xt7m3775v04k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m3775v04k/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1965 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. Quarterly, Publication suspended 1922 and resumed with v. 1, no. 1 (May 1929); v. 5, no. 9 (May 1933) not published; issues for v. 37, no. 2-v. 40, no. 1 (spring 1966-spring 1969) incorrectly numbered as v. 38, no. 2-v. 43, no. 1; v. 40 (1969) complete in 3 no. journals  English [Lexington, Ky. : University of Kentucky Alumni Association, Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus University of Kentucky. Kentucky alumni 2002- Kentucky alumnus monthly Kentucky alumnus, vol. 01, no. 36, 1965 text Kentucky alumnus, vol. 01, no. 36, 1965 1965 2012 true xt7m3775v04k section xt7m3775v04k     E O History of the University I “
1 T u c   • A Challenging Century  
• Brief History of Alumni Association C l
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J AL U M N U 5 www 1965 ' y
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I LIBRARY I _ I
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._ I   District Il—1lie1iar¢l Ii. Cooper, P, (), II, {J 
'·  I Published quarterly by the University of Kentucky on the campus of the University at Lexington. _5“'_"•’T$•‘i· l\;Q·_ `  
E { . Membership (Type A) in the Alumni Association includes subscription to the Alumnus. Member Dl$l"°i lll—“_Tll}*“" 1?*'il“"“¤*`· 915 $w;;}_:  
V I of National Editorial Association, Kentucky Press Association, American Alumni Council. ,$IT}‘*'1· 1-*““$"lll*`· l'*Y·  {9*
. ; District 1\’—l)r. (). Il. Murphy, ·l7ll 0,  
I I I   r IMI., Lexington, Ky.; ]. Paul Nickr~l1_ ·  
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I i A Centennial Letter from President Oswald 4 I,,·I'·eVl'· I`; II. II I _ _I_I, I, II I  
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I I I History of the Umveisity 5 ‘I§[{f_‘,_,,,I _._I ;;{F,§‘I.I,_ "“" ‘ - _
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2     Pictorial Historv of the University 9 II I _ I I ;I"`II "I'“` IIISY ` II I
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; l 1 IVing Of Expectation 2-1
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¥ I Through the Eyes of a Student 20 i>.I u..i..rI I. ,p...»i....».. mv ’1‘..t..».
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 . I Example of Centennial Leadership 27 .° ° °
 E ` The llrmrll ol 1)1ri·i·tors Ilivits .· *
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 i UK Placement Service 29
 . Centennial Books 30
I-  ‘ Significant Dates of the University 31
 ` A Brief History of the Alumni Association 32
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  A Message from VVilliam M. Cant 35
    ._ .I   I __ . I. I I Edited by the 1)i-partrnerit nt 1’ul~ln 1
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I.   I A UH1V€PS1tY Is A Place; It Is A Splrlt ..... X V I I I
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.‘f`_IQ‘g   I At the close of a century of growth the (`niversity of Kentucky has arrived at a I   _
""" "   proper moment for stocktaking. The first hundred years of the institutionI’s history I . 
  have been colored by the hopes and aspirations of a people who have wished to I    
  mature their culture and promote their general welfare. The heart of the (`ni- I I I
  versity’s story, however, lies more with the countless students and faeulty ' ·
  members in the past who have given so generously of their talents and lives to I I
I develop a struggling agricultural and mechanical college into a university of I I I
I . . 4
  parts and objectives.   . ,
I The (`niversity of Kentucky has responded to the changing demands of its I 5  
I times. It has created colleges. as trees put out limbs. Indeed. the history of the I I I Ii
3 (`niversity is essentially that of its colleges. In these the institution has experi- I  ,
E Clleerl its frustrations and savored its victories. These several parts have been I I _ 
I,,I,i,I r   The ('illU(’T.S`ili/,.9 broadening promises to Kentuekians that it has been ever aware   6
I _ of their educational needs.   I
I 7 . r ‘
  The past century, however. has been but a chart to the future for the l nz- I I
A.-Wn: Q versity of Kentucky. Present faculties and students are no more ambitious than ‘ ·-
I have been their predecessors. but they do have clearerconcepts of the educational I s , 
I Challenges of a complex age. Because of past sacrifice the second century opens I  
TI. `» l l _ _ . , I I ’
;N1·ir ·: 
-. present circumstances, and most of all, an appreciation . .   1,
{ . » _ _ campus and 1(),(l()(l persons enrolled in tl1c (tml;  5·
 1 ¤ of the extraordinary challenge 1tS second century holds. . (S    »
 1 i _ _ _ Colleges by L)14. Beyond numbers, lioweveyg    
I hope that you members of our alumni community will . i . · . .  >· 5; 
; h th_ _ _t _th VVh_l f _thf I 1 j d profound question ot the nature and organm1ta»a   .
