xt7ksn010q6j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ksn010q6j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420306  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  6, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  6, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7ksn010q6j section xt7ksn010q6j OS P
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C.F.

The Kentucky 1Cernel

TWO

The Aliicii.itiient

Is All Alton!

UNIVK

VMII'MF

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Names Collier
Jmli ciarv (iliai rmati
S(.JA

Sweet
Upon The Seat
Of A Liberty Hike

ARE ANNOUNCED
FOR SEMESTER
Sullivan, Server,
Beaumont, Potter,
Jones To Speak

By NORMA WEATHER SPOON

Jim Colhet was elected chairman
of tin' new SGA judiciary committee
last iii"lu as the Student legislature
set up committees provided in the
passed
recently
amendments,
Other members of the committee
which will interpret the constitution and try all violations of SGA
legislation, are Bob Humphries. Mary
'tinnier. Henry Bramlett. and Carle- ton Davis.
See today's editorial page fw
at lat Bight's arlim.
1 he provisions of the amendments
last week went into effect
last night as the bill was approved
which established three committees
similar to those who existed prior to
the amendment.
The committee? and their mem- Iters are
Finance committee: Givens Dixon,
chairman. Mary Olive Davis, and
j
Joe Bohnak.
Joe Gayle.'j
Social committee:
chairman: Betty Pugh. and Lida

VANCE WILL l!K
ADMITTED TO BAK
BY NEW BILL
Fellow Classman

Helps Law Student
To Get License

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law student

and

Hiram Brock. Jr., classmates in the
law college, pot together and put
their own private bill through the
General Assembly this week,
Vance.
student from
nad alreadv pas(5ed nis
Padllcan
.vomin!.tion arwt
to get a lawyer's license before he
is drafted into the army, but a
state law prohibited anyone under
21 from obtaining a license.
RepubliBrock is a
can Representative from Harlan
County, and he decided to help his
fellow student.
wl(n ,nc ajd of
Strother
Vance's fellowtownsman.
Ml.llon
,np
put the meMure through
tne House and the Senate.
Now Vance can become the young-whic- h
est licensed lawver in the history of
'
Kentucky.
,
Contrary to previous reports,
Vance told the Kernel yesterday, he
j
nol lne highest standing law stu- dent nor the only person who will
benefit by the bill. Charles Ship-- !
i,.y, Cecilia, claims the colleges!
'
highest rank, and a girl in Louis- ville will be enabled to obtain her
license since ie passage of the bill.

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Welfare committee: Jerry Mercer,
chairman. Rita Sue Lashe. Doris
Rcirhenbach. George Terrell. Fred
F.rin. Pr..f. Huntley Dnpre. and
lean M. M White.
A studf nt standards committee
was provided for in the
amendment will be composed of Col- lier. chairman of the judiciary com- mitt.: two members of the judi- ciary committee appointed by Col- lier to serve during the particular
pending ease; the Dean of Men; the
Dean of Women; and one faculty
member elected by the legislature for
a term of one year.
Legislators absent fit)m last night's
meeting in the Union building are
Joe Gayle. George Nollau. Stanley
Penna, Arthur Walsh. Elizabeth
Wii'finton. and Louise Wilson.

ART STUDENTS
EXHIBIT WORK

Kentucky or Oxford? Nineteen forty two or the gay nineties? Reality or nightmare?
These queries might have
I Kissed through
the mind of any
UK-it- e
who happened to be
outside McVey Hall last Wednesday.
With coat tails flying, hat
pulled low, and a scarf flapping
in the
created by
his super speed, what was apparently a professor whizzed
down the walks on a bright
blue bicycle. Thorough investigation revealed that Dr. Niel
Plummer, head of the Journalism department, was making-hiinitial trip to school on the
bicycle that the jolly old man
left at his house last December.
Before departing for his home
2.2 miles away. Dr. Plummer
kindly commented upon his new
mode of transportation. It seems
that he has Just recently acn
and
quired enough
to enable him to
cover the distance all in one
lap. In the future he plans to
pedal to class every day. Official christening of the bike
will be held as soon as a suitable name is selected, he volunteered.
Mounting the unnamed cycle,
the doctor gulped, started off
rather wobbly, gained speed as
he neared the walk between
Kastle and Pence halls. He
made the corner without mishap, looked back, and waved to
observers. Then shouting, "I
can even ride It standing tip!"
he pedaled out of sight.

