xt7ksn012g79 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ksn012g79/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670327  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 27, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 27, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7ksn012g79 section xt7ksn012g79 t

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ME MEL

ECmtiucky

77ic South's Outstanding College Daily

Vol. LVIII, No.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Monday Evening, March 27, 1967

Fellows Back
From Tour
Through East

A

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,

Seven University teaching fellows returned to Lexington Sunday from a week-lon- g
swing

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through the Eastern part of the
United States as part of an in- service traveling seminar.
The fellows were scheduled
to visit public schools and listen
ffiAS
If If
If
to prominent lecturers in Wash- 1 cm vxm
ington, Baltimore, Wilmington,
and Richmond. Dr. Harry Robin
son, coordinator for the UK Na1
I
tional Teachers Corp and
program, accompanied
l4 Jl ,W--J
the fellows.
As part of President John"'
son's Teaching Act of 1965, the
teaching fellows program is designed to improve less qualified
teachers and to improve teaching in poverty area schools. The
program is also designed to aid
Negro teachers in Southern
The Patterson satute stands alone in the Central Campus conschools, who have been disschool integration, to struction area as wrecking gets underway on White Hall, Patplaced by
terson House, and the Carnegie Museum. A crane was moved
get their masters or undergradin this morning to begin crushing White Hall. A 19 story office
uate degree.
tower will be built on the site.
The UK program began with
eight teaching fellows, but one
dropped out last semester.
"The fellows program is open
to people who have not taught
over three years or persons who
have previously been teachers
but for some reason have been
Although hoping to return one day to a free country, the
forced to get out of the profes250,000 Cuban refugees now in Miami are striving to adopt the
sion for a long period of time'," American way of life, says UK's Jim Cleason, who recently visited
Dr. Robinson said.
these people as a member of the YMCA.
"This is another way," he
After spending a week among centive to work hard and be
said," to interest teachers into the Cubans during spring break, successful while they are here."
Some of the refugees have
teaching in poverty areas."
Cleason says they are successStudents in the program fully assimilating into our cul- been in Miami since 1959. Others
spend two semesters on campus ture, and are being accepted by have recently arrived. All have
and off part of the time actually the Americans there.
one thing in common. They arrived with nothing but the clothes
working in the classroom.
childtheir
which they wore.
"The observation is across ren "They are sending
to school," he says. "The
the board observation," Dr. Rob"Castro takes the possessions
children are learning ourcustoms
inson said. "The fellows not only and
are already of all who leave," Cleason says.
language. Many
observe in poverty schools but in
"Still 3,000,000 are waiting to
all schools for purposes of con- bilingual."
leave Cuba."
"The Cubans are an industrasting students."
Those fortunate enough to
The University program is for trious people," he says. "Many leave are flown to Miami at the
two jobs, and only
elementary teachers. Students are holding
expense of the U.S. Government.
who enter the program without 12,000 are on relief."
When they arrive they are taken
a teaching certificate, or no
This figure includes those too to Freedom Tower where they are
teaching experience, will receive old to work and recent arrivals processed and given a medical
an elementary certificate.
who have not yet found work. examination.
The federal government picks
"Others are paying back the
Then they are taken to
up the tab for the program. It money our government gave them Freedom House where
they live
fellows last year
gave some 3,000
to live on when they arrived," until they find other housing and
to various colleges and universihe says.
a job. The American Government
ties across the nation. Eventually
a month on
the government will pull out of
"They are grateful to Ameri- allows them $100
cans and feel an obligation to which to live until they find work.
the program leaving the Univer
Continued On Page 8
them. This gives them an in
sity to support it.
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Patterson Sits Alone

Cubans Yearn For Home,
Y Seminar Group Found
'

ByJOIINZEH

V

ries of the candidates for governor
in t)e May primaries. The series
will continue throughout tfie next
tux weeks.

land developer wants to "pull a
few stunts to stir some people
up." Aided by a public relations
firm, he says he has the aggresdetermination
and
siveness,
money to do it.
Mr. Trapp considers the pri-

mary's outcome "imponderable,"
and contends that half the electorate is still undecided. "That's
why the situation is so explosive," he says, hoping the noise

