xt7kpr7mq37h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7kpr7mq37h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19230525  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 25, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 25, 1923 1923 2012 true xt7kpr7mq37h section xt7kpr7mq37h The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

A,

N:32

LEXINGTON, KY.. MAY 25, 1923

VOLXIll

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

NATURAL AMPHITHEATRE
ON

CAMPUS TO BE USED

IN

LITTLE THEATRE PLAY

TO BE

UNIVERS TYQFKEN

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"Mid Summtr Night's Dream"
Will Be Produced Outdoors

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Outdoor dramatic production, whkh

(Continued

on Bafe 4)

THETA SIGMA PHI EDITS
YELLOW STREAK'

PAPER

Women Journalists Take Humorous Crack at University
Politics; "Razx Many
"The Yellow Streak," mysteriously
advertised to flash over the campus
Tuesday came to pass in less than an
hour after the publication issued by
Theta Sigima Phi, women's honerary
journalism fraternity was circulated
to the students who clamored to pur- chase one of the 9mall yellow "scan-day- "
sheets. The following women,
members of Theta Sigma Phi acted
together as editor of the first and most
publication of its kind
sensational
ever issued at the University; Mary
Marshall McMeekin, Anna Louise
Connor, Elizabeth Ellis, Georgia Lee
Elizabeth Hume, Fannie
Murphy,
Dixon Davidson,
Summers Tarlton,
.Louise Connell, Betty Barbour, Irene
McNamara, Bertha Craft, Kitty Con-roMary Elizabeth James, Margaret
Lavin, Helen King, Mary Gorey,
Emma Lee Young, Laura Hubbard
and Affie Hammond.
"The Yellow Streak" was issued as
an experiment for the Department of
Journalism next year, as they are contemplating issuing a monthly magazine such as "Punch Bowl" and magazines issued by the larger universi- y,

(Continued

on page 4.)

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A PART

OF THE CAST IN MIDSUMMER

TAU KAPPA DELTA TO HOLD
INITIATION AND BANQUET

Fraternity Ini
National Oratorical
tiates New Men, May 28
The University of Kentucky chap
ter of Tau Kappa Alpha, national oratorical fraternity, will hold its annual
initiation and banquet at the Phoenix
Hotel, Monday night, May 28 at 6
p. m.
eligible
initiation
for
Those
are: G. W. Meuth, H. C. Johnson, J.
W. Gillon, L. H. Liles, J. Y. Brown,
present students, and Oscar Irvme,
Dean of Men, University of Toledo,
who represented the University of
Kentucky in oratory while a student
here several years ago, and will re
turn for the special purpose of being
initiated with the other candidates.
The banquet which will follow the
initiation, will be informal, "but a number of toasts upon appropriate sub
jects are being arranged for, and will
be responded to on that occasion.
The active members are: J. L. Hays,
S. B. Neal, James Darnell, Jr., C. M.
Professor E. E. Fleisch- C. Porter,
man, J. T. C. Noe and Professor L. J.
Horlacher.
K

R.
BE

0. T.

C. FIELD DAY TO

HELDJM

MAY

29

Winner of Individual Competi
tive Drill to Receive
Medal
The annual field day of the R. O.
T. C. Battalion of the University will
be held on Stoll Field, Tuesday, May
29th, at 2 o'clock. The program
which has been very attractively arranged will consist of ceremonies,
demonstrations, and exhibitions of the
work done by the cadets during the
year. The departmeat will condi
various booths in which the machine
gun, trench mortars, sand table, field
pieces and military maps will be exCompany
hibited and demonstrated.
B, which was selected as the best
company of the Battalion will give
a demonstration of close order drill
and of a platoon in attack.
The annual individual competitive
drill will be held, two men from each
platoon being entered in the contest,
(Continued on Page eight)

UCKY

ANNUALS

HERE
WEEK

NIGHT'S DREAM

NEXT

The 1923 Kentuckians will be
delivered by this time next week
and will be ready for distribution on the campus.
However, they can not be distributed until all pages are paid
for by organizations and fraternities. The following fraternities and clubs have neglected to
pay their full amount for space
in the annual and they are hereby asked to attend to it within
this week so that the books may
be distributed.
These organizations are asked to see Chas. D.
Graham at once:
Alpha Gamma Epsilon
Alpha Chi Sigma
Alpha Delta Sigma
Phi Alpha Delta
Men's Student Council
CounWomen's
ic

cil.

