xt7m3775vc57 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m3775vc57/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19370406  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  6, 1937 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  6, 1937 1937 2013 true xt7m3775vc57 section xt7m3775vc57 Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

Y

KERNEL

UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXVII.

OF

COMMUNITY CONCERT ARTISTS

1937-3- 8

'SWEETHEART'
For Nominations In Campus
Sweetheart Derby; Only
Men To Vote

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Presenting a series of talks on
Journalism and book reviewing to
student, faculty, and local organizations, May Lamberton Becker, famous author. Journalist and editor of
the New York Herald Tribune Sunday magazine will visit the campus
Thursday and Friday under the
sponsorship of the University
partment of library science.
"Writing as a Profession" will be
the subject of Mrs. Becker's first
address to be delivered to women
students of the University in special
convocation Thursday at 4 p. m. In
Memorial hall. Thursday evening,
she will speak at a dinner in her
honor sponsored by the University
Woman's club. This dinner will be
open to the public.
Mrs. Becker will appear three
times Friday. At 9 a. m. Friday she
will talk on "The Festival of Children's Books," In the browsing room
of the University library for students in the department of library
science, guests from the Division of
Elementary Education, and others
interested In this phase of library

work. At 10 o'clock she will make
second talk open to the general
public in the browsing room with
"Books and Book Reviewing" as her
subject.
Friday afternoon Mrs. Becker will
discuss the various phases of book
reading and reviewing in newspapers
In the browsing room. Her last talk
Friday will be on "Scandinavian
Literature" at 7:30 o'clock before a
Joint meeting of the American AsWomen,
of University
sociation
Theta Sigma Phi, honorary professional Journalistic sorority, and Chi
Delta Phi, honorary women's literary society.
Mrs. Becker will address the
Women's Club of Central Kentucky

a

The above artists have been booked for tne 1937-3- 8 Central Kentucky Community Concert Association
Reading from left to right, top row, Kathryn Meisle, John Charles Thomas, Oulomar Novaes. On
Concertino.
the bottom row, from left to right, a member of the Jooss Ballents, and the Barrere-Bri- tt

series.

Dancers To Conclude Concert Series Tonight;
Association Announces Next Seasons Plans
Fowler And Tamara Perform
At 8:15 o'CIock At
Henry Clay High
Fowler and Tamara, internationally famous dance team, will present the final attraction of the season, given under the auspices of
the Community Concert Association of Central Kentucky, tonight
In the auditorium of the Henry
Clay high school at 8:15 o'clock.
As usual, no tickets will be sold at
the door and admission to the auditorium will be limited to members of the association.
Fowler and Tamara are American born artists.
The program to be presented Is
as follows:
Jose Enrlquez
Secreto eterno
Piano solo Minuet (From Symmajor)
phony In
Mozart
Charles Ruetschi
Percy Weinrich
Gavotte
Piano solo: Valse Brlllante
Chopin
The Beautiful Blue Danube
Johann Strauss
Waltz
Piano solo Sonetta del Petrarca,
Liszt
No. 104
Sibelius
Valse Triste
Miss Tamara
Piano solo Hungarian Rhapso- Liszt
No. 6
die.
Nacio Brown
Modern Fantasy

Intermission
Two 8panlsh Dances Paso Doble
and La Gitana....Romero, Albeniz

Lecuona
Piano solo Malaguena
Romero
La Corrida
Miss Tamara
Campanella
Liszt
Piano solo La
Woodforde-Flnd- en
Dance Poem
Two Tangos:
Tango de salon 1938 (Camln- Dias Fillberto
to)
Tango de salon 1913 (El Cho- clo)
vuioaa

Satire The Debutante

Phi Alpha Delta,
Law Honorary,
Initiates Seven

All-Camp-

us

Bill Cnitcher and
Frankfort Troubadora
play at the next

bis
will

Dance which will be held In

the Alumni gymnasium Friday night, April 16, from I
till 10:30 o'clock. AdmiMtlon
as usual wlU be twenty-fi- ve
cents per couple or stag, and
the proceeds will go to the
student loan fund.

Tomorrow is the last day
National Youth Administration students have to get
their pay checks for the last
work month. There are over
ISO checks for the last work
month that have not yet been
collected Dean T. T. Jones
announced yesterday.
N. Y. A. time sheets for the
work month March 10, April
10 are due In at the offices
of the Dean of Men and the
Dean of Women Saturday,
Dean Jones also announced.