DAVID TRAPP: EXPLOSIVE PRIMARY
will ignite a spark in his favor. "bull sessions." He has no for,. . Relieving "people under 25 are mal backing as yet heie at the
politically the most aware," he University.
is particularly interested in movMr. Trapp discussed in a reing onto college campuses. His
collegians cent interview his campaign, himelectioneering among
will include rallies and informal self and his thoughts on govern

121

Kirwan Named
Arts And Sciences
Outstanding Prof
adminDr. A. D. Kirwan, professor of history and
istrator at the University of Kentucky since 1938, Monday was
named the College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor
top-lev- el

for

1967-6-

nj
uacncior ui laws utxree irurn r
School of Law.
A scholar of the American
Civil War period, Dr. Kirwan is
the author of several historical
works: "John J. Crittenden: The
Struggle for the Union;" "Revolt
of the Rednecks;" "Johnny Green
of the Orphan Brigade;" "The
Confederacy," and the most recent, "The South Since Appomattox," which he
with a UK colleague, Dr. Thomas
D. Clark, distinguished professor
of history.
Dr. Kirwan has received both
of the UK Alumni Association's
major faculty awards for outstanding research and teaching.
The Crittenden book was selected by the Southern Historical Association as the best book
on Southern history published in
c

8.

The announcement was made
at a meeting of the faculty of
the College of Arts and Sciences
today by Dr. James W. Gladden,
professor of sociology, and chairman of the election committee.
Dr. Kirwan was elected to
the post by his fellow faculty
members in the college. As holder
of the award he will be released
from his duties for one semester
to do research and writing at full
salary. He will deliver the College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor Lecture next
April.

The professor, an internationally known historian of the American South, is the 24th winner
of the coveted award established
in 1944 as a means of recognizacademic
ing outstanding
achievement. Dr. Ernst Jokl, professor of physical education, is
the holder of the award for 1966-6-

,

jei-ferso-

1962-6-

n

3.

7.

Dr. Kirwan is on a year's
leave of absence from UK while
serving as Fulbright professor
of American history at the University of Vienna, Austria.
On March 9 he was named
Theodore Hallam Professor of
by his colHistory for 1967-6leagues in the UK Department
of History.
Last June Dr. Kirwan asked
to be relieved of his post as
dean of the UK Graduate School
to return to fulltime teaching
and research in the Department
of History. He was named to the
Graduate School post in 1960.
He graduated from UK in
1926 after a successful undergraduate career as a student and
athlete. He returned to the institution in 1938 as head football coach, a post he relinquished
seven years later to become a
history professor.
After obtaining a Ph.D. degree at Duke University, Dr.
Kirwan served as UK dean of
men from 1947 to 1949, and dean
of students from 1949 to 1954.
He has a master's degree from
the University ofLouisvilleanda
9

David Trapp Plans To Come On Strong Now

Kernel Associate Editor
Campaigning in the Democratic gubernatorial primary so
far has been quiet. But now, as
the crowded race enters its last
month, candidate David M.
Trapp plans to make some noise.
Unknown and untried politically, the
Lexington
The Kernel begins a seToday

aM tm tram'

ment, youth, and since Kentucky's governor potentially has
great influence as chairman of
UK's trustees and maker of the
state's budget education.
Mr. Trapp feels higher education and state government
"should work hand in glove,"
with "politics removed from the
educational system," but with
"some guidance," though.
Autonomy "increases the need
fur darn good administrators on
the campuses," he added.
"I don't like political influence
in education. What we've seen
elsewhere (whenjhe two mix)
hasn't been good." He mentioned
specifically Berkeley, and although critical of the uprisings
there, conceded that "dissidence
does not always produce bad
things." The best solutions often
come out of good, healthy disagreement, he said.
"That's one reason v hy young
people are so necessary today.
Continued On 1'age