Women's

Administrative

Council.
Women's League,
Norwood Mining Society,
A. A. E.
Freshman Engineers,
Agricultural Society,
Scribbler (Tusitalia)
Home Economics Society,
Press Club,
Hoof and Horn Club.
Patterson Literary Society,
Little Theatre,
Junior Club,
Freshman Class
Y. M. C. A.

Send checks payable to
Graham.
--

C. D.

K-

NOTICE
The Senate Committee which has
had charge of the mental tests of certain groups of students in the University this year, wishes to state that any
student who has taken the Army Alpha
test may find out how he stood in the
test by leaving an envelope addressed
to himself in the office of the Dean
of his own college. The result wilt
be sent through the University mail
unless a postage stamp is attached.

TEN MEN FROM U. K. COLLEGE
OF LAW PASS BAR EXAMS
Eight Varsity Men Take Oath and
Receive License.
All applicants from the" College of
Law at the University of Kentucky
passed the State Bar examination
which was held at Frankfort Kentucky
on April 11 and 12. Those who took
the examination were: Messrs. O. W.
Cain, J. S. Caudell, E. E. Dixon, J. L.
Hays, G. Keon, L. F. Metzgar, R. O.
Shehan, W. H. Smith, T. E. Sparks
and E. S Winters
Only eighteen out of the twenty-fiv- e
applicants made passing grades on the
examination.
All the above mentioned student;
with the exception of Mr. Metzgar
and Mr. Winters who are not in
Lexington at present appeared before
the Court of Appeals of Kentucky at
Frankfort on May 15, at 11 a. m. and
took the oath of office and received
their law license.
Mr. O. S. Lee, a senior in the Law
College, who was admitted to the bar
last July appeared with the other
seniors before the Court of Appeals.
K

KY. TRACK MEN IN MEET
AT GEORGETOWN

FRIDAY

State Contest Includes Centre,
Kentucky, Georgetown, Possibly Berea and Wesleyan

The Kentucky track team takes the
field for the last time this season Fri-

day afternoon, when they meet Centre
and Georgetown in the State championship meet at Georgetown. The
Wildcats are in the best of condition
and are ready to give their opponents
championship,
a run for the state
which the yeasily won last year on
Stoll Field.
Centre and Georgetown, according
to the dope bucket, (which is so often turned over) have an edge on the
Kentucky team. Both have participated in Southern meets with a fair degree of success. The Cats, however,
have not shown so well in the S. I. C.
meetings and will have to work hard to
take the meet. Kentucky will rely on
gathering a large number of second
and third places, rather than carrying
(Continue

DR. W. S. TAYLOR IS DEAN

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is at present. passing through one of the
three great epochs of its history,
is increasing in popularity in the

schools and colleges of America. Many
of our leading universities have constructed outdoor theatres where plays,
pageants and concerts are very sucThe ideal outdoor
cessfully given.
theatre should foe built on a. hill side or
hollow so that the voices may be
thrown toward the audience. The
ideal is best brought about when the
surroundings can be made beautiful
and advantageous. However, the villa
should not be made so beautiful that
it distracts from the play.
The University of Kentucky has, on
its campus, one of the most beautiful
that can be
natural amphitheatres
found. This theatre has been untouched by improvements and in its
present condition it seats 3,000 persons. Very little expense would be
necessary to turn it into a (beautiful
outdoor theatre with modern equipment and a seating capacity of 5,000
persons. It is estimated that $3,000
would drain the hollow, build rustic
seat?, terrace the slopes and build and
light the stage and dressing rooms.
The trees have grown in the positions
in which they should be and very few
of them would have to be removed. Dr.
McFarland, head of the Botany De- -

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Little Expense Needed to Con
vert "Hollow" into Modern
Theatre

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Purpose of College is Training
of High School Teachers and
Principals

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on page 5.)