"Totalitarian Trade Methods"

near-cyclo-

was too young to
for

Bet his license but old enough
tlie army, so Roy Vance, Jr.

j

knee-actio-

wind-pow-

er

ARMY AIR CORPS

Military Department SETS UP BOARD
...
.
Will Institute
Examining Group
Officer Of The Day
Will De Permanent
A

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Class work of art students in Basic
IVsign will be exhibited in the music
room of the Union beginning Sunday and continuing for. three weeks.
The exhibition, sponsored by the art
committee of the Student Union, is
the. first" of its kind ever shown on
trus campus.
Giving the visitor an opportunity nipht.
of grasping the significance of what
he ees similar to that of the design
sturtent working in his studio, the
work in itself is very novel. The obCharles Lytton Pope, junior
server will be taken trough the
major from Harlan, has
equivalent of a semester's work in been accepted for the freshman class
l.ign
of the Vanderbilt university School
The exhibition has been prepared of Medicine, it was announced yes- by Raymond Barnhart, of the art terday.
department faculty, witr. the asHe is one of 52 students who will
sistance of Lavenia Warner and be accepted for admission to the
June Wiatt. students.
school at Nashville.
.

Pope Accepted

will

be the subject of Prof. Rodman Sullivan's lecture at the fourth open
class of the semester scheduled for
the seventh hour today in Room
101 of White hall.
The entire series of open class
lectures, open to all students and
visitors, was announced yesterday by
the arts and sciences college. The
schedule follows:
Prof. E. W. Rannells, head of the
art department, will speak on
"Charles. Masterpiece of French
Cathedrals," at the second hour on
Friday, March 27, in Room 315 of
the Biological Sciences building. It
is part of the course, history of medieval art.
Dr. Alberta Wilson Server will
lecture on "The Bull Fight In
Spanish Culture" at the fifth hour
on Monday, March 30. In Room 307
of Miller hall. The lecture will be .in
English.
As part of the course, psychological Interpretation of the unusual, a
lecture on "Hypnotism and Hypnotic
Phenomena" will be given by Dr.
Henry Beaumont at the fourth hour,
Friday, April 10. in Room 304 of Neville hall.
Dean T. T. Jones will discuss
"War in Origin and Development
of Greek Drama," at the second
hour on Tuesday, April 14 in Room
303 of the Administration
building.
"How We Resist Disease" will be
the topic of Prof. Morris Scherago.
head of the bacteriology department,
at the second hour on Friday. April
17, in Room 124 of the Biological
Sciences building
On Tuesday, March 10. Prof. M. E.
Potter, head of the physical education department, will lecture on "In
Training for Your Work: The Importance of Physical Conditioning In
Everyday Life" at the fourth hour
in Room 205 Frazee hall.
"Germany on Paris Time: the
Conquest by Napoleon" will be the
subject of a discussion by Prof. D.
V. Hegeman at the fifth hour on
Monday. March 16, in Room 204 of
the Administration
building. The
lecture is part of the work in the
course, German Language and Literature 120b. junior tutorial work in
German.
Prof. A2ile Wofford of the library
science department will discuss
"Banned Books: the Problem of
Censorship of Reading for Young
People" at the fifth hour Tuesday.
March 17, Room 314 of the Library.
On Tuesday, March 24. Prof. Vincent Nelson, geology department,
will lecture on "Water Under Our
Feet: How It Has Produced Mammoth Cave and Other Effects." at
the third or fourth hour in Room
108 of Miller hall. The lecture is a
segment of the.cour.se in elementary
geology for agriculture students.
Prof.. Florence Miller will talk
(Continued on Page Fouri

permanent army air corps cadet

examining board was established on
the first floor of the Health build-in- ?
Tuesday.
The board is open for applicants
at 8:30 a.m. each week day. and
stays open until business of the
day is finished about 5:30 or 6 pjn.,
one of the board officials said yesterday.
"A permanent board was established at .the University" because
there are many colleges in the
Bluegrass area. Colleges furnish the
majority of candidates for the air
corps," a member of fhe board said.
Col. Robert L. Rockwell, .in command of the board examinations
said the board planned to examine
cadets in shifts beginning at' 8:30
.
a.m. and 1 pjn. each day.Ground crew training, including
engineering,
armameteorology,
ment, photography and communica-Continue- d
on Page 'Four)
.