L  s are is s ].I'1 V1 Ls. 16 1 u "tl1I`Illll an . . . . .5. 
 - _ P X 1 _ _ a_ ° { learning these voung n1en and women will ret imp   ir 
D . t l
 e friends have helped the U1]lV€TS1ty to its successes of the thmwhtful Citiycm wud h_,ld(_r<  1.  
 · , first century, even more will such support be needed in ° . A i_ ` ` " , . .  
  — th d h d d { d Contronted by such a prospect. the L niversitv :.  _ .
  esecon one un re earso en eavor. . . . . . , . ‘ . _. at1·‘. 
I P h th t _ y t t L 1_ I t { th_ and administration are devoting tlns Lentennial lt.  
· = er a s e mos 1m or an accom IS 1n1en 0 is . . .  
 - j _ P _ P P _ discussing the means bv wlncl1 we can best hopet  wi 
; »; 1ssue of your magaz111e would be to impart such a 4 . ‘ .      
¢ ; _ _ outstanding education, research, and service wut.    
  · l measure of the Centennial purpose that many of you will 1 . , _ _   - ; 
’ ‘ k C. 1 H rt t . ,t the L . t n m S O the challenge of 1tS second centurv. Tlns c·111·re111—· ·¤  ·
. . maeaseiaeo ov1s1 exino ca u ra . . .. .   .  
 · ,p , g P ( of the University s academic responsibilities will pn <;
V community college during the months to come. Through- . ' . . .  
  an academic plan bv wlnch tl1e University can he Q- 1
- out the year we shall have many conferences, lectures, . ‘ . . ‘ g_ .
1 . . . . . H as it seeks excellence. Thereby. traditional Helds wo. ..
  _ art1st1c events, and ceremonies which should interest a _ _   _ , V ity;
 , ; Of Ou For instance in A IH will Occur the Centemlgil and research can be successfully modified xilisef;
 1 1 . 1 . ' . . . ’·
 - 1   . ’ P .. , , i. fields may be entered. ()nlv m tlns faslnon. it 11‘1‘..*§€
,- , Social Studies Conference on Main Currents in Ameri- ' . ' .  
i e can Lif€,, Its rind al artici ants will include \I“ remembered, can the University successfully tai? 4.
  ` P . P P P ` ii responsibility in a second centurv Cl1tll`t1Ctt‘l`lZt‘(li4 :
g Lerner, Seymour Lipset, and Peter Drucker, three of the . ' *5
. . . credible change a11d growth.  
;s ~ most famous scholar-commentators on American society. _ _r _ _.  
. . . . . Certamlv tl1e University needs the support ti. 
