xt7ksn012g3z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ksn012g3z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670426  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 26, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 26, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7ksn012g3z section xt7ksn012g3z Th
Wednesday Evening, April 26

EC

OTOCKY
The South's Outstanding College Daily

New Hours

Approved

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voted Tuesday by an
overwhelming majority to submit a recommendation to extend hours to the Office of Student Affairs for approval.
This decision to accept the
recommendation of the committee evaluating the recent
hours experiment came after a
year's study of the present hours

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will be reviewed by AVVS before
the new hours go into effect.
In discussing, the proposed

extension, AWS considered the
results of the hours experiment
and the hours survey conducted
last fall.
The report from the committee evaluating the hours experiment included several problems that AVVS members who
plan to attend summer school
will be considering.
The biggest problem reported
by housemothers involved in the
hours experiment was the difficulty in getting girls to serve
desk duty. They seem to feel
that the difficulties they now
have with desk duty will be
compounded by later hours.
Housemothers also reported a
general laxness about lateness.
In spite of the difficulties,
housemothers were generally favorable to the proposed extension
of hours. Their main concern
Continued on

rage

2

Correction

Eugene F. Mooney defended
the legality of U.S. involvement
in Vietnam at the Vietnam Forum
Wednesday. Professor Mooney,
an international law specialist,
was mentioned as one who attacked U.S. Vietnam policy in
an incorrect picture identifica-

tion in Tuesday's edition.

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Steve Driesler, left, and David Blair were among those who debated
the Vietnam war at the YR meeting Tuesday.

Hawks, Doves Vie
In Campus Debate

By DEL FUTRELL
Feathers flew at the Student Center Tuesday night as student
hawks and doves clashed over the U.S. role in Vietnam.
The occasion was a debate
sponsored by the College Young U.S. and South Vietnamese
troops at the polls, he added,
Republicans. The issue was "Resolved: that the United States "you didn't get your (food) rashould substantially reduce its tion card renewed unless you voted."
commitment in Vietnam."
"Cranted there were troops
The hawks were YRs Allen
Youngman and Steve Driesler; at every polling place," Young-mathe doves were John Frelinger
said, but this was merely
and David Blair, representing to ensure the Vietcong did not
resort to terrorist tactics to inthe local Students for a Demofluence the voters.
cratic Society.
"You didn't have to vote one
"Our purpose in being in
Vietnem," said Driesler, "is to way or the other," he added,
"but you had to vote. This doesn't
help defeat Communist aggresmean the elections were fraudusion so that the Vietnamese people can choose for tliemselves in lent."
Blair held that the Vietcong
free and democratic elections
like they've been having for the did not initiate their "aggression" until former premier Ngo
past year the form of government under which they'll live." Dinh Diem refused to hold the
Blair, however, suggested a 1956 elections provided for by the
completely fair election would 1954 Geneva Convention.
The 1956 elections were not
put the Communist Vietcong
in power. "If the people weren't held, Youngman countered, "because Diem and his United States
in favor of the VC and I believe they are the VC would advisers decided that it would not
quickly fold up, especially with be under any circumstances posthe number of troops we have sible to have a free election. We
did not have the military power
there now."
"I don't thing the Vietcong and neither did the South Vietnameseto ensure a fair elecare as popular as the gentletion."
man asserted," replied Young-ma"It was the Communist in
citing the recent South Vietnam elections as proof that the North Vietnam," Driesler added,
"that upset the Ceneva accords
present government has the supof 1954, that started aggression
of the voters.
port
Blair questioned the validity
against the South, and therefore
of the elections, noting that "they prevented what might have been
the ultimate union of both
weren't exactly secret ballots."
Commenting on the presence of
Frelinger called this reasonpointing
ing "gobbledy-gook,- "
out that North Vietnamese
on Pa re 4
n

n,

Viet-nams-

."

presi-Continu- rd

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By JANE MARSH
as students prepare for finals and commencement, an
activity vitally important to the ongoing of the University continues
relatively behind the scenes.
As the semester ends ami the is a myth that the average Kenlast of the faculty resignations tucky student is an idiot."
are submitted to department
But, he said Kentucky has a
chairman, the recruitment of new progressively better freshman
faculty is the first concern of class every year and that the
virtually every academic admin- ACT scores are above the national
istrator.
average. He commented that the
Among those faculty members
quality of the instruction may
known to be leaving are Dr. not have kept up with inequality
William F. Axton, Dr. Robert of the students. "I think this is
L. White, and Dr. Frank E. an excuse to move, and not a
Haggard, all from the English sincere perception," he said.
department; Dr. Frank Marini
Another possible reason for
and Dr. David Booth, from the
a high turnover faculty may be
Dr.