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IKIDAY.

MARCH

ti.

M'Mr'.FR

10 12

Bid For National Collegiate Meet;

Aiiiiouiiceinenl Is Due Today
von: von
'finalOU DIIKL
CATS
Wildcats Already
Matched To Meet
(ireat Lakes Team
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"Ituit rsiit his "studying." but lus
girls u liu h he rolerts for "oris" sake.

WILDCAT-

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1
I

JOHN TAYLOR

t, By JAY WILSON
Maybe it was art that caused year's subscription to Esquire and
John Taylor to start collecting Petty supported by contributions from his
girls. Maybe it was the lovely colors friends, the collection grew larger
or graceful lines. Maybe!
each month.
Came May. and John, rememberJohn himself has no explanation
at least none fhat he would offer. ing the unfriendly attitude of the
It all began three years ago when dormitory officials, hastened to store
John arrived at the University from his "girls" in a trunk.
Cynthiana, armed with a meager
This year over 100 Petty and Varga
Petty collection typical of most pictures paper the wails of his room.
Feeling quite a veteran at the busifreshmen.
By spring, hewever, the petty gal- - ness, John estimated he has clipped
lery had ceased to be "small stuff" "at least 75 magazines."
and occasional visitors were stop- "It has disadvantages, though," he
ping in to chat about quizzes and admitted. "You never can leave the
such things. John went home feel- - door open without someone drifting
ins his first year at college mast in."
have meant something after all.
"Take the time the boys and girls
"That was before I got a letter from the Legislature inspected the
from the registrar," John explained. dorms and trapped the poor felow
"Mcst of my deoosit went to pay a in the shower for over an hour. Part
fine the dorm placed on each picture of that time they were poking
around in my room, laughing and
on the wall."
a lot of quesNext fall, he returned to the joking, and
campus determined to continue his tions."
"Major Croft (who was with themi
"pictorial harem". Girded with a

'

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Members of the agriculture

col-

transcription

Wednesday,
March 11. and Wednesday. March
25. over radio station. WLW. Cincinnati, on their "Garden Round-Up.- "
a part of Everybody's Farm hour.
The professors were interviewed
last week by Merton V. Emmert, aslows:
sistant director of the agriculture
i
program, and their remarks were
;Mll.j
II
Cut
Anionic .senium
for the broadcasts.
Mart-A "LI
Prof. A. J. Olney, head of the horKttllllr
ticulture department, will be heard
p.uil.sh
OVfiltlli-IK.ll.ir ll.lu on
the first program on "Diguing In
on the Garden Theater of War"
t'liruiuiluin Si cue. Irom
Muu.s.Nurk.slcy
"lfuris ( imtomnmv
program will be given
A
Ruvt-H.iIitu
Mmint-on the cultivation of orchards, with
III
.'eru ho
Murtlii (iuulil Prof. C. S. Waltman. assistant proI'loloini''
fessor of horticulture, discussing the
Koll Call
If CIlH lit
cultivation, pruning, and spraying of
fruits; and Mre- Pearl J. Haack. asM.iiih nnd battle
Jovhua s Trumpets
sistant state home demonstration
Wall-Cnnit Tiimbltiitf Down
anient, talking on the canning situation.
t'HiMinl lovers Overture
Oeorgp Gault
Soiiiethliit About
Put due university, and Ohio State
A ShMut
Nuel Hay
university will also take part in the
program which Is to advocate the
of more gardens for defense.
Jimmy Hurt. Aits and Sciences
Two additional programs will be
freshman from HarUburly, was elect- given on another series in April, in
ed president of the Freshman club which Dr W. D. Valleau. professor
at a meeting Tuesday night to suc-- i of plant pathology, will discuss
eeed George Smith.. Lexington, who treatment and fertilization of tore.'igm-ilbacco, and Dr E. N. Fergus, profesHurt is
freshman represent- sor of farm crops, will talk on manative in the Studrnt legislature and agement and utilization of pastures
a member of The Kernel staff.
in prin? and summer
."

.

