xt7ksn010b1j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ksn010b1j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19190424  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 24, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 24, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7ksn010b1j section xt7ksn010b1j THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON. KY APRIL 24, 1919

VOL IX
LITTLE END OF

GIVEHJENHESSEAHS

Wildcats Use Whitewash in
Second Game, State Championship Looms Bigger
and Bigger
The Volunteers of the University of
Tennessee were defeated twice last
week at the hands of the fierce Wild
cats of the University of Kentucky. On
its trip into the State of Kentucky this
season Tennessee lost four and tied
one out of five games played. Georgeand Kentucky
town, Transylvania,
were victors, while Centre held the
Southern team to a tie.
The second game of the season for
the Wildcats was played Friday afternoon on Stoll Field, with the Volunteers, resulting in a decisive victory
for Kentucky, by a score of 10 to 3.
The feature of the game was a home
nih by Henry Thomas, catcher for the
Wildcats, in the fifth inning. The ball
sailed out into deep center field, and
rolled out of Stoll Field thru a gap in
the fence, making the longest hit, and
the only home run of the season here.
The game was not so exciting and
close, but the students and other
fans on the bleachers had a chance to
give the Wildcats a close "once over"
and see Just what material Kentucky
has for a championship team.
The Wildcat southpaw, "Doc" Las-lestruck out eight of the Tennes-seean- s
in Friday's game, displaying
his usual good headwork in his pitching. He easily outclassed the mighty
Meek, who wrought Buch havoc with
the Wildcat record last year.
Thomas, beginning his second sea
son behind the bat for the Wildcats,
upheld his part of the reputation for
the Kentucky battery His throws
were accurate and well timed. Out
of four times at the bat he secured
three hits, one resulting in the home
run.
Three hits out of five times at the
bat and an errorless afternoon of fielding was the record of Burnham, Kentucky's freshman thirdbaseman. Brown
the other freshman infielder, is fulfilling all the fan's expectations of a
crackerjack first baseman for Kentucky, and is doing his share with the
stick.
Calloway proved himself the best
player with the Tennesseans, altho he
did not add anything to his reputation
as one of the best shortstops in the
South. His work at the bat, however,
was better than that of any of his
mates. Ho made two clean hits, and
scored one run.
The score by innings was:
Kentucky
330 0 1021 010
Tennessee
00000021 0 3
Strike-outs- :
by Lasley, 8; by Meek,
1. Buses on Balls: By Lasloy, 1; by
Meek, 0. Umpire: Jim Park.
game for Tennessee
A "shut-outwus the reward of the Kentucky bat- "

(Continued on Page Two.)

F

BAND AT IRVINE
The University band under the com
mand of Captain Grover Creech, in
augurated the Victory Liberty Loan
drive for Estill county at Irvine, Ken
tucky, last Saturday. The band left
Lexington at 6:30 a. m. and after stopping to play at Winchester, proceeded
to Irvine, where It was met by Virgil
Chapman with about fifteen automo
biles in which the band was taken over
the county.
The band was treated royally by
the people of Irvine, who served not
only breakfast and dinner to the band,
but also furnished "dopes," smokes
and the like. About $60,000 in bonds
were bought by the people of Estill
county after hearing the band play.

FIRST TRACK MEET TO
BE HELD AT MIAMI SAT.

