, of the Park Methodist Martin R. Glenn. Richard Weaver,
Gosney, Raymond Vice, !
Church South, Saturday, October 5 Fulton
George Heffner, Garner Willey,
at the Lafayette hotel.

THE GYPSYING

264 West Main Street

Williams M. Irion, Jr., Cal Hosklns,
AUlc Mason, John Williams, Moss
Daughcrty and Martin R. Wilson.
Pledges: Harry O. Baum, Allen
Lavln, Hartwell Bally, Victor War
ner, Joe Kce, Bruce DcGarls, Ed
Kcc, William Hume, Stanley Ken
dall, William Longncrc, George
Ycnowine, Jake Gail, Malcolm Fos-c- r,
and Harold Nichols.

J