7

DR. A. D. KIRWAN

1 rans) ers

lioin

Sister Colleges
Register In July
Community college students
for the Fall
will
Semester in the first priority
period of summer orientation, according to Ray Cumberledge, assistant registrar.
Dates for this
axe July 5, 6, and 7, the first
three days of summer orientation.
This change in registration
for summer students, according
to Mr. Cumberledge, is on an
experimental basis to see when
they can best
Because of the limited number of community college stuin
dents who could
the spring semester of 1966-6- 7
was changed to
the Fall of 1966.
Only about half of the applicants
According to Mr. Cumberledge, "it is felt that the summer
period will better serve the needs
of community college students."
They will receive special orientation designed especially for them,
and will receive a "complete"
schedule.
Special faculy advisers will
be available to register community college students, noted
Cumberledge.
Over 500 community college
students are expected to
with 364 already enrolled
from the Fall of 1966.
pre-regist-

er

er.
pre-regist-

pre-regist-

er

pre-regist-

er

* 2--

KENTUCKY

T1IE

KERNEL, Monday, March 27, 19S7

Computing Center
Asks Expansion Grant

Tin Computing Center is going to ask the National Science
Foundation for a grant of some $500,000, to help support and modernize the center, says Dr. Martin Soloman, Assistant Director of the
Center.
are so broad and demanding, our
The center and the Administration are now trying to straigh- equipment cannot keep up with
them," he says.
ten out the details and problems
"If granted, the proposal will
of the proposal of bringing to
not go into effect until July 1968,"
UK the
"
"This machine in essence is says Dr. Hard. "We have plenty
of time to work out space and
phasing out other machines, and
it is three times more effective," other internal problems."
Also, the state is studying the
says Dr. Raymond Bard, assisfeasibility of a centralized Comtant vice president for research.
"The problems at the center puter Center in Frankfort.
"A Legislative Research Commission is studying the idea,"
I K Crndiintc

if
-

it

.

"IBM-SGO.-

ins IYIlou ship
Mary Jane Wagner of Louisville, a 1966 graduate of the University, is the first Kentuckian to
receive a $5,000 fellowship for
the Winterthur Program in Early
American Culture at the Henry
Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum near Wilmington, Del., and
the University of Deleware.
Miss Wagner will take a two-yegraduate course leading to a
master's degree in the American
decorative arts from the University of Deleware.
The program was begun as a
joint effort of the university and
the museum in 1952. Eight fellowships for the 1967-6- 9
program
were announced.

nrmi
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Shephard who holds Margaret Thompson. Tau
Sigma is the campus modern dance honorary,

TauSigma's practicing for their forthcoming show
are, from the left, Paula Wallace, Cricket Cotter- dam, Mary Jo Anderson, and, in back, Clint

Ke' nel Photo h D,ck Ware

Music: An Oasis In The Desert

By W. H. McNEW
Were it not for the Univer-

sity Musicales, Lexington would
be more of a musical desert
than it is.
Sponsered by the Department
of Music, these free concerts have
often provided a bright contrast
to the perfunctory and sloppy
performances which have characterized this season's Concert Association offerings.
Friday night's musicale, one
of the best of the series, featured
the Chamber Singers treating
an appreciative audience to samplings from four centuries of vocal
music.
This attractive young group,
capably led by John Alexander,
achieved a degree of ensemble
remarkable for any chorus of a
score or so voices. Indeed, their
mellow sound was marred only
by a slight harshness at its top;

and this appeared only when
they were pressed for volume.
The Singers began with settings of religious texts by
Byrd, and Callus; but it
was the Bach motet, "Jesu.meine
Freude," which dominated the
first half of the program. The
motet was well sung, although
it seemed Mr. Alexander could
have given more emphasis to its
structure.
Three Debussy songs and a
round of Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century madrigals were
highlights of the concert's sec-r- Swee-linc-

-

k,

Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding pub- llcation.

m.m.m.iim.m.:
FOR RENT

RENT
brick. IV2
baths, built-i- n range, inclosed garage,
fenced yard. $150 per
month with option to buy. 1250 Bordeaux Dr. Call
after 5 p.m.
277-10-

ftr DOLLARS

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RENT 3 Mi room apt. May
25. Close to school;
minimum
rental for
occupants. Call Uni27M3t
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TOR

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UNITED ARTISTS

ond part. Kay Carter's solo in
the Debussy song, "Quant j'ai
ouy le tabourin," was quite fetching.