Vocational Education To Be Included in Curriculum Specialization in Various Fields
Provision for the establishment of a
College of Education and appointment
of Dr. W. S. Taylor as dean, were
made at a meeting of the executive
committee of the University of Kentucky held yesterday morning in the
office of the president, Dr. F. L. Mc-Ve- y.
Authorization for such a college was
made by the board of trustees about a
year ago, but the carrying out of the
provision was delayed. The establishment of the college, which shall have
as its purpose the training of teachers
for high schools, principals and supervisors, was recommened by the survey commission of the state of Kentucky in its report of 1921 and is a
movement long looked forward to by
educators of the state.
Vocational education will be included in the curriculum of the new college, which will be organized with a
staff of about 12 persons; it is ex.
pected that the further growth of the
college will be along lines of more specialization in various fields.
Dr. Taylor, who will take up his duties here in September, is a Kentuck-ia- n
and a graduate of the University
of Kentucky in the class of 1912. He
is 38 years old and will receive his Ph.
D. from Columbia this spring. He
has held position in the University of
Texas and Pennsylvania State College.
He recently had charge of one of the
educational departments in the State
(Continued

on Page
--

Four)

K-

LITTLE THEATRE MAKES
PROGRESS SINCE

1919

Workshop of Dramatic Art Has
Bright Prospect For
Future
Growing from a very humble but
hopeful idea, the Little Theatre is this
year presenting "Mid Summer Night's
Dream," having passed through all
the stages of producing one act plays
from dramatizations to writing and
giving its own productions.
The Little Theatre was established
in 1919, as a laboratory workshop for
developing new ideas in dramatic art,
literature and music. It was organized
under the management of the
English department. Dr. McVey having first made possible an appropriation of University fusts for bui'di
and equipping a campus theatre.
"Overtones," a one-aplay by A!i:e
Gerstenburg, given Nov. 25, 1919,
marked the successful opening of the
Little Theatre. Since that time dramatic performances have been encouraged, and a great deal of admirable work in the art of acting has
been done on this stage. Many successful plays have been staged this
year, and a bright future for the Little Theatre is prohpesied by all those
familiar with the past and present
work of this organization.

* 1

THE

Page Two

KERNEL

KENTUCKY

Robert L. Gregory, Goo.
Enoch Jones, Carl Kuril Laucr, Henry
Russell
Hcrschcl
Wolf Schoening,
Shclton.

TJobrow.sky,

Alumni Notes
Editor

Alimi Secretory

Detroit, May 26. (Last Saturday
Regular) dinner. Dixieland Inn.
Frankfort, May 28. (Last Mon- day Regular) evening meeting.
Buffalo, June 9. (Second Satur- day Regular) Outdoor meeting.
Lexington,
June 12. Alumni
Day.
8 to 10 a. in., informal asscm- blies by Colleges.
10:30 a. m.
Annual Business

meeting.
6:30

p. m.,

Banquet, Phoenix

Hotel.
?

No less than S00 alumni visitors are
expected in Lexington
June 12,
Alumni Day of Commencement Week.
The program for the annual banquet
on the evening of Alumni Day, to be
held in the main cafe of the Phoenix
Hotel, will be 'announced in a few
days. It 9hould be the most elaborate
in the history of the Association.
The visitors will probably be guests
of the class of '23 at the Senior Ball
which will follow the banquet.
The conferences of alumni, faculty
and seniors will be held at headquarters of the several colleges Tuesday
morning from 8 to 10:30 o'clock. The
business meeting will be in chapel beginning at 11 o'clock. The
classes will have informal luncheons,

Harlan Notes
The coming of the Strollers to
was preceded by two meetings
of the alumni, which were unofficial
but very productive of results. They
were met by the alumni in automobiles decorated in Blue and White. All
went to Ivy Hill for a picnic lunch-i'oHar-Harl-

n.