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post-seas-

all-sta-

MAKE PERFECT 3.
Arts ncl Sciences
Release Standings

ON WLW HOUR
lege will be heard by
at 11:45 a.m. CWT.

wanted to know if I were an art
major."
Henry Turner, freshman engineer
who rooms with Jofin, dlsinteresteS-- !
ly claims "they're just something to
talk about." John, however, has the
collecting "mania" and optimistically looks forward to a still larger
gallery.
When asked how University girls
compared with the Petty cartoons,
John stammered that he'd "never
seen a U.K. girl ciressed in a Petty
costume." "But the Kappas . . . ".
Here he stopped short.
As house boy for the Kappas. John
should know how Petty girls coin- -'
pare with the sorority lovelies. He
should be allowed to state his frank
opinions becau.se this Is a free coun-- i
try.
Maybe he was afraid of losing
his job. Maybe he thought sorority
girls are superior to Petty figures.
Yeah! Maybe!

23 STUDENTS

AG BROADCAST

two-pa-

Tei h ' in Alumni gym March 14.
The Wilili ut lineup, left to right:
ftchert Thompson, lohn Hubbard, Bill Carroll, Dr Charles Knapp, coach and faculty adviser; Captain John Swift, Bill W'hai
ton,, and Seymour Pudding.
u

Early this morning officials of the
ir umey were debating between Duke
and Kentucky and the champions of
the Southeastern conference liouieil
as the most possible choice.
The fue Dukes last nmht had gre.u
difficulty in snuffing out Washington and Lee's
in a tilt at
Raleieh victory eomine by
slim
nine point margin.
The KentiickiaiLs based their Iiiim-.-- .
of selection to the coveted tourney
on the fact that earlier in the season
they dispensed with the Generals of
Washington and Lee by a 40 xint
margin in a game that was merely a
waltz for the big blue quintet.
If the tournament officials were
still tied at 9 ovlock this moining.
Oley Olsen. coach of Ohio State's
basketball Ave and chairman of
was to be called in to
vote and break the tie
Kentucky's
Southeastern con- ference bn.sketball champions will
meet what Is considered to be their
strongest opponent of the year, the
Great Lakes Nival Station, in a
benefit clash to be held
in the Jefferson county armory at
Louisville. Saturday. March U.
Great Lakes officially accepted
Kentucky's invitation to play for
the benefit of the Navy Relief Fund
at a Pendennls Club meeting of
members of the Navy league last
Wednesday night in Louisville.
The Naval Station outfit Is composed of former collegiate
including
Lee Huber.
who captained Kentucky last year
The Sailors have won 31 games
while losing only five in meeting
some of the strongest cage teams
in the nation this season.
NAVY LEAfilE SPONSORS
The Kentucky-Grea- t
Lakes bailie will be sponsored by the N.vy
Icaeue. in conjunction
with the
Courier - Journal and Louisville
Tunes. In their attempt to oiler the
greatest hardwood attraction ever
to be staced in the Pills City.
have, aruiyued a VrSltiu-inar- y
'
lilt in which the Seventh
Regional hii'li school elmmpion will
be delcniiiiK-d- . Male hu'h of Louisville will tanele with tlie winner
of the St.
game.
l
Marines and Navy men will serve
as ushers at the .?:imes as an
t
feature of the
HI KI R t'OK THE SAILORS
Included in the Sailor'
line-uare Huber. former Kentucky luminary; Bob Metike. who
made caee In 'ory at Iiuli.ma; Diek
Klein.
Ten player at Northwestern;
John Lobsu.er.
Six performer at Missouri hrrest
Anderson, a West Coa-s- t player at

guy oflrn iranrirrs to llir trull und his littnrr of thr Prll

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ll Musi I hive Refill Ail 'thai
Made Mm Called Pell) Girls

Hurt Lloctcl

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li.iskuh.ill
;iis
niieniN l the South
nun n.mu-n- -n I Tin
n
inlv were uiiliiti icaih ot
appall
an invitation to ilie N'jtion.it
Aflilrlii A.m k i:ttim
CoIlr;iaitiaskflWall tournament f.iilv this
morning.

