xt7ksn012h0r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ksn012h0r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650310  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7ksn012h0r section xt7ksn012h0r Inside Today's Kernel
English institute is set this summer for
secondary school teachers: Page Two.

Vol.LVI, No. 91

University of Kentucky
KY
MARCH

LEXINGTON,

WEDNESDAY,

Women students to receive honors
night: Page Two.

.JJ

10, 19G5

Editor discusses the Centennial Scholarship: Page Four.

Eight Pages

Readers comment on the
situation: Page Five.

Coopers-tow- n

Hears Side
Of Council

10th President
At Bible College

s

Dr. Wiley A. Welsh committed
himself to training of a more adequate ministry to meet the unclear future of the Space Age as
he became the tenth president
of the College of the Bible Tuesday.
Speaking at inaugural ceremonies in Memorial Hall Dr.
Welsh said, "I feel more strongly
than ever the need for specially
trained leaders in the church if it
is to meet the challenge of our
kind of world unified by mass
communication and rapid transportation, divided by uncertainty
of goals and divergence of ideologies, and shakily launched into
Photo by William Mitchell the unclear future of the Space
Dr. Wiley A. Welsh, right, was inaugurated as the tenth president Age."
of the College of The Bible during ceremonies at Memorial Hall
He recalled his decision toen-te- r
the ministry and said, "In
Tuesday. Dr. Paul S. Stauffer, left, chairman of the board of trustees,
inaugurated Dr. Welsh.
particular, I would reaffirm my
faith in the importance to the
church and to the world of the
high calling of the ministry in
all its aspects preaching, pastoral, educational, missionary.
"To the degree that I can contribute to the committing and the
The Town Housing Council's would be presented at the next training of a more adequate minPlanning and Liason Committee meeting.
istry for today and for tomorrow,
I stand ready to do so to the extent
President Doug Smith, in ansuggested at a meeting last night
that "there is need of a state- swer to a question about the of my ability and energy," he
added.
"abominable living conditions,"
ment of intentions by the adDr. Welsh, who was inauguministration on its position as said that the "most we can do is.
rated by Dr. Paul S. Stauffer,
regards student housing over five apply sanctions."
to 10 years of projected planOne of the new members com- chairman of the board of trustees,
mented that, since the rents are succeeded Dr. Riley B. Montgomning."
The committee also suggested going up with increased demand ery as president of the century-ol- d
institution on Jan. 1. Dr.
that the Council find out the Ad- for housing, it was necessary
ministrations position on dormi- "to grab the first thing you find." Montgomery retired after 15 years
President Smith said this was as president.
tory capacity when new dorms
A graduate of Texas Christian
are being built and what per- the reason for the
He said students will make a University and Brite University
centage of the student body they
will house.
School, Ft. Worth, Dr. Welsh
survey and comply this informahad been pastor of the East DalMichael Hoffman, chairman tion into the
by a ratof the committee, asked that since ing system, so that students will las Christian Church for 15 years
the
"will be a distinct know "what they're getting in- before coming to the College of
the Bible.
aid in integrating incoming stu- to."
"More good housing is availThe college is a theological
dents into the community and
able than is found," said Richrelieve somewhat the adminisseminary operated by the Discitration's problem of having to ard Detmer, vice president of ples of Christ Church. The instideal with a large number of planning. "And if we fet a good tution will be known as the Lexstudents," if the ad- rating system established, they'll ington Theological Seminary next
fall.
Interfraternity Council's Stan- ministration would furnish ditto have to improve."
In installing Dr. Welsh as
The next meeting of the Coun-- .
dards Committee recommended machines and paper for running
The Council, cil will be held the first Tuespresident, Dr. Stauffer said, "We
at last night's IFC meeting that off the
the three members of Phi Sigma he said, could provide the labor. day following Spring vacation charge him with the responsibilin Room 113 of the Student Cen ity of prophetic leadership, that
Other members of the comKappa charged with grand
under God, the Lexington Theo
be asked to terminate their mittee are Carol Mickler, Carl ter.
Haaga, and Shirley Ann Cropaffiliation with the fraternity.
per.
Ray Duncan, Donnie Miller,
Richard Detmer, chairman of
and Gary Thor have been charg- the constitution
committee, said
ed with grand larceny in connect- that his committee lias discussed
ion with a furniture theft from
The Associated Press
Neither man would answer ques"plans of organization which
an Eastern Kentucky State ColCalif. Clark tions or add to prepared statewould be acceptable, workable,
BERKELEY,
lege dormitory on Feb. 28. Dilly and functional under the student
Kerr, president of the University ments.
Does, a Phi Sigma Kappa pledge government."
of California, suddenly announc"It is with regret that I aninvolved in the incident, has
He said that the constitution
ed his resignation late Tuesday.
nounce that I shall be submitting"
since quit the fraternity. The
He made no mention of the riot- my resignation as president of the
four are being held to the Madous free speech movement which University of California to the
ison County Grand Jury.
has shaken the university's Berkeboard of regents at its March 26
The committee further recomley campus since last fall.
mended that IFC meet with Phi
Along with Kerr, acting chanA small group demonstrated
cellor Martin Meyerson announcSigma Kappa to determine if
ed that he too was quitting.
reason can be shown for them to yesterday in front of the Lexington Post Office protesting recent Neither gave any reason for the
remain on campus.
police brutality in Selma, Ala. sudden action.
In other business, IFC presiDr. Meyerson succeeded ChanDemonstrators, mostly student Keith I lagan urged fraters dents from UK,
Kentucky State cellor Edward W. Strong, who
nities to be able to define their
took a leave of absence after the
College, and some CORE repreprograms at the evaluation meetsentatives, marched quietly along arrest of some 800 demonstrators
ing scheduled for March 28 and Rarr Street carrying posters pro- at the university administration
29. The fraternities will meet
building Dec. 2 and 3.
testing police brutality and dewith their national officers at manding voter
Both resignations become, efprotection in
the Imperial House to discuss Selma.
fective at the next meeting of the
their goals.
Cerald Cunningham, chairuniversity regents in Berkeley,
The meeting will also be at- man of the Lexington CORF March 5 and 6.
tended by Vice President Robert chapter said, "We are here to draThe resignations were announced at a hastily called press
Johnson, Vice President Robert matize the need for federal protection of civil rights marchers in conference in University Hall,
Kerleyand Executive Vice Presiall parts of the country."
dent A. D. Albright.
where Dr. Kerr has his office.
I) II. CLAKK KEHH