Of the Twentieth Century

songs, the two Hindemith works
were no more vapid than might
be expected; while Peter Men-nin- 's

rousing "Crossing the Han
River" seemed as worthwhile
as anything on the program.
I understand that the Chamber Singers are going on a brief
tour. Certainly this fine group
can only bring credit to themselves and to the University.

WANTED
Bus drivers. Must have
valid Ky. driver's license. Must be
over 21, have mornings or afternoons free. Apply Wallace's Book
7Ftf
Store.
HELP! Babysitter needed.
0
boy. Tuesday and Thursday,
for rest of semester. My home near
campus, or your home or dorm. Call

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at the

Thanks for a wonderful time
Dairy-Mai- d.

R. D.

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to go to England in May; share ex-

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call ext. 8267.

PERSONAL

NOW! thru Thursday

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Sima's Prepare For Show

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255-431-

A
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National Society
of Film Critic

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DEST FILM
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entury-Fo-

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says Dr. Bard, "to sec if there
would be any gains from such a
plan. This Center is giving our
cooperation and technical advice
to the Commission," he added.
"This proposal is all part of
our plan of growth," says Bard.
"It is not an illogical proposal."
Dr. Nevarro declined to comment on the proposal, which has
not yet been sent to the NSF.
"I want no publication that
may be detrimental to acceptance of the proposal," he said.

4

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fun. For details
27Mlt

APPLY NOW!
Applications for the Board of
Student Publications are available in the Program Director's
office In the Student Center.
Applications should be returned
to the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs in the
Administration Building not later
than April 14.
WANTED
to play
guitar and sing country, folk, and
western music. Office lounge. Hours
Friday and Saturday nights.
Must be 20 or over. Call
or
ask for Mrs. Buchignani.
Male or female. 9Mtf
Salary 'Open.
WALLACE'S
BOOK
STORE
needs
your used textbooks. Bring them in
anytime. We pay top prices. We buy
all used textbooks.
SFtf
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SALE'

ENTERTAINER

299-99-

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REGULAR

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JAM SESSION DANCE
SATURDAY NIGHT

April 1, 1967
IN COMPLEX DINING ROOM

$2.00 per person
Tickets: Complex Office & Student Center
Call 1110 for information
Sponsored by Coopcrstown Complex
IT'S A HAPPENING

Regular
Ethyl

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ctanc

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FOR

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FOR
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CASHED

WITH ID CARDS

Va

Electric motors, used.
horsepower, $5.00 each. Bulk
all makes. Call Dennis.
after 6 p.m.
22F19t

1958 Pontiac Hearse. DeCall
pendable transportation.
all day weekends, after 6 p.m.,
weekdays.
23M5t
FOR SALE 1959 Porsche Super convertible. Red. with red leather upholstery; radio; 62,000 miles. Excellent condition.
Owner has new
Porsche. Call
27M5t

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FARMER MOTOR Co.
CHECKS

SALE

FOR SALE

32c

EAST MAIN AT WOODLAND
Open 6:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m., 6 days

&

discount;

LOST
LOST

Black billfold. Return to John
Mattingly, Alpha Gamma Rho, 700
Woodland Ave. Reward; papers contained in billfold are important.