Even

system.

The Experiment Evaluation
Committee, headed by Jonell
Tobin, recommended that hours
be extended to midnight on Sunday and week nights for sophomores and uppcrclassmen. Freshmen will have the same hours
as they have under the present
system.
The new hours would not
go into effect, however, until
Oct. 1. Housing units will be
required to meet next fall to decide on individual plans for closing the house, and submit these
plans to AVVS no later than Sept.
15 for consideration. These plans

143

Recruitment
Of Faculty
Is Underway

By AWS
AVVS

Vol. LVIII, No.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

19G7

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fcplj?'

v1

V

Cook, Vallebona Take Oath
Student Government President Carson Porter, back to camera, administers the oath of office to his successor, Steve Cook, and new
vice president, Rafael Vallrbona, in President John Oswald's office as the president looks on.

political science department;
Melvin DeFleur and Dr. Joseph
Scott, of sociology; Dr. Douglas
VV. Schwartz and Dr. Neil
anthropology; and Dr.
James F. Thorpe, mechanical enn,

gineering.
The Colleges of Law, Education, and Commerce said they
had received "no official resignations" yet. The Colleges of Den-

tistry, Medicine, Nursing, and
Pharmacy cannot release such
information until it is acted upon
by the Board of Trustees.
In talking to department
chairmen, professors, and representatives of the Administration,
several reasons were given as
possible causes for the resignation of a faculty member.
Dr. John Barrows, director
of institutional studies, said in
an interview that an
study of why faculty members
leave has never been made.
He suggested that a good share
of them leave because they get
th

Continued On Page

3

UL Fees Up;

Students
May Leave
Special To The Kernel

LOUISVILLE

Univer sit) of

President

Louisville

Philip

Davidson has announced that
the tuition increase at the city's
university will mean a loss of
"from 3 to 5 percent" of the
students.
The announcement, made
yesterday to several hundred stutuidents, pushed the
tion to $1,200 and the
tuition to $1,S00 an increase of $200 for residents and
out-of-sta-

$300 for

s.

The increase is the fourth
such raise in seven cars for
U of L, and it prompted speculation that a merger Ixtwcen
UK and UL would be studied
more thoroughly.
President Davidson said he
hopes this increase will be the
last because "there are distinct

more money elsewhere, just as
men are recruited from other campuses. Other possible reasons for
a faculty member's leaving may
be the opportunity for specific
types of research, a reduction in
classroom teaching load, and
there is always the "green grass"
concept, that the grass is always prospects w ithin a ) ear" lor state
greener somewhere else.
help.
Dr. Barrows emphasized that
President
Davidson also
the reduction in classroom teach- stated he thought that some stuing load is very much a part dents would transfer to UK beof the reason some faculty mem- cause of the extra costs. He
bers leave.
urged students to seek governWhen asked whether another ment loans and other financial
possible reason might be the idea assistance.
that Kentucky students were felt
The raise in tuition means
to be inferior. Dr. Barrows re an extra $1.9 million in rev enue
univerplied, "I don't want to lie to you. for the privately-finance- d
There is the idea that everyone sity. U of L's budget lor fiscal
at Kentucky is inferior. There 1968-1- 9
is $20 million.