Committee Suggests
Housing Clarification

tip-boo- k.

tip-bo-

IFC Group
Recommends
Drop For 3

President
Clark Kerr's resignation
stuns California: Page Seven.
Dr. William B. Castle, of Harvard
University, will speak at the Medical
Center Thursday: Page Eight.

Welsh Becomes

UK Faculty

Larry Buxton, Cooperstown
treasurer, told Cooperstown residents last night that he had presented the town council's side of
the "eviction decision" to the
University Faculty.
"I believe (faculty) feeling is
with students rather than with
the administration," Buxton said.
The faculty had voted unanimously to let Buxton stay at the
meeting Monday to hear Vice
President Robert Johnson.
Cooperstown student officials
told the residents they would
meet with President John Oswald
Friday at 9 a.m. to discuss their
future. At that time they will ask
to meet with the Board of Trustees at their next meeting Friday
March 20.
Mary Jeppsen, Cooperstown
secretary, urged students "Please
don't move! You will know you're
being evicted when you get your
notice." She said that formal
eviction announcements are due
March 15.
'
'Any of you who have received
honors at "Stars in the Night" or
in the Men's Honor Night (Thursday) accept them 'in absentia.'
Tell them you are working too
hard to keep your home to be
present," Jeppsen advised the
residents.
Mayor Fred Dellamura told
the residents that although it
looks like there has not been as
much "noise" made openly, but
the noise is being made "in the
places where it counts."
Mrs. Mary Schole reminded
the residents of the financial importance of the alumni. "If we
could get a few alumni on our
side to cut Oswald's money off
and strangle him, he would have
to give in."

to-

Spring football practice begins March
24: Page Six.
Yale students protest in behalf of
Professor Bernstein: Page Seven.

tip-boo-

non-house-

k

d

tip-boo- k.