The second annual gridiron dinner
given by Alpha Delta Sigma fraternity will be at the Phoenix Hotel
Monday evening, June 11. Officers of
the Alumni Association, including
presidents of local clubs, have been invited. More than 100 prominent mien
of the State will attend the fun classic.
Last year there were more who desired
to attend than there were places at the
banquet.

Ivy Hill is the show spot of Harlan,
affording a fine view of the city and
surrounding country.
A ball game was played in honor of
the Stuollers in the afternoon but all
of them Were cither sleeping or work
ing. The advance seat sale for "Lady
Windermere's Fan" was very good
but thirty minutes before the doors
opened there was a frantic crowd in
the lobby buying tickets. Immediately after the doors opened, the S. R. O.
sign was hung out. Members of the
cast said it was their best performaiu
on account of the large and enthusiastic crowd.
After the play, the entire cast and
stage crew (and most of the young
people in town) went to the Masonic
Hall where a dance had been arranged.
The hall was decorated in Blue and
White, by Miriam Kinchleoe '22, and
Sreamers of
Elsie
Rache,
Blue and White covered the hall and
a large "K" hung from each light and
"U. K." on each window.
Harlan lived up to its reputation as
an exciting town at intermission. Just
as the party left the hall, the siren fire
alann blew and everybody went to the
fire. Ed Gaus played hero by going
upon another building with a hose and
trying to extinguish the fire.
Wednesday morning, the party left,
expressing regrets at leaving Harlan,
but if they enjoyed themselves as
much as the Harlan alumni did, the
trip was well worth while. We be
Hcve that the trip was the biggest ad
vcrtisoment the University could have
up here.
Of course we are already
planning on having the Strollers next
year. Ted McDowell,
ex-'2-

Visit University
Three hundred officers of the Re
serve Corps and former officers of the
army are expected for the Annual
0
in Lexington.
Convention May
Major General James H. McRae, U. S.
A., and Brig. General Henry J. Reilly
will be guests of honor. Major Allen
W. Gullion 12, now stationed at Gov- emor's Island, N. Y., will be one of
the principal speakers.
The delegates will be guests of the
University on the afternoon of May
29 for the Field Day exercises of the
R. O. T. C. unit. Gen. McRae will pre- sent commissions in the Reserve Corps
to fourteen seniors.
29-3-

1

j

Buffalo Notes
Our regular meeting held Saturday,
April 12, was one of the best of the
year. It was Ladies' Day. There
were 28 present at the lunche.on. After
luncheon, Mrs. McClanahan and Miss
Linsler played the piano while the
rest sang. The party broke up around
4 p. m everybody having a very enjoyable time
Arrangements are being made fsr
regular outdoor meetings during the
summer, basket picnics, boat rides, .or

ex-2-

ARE LOST

ADDRESSES
13

Alvin Hovey Colbert, Shimegoro
Matthews,
Innis
Kurozawa, Roy
Showdy Elbert Puckett, Luella Marton
Schaffer, George Atwell Scott, Watson
Anrew Sudduth.
'14
Vircril Alexander Bab'bage,

Louis

Esther Mho Bailey, Jcanctte
Bell, Logan Bcntlcy Caywood,
Elizabeth
David Dallas Donohoo,
Pierce
Zcchariah
Fcarn Eldridgc,
Hamilton, Mclvin Hays Judd, John
McGarvcy Logan, Archie Xavicr Pfcf-feThomas Hart Robinson, Clarence
Bar'bour Shoemaker, Newell Pembcr-to- n
Smith, Arthur Eugene Wcgcrt,
Elizabeth Elinor White.
Tor-ren-

something where the whole family can
attend.
O. K. Dyer will be in Louisville to
attend the Derby and if possible will
stop over at Lexington for a day.
Mr. and Mrs. Milwatd also arc planning to attend the Derby and spend a
few days in Lexington
We just received the good news that
Mr. Johncs and Mr. McDaniels, who
graduate this year in chemistry, have
accepted positions with the National
Aniline Company, of this city. With
these two men, we have a total of n'nc
men from this year's graduation class
located in Buffalo, with a prospect of
one ontwo more. G. Frankcl '19, Secretary.