Many Changes Uriderivay In Library
A paper sign is presently hanging on a door to the left of the
circulation desk in the library.
The sign reads:
"The Physical Plant and the
Good Lord Willing This Room
Will Be Furnished for use by 90
Students, Sometime during the
Spring Semester."
This sign is a herald of times
to come.
Four years and$l millionfrom
now. the Margaret I. King Library will be twice its present
size, Dr. Harold Cordon, associate director of the library,
predicts.
"Students who graduate from
the University in the past two

years will not recognize the library after the planned changes,"
Dr. Cordon said.
Proposed facilities for the new
y
library include small
and seminar rooms, listening
rooms, smoking lounges, and
closed faculty studies.
talk-stud-

An experimental lounge, perhaps not this semester, but soon,
will be located on the second
floor. Dr. Cordon said that it
will be a large reading room,
graced with iiutiv idual study cubfour person
icles,
cubicles,
slanted top study tables, and
otl icr new lounging furniture.
The room will be experimental in that student reaction to
--

its new fixtures will be carefully
watched and assessed to aid in
planning other library innovations.
Two committees arc also
working with Dr. Stanley Forth,
chief librarian, and Dr. Gordon
on the programming.
O.K. Currv . chaiiman of the
committee of academic atfaiis of
Student Confess, assisted Dr.
forth in draw ing up a questionnaire to determine what other
changes or additions in the ibi.uy
facilities students would favor.
Plans ahead)' in progress include a new circulation system
which, aceoiding to Dr. Cordon.
I

Continued On Page

l

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 2f,

1907

New Greek Government Tells Youths No Miniskirts
The Greek Orthodox rite is
the official religion of Greece,
but the constitution son ifies that
all other religions are tolerated.
Patakos, until two
Brig.
months ago a colonel like the
rest of the members of the junta,
is one of the most powerful figures
in the regime. The fact that as
interior minister he is demanding
action by another ministry is an
extraordinary procedure in Greek
political practice and is viewed
as evidence of his exceptional
powers.
Many Greeks said that not
since Metaxas' days, when students had to wear regulation uniforms and caps, have there been

By HENRY KAMM
New York Timet Newt Service
ATHENS The new government of G revec, in its first si'uni-fica-

innovation in social ix)lky,
has prohibited miniskirts for nirls,
long hair for loys and called for
regular church attendance by all
youths.
The emphasis on austere
morality in a country not noted
for moral laxity, combined with
trend of
the general
the military junta that seized
power last Friday, reminded
dictaGreeks of the fascist-styltorship of Gen. Ioannis Metaxas,
right-win- g

e

who ruled Greece

from 1936 to

1910.

prescribed standards of dress
pupils.
Principals will be instructed
to enforce the dress and grooming
rules and will also be ordered to
tell their pupils to slay away
from pinball machines and sin:
ilar diversions.
In its policy declaration Sat- -

The Minister of the Interior,
Brig. Stylianos Patakos, called
on the education ministry to instruct school principals to tell
their pupils to go to Confession
and Communion next Sunday,
the Greek Orthodox Easter, and
to attend Sunday masses throughout the year.

for

KENTUCKY

PC

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Starting FRIDAY!

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Starts 8; Adm. $1.25

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CHRISTOPHER
by MAGNA

In

it, a
official spoke of reform
constitution to make
social and economic

discussing

of the
possible

&

The final oral examination
of Scott B. Carr, candidate for
the Doctor of Philosophy degree
will be held at 1 p.m. Thursday, Herb Book Room, Dairy
Products Building.

All students interested in formal rush may register in Boom
203 Administration Building until May 5. Students must have
a 2.0 overall and a 2.0 the pre-

THE WILD ONES

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RICHARD LONG

2u"ast

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"main'st." ""

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The world of the

AFROTC, Civil Engineers,
Chamber Singers, Delta Sigma
Rho, Home EcClub, IEEE, Kappa Delta Pi, Kentucky Engineer,
Ky. Rangers, KSEA, Keys, Eta
Kappa Nu, LKD, Pershing RiTheta Sigfles, Pryor
ma Phi, Traffic
Engineers,

tell your neighbor

Pre-Me- d,

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Army ROTC, Mortar
Lamp and Cross,
Student Government,

A totally new concept in

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NOW SHOWINGf
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artistic motion pictures

HIMI

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and the get-gguys. It's the
now sound in music and the
new sensation of the screen!