Wildcats to Invade Ohio to
Try Skill at Oxford ; Coach
Gill Confident on Runs
and Dashes
The University of Kentucky track
squad will meet the Miami team in
Oxford, O., Saturday. Coach Gill and
the men he has selected for the events
will leave Lexington Friday night at
6:10, and will arrive in Oxford at 9:05
Saturday.
Coach Gill feels confident of win
ning several of the events, especially
the runs, dashes, hurdles and high
and broad Jumps. Kentucky's chances
on the pole vault, discus and shot put
are not very flattering, because of the
for 'these
scarcity
of candidates
entries.
The second meet in which Kentucky
will take part will be held on the Hin
ton Field track at Georgetown College,
Monday afternoon, May 5, when they
meet the team of Georgetown College.
The following is a list of the events
and the candidates who will be taken
to the Miami meet:
.
100 yard dash Grabfelder, Williams
and Snider.
220 yard dash Grabfelder, Williams
and Snider.
440 yard dash Williams, DeBrovey,
Kohn and Snider.
f
mile Knight, Graham and
Gibbons.
Mile Knight, Shouso, Graham and
Gibbons.
Knight, Shouse and
Baumgarten.
Low hurdles Wllhelm and Claire.
High hurdles Wllhelm and Claire.
Discus Snider, Baugh and Downing.
Jnvelln Downing, Gray and Claire.
Shot Put Warth, Kohn and Baugh.
High Jump Wllhelm and Clairo.
Broad Jump Grubfelder, Nicholson
and Snldor.
Polo vault Nlckolson.
Coach GUI will take more men than
can be entered merely to give his
squad the necessary experience for
trying their abilities. Only two men
can be entered in each event and only
first and second places count as points.
One-hal-

Two-mil-

e

MMMMIItill!

ARBOR DAY PROGRAM SENIORS PLAN ALUMNI

TALKATIVE WILDCATS
WILL DEBATE CUCKOOS

Two eKntucky Teams Will
Oppose Centre and Tran-

sylvania Thursday Night
Inter-Societ-

y

Con-

test Later
Thursday evening, April 24th, is the
time the Intercollegiate Debates in
which Kentucky's four leading colleges
will take part. Trarisylvania and the
University of Kentucky will debate in
the University chapel at 7:45 p. m.
J. P. Barnes and Goebel Porter representing Kentucky, and Wright and
Brooks representing Transylvania.
On the same evening, another team
composed of Marcus C. Redwine and
William J. Kalbreler will meet Centre
College in Danville in a similar debate.
Transylvania will debate Georgetown
at Transylvania, and Centre will send
a second team to meet Georgetown at
Georgetown.
The question for the debates is "Resolved, That the American System of
Trial by Jury Should Be Abolished."
Ken(Constitutionality
admitted).
tucky's teams will handle both sides of
the question, the team going to Danville upholding the affirmative and the
other team defending the negative.
Patterson Literary Society furnished
the team which will debate Centre College and the Union, the team which
will oppose Transylvania. Much interest has been manifested in these intercollegiate debates and that interest
has been somewhat intensified by reason of the fact that the University of
Kentucky teams will meet each other
within a short time on the same question to contest for the Barker Trophy
Cup, which is now in possession of the
Union Society,? "two time winners" of
the trophy.
Every student in the University Is
a
urged to come out for the
debate and give our team
the support which it deserves. Transylvania will send out a large delegation of supporters.
Judges of the debates have not been
chosen yet.
Kentucky-Transylvani-

MENACE

No. 20

OF IGNORANCE
DISCUSSED BY TUTHILL

Dr. Edward Tuthlll discussed the last
of a series of questions in the world
forum Thursday afternoon, April 24,
In the Y. M. C. A. room on the "Menace of Ignorance."
The speaker pointed out the relation
of Ignoranco to the Bolshevist movement in Russia and adjacent countries.
He indicatod that the condition of
Western Europe has grown worso educationally because money formerly expended on schools has been wasted In
wai's. Ho presented statistics of illiteracy in various armies, Including that
of the United States. Finally ho called
attention to an apparent neglect of
sound moral instruction which is likely to leave tho various nations at the
mercy of the domagoguo.

"

Plans are complete for the annual
Arbor Day exercises to be given Friday
morning, April 26, starting at 10
o'clock. The Seniors will march out in
a body, plant their tree, a burr oak,
which will be dedicated to the memory of five men, former members of
class '19, who have lost their lives.
They are Elrldge Griffith, who was
killed while celebrating the tug of war
victory in his freshman year, and Stanley Smith, Louis W. Herndon, Aubry
TownBend and Chester Helm, who
were killed in service abroad.
After planting the tree, Lee McClain,
the class orator will speak, followed
by Ed Dabney, the Junior class orator.
Miss Mildred Graham will give the
class prophecy. After the program, the
pledging of the Senior honorary fraternity, Lamp and Cross and Staff and
Crown will take place.