CALENDAR

tbe,S;outK

15

Brueckner,

Harry

Arthur
Benjamin

r,

16

Ralph Emerson Bitncr, Norbcto
Sue Hunt Frost, Logan Nourse
Green, Mrs. Bessie Foglc Judd, Charles
Frank Kumli, George Page Ncaglc,
Homer Lloyd Rcid.

a,

'17

Bcnj. Franklin Foster, Jesse Forrest
IS
Lee
Hutchison,
Gregory,
Ronald
Moore, Floyd Wellman
Stephens
Company soon afPotts, Clovis Ray Wilkcy, Burton F. Western Electric
ter receiving his B. M. E. and remain
Williams.
ed in their employ until Octoiber, 1911.
'18
accepted a posiGeorge Clifton Bradley, Constantino In August, 1912, he
Company,
(jeorgieff, Sara Winn McConncll, Min- tion with the Ideal Electric
of Mansfield, Ohio, and remained with
nie Evelyn Neville, Tudor Nicholoff.
them until 1921, holding the position
'19
years.
Ruby Karl Diamond, William Whit- of chief engineer for several
early in 1921 he has been chief
field Elliott, Mose Smith, Carl Albert Sini.:
cng:Jii'er of Roth Brothers & Company,
'1 immcr.
1410 West Adams Street, Chicago, 111.
'20

125

Commodore Bascom Fisher, Her
bert Prootor Haley, Ruth Phyllis
Hoag, William Hugh McCord, Jos.
Stuart Misrach, John Caleb Morris,
Petrus F. Van dcr Watt, Morris
William Yourish.
'21

Reginald Ernest DcAltry, Mervin
Kolm E'blen, Gustavc Berry Foster,
Eugene Sheridan Perry.
'22

George Wesley Benson, Carrie Louise Dwycr, James Newman Faulconer,
Lafayette Brown Herring.

Betwixt Us
'82

Colonel Robert A. Burton ex-- , a re
tired army officer, was a recent visitor
He is now living at
in Lexington.
Danville, Ky.,' and will take an active
part in the drive for the stadium and
allied projects.
'93

James Richard Johnson, known to
all older alumni as "Dick" was the
first graduate of the College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering,
He was instructor in Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering until 1900 and
for the next five years, was assistant
professor of Mathematics in the Uni
versity. The next year he accepted the
position of Professor of Mathematics
in the University of Nevada, but re
turned to Kentucky after one year in
the west, to accept a position in the
Eastern State Normal School at Richmond as Professor of Mathematics,
where he remained for several years.
For a short while he was with the
Ohio & Kentucky Railroad at Cannel
City, Ky., and then with the Depart
ment of Public Roads at Pineville. He
returned to the University of Kentucky
1919, as Professor of
in December,
Applied Mechanics, College 4 Engi
neering, which position he now holds
Mrs. Johnson was Miss Nancyc Smith,
of Cynthiana. They have one son, Vin
son Johnson, who graduated in the
class of '21 and is with the Anti-Co- r
rosion Engineering Company, New
York City. Professor Johnson is a
Sigma Chi and always interested in
the active chapter at the University
lie is acting c'ass
sec-tta'-

A SIGNAL?
'08

Charles Miller Roswcll received his
B. M. E. in 08 and his E. E. in 1911.
He was connected with the Commercial Engineering Department of the
General Electric Company until 1916,
when he accepted a position with the
Appalachian Power Company,
W. Va. From 1920 to 1922 he
was electrical engineer with the
Charles-tonC.)
Consolidated
(S.
Railway and Light Company. He is
now with the United Gas Improvement
'02
Company, 1401 Arch street, PhiladelFrom 1902 until 1908, Chester Martin
phia, Pa. He lives ait 1162 Marlyn
Smith was in the employ of the Buffalo
Forge Company. In April, 1908, he Road.
went into the engineering department
'69
of the Western Electric Company and
The Lacteal Analytical Laboratorit now general sales superintendent at ies, of which Dr. Phillip L. Bhfmen-tha- l
their Hawthorne Plant, Chicago, II!.
is
have been movLida V. May in ed to 176 Franklin Street, Buffalo, N.
He married Miss
September, 1901 They arc living at Y.
415 Seventh Avenue, LaGrange, 111.
Blue-fiel-

.