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Kernel Sport

KcnliKkv's

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The University concert band, under the direction of Mr. C. V. Magur-- t
an, will present the afternoon
at 4 p.m. Sunday in Memorial
Hall.
"Jericho." a modern rhapsody for
a symphonic band, by Martin Gould,
will be the featured presentation.
It consists of eight lfcirts depicting
the fall of Jericho. They are
Roll. Call." "The Chant."
"Dunce." March and Battle" "Joshua's Trumpets." "The Walls Came
Tumbling Down," and "Hallelujah."
The complete program is as fol-

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Ken Lucky Almost Cerlain To (lei

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KKNTUCKY

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Siiiulay iUiisicnle To Re (iiven
Iy Uiiiveisity Coiiccii laiil

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Klerk CtitMmr Otfiiif
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The University military department became more like a war time
army post this week with the daily
appointment- of an officer of the
day to see that the armory with
its sunplies is locked each night.
The officer of the day duty is rotated among the officers. It is his
responsibility to unlock the armory
;
in the morning, inspect the equip- -.
ment. and see that the building is
locked when meetings are over at

KINUCkY.

ON.

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OPEN LECTURES

lrof Looks

By JIM WOOl.DRinGF.

Si oil.

FI(.

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It S 1 T

ON l'ACiL

'

Tweuiy-lliree
.students made per-- feel 3. standings in the arts and
sciences college last semester, il was
announced yesterday. Nine of the
students were from Lexington.
perfect
The students making
standings were:
Virginia BiLskett. Casper. Wyoming
freshman; Jane Birk. New Albany.
Indiana junior: Frances Bogie. Lexington junior: Louise Brightwell,
Frankfort senior; Arthur Collins.
Lebanon senior; Algernon Dickson.
Paris sophomore: Earle Fowler. Lexington senior; Richard Griffith,
junior; Helen Harrison,
sophomores.
Arthur Herman, Winchester sophomore; lida Howe. Louisville senior;
James La Bach. Lexington senior;
Mary LaBuch. Lexington senior;
Laura MiConathy. Lexington senior;
Mary Macke. Newport freshman;
Mary Martina. Lexington sophomore.
Wharton Nelson. Hopkinsville
junior; H. Louise Nisbet, Lexington
senior; Betty South. Frankfort senior: Bernard Stall III. Lexington
senior; Shirley Thomas. Erlanger
junior; Joan Emery Taylor. Cynthiana junior; and Mary Norma
Fulton sophomore

X.ivier-M:nu:i-

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Stanford;

Frank

Baumhult.

at Ohio U Bob Calilwu.
at Detroi' U.; John
Adams, who starred at Kansas; and
Junie Andres, a JeiTrrsonville boy
who matle
at Indiana
Great Lakes split two games with
Notre Dame during the season. The
Irish defeated Kentucky with a second half rally Also among the victims of the Sailors are Illinois. Big
Ten champions. Indiana. Purdue.
Northwestern. Nebraska, which lo t
to Kentuckv in Alumni gym. Kansas. Washing Km university, and
Wake Forrest Iti a fame played
Wednesday night, the Sailors pas lied over the strou Ohio tunversity
aggregation 54-- 3 j
General admission for thr
scrap has been set ar $1
Reserved seats wiU b' $1 50 ana
The picture ot the week now on boxes, lor six (levsons. will be $15
at
display in the Union is characters Special courtsutc seats will
taken from Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs, a recent movie. These
The prelmiiiia! y tilt is scheduled
onginaLs were loaned by Dean Alvin lor 7 3o and the main attrictioii
E Evans of the law college
lll start at 9 o'clock
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Snow White Exhibit

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFICIAL
PUBIIMft)
XCPT
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OR

OF THE UNIVERSITY

NEWSPAPER

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DCTUHO TBI SCHOOL TA
PERIODS
EXAMINATION

'

Post OB.c .t lxln,to. Kntucky. M
under the Act of March . l7t.

Jim
Bob

prm Auoclfttios
Kentucky
Leilncton Board of Com mere

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Features

New! Editor
Business Manager

ADAIR

Hillenmeyfr

society Editor

p"""""

DAN SHINDLEBOWER. DANA R. OLIVER Cartoons
JAY WILSON
i. Advertising Manager
LEWIS SAWIN
Assistant Managing Editor
.