DAY GRADUATION

WEEK

Best Commencement Exercises to Mark Year's Finish; Reunions to be
Inaugurated.

The inauguration of an Alumni Day
during Commencement week at the
University will be the feature of the
program if present plans of a faculty
committee and the Senior class are
successful.
A committee, of which Professor E.
F. Farquhar is chairman has been appointed to prepare plans for a larger
program for the week of graduation
and this committee appeared before
the Senior class at a meeting Tuesday
afternoon with tentative plans for
such a program. It is the policy of
the committee to provide such a week
and interesting
of entertainment
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
events that many of the alumni will
return for the occasion. At the meetFAVORS FRATERNITY ROW ing Professor E. C. Mabie spoke on
the spirit that holds alumni together,
and methods by which such a spirit
Dr. Dimock To Succeed Pon- can be fostered in Kentucky. The
election of a permanent secretary to
tius as Professor in Colkeep members of the class in touch
lege of Agriculture
for years to come was discussed.
The Executive Committee of the
Probable Program.
Board of Trustees of the University
Professor W. D. Funkhouser gave
met in regular session In the Presi
a tentative program for the week. On
dent's office Wednesday.
Monday, June 15, Class Day exercises
Applications were received from the
will be held in the morning. In the
Epsilon Chapter of the Phi Delta Theta
afternoon there will be a concert by
fraternity and the Sigma Alpha Epsithe Glee Club of the University follon fraternity, asking for building
lowed by the President's reception at
sites for these fraternities on the Unihis home, Maxwell Place. The Senior
versity campus. These applications
ball will be held in the Armory Monwere presented by the President to
day night. Tuesday will be known as
the committee with the statement that Alumni Day if the plans mature. Every
the Sigma Chi fraternity was alsq conclass and every fraternity, society or
sidering making application for a site.
sorority will be urged to have its sepPresident McVey recommended that arate place and program for its rethe applications be given favorable union. In other universities, classes
consideration. A form of contract for
adopt some distinctive clothing or
lease of such property was drawn up
mark by which members can be disand presented to the committee, and
tinguished. At noon of Tuesday, the
after a few changes, was adopted by Alumni banquet will be held. Followthe committee as a tentative lease
ing this there will be a great parade of
form, and the President was authorstudents and Alumni to Stoll Field,
ized to enter into negotiations with
where a special athletic event will be
fraternities for building sites.
staged. The athletic department stated
President McVey reported to tho
that it could not hope for a game with
committee that tho final settlement of
another university, as all other Instithe University with tho War Departtutions will be closed by that time, but
ment for the operation of the Students
a gamo between tho varsity baseball
Army Training Corps had been apteam of this year might bo arranged
proved by the War Department and
against tho baseball stars of the Alumthat tho University expects to receive ni. Tho night program would be taken
a check from tho Treasury Department
up by tho Strollers and some other
and Surgeon General within a few
collogo organizations.
days. Tho final settlement called for
Wednesday, Juno IS, Is Commencea total of about $5S,000.
ment Day. In tho afternoon a final
Tho President asked tho Executlvo cadet hop has been planned. Those
Commltteo for authority to proceed plans wore presented to tho class of
with repairs on tho old dormitory. Tho 1919 Tuesday afternoon, and their debuilding will bo nuulo over for class cision was to accopt tho program and
room purposes for tho coming year undertako to carry It out.
and construction will begin on tho
Arbor Day Exercises.
building in tho noxt few days.
Arbor Day exercises at tho UniverPresident McVey recommended to sity will bo held Friday, April 25. Tho
(Continued on Pago Two.)