10

'03

E. Reed Wilson has been connected
Edward C. Wurtele received his A. with the B. B. Wilson Company, veB. degree at the University of Ken
hicles, implement and lhardware, ever
tucky in '03 and then studied law at since graduating except during the
Harvard, receiving his LL. B. in '05. Word War when he served with U.
He practiced law in Louisville until S. Base Hospital No. 40. His business
1918. Since then he has been practic address is 139 N. Upper street, Lexinging in Chicago with offices in the Na- ton.
tional Life Building, 29 South LaSalb
'11
street.
After receiving his B. M. E. degree,
'04
A. B. Phister was connected with the
Henry J. Wurtele graduated in Civi. Anaconda Copper Company at AnaEngineering in the class of '04. Fo conda, Mont., until July, 1914, when
several years he was division engineer he accepted the position of mechanical
witlh the Southern Railway Company. engineer with the Wadsworth Watoh
Since 1920 he has been assistant sup- Case Company, of Dayton, Ky. Mr.
erintendent f transprtation with the
(Continued on page 3.)
Tenn. Coal, Iron & Railway Com
pany, Transportation Building, Ensley,
Ala. He is a member of the Birmingham Alumni Club. Residence address,
DUES AND THE KERNEL
2026 Twenty-sixt- h
street, Ensley, A1a.
ONE YEAR $2.00.
Herbert Graham,
'OS
Secretary.
r
The class secretary is Harry G. Edwards who went with the General
Electric Company soon after graduatTHE
ing. He then farmed in Canada for
COLLEGE ANTHOLOGY
returned to Kentucky in
a while and
FOR 1923
1912 and farmed near Lexington until
1921. In that year he accepted a poStudents who wish to submit poems
engineer and
sition as agricultural
manager of the Valley City Land Syn- for possible inclusion in this year's
dicate at Naples, 111. He is now sec- College Anthology (THE POETS OF
retary of the Valley City Drainage and THE FUTURE, Volume VII) are
requested to send their contributions
Levee District, Naples.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard P. Ingels, of not later than May 15th to
New York City, are guests of relatives DR. HENRY T. SCHNITTKIND.
in the city and attended the Kentucky The Stratford Company, Publishers.
0
Boylston St., Boston, Mais.
...
Derbv at Louisville.
234-24-

jgfielp fcrBleedy Sxu(XentS2

y.

'94

Mrs. P. F. Kesheimer (Lille Kroes
Mrs. Kesh
ing) is class secretary.
eimer's record as an active alumna
clear and she is rnways most interest
ed in all that concerns ;he progress of
the University. Her eldvst sou. Eu
gene V. Kesheimer, is a student in the
Colleeg of Engineer1 1" and the second
son, Julian, is in hijh school. The third
and youngest is a d.iij.hUr, Pa.t.inc
still in the grades. T..e horn. address
it 311 Madison Place, Lexington, Ky

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* .Wtttiimmmtmmim

THE

FACULTY AND STUDENTS

SOCIETY
Calendar
THURSDAY, MAY 24
Installation of local chapter of Delta Zcta Fraternity.
FRIDAY, MAY 25
Engineers' Ball, at Dicker Hall
SATURDAY, MAY 26
Presentation of "Midsummer Night's
Dream," on the campus at 8 o'clock;
auspices of Little Theatre.
Delta Zcta Installation Dance, ball
room of Phoenix Hotel.
Alpha Tau Omega Dinner Dance
at Shropshire home, on Lemon's Mill

ABOUT

PLANNING GOLF COURSE
Heavy Expense Will Be Incurred
In the

TOM PUS

to Fiaducah

next week
Professor Mathews will make a trio
to Paducah next week to judge straw
berries. The growers of that vicinity
have a large acreage and the display is
made up of berries in crates rcadv for
shipment. He was judge at the same
exhibition last year.