. V 1 You are all cordially invited to attend this event and , ‘ _ _ · I 5 _
, . . alumni and friends as it undertakes to meet tl1e¤ EDm) · N
, Q ¤ many others which you will read about. I I , I _ I I _ I t tl t N 1 RS ori;
; ¢ . . . . . . . en< es in ll Y 1er earmnu. .e ne 1 r re ia a ~  
 2. l . All of the special mtellectual and artistic act1v1ty in ° , , S . , F` I I l" ,,3 Df.Bcm1er¢
·— h . . . . . read this issue ot 'llie Kentucky; Alumnus- earelins; · . _
 < t e University system during the Centennial Year is · _ , vgmgmficaiice yy
1; . 1 . . . even more, that each of vou attempt to visit senin .-lime k
g , ; designed to do more than enrich us generally, important _ _ · _ , _ . \ §. nown C
»  , . . . . of the University system during tlns (1(‘lli(‘lllll1ll r ;w k
. is  I as th1S 1s. These events have a special purpose in that * 1 W reflects
 . they are designed to suggest to everyone something of C l_ U ?S“"f0€6 of ll (
`_  . . . . . .0 2 ’, ' * ·
 R the awesome challenge facing the 1nst1tut1on m the new H H l pgnltiles. Dr, ti
I  century. When the University began its life, the setting W ®Q_§§??‘”l”g in higr
i  was essentially a rural environ in wh1ch men could _;1"P°nf0 wntg
  I`€3.dlly UI1Cl€ISt21l'1d tl`l€i.I' WO1‘l(l, manage their affairs, and I W. OSWALD» Pl€"‘i_Te·$`€lZTCl} {MO
Q' make decisions on public issues. Now, at the start of a L/p1.iwr.gi{y of KenIH·l` he drawn wi
" ‘ ` "  .} ~·

  i I ..,.
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  Turxung PO1I1tS In The . . a
  · .` H • • •   I P 5
  istory Of The Un1vers1ty   I .
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Llillllilt-_   HE STRUGGLE of Kentuckians with vision to fulfill the »   l
liV_VVV`_     T promise and unrealized ambition of their forefathers   · I
; LW    _ through establishment of a great state university is V   U  
QUVVIVV `    V  · fundamentally the story of the University of Kentucky. ' I I
Yue` V    ; »  Ably led by all of the administrators of the University, I   I i
mlm   __  . ]ohn B. Bowman; ]ohn A. VVilliams; ]oseph D. Pickett; · I  
(Um,    QV   V i` ~  V __ _ lames K. Patterson; Henry S. Barker; Frank L. McVey;    
   ~ ? Herman L. Donovan; Frank C. Dickey, many other per- I I
my    . . Q  V. sons have helped shape the institution of today. The lead- ·  
iinl IQ   I i . I.  I GTS WET? m€U of diH€1'€l1t Vi€\\‘S with varying conceptions   I ’ 
Ulm    2;  .j,, -.  of what a university was and what its function should I I  
X wm;    . ` be. They performed a remarkable job considering the I I *
www    support they received from the state and its citizens.      
will PU  Leadership in the University of Kentucky may not have I    
H bm   ` been consistent or pointed in the same direction, but It I § I
qdwtr   .V has been, all facts considered. remarkably good. Based I I
wwf   a upon the successes of these leaders and their devoted ' I g
V it mg  ` followers. President john \V. Oswald in 1963 tackled the    
Hy Cm    . _V herculean task of building a university to serve future I I j
TIN; 3.    _    generations. I I :
  3*;*;.. In its 100 years. 1865-1965. there have been several V I I r
wt UI    fundamental crises. To those who witnessed or par- I I  
I thy;.   NOTEV tieipated in the life of the University during that century I I
It HH I.   ‘ virtually every day brought either crisis or drama. Most I   V. 