The presidents of the following organizations should come
to the Kentuckian office, Room
210 of the Journalism Building,
before the end of the week: Tau
Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, Arnold
Air, Army Sponsors, American
Marketing Assoc., Army Staff,

recent hours experiment.
Keeneland coeds reported that
girls seemed to sign out more
and were more honest about
where they were going when the
staff signature was not required.
After a discussion of green
slips used for daytime trips out
of town, AWS voted to discontinue their use. Instead of using
green slips; girls will sign out
on the sheet used for nightly
sign outs.

and AWS.

girls

Go-G- o

A program of light band music will be presented by the
University Symphonic Band at
7 p.m. Thursday in the Memorial Hall Ampitheater.

et

RECOMMENDED FOR MATURE ADULTS!

1

was with the procedure to be
used in carrying it out.
AWS also voted yesterday to
discontinue the requirement of
the staff signature on overnight
slips. This was tried experimentally in Keenelandduringthe

From Sweden...

STARTS TONIGHT!
1st RUN LEXINGTON!

at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the
Presbyterian Student Center.

YWCA,
Board,
Lances,

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Just a short drive south of

to be eligible.

KENTUCKY

E mania?
J-W--

AWS Okays
New Hours

UK Bulletin Board

Citizens for Peace in Vietnam will hold its final meeting

DISTRIBUTION CORP.

Plus

well-inform-

could deceive the farmer more
craftily," he said.
"Politicians," in the language
of the new leaders, has liccome
ing for feasants.
a dirty word, and contempt for
The life of the peasants of the
political practices of Greek
this predominantly rural country
parties is a constant theme of the
is another subject of emphatic new
government and its spokesappeal by the government. Its men.
policy statement declared:
The government official said
"The village will have the that the regime did not represent
entire affection of the governeconomic "oligarchies." Hut he
ment."
added that while no socialization or state takeovers were planIn assuming office Monday,
the new agriculture minister, ned, the status of Creek banks
would be reviewed.
Alexander Matthaiou, promised
a better deal for the farmer and
combined the pledge with an
attack on all political parties.
"The politicians kept competing with each other to see who
measures that were not possible
lefore. The only specific goal
that came to his mind was hous-

Continued From Page

vious semester

color
Released

sources are

government

201 on or before April 28.

FIRST RUN!

rrtil--

Greece,
vague.

Singers and musicians interested in performing May 26 and
27 at Hanover College in Hanover, Ind. at that college's annual bike race weekend should
contact Student Center Office

no

BiuiuKvuiTTruumi

the government of Premier
Constantino Kollias characterized youth, "devoted to the
national ideals, as the golden
hope of our nation." It promised
to makeeducation and youth "the
niimlxr one target of the government."
The pronouncements of the
government, on the radio and in
have
the controlled press,
abou tided in hymns of glorification to youth and national purity.
In response to specific questions
on the content of its program for
tirxluy,

J

A MAM
FOR ALL
SEASONS
From

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RISES

ABOVE THE TIDES

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6:00
7:00
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EVENING

Evening Concert
Short Stories of Morey Cal- laghan: "A Blue Kimono"
Theatre of the Air: "The
October Man"
News

Viewpoint: Discussion
Masterworks, Schoenberg:
"Trio for Violin, Viola. Cello"
News; Sign Off

9:00

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2:00 Afternoon Concert. Saint-Saen- s:
"Symphony No. 3 in
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1:00
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5:15
5:30

Transatlantic Profile:
Discussion
Music

It Happened Today: News

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The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40500. Second claw
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 49B6.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is
to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising ehould
be reported to The Editors.
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* "

Till; KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Faculty Recruiting On

Continued From Pafce 1
TIAA, Teachers Insurance
and Annuity Association.
When the purchaser of this
annuity leaves one employer for
another, the annuity goes with
him, including all benefits purchased by his own and his emtlit

ployer's contributions.
The TI AA plan makes for more
mobility than a state retirement
plan in which money is lost by
moving. At UK an amount equal
to 10 percent of the person's salary
is put into the annuity by the
University and five percent of
the person's earnings is taken out
and put into the annuity.
"Publish or perish," the
perennial whipping boy of Administration and faculty alike,
may have something to do with
the exodus of faculty members,
according to a consensus of
people interviewed.
Dr. Barrows said that in most
major universities a faculty member is expected to publish, but
more importantly, there seems to
be a directed idea for reward
of a good faculty member here.
The University, he commented,
is trying to get an answer for
good teaching. The faculty member has available to him forms
and processing personnel and
equipment for evaluation of his
classes, and this is his for personal use. Such a system is quite
different from the student originated
profaculty-evaluatio-

n

jects.