Doctor Holmes conducts classes in
Sigma Chi Dance at chapter house hygiene each week in the surrounding
towns of Paris, Cynthiana and
in Bell Court.
for which the University is
credit is given.
Invitations Are Sent Out
The following invitations are issued.
E. M. Prewitt, Department of DairyThe cards arc dainty blue prints made
ing, is in Jefferson County working
(by the hosts at the College of Engiup a cow testing association. His
neering:
work this week is in the vicinity of
The Students of the
Lakeland.
College of Engineering
University of Kentucky
request the pleasure of your presence
Professor Farquahr has 'been engaged again this year by the Radcliffe
as guest at the
Engineers' Carnival Ball
Chautauqua and will leave immediately after the close of this semester.
Dicker Hall
Friday Evening, May 25, at 7 p. m. This year his work takes him thru
New York, New Hampshire and VerThe following invitations have been mont.
received:
Chapter
Alpha The-tWellington Patrick, director of Uni
of
versity Extension, left Wednesday
Delta Zeta
morning for the eastern part of the
of May State to be igone until Friday. He is
on Saturday the Twenty-sixt- h
nine until twelve
to deliver the commencement addressLafayette Hotel
es at Elizaville, Fleming county, and
Dancing Frcnchburg, Menifee county. Friday
Formal
The following officers and visitors night he is to deliver the address to
will be present for the banquet and the class at Brooksville, Bracken coundance: Mrs John M. Coleman, grand ty, where "Big" Jim Server is doing
Loveland, O.; Miss duty.
Grace Mason, Muncie, Ind.; Mrs. F. J.
Ellis, field secretary, Miami UniversiThe College of Agriculture has purty, Oxford, O.; Misses Eleanor Peters, chased a young Jersey 'bull from
Allen
Clara E. Findlater, May Oliver, Dor- Dale Farms, Shelbyville, which will be
Cincinnati, sent on
othy Hetzel, University of
show circuits. This is the
Cincinnati, O.; Miss Lucy Draper, Mrs. first animal of dairy, breeds that
the
Lois P. Zimmerman, Mrs. Sarah K. College has been fortunate enough to
Bande, Mrs. Margaret Crawford, Mrs. obtain for show purposes. This
Iva Stock Smith, Mrs. Flo Easton
is a full brother to Glen
h
Willcy, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Lad who made such a "hit" in
visitors are ex- the large shows
Albout thirty-fiv- e
of the country last
pected for the banquet at which Mrs. fall, but as that farm had him
readv
F. H. Ellis will be toastmistress.
to show When the College bought him
The members of Delta Zeta will be another fine bull will be sent in his
guests of honor at a tea Friday after- place until the end of the show season.
noon, given by the K'appa Kappa Gam- The las one will arrive tomorrow.
ma fraternity.
pike.

c,

ani-in;- il

Raw-Icig-

Messrs. H. C. and J. C. Coppage, of
were pledged during the
week to Triangle fraternity .
K
SENIOR BABE RUTHS SNATCH
GAME FROM SOPH GIRLS' NINE
Lelbanon,

P"5fcssor Mathew's office has received reports from all sections of
Kentucky bearing information as to
the size of the ifferent fruit crops. Ap0
ples,
per
percent, peaches
cent, cherries (sour)
per cent,
5
per cent. The
strawberries
yields tn the eastern part of the state
are very poor an in Rowan county
there is scarcely any fruit of any kind.
10-7- 5

20-5-

5

50-7-

Winner of Frosh-JuniContest
The Senior girls of the University
defeated the sophomore girls by the
score of 10 to 5 in a baseball game
held Wednesday afternoon on the campus in front of the Administration
building.
Those composing the senior team
are: Harrison, Potter, Jackson, Ligon,
McNamara, Hume, Brown, Hainor.
Sophomore team: Galaway,
Carroll, Cromwell, Beard, Martin, Bonar, Thorne.
Thursday
afternoon the freshman
girls and junior girls played, but the
result of the game was not learned at
the time the Kernel went to press. The
winners of this tile will play the Seniors next Friday afternoon.
K