8.

anist, and the Barrere-Bri- tt
certina, a chamber ensemble

PASTORS

OPEN SESSIONS
Clergy Inaugurates
Five-DaConvention Here;
College Of Agriculture In
Host's Role

Country
y

Opening yesterday
of Agriculture with

at the
lecture-serie-

College
s,

demonstrations, round table

dis-

cussions, and recreational projects,
the third annual short course for
town and country pastors and lay,
leaders will continue its program:
through Friday.
The meetings,, being held In the
Pavilion building on Rose street.
are under the general direction of
Dr. W. D. Nlcholls. head of the de--1
partment of farm economics, and
Dr. Walter V. Cropper, of Lexlng-- ,
ton, presiding elder of the M. E.
Church, South, and president of
the Kentucky Rural Church Coun-

i

cil.
Blacks-bur-g,

ay

Unl-vorsi- tv

TRl'STEES CONVENE TODAY
The Quarterly meeting of the
University board of trustees will be
held In the offices of Pres. Frank L.
McVey at 10:30 this morning. Gov.
A. B. Chandler will preside at the
meeting.
COLL'MBIA PROFESSOR BOOKED
Dr. George D. Strayer, professor
of Education at Teachers' College,
Columbia University, eminent authority on school administration,
course In
will offer a three-cred- it
"Modern Problems of School Administration" at the first term of
the summer session, which opens a
five-we-

ek

term June

14- -

Con-

con-

sisting of violin, viola, cello, flute.
and piano.
According to Professor R. D.
executive secretary of the
association, the membership campaign will open on Wednesday morning, April 7, '937, at the association
headquarters on the mezzanine
floor of the Lafayette hotel. Mrs.
I. D. Best will again direct the activities of the campaign. Mr. Arthur Wisner, western manager of
the Community Concert Service,
Chicago, will be in Lexington during the campaign.
Memberships may be obtained In
the association for $3.80 (tax included). These memberships entitle
the holder to attend all five con
certs given in Lexington as well as
concerts sponsored in near by cities
by the Community Concert Service.
There are no reserved seats in the
auditorium as the association follows the policy of "first come first
served." The student rate of $3.90,
which has been used In former
years has been abolished this season and all memberships will sell
at the same price.
During the past season hundreds
of music lovers in Central Kentucky were disappointed in not being
able to obtain memberships in the
association.
The seating capacity
of the high school auditorium limits the total membership to 1320.
Inasmuch as many old members
are doubling their subscriptions for
next season. Professor Mclntyre estimates that all memberships will
be sold on the first day of the campaigns and urges all those who are
desirous of hearing the concerts
next season to make reservations on
the first day.
Mc-Inty-re,

Dr. B. L. Hummel, of
students were initiated into
Va.. In charge of rural sothe Henry Clay chapter of Phi Ai ciology extension for the state of
pha Delta, honorary legal frater-nlt- v Virginia, spoke on the American
at th unnnal sDrlmz initiation Country Life Association at a spe-ciservices Saturday afternoon at the
convocation for agricultural
Lafayette hotel.
students and delegates held yesAlvin E. Evans, dean of the
terday as part of the program.
law coileee. was the Drlncl- Dr. H. L. Donovan, president of
pal speaker and guest of honor at Eastern 6tate Teachers' College,
a banquet held alter tne initiation Richmond, will speak at a banquet
to be held at the University ComIn honor of the new memDers.
Thnsa Initiated were Nathan El mons Thursday night, on religion
liott. Lexington; J. R. Bush, Lex In Russia, as he found it in a reington; Lloyd Wathem, Lonaon; w. cent tour of that country. He will
Rpven

Saturday afternoon at the Lafayette hotel. While on the campus, E. Dean, Salvlsa, Steve White,
she will be the guest of President Hnnklnsville: Leonard Stevens,
and Mrs. Frank L. McVey at
Whitley City, and J. L. Harrington,
well Place.
Jackson, Tenn.
h. O. Whitlow, chanter Justice,
presided at the Initiation.

April 1 6 Set
As Date For
Hop

The Community Concert Association of Central Kentucky
has
completed arrangements with the
New York office of the association
for a series of five concerts by internationally famous artists to be
presented in the auditorium of the
Henry Clay higa school during the
season 1937-3Artists who have
been booked include John Charles
Thomas, American baritone; Kath
ryn Meisle, American contralto; the
Jooss European Ballet: Oulomar
Novaes, distinguished Brazilian pi-

that

RURAL

SING
DUE

Group Applications For Participation In Annual Glee
Club Contest Should Be
Five Famous Artists Booked;
Turned In Before Noon
New Campaign Starts
Tomorrow
Today Is the last day on which

Wednesday
Last Day To
Get NYA Pay

E-f- lat

CANDIDATES

be Introduced by Frederick A. Wal-11- s,
state commissioner of public
welfare.
Prominent speakers throughout
the week Include Dr. L. Rlggleman.
Colpresident of Morris-Harve- y
lege; President Frank L. McVey, and
Dean Thomas P. Cooper of the
College of Agriculture.