(Continued on Page Seven)

* PAGE 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

STRAND

The Best in Moving Pictures!
PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT,
GOLDWYN AND SELECT PICTURES
Remember! We Lead, Others Follow!

SAX

PRAISES

TALENT

OPEN 10 A. M. TO 11 P. M.
Children 9c, and 1c War Tax;
Adults 18c and 2c War Tax.

STROLLERS

Amateurs Have "Under Cover" in State of "Rough
Perfection"; Date An.

nounced, "Make it
Now."

9

"Under Cover," May 3, Lexington
Opera House. Make that date now!
The Strollers' interpretation of "Under Cover" has reached the Btage of
rough perfection," says Carroll M. Sax,
who Is now in charge of rehearsals.
"The play is original, interesting,
and well adapted to college players,"
says Mr. Sax. "I had heard of the
really good work of the Strollers in
Baltimore, and after directing two rehearsals I am convinced that the reports were not exaggerated. The mem
bers of the cast are talented and show
that they are able to characterize."
Mr. Sax is a believer in simplicity
of science design and he will probably
paint the scenery which will be used
in this production. He also emphasizes the value of artistic lighting,
which, he says, brings the audience
Into a sympathetic contact with the
players.
Mr. Sax is interested in the much- talked-o- f
Little Theatre, which, he
says, will be the nucleus of dramatic
and literary accomplishments in the
near future. Such a theatre will tend
to draw the town and the University
Into closer touch and will realize the
ideal of a house of their own, which
has been fostered by the Strollers for
several years. Since Lexington is a
town with dramatic traditions and an
unlimited amount of amateur talent,
the success of the theatre is guaran
teed, Mr. Sax thinks.

HONORARY SOCIETIES
PLEDGE NEW MEMBERS
Keys and Mystic Thirteen,

honor

ary Sophomore and Junior fraternities
of the University, entertained with a
dance Friday night, April 18, at Buell
Armory In honor of their new pledges.
The pledges to the Keys are:
George Oldham, Donald Dinning,
Thomas Young, Owen Carroll, Herman
L. Becker, L. H. Royster, L. H. Burn-haEarle Williams, Joseph Dodge,
and Barron Faulconer.
The Mystic Thirteen
Society's
pledges are:
Arthur Shanklin, George Zerfoss, W.
D. Thompson, Henry Thomas, Earl
Wallace, Forrest 'Weatherholt, Marion
Lasley, Norman Witt, Ben Orr, Dewey
Downing, Arynne Bell, Victor Barlow,
J. P. Barnes.
The programs were white, with the
society emblems and the date embossed in gold, the booklets including
the liat of dances, the chaperones, and
hosts. Fruit frappe was served, and
the music was by a popular saxaphoae
quartet.

ALL-AMERICA-

ADMISSION

LITTLE END OF HORN

EXECUT'E COMMITTEE

(Continued From Pago One.)

SHOWHjy

Concerts Daily, Afternoon and Evening!
THE STRAND'S
ORCHESTRA
in the South ! Hear It!
The Best Orchestra

(Continued From Page One.)

Veterinary

medicine

In

N

Connecticut

from 1905 to 1906 and from 1900 to

McGURK'S

1909 in Cuba. In 1909, he was olected
tery and fielders in Saturday's game, personality, forceful delivery and a professor of pathology in the Iowa Coland just to bIiow the Southern neighTHE POPULAR
message for every agricultural student, lege of Agricultare and later became
bors what Kentucky could io with the
head of the department of pathology
appointment of Dr.
stick the Wildcats piled up 11 scores. iho committee the
AND
CONFECTIONARY
W. W. Dlmock as professor of animal and bacteriology, which position he
"Bud" Slomer, the big freshman
pitcher for Kentucky, twirled his first pathology in the College of Agricu- holds at the present time.
LUNCHES
ani'varsity game with much success. The lture and head of the section of
mal pathology in the Animal Industry
results of the game speak for. his abilGroup of the Experiment Station, efity with the pill. His 180 pounds of
1, 1919, to take the place
weight put behind a delivery gives daz- fective July
speed, and in the game Saturday of Dr. R. L. Pontius, who resigned
zling
April 1, 1919.
his steam proved too much for the
Dr. Diniock is 39 years of age, is a
The Wildcats, by way
Tennesseans.
encouragement to their new hurler, graduate of the Connecticut Agriculof
tural College with the degree of vetmade only one error in the entire,
Have Bscker clean that suit.
Cleaning: that satisfies
erinary medicine from Cornell Univer
game, the support being much better
sity; and his experience has been of
than that received by the Volunteer
such s nature that he will be a valua
pitchers from their fielders.
ble man to the students and farmers
Cor. Limestone and High
r
Phone 621-- Y
Muth, of the Wildcats, made a
of the State. He was a practitioner of
out of a long hit to right field,