"AT SNIDER

BETTY FUCH

Al Least There's Possibility Now
have limited, tin tommil-tie- s
iiiyanitil and aiioiiiit'tl In (Ik- siudiiii
under (Ik- new amended
lijjislature l.isi
almost exactly as bclore ihe
constitution arc
thangc. In lad. I lie aiiu.il working units l
Assoc iatioii remain
the SuuU in f.ovii nun-li-

di pat l mi nts, and setting them up al this lime
would lead lo mulling Inn contusion.
I hat is whv
the SGA has nol taken advanol tin- possihilh ies given in the new amend-iiunis- .
tage
I hat
is whv the actual SGA setup is
almost exactly the same.
Ilui and here is the imMrtaiil (joint the
SGA now has the potentiality ol expanding in
the Inline, as the oviasion arises.
That (Mdeiil ialilv we believe, is well worth
the woi k thai has Urn done. These amendments, passed without lanfarc now. may well
assume tea I important c several vtars in the

imi1).iIi1

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unaltered.
Ilui Inline vim linlU i "well uhai was all dial
woik on (Ik loiisiiituion a mut '' listen to (his.
ii i In- fust place, ilie amendments were nol
intended to In ini; aii sweeping ihanges in
,SCA oi ganiai ion immcdialt'lv . As The Kernel
xiinlrl onl lit lore ihev were passed, their nature is almost purely tetliuital. anil involves no
change in (towers. Thai was whv we did not give
iliein in nc Ii puhliiiiv or ancmpt to stii U am
I hex
are jusi ol a nature
great t niluisiasin.
that it is haul to work up enthusiasm over.
What the amendments did bring was the
(ijijuii l uiittx loi cs. paneling iheSGA in the lutiire.
i

act ii all

I

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Inline.

VII Leave It Up
To Those Who Know

when that occasion arises. Ileloic ihev were
passed this did not iisl.
s
old.
I hi S(p A i oust it ut ion. now three
has already shown scleral Haws, anil it was
rcalied that il was so delmite in its limitations
anil organization (hat it was rixed loi all lime.
II there had Urn the need or o jsporl u n i I y lor
the SGA to assume a gtcater pari in student
aHaiis. involving a greater nuinUr ol coniiiiii-leeor aifminisiiaiiiT groups lo consider or administrate student legislation, it could not hale
U-edone.
With the new amendments there has Urn treated the opxi timid for setting up "adminis-iraliitlepartmeiUs" lo lain out. under the
N(t A president's tlireition. the provisions ol
SGA rules, as well as legislative cotniiiiiii i s''
lo tonsitUi and advise on legislation.
At this (xiint. meinUis ol the studeiil legislature have nol loiisiileied it advisahle lo set up
am '"admiuisli.ilive departments" and no "leg'
islative committees t t t pt those lo t oi I
with (he old soi ial. Iinaiue. and wcllaic
Thei Ulievt. and liglnlv. that at litis
piiiil the S(. A just doesn't have enough rules lo
necessitate i In- orgaui uiou ol administrative
s

e

coiii-iiiillei--

Quite a number ol the lesser livilian mi nils
tommy have been hollering lecenllv

in the

e

the alius and navv are scnding si much
lime on the delinsive.
"Ihev ought io tall them Ojjfiin- - Unils"
someone suggested in a downtown paer this
week. "We want lo lake the ollense!" others have
Urn veiling.
I'eople like that sound annoy inglv like those
grandstand tpiariei bat ks at a football game who
i ha H "We W ain Allen!" when the coat h knows
Allen is tied up willi a sprained ankle.
There are plintv ol things the army doesn't
know how lo do. we'll admit, bill we believe
that ihev tlo know al least belter than some
lit- - middle oi
Keu-- t
t o.i stove philosopher in
in U oi a Washington poliiitian who sxntls
hall ol his lime miles hum the scene of auv
w
to run a war.
at lion ai
I Ikaimv and navv know what ihev have and
what ilui don l have whith is mote than we
know and lluv have Urn working on war
problems lot a long time. Wc have mote than
a slight snspii ion thai even though ihev have
made inanv a niisiake ihev are still betler qual-ihithan anvone else in the lounirv to. sav
when it lime to start on the oHclise.
i

I

I

all-ho-

BallleOlThe Pronouiiciii Gazelteer
ol the (ii'iiu ijiles ol wartime defense, the jxmii
cilizeii goi s loi ih lo battle with his dailv paper,

CARRKX)
The I'niled Nations are putting up a still fight
on baillt Ileitis siit tthetl all ovel the world, but
it's nothing l" the snuggle thai the tilien is
OM

P.i

(Killing up on tin home IioiU.