lar-cen-

logical Seminary may become
the instrument of His will and
purpose."
Dr. Albert C. Outler, professor
of historical theology at Southern
Methodist University, told institution officials they must make a
transition "from an impressive
record of providing yesterday's
church with a vital ministry to
the very different challenge of
doing well by the church of tomorrow."
"You cannot prepare men now
for vital ministry 20 years from
now merely by fitting them out
with the repertory of ecclesiastical skills and fashions that are
current and choice today," he
added.
A strong academic offering by
an institution and good student-teache- r
relationships are the bases for theological education, he
said.
Representatives of approximately 200 academic institutions
of higher learning attended the
ceremony. The invocation was
offered by George L. Florence,
president of the College of the
Bible Alumni Association.
Gordon Amos Read, student
body president, gave the benediction.

AAUP Chief
Speaks Here
Dr. David Fellman, national

president of the American Association of University Professors,
and Vilas professor of political
science at the University of Wisconsin, will give an address at
the annual dinner of the University chapter of the American Association of University Professors
tonight.
The dinner will be at 6:30 p.m.
in the Student Center. A social
hour for AAUP members and their
guests will begin at 5 p.m. in the
Helen G. King Alumni House.
Dr. Fellman, an authority on
American constitutional law with
special reference tocivil liberties,
also will speak at 3:30 this afternoon at a political science grad
uate coffee.

Kerr Quits At California
-

Group Protests
Selma Brutality

-

meeting to be effective immediately thereafter," Dr. Kerr said.
He noted that he had served
the university in administrative
capacities nearly 20 years. He was
the first chancellor of the Berkeley campus oldest of the university's seven campuses when it
was recovering from a bitter controversy over faculty loyalty oaths.
He became president in 1958.
Gov. Edmund G. Brown, in
Sacramento, said "I intend to do
everything within my power to
see that Dr. Kerr rescinds his
action of resigning.
"I think it's a terrible shame
that a few thoughtless students
led by a handful of troublemakers can hurt the reputation of the
greatest public university in the
world and cause its brilliant president and a
new
chancellor to resign."
Dr. Meyerson's statement criticized spokesmen for student com- hard-workin-

g

Continued On Page

7

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

J
-

10, 19G5

Lemmon 'Bond-isIn 'How To Murder'

ir

h'

1

I

J

TO

i'.
Students Meet Ailcs

Davenport, Robert A. Crosson, Ginger Sabel, Secre- tary Ailes, Annette Westphal, Ben Crawford and
Bill Duncan.

of the Army, the Honorable Stephen
Ailes, center, entertained UK students who at- tended the inauguration of President Johnson in
Secretary

Washington Jan.

20.

From the left are Feter

M.

Aid
English Institute
Secondary School Teachers
To

A summer English institute
which will be aimed primarily at
improving the competencies of
secondary school teachers (grades
in the areas of literature,
language, and composition, will
be held at the University June
14th to August 6th.
According to Mrs. Lizette Van
Gelder, director of the institute,
many of today's teachers are
teaching two or more English courses when they themselves
have only a minor or less in
English and many are not adequately prepared nor have a sufficient background to teach English to today's youth.
The institute is designed to
increase the knowledge of and to
improve the proficiency of high
school and junior high teachers
of English so that they can go
back to their prospective schools
with a better understanding and
knowledge of what they are teaching.
Applicants for this program
must have a bachelor's degree
from an accredited college, a
secondary teaching certificate
with a major or area in a field

Women Students
To Get Honors
"Stars in the Night," the annual awards program for University women students, will be held
at 7 p.m. today in Memorial Hall.
The purpose of the program is
to honor women students who
are outstanding in scholarship,
service and in various fields of
study.
Highlights of the evening will
be the tapping of new members
of Mortar Board, a senior women's
leadership honorary, presentation
of two Mortar Board senior service awards, and the naming of the
outstanding graduate women in
the College of Education and the
outstanding unaffiliated freshman, sophomore, junior and
senior women.
Mistress of ceremonies will be
Dede Cramer, Lexington, chairman of the steering committee.
The event is open to the public.