Just because it is soiled does'nt
mean it's permanently spoiled
Becker Dry Cleaning Co

three-bagge-

which was easily the batting feature of
the game. Landess, of the Volunteers,
got a
and Slomer and
Kohn, pitcher and left fielder respectively for the Wildcats, each knocked
Score by innings:
Kentucky
34100300 x 11
Tennessee
e
Hits Kohn, 2; Landess, 1.
Three-bas- e
Hits Muth. Sacrifice Hit
Zerfoss. Base on Balls By Haskew,
Kentucky, 11; Tennessee, 5.
1. Hits
Umpire Jim Park.

ISP

W. B. MARTIN'S

Spring Suits

0000000000

HATS,

Two-bas-

SHOES
and
Furnishings
that are full
of that
Mash and pep'
that every
College Fellow
Wants

U. K. ORCHESTRA WILL
GIVE SUNDAY CONCERT
The University Orchestra under the
direction of Professor Carl Lamport,
will give another of its
concerts in chapel Sunday afternoon at
3 o'clock.
Mr. Booker, of Los Angeles, California, will probably be the
soloist.
The feature of the afternoon will be
the "Blue" Danube Waltz."
All the people of Lexington are invited to these concerts. There is no
charge for admittance.
y

SPEED WILL SPEAK
TO 'AGGIES' MONDAY

BARBER SHOP
CUT

HAIR

2Se

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1S

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PRESCRIPTIONS
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Should

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The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO
INCORPORATED.
0
PHONES
AND NIQHT SERVICE
DAY
1854-368-

See the New Things
while the time is Good

He Furnishes Weekly Information For

Newspapers and Contributes
Regularly to Farm Magazines

119

James Speed, head of the Publicity
Department of University of Kentucky,
former editor and chatauqua lecturer,
will address the Agricultural Society,
Monday, April 28. His subject will be
"Keep Your Eyes Open."
Before coming to the University, Mr.
Speed was editor of a farm paper for
several years during which time he
was associated with the Board of Trade
and Commercial Club of Louisville,
doing publicity work to boost good
farming and education in the rural
districts. As head of the Publicity Department of the University, Mr. Speed
furnishes weekly information for 119
newspapers, as well as to 56 county
agents and 17 home demonstration
agents. He also contributes regularly
to the Breeders' Gazette, Southern
NOTICE
Agriculturist, Inland Farmer and Farm
All Seaiors desiring to teach after and Fireside. He Is now pushing the
graduating should go to the Registrar's Farmers' Chautauqua in Kentucky,
office In the Main building and fill out
Mr. Speed toured the Northwest on
a teacher's blank.
a lecture platform. He has a pleasing

ir

CupjrUMHtt
,

Th Houm of Knpy

nbltl

College Men receive
special attention here

CITY RATES 50 CENTS
Phoenix Hotel Lobby

RB

Robards

Graves, Cox & Co.

COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR

INCORPORATED.

Cleaning,
fl.K
Cleaning,
fl.lt
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fO.M
ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY
ALL WORK GUARANTEE

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HEADQUARTERS

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FOR STUDENTS

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152 S. Lime.