B. S. U. To Sponsor

Regional Conclave
The annual spring banquet of the

B. S. U. on the campus will be held
at 6:30 p. m. Friday, April 9, at

Calvary Baptist church.
The banquet is the opening meetregional coning of the two-d- ay
vention at which delegates from
Georgetown, Eastern, Berea, More-heaand Louisville will be present.
Tickets for the banquet can be secured from Lynn Cleveland or from
any member of the B. S. U.

d,

Law School Will
Start New System
In order to give law students
more training In preparing written
briefs and making oral arguments
before courts, the College of Law
will Introduce in September a new
system of arguments on questions
of law, according to an announcement from that college.
Problems will be proposed by the
faculty and then assigned to sets
of four students, one pair to argue
against another. From these arguments will be selected eight contestants in the second year, and In
the senior year, four of these eight
will be chosen to present the annual argument before the court of
appeals, which hears the students
each year, with the whole court sitting.
The new plan contemplates a
series of contests In which there are
to be opposing arguments as In an
actual court case, with all students
participating rather than individual
students voluntarily muklng

applications for participation in the

annual Cwens-ODsing, to be held Monday, April
K

12,

In Memorial hall, will be received.
Entries should be placed with Mary
Roger Brown
Jane Roby at 2208-at 2691. or with the Kernel Business Office, before noon.
Any sorority, fraternity, or residence hall may enter one group In
the "sing," which is also open to
any number of town groups. Each
chorus must have a minimum of
twelve and a maximum of twenty-fo- ur
members, and it must be
coached by someone who is also a
member of that group.
Groups may sing uaccompanled
if they wish, and all directing must
be done from the stage by one of
the group. Two verses of the Kentucky Alma Mater will be required
as one selection, and the other may
be a choice of any spiritual,
or fraternity song.
Omicron Delta Kappa and Cwens
will present the winners of the boy's
group and the girls' group with
cups, and they will give a broadcast
over the extension
studios of
WHAS.
All competing choruses are re
quested to dress in formal attire,
with the women's groups having
dresses as near a uniform color as
possible.
semi-classic-

DOWNTOWN STATION
WILL CARRY PROGRAM

Annual Gathering Of Agricultural Students And r acuity Doctor McVey Will Open AfJs Set For 6:13 o'clock
fair At 3 p. m. On
Tonight
Building Site
The annual College of Agricultural banquet, given for the purpose of bringing together students,
lacuity, staff members, and alumni
of the college, will be held at 6;4o
oclock tonight, In the University

v.
Keen Johnson will be
the main speaker at the breaking
of ground ceremonies for the new
student union building at 3 p. m.
today on the site between the
Alumni gymnasium
and Frazee
hall, members of the Omicron Delta Kappa committee, In charge of
uotnmons.
the affair, have announced.
Jesae Tapp, Washington, D. C,
The
president oi the
Products includescompleted program of events
ouipius corporation, ana Mrs. ha H. president talks by John McKenney,
of Omicron Delta Kappa,
vjit'Kg, Louisville, memDer oi the
venuiil Jjuiry council, will be the and chairman for the day; Virginia
Robinson, who will represent the
principal speakers.
Association of Women
Mr. Tapp graduated from the Mortar Board, women'sStudents and
senior honUniversity wiln a B. S. degree in orary, and Dick
president
agriculture m 1920. At the oegln-iui- ig of the senior class,Butler, will shovel
who
of the Agricultural Adjustthe first dirt from the site.
ment Administration, he was appointed assistant administrator in a In a telephone conversation with
member of the committee. Judge
unarge of the division of fruits and
Richard C. Stoll, chairman of the
special crops.
Mrs. uregg was graduated from University board of trustees, said
that, due
the University in 1924 with a B. S. Is holdingto the fact that the board
a
in agriculture. She took a position meeting today, regularly scheduled
he would be unable
with the Mississippi Agricultural to
speak, but that he would attempt
and Mechanical coiiege as a poultry to adjourn
meeting long enough
the
extension worker soon after grad- for
the board members to be presa,
uation. Later she returned to
ent for the rites.
Ky., where she was emJohn Lewis, director of the Uniployed as an insurance saleswoman
and from that position she ob- versity band, declared his unit
would be present with full uniform.
tained her present position.
In addition to the presentation They will play during the cereStaff members of the
of the speakers, a musical program monies.
has been arranged by students of University studios of station WLAP,
the College of Agriculture. An or- Lexington, said that station would
chestra and quartet composed oi carry the full program over the
students of the college will be heard. air.
"The ceremonies today," said McKenney, the ODK head, "represent
the beginning of work on a project
NEW UNIT
which for five years has been the
most sought after ideal in the history of the students of the University. I would like to Impress
upon students the Importance of
their being present."
of trust-- l
In the event
PWA Officials At Louisville ees adjourns for the board Dr. Frank
the rites.
Will Receive Plans For New L. McVey, president of the UniverWest Unit By Mav 1; Edi sity, will open the ceremonies, and
will introduce McKenney, who will
fice To Cost $85,000
make a short talk. Miss Robinson
Plans for the new section of the will then be presented, and followengineering quadrangle will be sub ing her talk the main speaker. Govmitted to PWA officials at Louis-vil- la ernor Johnson will address the
by May 1, E. V. Johnson, ar gathering.
At the conclusion of his address.
announced
chitectural designer,
Butler, with the proper ceremonies,
yesterday.
The razing of the present west will shovel the first spadeful of dirt
section of the engineering buildings from the site.
Members of the committee In
to provide space for the new unit is
charge, all ODK men, are James
now under way.
Shropshire,
Ernest Shovea, and
The proposed unit, which will Oeorge Spencer.
Act.-Oo-