27M2t

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam ptTtoda.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, March

17

27, 19d7- -.i

Turned Out To Be A Slag Party

e
hair.
letters on it's side that said: comb their
never go in the water. Up
"Fort Lauderdale Or Rust."
They
The girls who have followed on the CajK" (Cod), ever
the sun (and the boys) here from
swimming."
all over the country have a daily
University of Miami coed: "If
ritual they follow while visiting a girl is pale, plump, and rowdy,
this cast Florida community of she's probably from the Mid127,000, dubbed "the Venice of west."
With thousands of bikinied
America" because of its canals
bodies spread out on the beach
and rivers.
They go to the beach around before her last weekend, Mrs.
for10 a.m., and congregate near the Frank Button, a
intersection of Las Olaf Roule-var- d mer resident of Ogallala, Nebr.,
"the cowboy capital of the
and Atlantic Boulevard,
sometimes called "function juncworld," commented:
trouble with this
"The
tion" because so many students
younger generation is thatl'mno
mingle there.
About noon the girls stroll longer a part of it."
across ihe street to the Humfor
cheesedinger drive-iburgers. Then they return to the
beach where they will get dates
by 3 p.m. if they're going to get
them at all. ("pickups are a
COOK COUNTY
way of life here," said Jane Dal-b18, of Joplin, Mo., a student
HOSPITAL
at Monticello Junior College.)
Around 5 p.m., the students
An active social, cultural,
wander over to the Elbo Room,
professional
where an estimated 9,000 glasses
awaits you, only 10 minof beer are sold daily, or to
other popular hangouts such as
utes from Chicago's Loop.
Sand Box, the Student Prince,
A position of your choice
or Lum's.
is waiting in our 2,747
At night the girls usually atbed hospital. Instructor,
tend motel room beer parties,
head nurse, and staff
or
dances on the
beach.
nurse salaries range from
One of the favorite beach acti$545 to $855.
Lovely
vities is reading, and books that
rooms with maid service
appeared on blankets this week
available
at minimum
ranged from "Last Exist To
cost.
to Gideon Bibles from
Brooklyn"
their motel rooms.
Coeds also like to comment
For more information write:
on the competition:
Cook County School of Nursing
University of Georgia coed:
1900 W. Polk
"The New York girls are easy to
Chicago, III. 60612
tall and skinny like
spot. They're
that
model, Twiggy.
NAME
And they talk fast."
ADDRESS
State College at Boston coed:
"These Southern belles are disCITY
gusting. All they do is squeal and
bottle-blond-

By JUDY KLEMESRUD
Nf w York Tlmn Nf wt Service

FOHT
LAUDERDALE,
Fla. A crudely lettered sign was
taped to a tall, slender palm tree
on the city beach here last week.
It said:
"Where the girls aren't!"
A policeman soon tore it down,
did nothing
but his derring-dto conceal what the 30,000 college students gathered here for
sun and suds could readily determine for themselves:
The annual Easter pilgrimage
has turned out to be another
colossal stag party.
With the ratio estimated at
20 to 1, (by the boys), 10 to 1
(by the girls), 6 to 1 (by the
police), and 2 to 1 (by the city's
publicity department), the boys
were downhearted and the girls
were delighted.
"I feel like the proverbial
queen bee," said Kathy Knott,
21, of Garden City, Mich., a
senior at Michigan State Uniblonde
versity. The
was surrounded by five beefy
University of Rhode Island football players in the Elbo Room, a
popular student watering hole
across from the beach.
"Any girl pretty or plain-c- an
come down here without any
money and have a good time,"
she said.
She took a sip of the beer
one of the athletes had bought
for her, then added: "my mother
trusts me."
Sara Limberis was not so sure
about her father.
"It's not that I'm keeping my
whereabouts a secret," the
Dade Junior College
coed said. "I'm just not letting
him know I was here until after
I get home."
Sara, from nearby Miami,
drove to Fort Lauderdale with
four other Miami coeds in a red
convertible with white shoepolish

body-goe-

o

silver-haire- d

1

,

MORNING
Novak and Evans enter the
Capitol Building to ct tne facts

29-ce-

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NURSES

y,

and

long-haire- d

life

f

:

'

, J4

'fx

Evans and Novak
AFTERNOON
phone (around the world, if necessary)
to check every facet of the story.

flat-chest-

"

S

Almost Engaged?