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My work and prices always
keep me busy
140 South Limestone
Shoes repaired while you

wait

4'J

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
DRAMA OF EMOTIONS TO KENTUCKY
BE GWEINI CHAPEL

PRAISED

HOSPITALITY

PAGE

Engineering, we left in the morning
for New Orleans, sorry to say Good
bye to Kentucky."

PATTERSON SOCIETY TO
Educational HEAR FOUNDER'S TALK

INCORPORATED.

Farquhar Coaches Members of
Bible Literature Class in
Commission Writes Warm

Prof.

Production of LamenCast May
tations
Travel

The elegiac dramatization of the
Book of Lamentations to be presented
by Prof. B. P. Farquhar's Bible Literature class in chapel Tuesday, April
29, at the regular chapel period Is as
sured to be one of the best chapel programs the University has had In years.
Professor Farquhar has made this
exquisite Old Testament elegy Into a
drama that depicts the emotions of
the Hebrew people exiled from their
own city of Jerusalem to Babylon. The
main theme of the drama is the sorrow
of the captured tribe of Judah, who,
at the downfall of their city, were
placed in subjection by their adversaries and driven from their native land
because they had sinned and knew not

their

Qod.

The scene of the elegy is laid outside the city wall of Jerusalem immediately after its destruction by the
Babylonians in 586 B. C. The total destruction of the city came as a shock
to th'e citizens of Jerusalem who had
not heeded the warnings of their
prophets, Ezra and Nehemlah, that the
Lord would bring affliction and misery
on His sinning people. The final destruction of the city in 586 B. C. was
positive proof to the old prophets that
the Lord had fulfilled His vow.
The drama begins with a procession
of exiles, elders and women of Jeru
salem, driven by a Babylonian soldier,
led past the ruined city with its temple
pillars yet standing where the Wom
an of Jerusalem sits despondently
with the only true Prophet of the
tribe who has refused to leave his
abandoned city.
This dramatization will prove in
tensely interesting since It brings out
more vividly than the text can do
the elegiac beauty of the book, brought
out by entiphonal dialogue and dramatic scenes of emotion. It is par
ticularly interesting at the present
time because the very scene where the
drama is laid, outside the city of. Jerusalem, held since the seventh century
by the Mohammedans has been captured from the Turks by the Allies,
and if the Zionist movement proves
successful, will probably be restored
to the Hebrew race.
The drama will probably be given,
Professor
Farquhar announces, at
Transylvania or Hamilton and perhaps
be taken to adjoining towns in addition to its presentation here.
Miss Elizabeth Marshall has been
chosen to play the part of the Woman
of Jerusalem with Bernard Moosnlck
the Prophet.
Charles Planck and
Frederick Jackson will be the elders
of the captured city who lead the procession toward Babylon. Lee McClain
plays the part of the Babylonian soldier, and a chorus performing the function of the Greek chorus to reflect the
emotions of the main protagonists will
be composed of the following ten girls:
Elizabeth Megowan, Ruth Thomas,
Florence Whittenhill, Vivian DeLaine,
Lucy Dean, Nettie Pushin, Dorothy
Walker, Thompson Van Deren, Eleanor Eaker, and Katharine Moglbbon,
Not the Only Thing Stationary
(The Thresher.)
"No, Percy, writing paper is not the
only thing that is stationary."