uV_CIHIi_V     B¢’7m€tt H. lVr1ll luis contributed a work of unusual of these are deservedly long forgotten. Many of them   I
Slwv;..§;§t'l:B;a'lC€ mVl1»1S Vmost interesting article eoneerning have been well chronicled in histories of the 1I`1SlZ1lZlltlOI`1·   V
mmH_VIiD0rk "Own 0`Tl·$`CSl1lfllC·l1.1sf0rI] of the University. His Some. perhaps. deserve a closer look than they have    
  '€ll€€YS ill-0 turmoil lzeneatli. the seemingly placid hitherto received. I ‘
  vt U Uiitvlffsify struggling to meet its responsi- l’erh;1ps the most important crisis in the life of the I    
'fzltlt'?S· D7`- llfllll is the autlior of numerous articles up- University was the Stfl1§lgl€‘ OVW $t1‘~t€‘ SUPPOIT and the   l
®QM €?~~g¢·»1·ism»·rmz journals and periodicals and is culled degree of secular control. From the bsgliiming 1¤¤¤Y I    
»V._i pon to write book 7‘CUiCwS for sueli. puljlieations, His vintlictive and jealous citizens thought that higher €dllC3.-    
·D» P"“‘I"”“'°l' mtv the celebrated Gon. Goebel murder ease tion would be more p1‘<>P<*1`l>' lumdied b5` Secular l“Stit“‘ I I  
Y<‘r¤F***l“Ih°‘° drawn wide u.tten.tion. rlimnglwnr the Smm tions or institutions outside the Comruouwealth- $11011  
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Q   struggles were almost continuous in the first twenty-five maneuverings of these various interest groups ii, it  Owncrl the ag
{    l · years of University history. During that periodthe hos- convention have never been fully portrayed nnr lr. {1 the sccnlnr (
_‘  l i . tility of churches, and of the supporters of secular their activities been chronicled in the light of ein;. U  r,r,wari`iii e
i ‘   { education significantly influenced the legislature. This. records now available. An additional concei·n l-(ir:.  leckncr-’ nt (lil
i ·y   l perhaps, was a factor in the failure of the state to convention members was the constant pressure i`i-i,,rr._  m lcrl thc dal
A, 5 l i properly support the institution. Yet denial of proper depression—torn and aroused citizenry of the statr·i.,r_l  nivorsjty llc
 .     support did not satisfy these groups. They desired either positive action to restore confidence in state giii·r·i—i,;,  `eclrncr nosscs
  9 1 control or destruction. to shackle the giant corporations such as the i·inlr__   ncrsonaliiy
i   _ The meeting of the constitutional convention in 1890 distilleries and coal companies. and above all to pn.,  [his pliysical
  n i X was to provide enemies of the Agricultural and Mechani- rigid safeguards against unnecessary expenditin·r·t ij   in dcliata
j   l cal College (UK’s original name) another opportunity mics of the University. not desiring to operate opt »·_‘_  l crcrlilficnlt ii
  n l 3 to either destroy or hamstring the state’s university. enemies of the t uiversity, saw economy as a nu. rl  Fnyi_·[tg an
i   . Careful study provides th; basis for concluding that the mask for their true intent.   to {lic d
; Q     forces of hostility to old “A. and M.”, as it was then The Committee on Education reported on Xin  ilaiawiins tlic"
if  5 \ t called, mounted to a feverish height in this period. 1891. The report specifically stated. "No suin slit  liecangclic win
l Furthermore, the convention was meeting in a year of raised or collected for education. except in the Liv   grr-at incntii
’ E T   farm depression and economic uncertainty. Powerful schools, until the question of taxation is subniii:»  lading orator
 Q l 3 l farm organizations such as the Alliance and the \Vheel the legal voters and a majority of the votes east ii;  `Qovernor Bncl.
    ` i were demanding economy in government. Perhaps the of taxatiou." The report brought on a three-d_i·.  and Bronston,
L {   enemies of the institution reasoned that by combining debate. The fight began over the question of ii] -   of fricndg
 _i E ` l forces with the agrarians they might write into the new or not a one-half cent property tax then colleen  i·Cassius Xl. Cla
  l l constitution a clause forbidding state support. Hardly support the University would be continued. l·`i·i· { enemies later