II

5

LATE AFTERNOON

She'll love this
Diamond Ring

out the story in
tion with Evans.

word-by-wor- d

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you are not quite ready to be
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141c. gold setting.
00

Novak pounds
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If

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25

Budget Terms

INSIDE REPORT is a column unique in the
field of news analysis. It has broken through

the reams of dry, pretentious political' writing to become the hottest, most exciting' column from Washington in years.

Under 21? Your Account is Invited

Well give Your 25.00
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engagement ring.
P.S.

Lexington Downtown, Main & Lime; Eastland Shopping
Plaza. Also Winchester and Frankfort.

Its authors, Robert D. Novak and Rowland
Evans Jr., are two ace reporters thoroughly

backgrounded in the Washington game;
is your ideal date?
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Evans and Novak don't always agree on

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sues

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Inside Report'
now a regular feature in
Toe Kentucky Kjhinel

* The Kentucky

Iernel

JX

The South's Outstanding College Daily

Univihsity of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

1894

MONDAY,

MARCH 27, l!)07

i

I

Editorials represent the ojnnions of the Editors, not of the University.

Waltkh

M.

Grant,

'

'l

I

I'M

:

1'

fi

William Knatp,

American Forensic Association, is
set up into regional and national
finals as are the NCAA basketball
finals. The topic to be debated this
year is' "That the U.S. should substantially reduce its foreign policy

commitments."
The topic is announced in August, and, as coach Dr. Cifford
Blyton, has noted, many students

17-1-

From UCLA

The NCAA Basketball Tournament held Friday and Saturday in
Louisville made it painfully evident that UK's segregated teams
are hurting the University'.s,athletic
program in more ways than one.
This was even reflected by the
UCLA cheerleaders, a pep group
which showed true comradeship
among both whites and Negroes
and demonstrated how entertaining the cheerleaders and the band
can be when both are coordinated.
UCLA cheerleaders had worked
up clever and imaginative choreography to renditions of popular
songs, while at UK we plod along
with the same old Dixie
routine we have had
for years, a routine which Negroes
find not very flattering.
We might ask why the Univer- -'

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sity has never had a Negro cheerleader, but we would undoubtedly
receive the same doubletalk that
is dished out when we ask why
there are no Negroes in "white"
UK sorority or fraternity chapters,
why there is but one Negro on
the University faculty, or why the
basketball team has never been
integrated (after this season, the
old hogwash that there are no
Negro athletes available just won't
hold up!)
How strange that a University,
which supposedly has as its goals
the search for truth and the education of the whole man, can be so
narrow-minde- d
at times.
There can be little doubt as to
why CORE is considering making
Lexington a target city in its drive
for equal rights.

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Letters To The Editor

Join Viet Vigil, Faculty Asked
To the Editor of the Kernel:
We write to express our hope
that more students, faculty and
local citizens from all concerned
groups will join in the weekly
Silent Vigil on Tuesdays at noon.
We have been pleased with past
turnouts for the Peace Vigil and
note the increase in size and the
appearance of new faces. A total
of 16 attended the first snow-rai- n
dampened vigil and 24, the second.
Four participants during the first
vigil were unable to attend last
Tuesday which means that 12 new
people came during this opportunity for personal expression. It is
hoped that the "ease of counting"
will be eliminated and the size of
the group will grow (North
Carolina's peace vigil has had an

estimated 4,000 participants).
Those who take part do so out
of individual concern and represent a wide range of opinions;
however, we all wish to express
our sorrow for and our protest
against the Vietnam War. We encourage the individual with the
slightest "cry of concern" to join
the vigil.
In addressing the faculty, we
must admit that as yet only one
member of the faculty has joined
this peace movement in expressing
their concern over the war in Vietnam. Does the faculty lack members opposed to the Vietnam War?
a-.A- y
Do faculty dissenters, like many
"living room activists," lack the
conviction or courage to stand up
t
for what they believe?
We believe that similarly concerned faculty members should obviously not be complimented nor be
;
u 'W7. tn
condemned for such a slight showv
ing, but challenged to show that
they willingly stand with not
away from concerned students on
v
our campus.
1A
.
We do not end with thoughts
TRIVIAL MATTERS SUCH AS SKIN COLOR DO NOT A ELECT COOI) TIMES
of faculty only but primarily speak
AND (;OOD PERFORMANCES OF UCLA' CHEERLEADERS
song-and-dan-