Tribute to Their Hosts
in Lexington
University men and alumni are giv
en credit for their exhibition of Ken
tucky hospitality to the visiting mem
bers of the British Educational Mission
which inspected the University last
fall.
The Mission was making a tour of
the universities of the country, and
while they were here, they were enter
tained by a committee composed of
members of the faculty and several
men of Lexington who were former
students here. In the March number
of Scrlbner's magazine, an article appeared which consisted of the diary
kept by Arthur E. Shipley, master of
Christ's College and Vice Chancellor
of Cambridge University, England,
while he was making the tour.
The Mission was entertained at a
local club for a short while, where they
had opportunity to test some of the
products of Kentucky which has made
her famous. They all liked it. The en
tries of Mr. Shipley which refer to
Lexington, the University of Kentucky follow:
"We had been invited by the Council of Defense at Washington and were
sent out under the auspices of our own
foreign office. For more than sixty
days we went up and down this vast
country, traveling many thousands of
miles and seeing so many universities
and colleges and so many presidents
and professors that those amongst us
who had not hitherto had the privilege of visiting the United States
formed the idea that all its cities are
university cities and that all the inhabitants are professors, an idea very
awful to contemplate!
The members of the Mission represented the older universities In Eng
land as well as the big municipal uni
versities of London and of the Mid
lands of the North. The Scottish uni
versities and those of Ireland were
also represented.
"Thursday, November 21st. Every
where had we been received well, but
at Lexington there was a warm
heartedness about our hosts which
made us feel at once inhabitants of
"My Old Kentucky Home." We mo
tored out some twenty miles to the
Shaker village, where we fed on the
dishes of the South, and very good
dishes, too, in a stately home with well
proportioned rooms, and the date of
1817 over the lintel of the front door.
On the road we passed what we had
not passed before, the homes of country gentlemen who live in them, and
do not merely spend a 'week-enIn
them. They breed race horses and
race them, and raise tobacco and
smoke It; in fact, Lexington is a social
and a trading center. On returning
we saw something of the University
buildings, and inspected the Students'
Army Training Corps, now all eager
to got out of khaki. At dinner we were
cheered by nigger minstrelsy and by
a minimum of speeches. Afterwards
wo had a discussion with some of the
Governors and members of the faculty.
The value of these discussions is always inversoly proportional to the
size of the meeting. At Lexington the
meeting was small.
"Friday, November 22d. After a
hurried visit to the University farm
and to the schools of Agriculture and
d

President Emeritus Patterson has
acecpted the invitation of the Patterson Literary Society to be with them
in one of their weekly meetings. The
date will be announced later. Doctor
Patterson Is the founder and most dis
tinguished member of the society. To
his generosity the society owes the
beautiful medal given each year to the
winner of the oratorical contest.
The society met Friday night, April
18, and gave one of the year's best
programs.
Robert Warth, formerly
second lieutenant, spoke on "America's
Military Blunder." He discussed the
rejection of the Lewis machine gun,
the neglect of General Wood, and the
premature signing of the armistice.
Two numbers of especial Interest were
declamations taken from the writings
of famous Kentuckians, Walter Piper
gave Henry Watterson's great speech
on Lincoln and H. B. McGregor gave
J. Proctor Knott's masterpiece of polit
ical satire "Duluth." It is a policy of
the society to encourage researches
into Kentucky's history and literature.
A pleasant literary touch was added
to the program by W. I. Moore, who
delivered
that American favorite
among poems, "The House by the Side
of the Road."
New members who have been received recently are J. W. Baumgarten,
W. I. Moore, Emery Fraser, Boswell
and W. R. Pearlman.

Co.

Graddy-Rya- n

BY BRITISHER

I

Telephone 903

140 West Main St.

"Wear for Young Men and Men Who Stay Young" D

THE PHOENIX HOTEL
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

A Metropolitan Hotel
Respectfully selicits the patronage of University People

JOHN SKAIN, Manager

you buy a pipe bearing the
trade-maryou have the
satisfaction of. knowing that your money
could not haw; bought a better pipe. The
W D C is strictly American made. You can
choose among a multitude of styles, sizes and
grades at the bast shops 6 down to 75 cents.