One associate professor said
that a faculty member doesn't
get raises in rank and salary if
he does not publish. Nevertheless, he noted that everytime a
faculty member publishes he calls
attention to himself in the "outside" world.
He also pointed out w hat may
be termed a negative side to the
idea of faculty publishing. "By
emphasizing research and publication, it makes us (the faculty
member) known and it costs them
(the University) more to keep us
or we leave and it costs them a
lot to replace us."
One young faculty member
who asked not to be identified
commented that he concurred
with what he feels is a widely
held view, that only when the
young faculty members are made
better offers by other institutions
in terms of rank, salary, and working conditions, is their value
recognized by their own institutions. And, he said, this happens
when it is too late.

recruitment system is
the same in each department, varying in scale and extent with the depai tmcnt, its
size and individual needs.
Dr. Jacob II. Adler, chairman
of the English Department, said
that although this department
may differ in the relative size of
the recruiting program, his department might be used as an
example in that it incorporates
most of the recruiting methods.
He noted that the English Department was losing one associate
professor and two assistant professors. It is gaining one full
professor and associate professor,
and seven assistant professors.
"It's a continuing process,"
he said when asked the time of
year recruiting was done.
The University if constantly
on the alert for full and associate professors, as well as assistant professors, who are those
who have just recently received
their Ph.D. degree and are expected to teach at least one upper division course in their field
at least once a year.
The recruitment season, it
might be said, is in the late fall
and early winter when most of the
conventions are held.
For the English Department,
the South Atlantic Modern Language Association convention is
held in November. Dr. Adler
said a little recruitment was done
then, but not as much as is
done at the Modern Language
Association Convention.
The University sends a team
of three or four people to the latter convention to interview.
This year the English Department has added Dr. Steven
Manning from the University of
Virginia, as a full professor, specializing in medieval literature,
and Dr. William A. Cordon, an
associate professor from Tulane.
Dr. Adler said, "It's obvious
the Kentucky reputation is improving rapidly and vastly." He
noted that the seven new assistant professors come from a widespread area, including the University of Virginia, Univ ersity of
Florida, Ohio State, University of
Illinois, University of Wisconsin,
The

much

and Oregon.

lie said that the three who

are leaving are not leaving because of the "publish or perish" idea. All, he felt, had shown
their ability as scholars so that
this was not a factor.

Whv Can'l You

rr

.

M

In talking to Dr. Harrows
about recruitment he noted th.it
UK is competitive. What the University can offer people is not

1W7

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a

deterrent to recruiting at all, he
commented.
As a bench mark, the University uses 11 institutions in adjacent areas and their salary
scales. The schools arc Purdue,
Illinois, Ohio State, I.idiana,
Missouri, Tennessee, Virginia,
West Virginia, V.IM., North Carolina State, and the University
of North Carolina. The Univeras
sity was very low in
compared to these schools, but is
now above the median.
"We are moving up a little
all the time," Dr. Harrows said.
Recruiting, he said, is done
Ll the department level. Potentials can be made known by a
chairman or faculty member.
"This is a departmental problem and responsibility,"
he
added. Administration plays a
verv small role.
One problem in recruiting
noted by Dr. Barrows is that
Kentucky is perceived as being in
the deep South, that to get here
you have to cross the Ohio in a

I

cswf ...

v.

1963-6-- 1

...

Hey

Look In The Trees!

Campus rules forbid the use of motorcycles or motorscootcrs on
campus walkways but everyone knows they are used and many
have dodged them from time to time. One careful owner, however,
uses the trees near tire Journalism Building to hide his cycle from
ever watchful campus police.

and now -J-

ADE

skiff.

In talking to those professors
who are leaving, some general
reasons, most of which have been
mentioned, were given.
Dr. Frank Marini, in political
science, said, "I'm leaving because I got what appears to me
a good offer and a good opportunity." He is going to Syracuse University.
Dr. William F. Axton, of the
English Department said that his
appointment at the University of
Louisville starts this coming summer, but that he will be in England all of next year doing research on high Victorian structural design in painting, architecture, and literature.
Dr. Neil Eddingtoit, in anthropology, w ill teach in summer
school here and will then go to a
post at the University of California at Berkeley.
Dr. Joseph Scott, in sociology,
will go to the University of Toledo, where he will teach much
the same curriculum as he has
here which has included complex organizations, juvenile delinquency, sociological theory,
and introduction to sociology.