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debating squads. This national
tournament, conducted by the

spend as much as eight hours a day,
several days a week for several
weeks in libraries preparing for
their debate speeches. The UK
team began its basic research with
a bibliography of 20 pages and
has added to this.
And many victories there have
Perhaps this hard work does
been! So far this year the debate
not reap the material benefits
team has brought home 28 trophies awarded the
big time athletic suas well as several top speaker
but it is certainly providperstar,
awards. The team will be repreing something much more impoSoutheastsenting the seven-stat- e
rtantintellectual and academic
ern Region in the National Debate
betterment for both the individual
Finals April 9 in Chicago. The
on the debate team and
berth was resultant from a victory participant
for the University community as a
in the nine-roun-d
regional tournawhole.
ment held at the University of'
We extend wishes for success
Alabama recently.
to the debaters at the Chicago
Rodney Page and Bob Valentine finals, and congratulate the entire
will compete there against 38 teams debate team for its unselfish conremaining from the 900 collegiate tribution to the University.

A Lesson

J

Business Manager

The Quiel Vic lories
The University debate team is
to be commended for its quiet victories this year. This group truly
seeks achievement merely for the
sake of
and for
the honor of their University rather
than for splashy headlines and large
photographs in the local press.
The contributions of the debate
team to the academic atmosphere
of the University is far superior
to that of all athletic teams of the
past, present, and future lumped
into one. When The Kernel asked
two years ago, following UK's upset of Old Miss in a football contest, "What of Quieter Victories?"
this was just what we had in mind.

Henri

I,

Mill

Editor-in-Chi-

Sunk ltocco, Editorial Page Editor

.

-- i

A

to students, who may have overwhelming popularity, a "'67
Corvette, VW or Mustang,"
the most impressive physique or
bod' on campus, a Dean's list
notification, or any other commendable assets, that your symbolic
stand will influence others and express concern that many share!
Don B. Pratt
Im-pal- a,

Commerce Senior
Ken Vance

Graduate Student
in Communications
Gilbert Wilson
Free Lance Artist
Junior
Kii

Tronhles Alumnus

am writing from the distant
past, as a member of the Class of
I

in connection with the Rupp-Talleaffair. It troubles me that
this young man has been excluded
from the team. I believe expulsion
was completely out of order.
1916,

nt

In my opinion, a coach is a
teacher and should act as one.
Rightly construed, the curriculum
includes athletics with the primary
objective being development and
growth of the student. Winning is
important but not primary.
From this point of view conflict
between coach (teacher) and player
(student) offers an excellent chance
for learning, not for "disciplining"
or retribution. Putting this in the
vernacular, it is a chance for the
coach to "catch the breaks" in the
interest of learning.
With the facts at my disposal
it seems to me that the least the
coach, as an established person,
should do is to reinstate the player
and allow him to reestablish himself. To do less may well be prejudicial to the University, the coach
and the player, but to the latter
least of all.
Karl P. Zerfoss
ChkQgo

* 27. IM7 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Monday, Maidi

'

POSITION PAPERS About Hours And AWS
YAF: Abolish Hours

SOS: Abolish AWS

By II NK DAVIS
The Bourbon and Tobacco Cazctte Staff
YAF Vice Chairman
Well, gang, AWS elections are over, and, as always, the camThat man in society should Ik fiee is a fundapaign was devoid of issues. There were plenty of issues to be mental premise which needs no defense, freedom
discussed, but apparently not enough people were willing to being a good in itself. That the situation of the
discuss them.
student in a University environment is greatly
There was some interest in holding a forum at the Student
different, however, Incomes obvious when it is
Center patio, where candidates could present their platforms. considered that:
However, the AWS Senate turned down