other than English, must be
teaching at least three courses in
English during the present year,
meet the requirements for no
more than a minor in English,
have evidence of good character
and teaching ability, and have a
willingness to participate fully in
the program.
The institute will be
limited to forty eight participants
and will offer six to nine hours of
graduate credit. Final selections
will be made by a screening
committee consisting of members
of the UK English faculty.
The eight week program is
held in cooperation with the United States Office of Education
National Defense Education Act.
Under the provision of the
N.D.E.A., participants in the institute's program will pay no
fees, but will be required to purchase certain texts and supplies.
Those accepted into the program will receive a stipend of
seventy five dollars per week,

plus fifteen dollars per week for
each dependent.
Applications for this program
must be in by April 15, 1965.
Those applicants who have been
accepted will be notified between
April 16 and 23. Letters of acceptance from the applicant
should be postmarked no later
than May 8, 1965. For further
information and applications
contact director:
Mrs. Lizette Van Gelder, Department of English, University
of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506.

fast-pace-

d,

For Cut

Stupid."

"How To Murder," howevei,
gives sex it chance to strike back
at the insipid comedy. Lemmon
crea-atas a
of a Bond-isstyle comic
strip is beset by sex personified
in the form of Italian actress
Vema Lisi. Miss Lisi's form is
up to the task, and sex emerges
triumphant at last.
Yet that is sidestepping the

A
student was
treated at University Hospital
Sunday for cuts on both wrists.
John Mark Medley, a freshman
in Arts and Sciences, was found
in his room at 424 East Maxwell
St. with his wrists slashed.
Mrs. Russell Maynard of the
same address notified city police
at 3:25 a.m. Sunday. His condition is listed as "good."

or

pseudo-adventureso-

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Will Dunn Drug
Corner of
and Maxwell
S. Lime

The College Store
FOUNTAIN

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Peter Sellers George

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Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 4J50tf. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published four tunes weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam per.ods, and week.y during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Stephen Pa.mer,
secretary.
iiegun as the Cadet in 1894,
the Kecord in UM), and the Idea
in ltf J8. Published continuously as the
Kernel since ltf 13.
SUHSCH1PTION

Me,

COSMETICS

The Kentucky Kernel
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thesis Lemmon even takes to
court to defend. Should you, or
should you not, feel free to murder your wife? Lemmon's argumen
is both action and rhetoric the
action
ingenious, and
paper topic, but with Jack Lemmon arguing the point the grade amusing; the rhetoric emotional,
has to be "A".
misogamistic, and also amusing.
Perhaps "How To Murder"
The Jack Lemmon of "Days
Of Wine and Roses" and the docs not achieve the belly laughs
of Lemmon's wonderful "Irma
Jack Lemmon of "The Apartment" is perhaps the best side La Douce." But it is certainly a
of the man. "How To Murder"
healthy night's entertainment.
does not really grant Lemmon
While you are waiting for anthe same opportunity to act, but other sample of Jack Lemmon's
it is by no means a superficial dramatic ability, lighter pieces
like "How To Murder Your Wife"
comedy.
A REVIEW
will make the wait an entertainThat style unfortunately ment. If you can't support the
seems to have captured televititle thesis for English 102, at
sion after a demise on the mo- least you can spend one evetion picture screen. Sex has al- ning forgetting the problem altoways been funny, but it has not gether.
always been dealt with in a
successfully 'funny manner as Freshman Treated
Dean Martin proved in "Kiss
Wrists
Dy SCOTT NUNLEY
Kernel Arts Editor
"How To Murder Your Wife"
offers a thesis that few professors
are going to accept as a term

L.
Farrelu-Luka-

s

Heller . Henry Far reli

ST
ST
ST
ST
ST
ST
ST

1669
1711
1829
1936
2013
2083
2142

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

The Drab Sex Turns

Elections

Men Dare Add Dash

By MAGGIE SAVOY
AP Ncwsfcaturcs Writer
Next? Girls will form
clubs. Men are better
to look at every day. They look
taller, handsomer, more James
Bondier in their rugged astra-kan- s,
Men-Watche- rs