To

Play

Hel-bur- n,

V

HIS ANXIETY RELIEVED
A well known scientist was lecturing on the sun's heat, and In the courso
d
of his remarks said: "It'sanesvl
fact that the sun is gradually losing
its heat, and in the course of some
of years it will be exhausted;
consequently this world of our will
be dead, and like the moon, unable to
support life."
At this juncture a" member of his
audience rose in an excited manner
and said: "Pardon me, professor, but
how many years did you say before
this calamity overtakes us?"
"The Professor "Seven miHio."
I
"Thank God," was the reply;
thought you said only seven milllo."
Selected.
;!".-e-

KERNEL

KENTUCKY

A call meeting was held Monday
at the fifth hour in chapel by the golf
enthusiasts.
Plans were laid before
the meeting by Professor Jones and
discussion of the location of the course
ensued.
The proposed golf course will prob
ably be located beyond Clifton Pond
on a plot of ground owned by the University. The ground will be sufficient
to furnish a course of six holes, but a
great deal of work will have to be
done to put the plot into condition.
To form a successful golf club at
the University it will be necessary for
most of the faculty and a large number of students to be interested. The
expenses of keeping a course in con
dition are large.
At the close of the meeting a com
mittee was appointed composed of
Professors Jones, Lampert and "Daddy" Boles. This committee will make
further solicitations for membership
on the campus.
Definite plans for a permanent or
ganization will be decided upon at
the next meeting of the enthusiasts.
K
INTERESTING ART EXHIBIT
VISITED BY ENTHUSIASTS

Department

Making

is Considering

Pane

War she entered the civil service and
now in the office of the Auditor,
Income Tax, Internal Revenue, Wash
ington, D. C. Her address is Govern
ment Hotel, G. H. building.
is

his father and an active worker with
the Hurley
Association.
He is a member of the Executive Committee of the Alumni Association, his
term expiring this year.

'16

'20

Carolyn F. Lutkcmcicr is teaching
Home Economis in the Frankfort public schools. She belongs to the "regu
lars" on the list of active alumni. She
of the
was elected
Frankfort alumni club and at is incep
tion and as the president removed to
another city soon after, she served
practically two years as president of
that organization and is still active in
its behalf. Her address is 419 Lewis
street, Frankfort, Ky.
'17

Bart X. Peak entered the service of
his country during the World War.
Since his return to civilian life, he has
been secretary of the Y. M. C. A., Uni
versity of Kentucky and is unfailing
active in behalf of his Alma Mater and
the student body. He residence address is 208 South Broadway, Lexington, Ky.

The engagement of Lcland Brad
ley Snoddy to Virginia Halbcrt Croft
'20 has been announced, the wedding
to take place in Louisville, June 16.
Miss Croft has been instructor in home
economics at the University of Kentucky the past two years. She is a
member of Alpha Xi Delta and of Phi
Epsilon Omicron, the honorary fra
Mr.
ternity in home economics.
Snoddy graduated with a B. S. in
chemistry in 1921 and will receive an
M. S. in physics this year. He is an
department
assistant in the civics
while doing his graduate work.
Fred W. Lukcr was a visitor on the
campus last week. He says he is delighted with his work with the General
Motors Research Corporation, Dayton,
Ohio. Address Box 137 Y. M. C. A.
'22

Frank J. Wedekempcr is with the
AsLakeland Highland
'18
Tilford L. Wilson entered the army sociation, Lakeland, Fla.
and served his country during the
'23
World War. Since his discharge in
1920 he has been connected with the
Members of the class of '23 are now
B. B. Wilson Hardware Company, at coming to the Alumni Office to pay
139 N. Mill street, Lexington, Ky.
their dues for the ensuing year so they
will not miss any issues of the Ker'19
nel. Horace Miller Clay was the first
S. Headley Shouse is farming with to sign up.

fr"H

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

Exhibit Annual Affair
The Art Exhibit of Lexington artists
was
held in the art studios, May
one of. the most interesting exhibits of
its kind ever held at the University.
Over a hundred people visited the stu
dio daily and it was pronounced quite
a success. It was a w