lor the

news-p.it-

unpi epai id

l

is btioming groggy Irom the dailv
gets living to master the nanus ol
towns, straits. k iiinsuias. elt. lor whith the
rival (Miwi is an i unit niling.
It's nol so bad lot the inililaiv. I rom evpci
itnii ihev know bet el than lo try to pronounce
loriign nanus. When they toini to a town entitled Doiogobuzh. they sitleste) the issue bv
the nlati as Vi tot '".. The Djeni oiiio
and vi on. until
Objetliie
liver
the inosi uiiilving names Utonie as simple as

Ualings

I

M idwav
the

pro-iioiini- e

U-Ke-

.

kkh noil

t

reading ahead.

amsf(ui

(itizeits were beginning to show signs ol yielding.
I hi
situation was beioiiiiug iritital until
linallv arrived the oilier dav. Mercilully.
tin apainsi- nitd an assault on l'ort Darwin.
How die itailei must have rolled that name
on his tongue, enjoviug the sweel sensalion of
liiinnph. (hi sheei glotv ol being able lo
the
it. I he oiulook beiame even
a sub llncw shells into Santa
oilier tlav when
ll.ii a i.i mi our wesi toast. Ah. Santa Barbara!
A bit Spanish, ptihaps. but slill (ironouiKeable.
San ta llai ha la!

In

ont sv illt oi
Sot so lot

the rigorous

lor

in K when he meets up with Miudv
lot s like I In si V h i aba ja. Amboina. Singaradja
well,
voile tan'i be a Mai Arthur and some

(

batant. Ignorant

Chilians Students Stand By Books
In Fare Of Bombs, Hunger, Cold
Ky Mil DKI l MURRAY
relief by food, clothing.
aid will go to
Induing, aaci
as a re.sult of
the starving
ActUHl

the World Student Service Fund

drive, which will open on the University mmp;is next week, in concamjunction with tiie nation-wid- e
paign for lunds tor Chinese students
and European prisoners of war.
Price!- have risen so much in China
pound of nee now
that ii is said
costs l x )e:eiit more than it did
last year As n .Milt. mole Ulan hall
are now on
of the Chinese
relief
e
In lact. there ;uf only 4.1,000
stucients cut of a population ol
400.000.000. or one person to every
tf 00 pers(,i:s Ii. the United States
we have one s'uiien: to every 1IMI
p
Throughout tin- ienr Chinese-Japane-se
war. the Japanese have
aimed their tjomb- - al the Universi-Me- s
morale, which
in orriei to
lias meant a
ceasing trek ot
students toward the interior The
second
tiecuiatlon ol
Mucienl center, lias meant
t
more dislocation anil more migration
lor additional thousands ot students
The migrating si.idents flee w iUi
llle
uli;it lymks or iii,e!
-

t

atir

luij-'es-

j)s10iis

ciioi

i i:

I'lioTicnox

line nl ('In in w .tinlrnl
Wtiilif Sliiilrul Sri, hi flimi.
Jiiiii
m

il

hill

can c;iriy on Ihcir hacks Trair-p.ir-tatiolacilitii-like those o!
Slates a re hardly known in
f.'hltm. Ihe Mucin's Ink.- to caves
or builil mud-thatc- h
huts on their
new schools
In many case.- - tin .same building
is used tor classes and lodging The
tieiiche.s on v hah
it students
uite
duimg the dav are converted ml"
beds at night. T. Z Koo. noted
Chinese lecturer, has said
And yet. Chiang Kai Click insists
that Ihe young ptn:,- niti.-t- . m; in
'I laisc who are m
claMi!s
I

-

schl

g.v(

l.

n.tr

:

there

h

M4

II

in

jillfi IlllMll

not give it up to light, but
iv ill be a
new China, he be-h-

ies

There is little money to keep these
students in school. Sole relief in
many cases tollies from the World
.Student Service p'und. The Fund has
goal of S.iO.000 for
set a nation-wid- e
tin- Chinese .students alone
American dollars go far in
China where the standard of living
is so much lower than in the United
St 'lies
These-

ML'MCAl.