dashing boots,
trench coats, slim-trisuits, colorful sport coats.
This hasn't happened overnight. Men change fashions with
the pace of snails. But men are
breaking out of their dull drab
shells of conformity and daring
to care how they look.
Coming to their defense is
Betty Gardner, young double-rarita woman advertising
agency president in the men's
wear field.
"Men would look even handsomer if they'd keep their wives
home when they buy suits. Eight
out of 10 take their wives along.
They're crazy to do it," she
says.
"Let women pick out ties and
sport coats. They're great at that.
YVomen relate to color instinctively. But they don't know the
masculine figure."
Most men, she believes, are
unsure of their taste. They're
impatient shoppers anyway; their
minds are on other things.
"Businessmen are timid, afraid
to be different. They equate conservatism in business with conformity in dress their status
symbol."
But there has been progress.
It was once only the millionaire,
the show business star, the beatnik, who could afford to look
different. Retailers conservative
businessmen themselves stock- mink-line-

d

brighter shades and patterns.
Even the conservative man
suit. They "bought safe,"
has a choice of 18 different modrisked little hard cash on what
the trade calls "fancies," a plaid els today, the three, two or
on the bold side, a check a bit
suits, variously shaped
coats and lapels.
dashing.
Because of the fear of being
The average man spent his
money dressing the wife and kids, unmasculine, he has veered away
of from the
bought himself
Many a fashion pops up and
dies because
grabbed
conit. Suede shoes, stove-pip- e
tinentals came in and went out
fast.
Miss Gardner sees many new
fashions coming, all in the
ed only the staples, the

three-butto- n

one-butt-

three-quarte- rs

too-far-o-

off-bea- ts

"rugged-com-

.

.

I'm

Margaret
jf rom the

i

Furs: the astrakan(takeabald
man, put a fur hat on him and
he's Instant James Bond);
coats (Cary Grant prefers
mink).
Shoes: the slip-oshoe is now
in the ballroom and office; evening wear will be more dressy.
Colors: even business shirts
will show color. So will suits
no screaming oranges, but offbeat browns and tawnys,
and greens.
Jewels and cosmetics: once
a man owned one pair of onyx
cuff links, period. Now he has
has jewel boxes full. Men smell
better too. Scent, once considered
feminine, comes in a whole range
of men's colognes, deodorants,
soaps, refreshers.
fur-line-

A. I
a suit a year, wore it for

Sunday-go-to-meeti-

until it was shiny,
then to business until it frayed.
Today, with more leisure and
money, they've found excitement
breaking out of their rut. They've
dared bright sport coats, colorful
slacks, madras shirts for golf and
barbecues.
Today's heros have made their
mark, too: James Bond and Rex
Harrison are none the less manly
for all their dash; John F. Kennedy no less compelling because
he was
Fashion magazines and color
advertising have had their effect.
Men can picture themselves in
well-dresse-

d

Kappa Delta
President, Llaine Baumgartcn;
vice president, Susanne Zeigler;
secretary, Marty Henkle; treasurer, Betsy Park; assistant treasurer, Judy Price; rush chairman,
Patty Lyons; editor, Deanna
activities chairman, Diane
Sailing; alumni coordinator, Connie Mullins; assistant house president, Susan Hobertson; assistant
membership chairman, Kathy
Bass; assistant vice president,
Bonnie Bee Buskirk; athletic
chairman, Joyce Billings; chaplain, Meredith Smith; and education chairman, Sue Shoopman.
Corresponding secretary, Carol
Ghent; efficiency chairman, Fran
Brannen; guard, Karen Kiel; historian, Holly Henkle; Homecoming chairman, Patsy Young; house
president, Barbara Lieb; LKD
chairman, Judy Schlosser; magazine chairman, Tee Lou Taylor;

parliamentarian, Janice Kemper;
publicity chairman, Lyn Ander-egg- ;
scholarship chairman, Suzi
Soames; senior picnic, Carol
Ghent; senior sale, Ophelia
Speight; sergeant-at-armJudy
Stevenson; social chairman, Billie
Peterson; social service chairman,
Denny Barker; song leader, Barbara Carter; recommendations
chairman; Kathy Binkley; and
town chairman, Connie Elliot.
s,

Mc-Clai- n;

Recipes
Cream sweet butter with grated
orange rind and a little orange
juice to serve with waffles and
honey.

halved chicken livers

Wrap

with bacon and broil; serve with
scalloped tomatoes, green peas
and sweet potatoes (candied or
baked) for a delightful luncheon
main course.

n

d.