Cyn-thian-

PLANS

ARE SUBMITTED

,

cost approximately

$85,000, will be

similar to the newly constructed
south unit. An arched passageway

will lead through the ground floor
and will open on the quadrangle.
At the northwest corner of the
building a three-stor- y
crystallography tower will be constructed.
On the second floor there will be
classrooms, a photographic laboratory, materials and testing laboratory, conference rooms, and W9J1.
tt
wireless
the college's
transmitter. The mechanical and
University To Greet Friends electrical laboratories will be on
the first floor.
At Louisville Hotel
Construction Is expected to start
April 15
about May 20, Mr. Johnson said.
Elgan B. Farris, construction engiA reception and dance in the neer, and Dean J. H. Graham were
crystal ballroom of the Brown in Frankfort Saturday conferring
hotel In Louisville on Thursday with state welfare officials.
evenlng.Aprll 13. will be the highlight of the University's entertainment for teachers, students, alumni,
and friends of the University during the meeting of the Kentucky
Education association April
The University will maintain
headquarters in Parlors A. B, and C
colleges of central Ken
All
of the mezzanine floor of the Brown tucky the be represented at a dewill
hotel during the K. E. A. meeting.
McAmong those who will be In the bate tournament to be held in
beginning
receiving line at the dance with Vey hall next Saturday
8 a. m. Asbury, Berea, Centre.
Pres. and Mrs. Frank L. McVey will at
Georgetown, Transylvania, Wesley-abe: Gov. and Mrs. A. B. Chandler,
Morehead. Eastern, and WestLleut.-Goand Mrs. Keen Johnto send
son, Mr and Mrs. P. W. King. Pres. ern have been Invited
James Richmond, Murray State teams.
Each team will be composed of
Teachers' College; Pres. and Mrs.
on? person. Each team will go
H. H. Cherry, Western State Teachpreliminary rounds,
ers' College; Pres. and Mrs. H. L. through four
Judged and
Donovan, Eastern State Teachers' and each match will be system will
College; Pres. and Mrs. Harvey criticized. to A low point
determine the teams In
Babb, Morehead State Teachers' be used
The matches will
College; Pres. and Mrs. Raymond the
be continued until a winner Is
A. Kent, University of Louisville;
Mayor and Mrs. Nevlllo Miller, and chosen. Each debate will be limited
to 15 minutes.
the out of state speakers scheduled
The subject for debate will be:
for the convention.
"Should extension of the consumers
cooperative movement benefit the
DOWNING TO SPEAK
several Southern states?"
Dr. H. H. Downing, professor of
mathematics, who is in charge of DI TCH LUNCH CLUB
TO ELECT OFFICERS
astronomy, will speak tonight on
"The Progress of Astronomy" at a
meeting of the Louisville AstronReservations for the Dutch lunch
omical Society at the University of club's final meeting, to be held this
Friday, must be made by noon on
Louisville.
Thursday, April 8, through the Y.
W. C. A. olllce at the Woman's
LEWIS TO CINCINNATI
building.
UniThe election of officers for next
John Lewis, director of the
versity band, will go to Cincinnati year will be held at the meeting at
Thursday to select the material for noon Friday In the Maxwell Presthe sleht reading division of the byterian church. All town gills and
commuters are Invited.
state bigh school band contest

Uky Plans Dance,
Reception At K.E.A.