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17

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 2f,

YRs Hold

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Vietnam
Debate

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JOHN FRELINGER
That failure can be attributed
to the conditions the U.S. has
insisted upon lcfbre talks could
be held, Frelinger countered.
"The VC should be included in

the
defended
bombing on the grounds that it
Ixxjsted morale in the South. He
cited the decrease in desertions
from the South Vietnamese army
since the bombing began early in
1966 as evidence of this.
Frelingcr further held that
a bombing halt would encourage
the Hanoi government to seek
peace negotiations, but Driesler
replied that "we have stopped
bombing on numerous occasions"
and no peace talks ensued.
Youngman

negotiations

and should be

pro-Sou-

Frelinger

those "re-

compared

grettable" actions to the perseTories durcution of
the American Revolution.
ing
"Those that we consider teach- pro-Engli-

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ALLEN YOUNGMAN
ers are considered 'propagandists' by the VC," he added.
Youngman said that the Viet-con- g
insist that negotiations can
only be held if the U.S. withdraws from Vietnam, and maintained that if that course is followed "we'll have lost another
country" to the Communists.
Also, he added, American prestige would be lessened in the international community.
Frelinger replied by recalling

the French pullout in 1954 and
that country's subsequent withdrawal from Algeria. "I submit,"
he said, "that French influence
has not diminished in this period of time."
He rejected the contention
that an American withdrawal
from Vietnam would result in an
immediate Communist takeover.
Citing the success of the Philippines and Indonesia in quelling
attempted Communist coups, he
argued that Asian countries "can
do things on their own if they
want to."
Gen. Maxwell Taylor was quo-

ted by Driesler as warning that
"the freedom and security of people around the world" is threatened by "aggression in the form
of armed attack by the North
Vietnamese army against the
South Vietnamese Republic."
Frelinger, on the other hand,
recalled Gen. Taylor's warning
that we are fighting "a war of
attrition, and the only alternative is a war of annihilation."
"Of course," Frelinger added,
"there's one alternative he didn't
mention: no war at all."

easy way out

v

in-

cluded in a coalition government
of South Vietnam," heexplained.
Asked about the assassination
of
village leaders and
teachers by Vietcong terrorists,

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WON with WARD

Mr. Kennedy said.

Senator Fulbright of Arkansas, chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, said he
believed that the "bringing of
General Westmoreland to Washington to make speeches and to
meet with us (in joint session
on Friday) is a final drive for
a vastly enlarged manpower and
a great drive for a military victory."
Mr. Fulbright said that as
the tempo of the war increased,
so would the pressure against
dissent. Indeed he suggested that
the Senate might even today
be witnessing the beginning of
the end of dissent, and that Mr.
McGovern might be voicing
final warning."
Senator Church of Idaho

C

b.rle. Keor, ( btlrmin

Wlntton Miller,

VlefC'btrmn

re-

This statement about General
Westmoreland provoked the only
extended exchange with defenders of the President's policy.
Sen. Spessard Holland,
said he agreed with General Westmoreland's views on
the effect of criticism. He said
the general was on the scene
and therefore probably the best
able to make a judgment. He
strongly rejected the idea that
the general was "a Charlie McCarthy" who could be told to
say something he did not believe. It was incomprehensible,
he said, that anyone would accuse the critics of "disloyalty or
treason."
"They're already doing it,"
Mr. Fulbright interrupted.
"They're coming pretty
close," Mr. McGovern added.
Senator Holland replied that
he hoped Congress and country
would pay attention to the general, and suggested that he testify before the Foreign Relations
and Armed Services committees.
D-Fl-

Little Named
Corning Fellow

For the second straight year,
a Maysville student is the recipient of the Corning Class Fel-

lowship, awarded annually to an
outstanding senior. It is one of
the most coveted awards by members of the graduating class.
DonC. Little, graduating senior in the College of Business
and Economics, was notified