Mi:HtRI(.S

I'.v

Ken-lutk-

bin I'tMik
(pwswf

?sTI

i

v

l

I

Siuum

Bv Rov

E

diente lor the most pail had a lew ttais rolling
down their i hecks.
Vou ton Id have heanl a liaihti thop. the
gathering was v silent.
T
It is

hard lor

uhi xnnr

to uiidrisi.tntl

me

students (ursist in remaining

liom

awav

invo-

cation regardless of who is speaking I tan understand stink nls "culling'' some hhimh alions.
but habitually lemaiiiing awav hum Miinuu.il
hall is something that I miiiplcielv l.uk explanation for.
Certainly Rupp is the most interest ing of
sieakers. His fame as a storv teller is widespread
among the loathing liaiernitv.
When he conduits a mat lung m hool. iiicnlors
come from the lour minus of the I'niled Stales
10 attend. If he failed to move (hat group of students Irom their (H it lit s in the grill, then the
task of attracting the emiii student UhIv
a lioK.les.s

situation.

have never been one lo woirv
piailiics or public
I tlo. however,
mini about
who make laws and then fail lo enloict

Personalis

I

ninth aljoiil
exhibitionism.

"Hell-Week-

hem.
What leallv const iiutt s publu exhibit lonisin!-Dm- s
selling hair (unit on Main si i tit or tailing out buses at ihc ( .i t In hi ml lerminal
a violation ol ihe tults ptisittbcil bv 'he
Dean ol Men ami ihe I nti Ii an i nil v Council!- II the nil I h all I nil dishes lo U- something
more than a pupicl oi ganiai u n. as u is now.
11
lan he by enloicing it- idles ih.ii it has al
readv laid clown.
l

ioii-slilu-

I

1

1

grind an axe. Sometimes it's propaganda he grinds out.
Option The Nomad type. Like
5. The Fatherly type. He is the the Nomad cf the desert he loves
The Emory Wheel, newspaper of
Emory University, declaring that unexpectant father, always giving to wander, and what he wanders
:
over Is as dry as the desert.
"since the professors divide stu- pop quizzes.
dents into classes it is safe to as8. The Hard Rock type. You have
sume that all professors can also to be more than a good musician to
be divided into classes." offers these hi; a high C under this joker. If
1
groupings:
he were a movie critic he wouldn't
1. The Kilier
type. He wants to even give the United States flag 48
Ambrose Birrrr: Here's to woman
kill off the lower third and thinks stars.
r
ah. that w cculd fall into
the best way is by overwork.
n
7. The
type. He doesn't arms without
falling " into her
2. The Card type. He is a card,
$
l
know any punctuation except "uhs"
but not an ace. He's a 3x5 card. For variety he throws In a "but uh" hands."
Outstanding is his index appeal.
now and then.
SONNY DUNHAM
3. The Spicy type. He has a lot
8. The Cocktail
type. He whets
of cheek and plenty of tongue to your
intellectual appetite. He knows
ii(.viiy tnusiiol :eues ut put in it. His lectures kick up in- a great deal but dotsn't try to
L uton's
l iitnuil.
tellectual sparks out of the aca- make everybody realize it.
demic flint.
9. The
Cand
type. The sur4. The Skimmer
type. A course under him destroys
Jersey. Sonny holds the record for
facing in his courses is fine. But your intellectual appetite.
playing the longest engagement at
the foundation is weak.
type. He
10. The
1
the Meadewbrook and has just comV
can't sharpen his wits, so he has to
pleted another month-lon- g
date
there.
OTHER KINS
The band comes here after a
"NO-BREAK- ?
l
week's run at a Washington theater
n 'I I' "il'
"lie,
Following the dance on this campus. To The Editor of The Kernel:
S.e ,,i,;l;, l
Dunham will lead his group to St.
Ycu say we walked and talked
).,. t,,i:
Louis where they will piay for sev- with Beethoven this morning? Yes
Ini
e
I was taken back to his period, and
eral dances.
Mi.il. .V."'tby
in hand with him. walked
I
II rtn.
In addition to his own sensational hand
the little brook in the country near
u ,i..,,:! "..i
and melodic trumpet and trombone Heiligenstadt. and almost knew and
v.. Ii, il l
solos. Sonny features instrumentalfelt the inspiration which possessed
nn
It'll
him when he composed the great
n
ists Guy McReynolds and Tony
I
I,:
and vocalists Haniet Clarke Pastoral Symphony.
"NO BRIAR'
We saw him hands behind his
Mrs. Charlie Barneti and Ray
im- tt.i:
back, walkirg in the fore