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Remember too that the
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* "Mc Strong Man"

Tin Cups Maybe
We are indignant! When we
first announced support for the
Centennial Scholarship fund we
did not fully realize the nature
of the committee's work.

Naturally the scholarship committee cannot expect students to
sacrifice a trip to a movie, or to a
party, or to a sports event, or to
the Paddock in order to be able
to give money. It is unfair to ask
sacrifices that impose hardships on
students. After all, students have
to go to school, too, and it's difficult to make ends meet already,
what with Grille prices so high
and all.
And then there is the problem
of brotherhood. By asking students
to contribute'to a fund from which

they will not benefit directly
the committee is asking students to think of someone other
than themselves. How docs one
justify such gullibility to friends,
particularly those who are followers of Ayn Rand.
And then there is this business of signing cards just like
a church offering. It's troublesome
to fill out cards as if the University doesn't require enough
cards to be filled out anyway!
It's like signing your life away.
Why doesn't the committee set
up canisters like the TB people
or the March of Dimes. Tin cups
maybe.
Old softies can get pledge cards

at Frazee Hall.

The Grip Of The Networks
Aid to the public elementary and
secondary schools, debated and defeated with almost annual regularity for over forty years, now appears
likely to become a reality during the
current session of Congress.

The measure approved yesterday
by the House Committee on Education and Labor does not represent
total victory for those who have
fought so many years for broad and
general aid to the public schools.
Rather it is a bill which, by resorting to two separate and distinct devices of compromise, aims at substituting consensus for controversy.

establish supplementary education
centers. The benefits of these provisions would go to children in
private and parochial as well as in
public schools. This compromise
is clearly designed to appease the
Roman Catholic opposition, which
has, in the past, represented the
most serious roadblock to all school
aid.

Tinted Glasses

In his vigorous denunciation of
those who don't "like the American
The principle of separation of
way of life," Ohio's Lieutenant
church and state remains as basic Governor
John Brown showed that
to this country as it ever was, both his own
vision of that way of life
to protect the strength and integrity is
at best nearsighted.
of the public schools and to safeTo hear such shallow thought
guard religious freedom. In recog- presented by a high state official
nition of the fact that direct aid to is
very disturbing.
The first device appropriates the religiously controlled schools would
In his speech on "Christian
criterion of poverty as the key to violate that principle, the House
Involvement in State Politics" at
distribution of aid dollars. By offercommittee provided that all funds
Wesley Foundation Tuesday, the
over $1 billion to help the states would go directly and exclusively
ing
referred to "the
finance the education of children to the public school authorities and leutenant governor
basic fundamental rights of life,
from the poorest families, the Presiall facilities provided with such
liberty and the pursuit of happident has skillfully taken fair advanfunds would remain under the conness" and used such phrases as
tage of a growing recognition that trol of the the public schools. Chil"the blood, sweat and tears that
pockets of poverty sap the strength dren enrolled in nonpublic schools have
gone into making America."
of the nation as a whole, including thus would benefit under an arThen in the question period
the wealthier school districts.
rangement of "shared time," withwhich followed, he said the Uniout any diversion of public funds
there is little opConsequently
Speaker's Rule should be
to religious institutions. Even this versity further. He said:
carried
position to any Federal effort to
eliminate such pockets. Since the compromise will still require legal
"I don't want those people who
rulings in some states, such as New try to overthrow our government,
expenditures required to educate
the children of the needy are a heavy York, where the State Constitution and who try to convince people
burden to entire school districts and has been interpreted as prohibiting that there is no God, loose in my
shared-tim- e
arrangements.
indeed to whole states, it can easily
town I want them out."
be demonstrated that aid directed
He said we should do away with
But in the main the bill as it
at the pockets of poverty has many now stands offers every
prospect of extreme groups like the American
of the beneficial effects of general
Nazi Party and the Communist
getting Federal aid out of the talkaid to the public schools.
Party. He added that he was "sick
ing stage. Untold millions of chiland tired of hearing people scream
dren have been hurt by the legislaThe secon