WHEN

ALPHA XI '3 WILL HOLD
FOUNDER'S DAYj BANQUET
The annual Founder's Day banquet
of Xi chapter of Alpha Xi Delta fraternity will be given Saturday evening
at the Phoenix Hotel. Virginia Croft
Several
will act as toastmistress.
alumni are expected to be present.

k,

Jksm WET

WM. DEMUTH & CO., New York
World'I Largest Pipe Manufacture)

CONTRALTO COMING
An announcement of Interest to all
lovers of good music is that of the com
Ing of Margaret Matzenauer to the
Lexington Opera House for a concert
Friday night, May 9. Madame Matze
nauer is one of the leading members
of the Metropolitan Opera Company
and has Just closed a successful seas
on in New York City.
Her voice is exceptionally beautiful,
rich, warm and of noble volume
Critics declare her to be a contralto
and her low tones, full, deep and ex
pressive uphold this designation, but
what can be said of a contralto who
delivers a high B wkh perfect ease,
yet with splendid force and thrilling
Only this, that she has
intensity?
one of the most remarkable voices of
the time, vocal equipment that is well
matched with interpretive skill.
Seats went on sale at the Ben All
Theater April 5.

Look at the llnei of thi one. They
flow, a delight to the eye, from the rich
brown of the genuine French Briar bowl,
through the sterling rheen of the ring, to
the jet black ltutro of the vulcanite bit

MARTIN &
STOCKWELL'S
RESTAURANT
ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE
SEASON
115 S.

mHI ofDerfee fcv
Ition pencil
un- -

auallad for
eeaoothneee,

of grading
and durability.
17 black degraaat
from 6B softest to
to 9H hardest, and
hard and stadium
(indcllMa)

tag.

Leek for the
live VENUS

copy

Jiitttw
JiniM

411-41- 2

Inter-Souther-

1

FREE!

OLD NAN HARRIS
Editor of the Kentucky Oil Journal,
of LouisvUlo, has nmdo scores of his
readers from $100 to $800 on "inside
tips" on oil and mining stocks tells
what is Rood buys and what Is bad-f- ree
to his subscribers only. Sample
copy free. Mup of Kentucky oil fields
16x25 inches wash drawing and a
beauty free to agents who will take
subscriptions for mo among their
friends. The Journal is 1C pugos, illustratednow $2 per year soon ?3.
Bldgg., Louisville, Ky.

.

ty

'
l
V

at U.

12

Ut.

REEDER'S
Barber Shop
Done Right

$2.00 per tax.

Ifefa

Right

Now-cleanin-

g

AND PRESSING

Suit
Overcoat

$1.25
1.25

Suit
Overcoat
Trousers

Fifth Ays.. N.Y.
Dept.
in

Chas

PRESSING

AaMricaa Load FeacU Co.

0

WHEN THAT SUIT
NEEDS CLEANING
AND PRESSING CALL

Thta trial box
Drawing, femelle,
Holder mmd
VENUS

Lexington, Ky.

Limestone.

aaaaaj

r

50c
15c

E. Main St.
Carl Denker,

164

50c

Phone 3743

University
Representative

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published ovory Thursday thruout tho College year by the student body
of tho University of Kentucky, for tho benefit of tho students,
alumni nnd faculty of tho Institution.

It

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is tho official newspaper of the University.
is isnucd with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all tho college news

of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States nnd Canada.
'

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTS A COPY
mail matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clas- s
EDITORIAL STAFF

THORNTON CONNELL
Charles Planck
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Eliza Plggott
lice McClain
Frederick Jackson
Robt. J. Ralble
Adele Slado
Donald Dinning
Miss Mildred Graham
Miss Austin Lilly
Kiss Virginia Helm Milner
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrin
N. D.

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Manaflng

Editor

Assistant Editor
Associate Editor
Squirrel Food
Feature Editor
Military Editor
Club Notes
Sporting Editor
Editor
Home Economics
Patterson Hall
Philosophian
Law
Engineering
"Co-Ed- "

.

Witt

.".

REPORTERS.
Frances Marsh, Margaret Smith, Roberta Blackburn and Margaret
McClure, Amelia Volers.
.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager
Edwin T. Tapscott
Assistant Business Managers
J. P. Barnes and Carl Dcnker

EXPURGATE THE MODERN DANCE

The Kernel's attention has been called several times
recently to the new mode of dancing, which has sprung up
so suddenly both here and thruout other University
centers.

This paper does not wish to