 at J any other conclusion is waranted by the reports of the initial point opponents sought to eliminate the t`n;·. ·  tiby his rulings
f convention proceedings. For when the convention met from consideration for state tax support. \\`···  Trccognize dnri
 ‘ l in Frankfort in September, 1890, these groups were southern, and castcrn Kentuckians in the conw iopposiiigliis or
 . \ determined to rip state support from A. and M. College. expressed their fears that such an institution ··  i€University for
 V _ Than; was high drama in Frankfort that yaa,·_ Tlic become a haven of the godless. that it would lir·iiF·  iinstitution and
r l constitutional convention was composed of Kentucky`s tht? €’¤tiY¢` Stiittf but it $¤`¤'il<’¤· Tll<‘>' ¤`¤i$<‘¤l #1 lint?  jj°B0ckn0r and
 ` i great and near-great. \Vbile ]ohn C. Carlisle and many UWT taxing all UW P¢‘<>Pl¢‘ to $\¤PD<>¤`t H few t<
 · obvious candidates for nomination for govemor. Cer- have been the state university wc know had tlt"li`a?1€ illlllllY ttl
  tainly several expected to make a record at the conven- men not met there and defeated the challenit Zighfhf clllnnnt
 f tion that would strengthen their political status. The by thc report of the connnittcc on edncatiell   at Tllc tax
» l 6
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 i I `· 
in tt  wlwd the ugrarians, overcame the bigotted arguments for the endowment and maintenance of the Agricultural   l ' ‘
my hi   the Secular educational lenders, and risked the wrath and Mechanical College shall remain until changed by    
cme { Powerful eeonomic groups in Louisville. W. M. law." The Court of Appeals of Kentucky later held that l J e 
[UI., Q, kncry ut that time onc of Kcntucl¤St<>¤ gm'? €’¤<’mi<’5 of the i¤$tit¤ti0¤ P9~¤$€ to C0¤·   » 
· mz.-  jgucnt the wnsmnnmi make,-S from killing ilic Univer- Sider the d<>¤bt¤·b¤rr¤U€d thrwt to any plans they had- g l g
rm. lg  During the long debate Beekner spoke for {pany lu the Constitutional convention Beckner and Bronston I 5 ,
H t¤gg_   l)Ollgl]t tlITl(’ dllflllg \VhlCl] PHtt€I`SOI`l Ch3I`1g€d   COl1I`S€     1
e_ sz? ...‘  Q i ina during this period was remarkable for when the mid began tv SGH more Of 3 U“i"€T$it'}` and less Of 3 i    
· . r   was called he was confined to his room with an €0ll9§€`· I   {
of tlicl  Suftered in a fall. In defending the University hc One of the major crises in the history of the University I  
l eww.   “lt would be better that this convention had never eumc in the famous Henry S. Barker fghf. Here the issue · l  
aw ‘.l‘  T EL than have it leave the educational situation in Ken- was much confused. if not completely obscured, by thi?   l
 worse than it found it." Of the speakers. Beckner rampant hostility existing between former President    
{_ 1%},,  Q?¢1t7¤€ €¤ViSi0nGd or comprehended :1 system of higher Patterson, his supporters. and President Barker and his I I $  r
V] ;U;·; édU€¤ti011. Both Beekner and Bronston did have visions supporters. This emotionalisin was Carefully CultiV9.t€d l l l  
lhljt Q   1'0l€ of education in society, by the press. There were political O\'€I'tOl]€S ill tl1lS iight   l   ; 
ion iw  delegates argued that Kentiickv had no legal whivh HWY “*"`*`Y be °`O‘hl’1°t°h' “hd€r$t°°d‘ The gov` r  
lp rtw?   Or IUOI-al Obligation to Coutilnuc the Collegtx (‘]`l`l()l` {lt tl]€ til]]€_ ,'\llgl1StUS   Stilllle)'. had attended the r   y 
 §¢V€¤tl10ugli they had aeeeptetl the land given hy the U“i"<`Y$it}` imd was through his lohg wd distiuguished    A
md} ; :lf¢d€1'Hlgovernment tmdcr tho tcrms Of thc Morrill ACL career a loyal alumnus of the institution. ll‘1'€Sp€CtlV€   .
»,mt\t· tD€$PitG the fact that the Stntc had Sold this land and of the widely known issues, al salient feature of the l  
ion  hid received f€tll‘fHl Support in other way; these men Bzulter fight was the fact that Governor Stanley intensely p  
,]_\%ii i—?rg“°d that there was nothing binding tm tht- smtp to disliked him. Years afterward he told the story of the I A  
\\`i¤¤~l‘ic9miml° Such it S}’$t0rn of pnblie higher- education Bzu‘l~·rS ill l‘lll`llll lll lll*` Ulll""l`*llY ll lll"}` ‘l"*ll"`*l ll"
` \ { inHu€uC€S but from Outside pI·€SSuI·€S_ Irrank   BlC\v€y· (`Xilllllllt‘ S\l