14-1- 7.

Students Representatives

clude

AT AGBANQUET

Urging that every student not
academically engaged be present for the student union ground
breaking ceremonies this afternoon, John McKenney, president of Omicron Delta Kappa,
honorary campus leaders' fraternity, told a representative of
The Kernel Inst night that the
rites would be an "event In the
history of University growth."
"I, personally, would like to
ask every student and faculty
member to be there. I don't believe anyone who comes will be
disappointed.
This will be one
of the things to tell your children when they come to college."
Pointing out that the program
is fully planned and that
or
Johnson will speak,
McKenney declared, "a student
union was a dream when most
of the present student body was
in knee breeches."

CWENS-OD- K

Completed Ground Breaking
I'rojjram ( eremonies In-

TAPP TO SPEAK

Acting-Oovern-

contest.

Mrs. May Becker,
Noted Journalist,
To Address Groups

Keen Johnson
Will Be Main Speaker For
Student Union Rites Today

By McKcnney
To Attend Rites

1

Sour Mash

ganization.

NEW SERIES NO. 47

Students Asfed

t

A

Winner's Picture To Grace
Front Cover Of April

The election of the queen will be
held nnxt Fridav. with ballots be
ing cast In the University post of
fice. The ballots win oe puousnea
in Friday's Issue of The Kernel.
The April Issue of "Sour Mash,"
will feature the winner of the contest, and her picture will appear on
Its front cover. This issue will also
contain the usual featured columns,
including the "Mash Barrel," the
"Biological Dirge," and other short
stories and humorous bits both
original and selected.
Announcement was also made by
Editor ChepelefT that the deadline
for the monthly ag contest, sponsored by Sour Mash in cooperation
with a national advertising concern,
is April 12. Students are urged to
sed In their best gags, which will be
Judged by the editors. The right
to publish any or all Jokes Is reserved, and the editor's decision will
be final. Last month's winner of
this contest was Dave Griffith, Jr.
Sour Mash is published monthly
by Delta Sigma Chi, honorary
Journalistic fraternity, and is a successor to the Kampus Kat humor
sheet formerly published by the or-

6, 1937

4,

KD DILLIE IIOLLIDAY
WAS 1936 SELECTION

Petitions for "Campus Sweetheart," named by men students of
the University each year In a contest conducted by Bour Mash, University humor publication, must be
turned In to Ross ChepelefT. editor
of the magazine, by noon next
Thursday, according to an announcement made yesterday.
Each petition for the queen must
bear the names of twenty male stu .
dents, and must be accompanied by
a statement stating the candidate's
willingness to be nominated and
signifying her approval. Only men
students are entitled to vote In the

lib

t

3 P. M. TODAY

Acting-Go- v.

FOR SOUR MASH

Thursday Noon Is Deadline

FOR STUDENT UNION

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, APRIL

PETITIONS DUE

GROUND RREAKING

Kampus
Kernels

1,000-wa-

Central Kentucky
Schools To Clash
In Debate Caucus

n.

v.

seml-flnal-

s.

Alpha Delta Sigma, men's
honorary advertising fraternity,
will hold an important reorganization meeting at 5 p. in.
Thursday, in the Kernel business office. It is imperative that
all members be present.

There will be a meeting of the
White Mathematics club at 4 p. m.
Thursday, April 8, in Room 109 McVey hall. William Pell will address
the olub on "The Fundamental
Theorem of Algebra." All members
are urged to attend.
The Peace group and the

Y. W.

group will
meet today at 5 o'clock In the
Woman's building, for an address
by C. M. McPherson of the Melho-di- st
Board of Education. Plans for
the observance of Peace Week will
be discussed by members of the
Peace group, following the address.
C. A. World Fellowship

Mortar Board, senior
honorary, will meet today
in the Woman's building.

women's
5 p. m.

at

Keys, men's sophomore honorary,
hold pledging ceremonies at
toninht in the Sigma Chi
house. All members and pledges
are required to be present for tills
meeting.

will
7:30

A very important meeting
of
Pershing Rifles company will be
held tonight at 7:30 In Major
Saundvr's oiHee in the Armory.
A Joint meeting of Theta Sigma
Phi and Chi Delta Phi wlU be
held tot'ay at 4 o'clock In Boyd hall,
to discuss the visit of Mrs. May
Lamberton Becker to the campus.
of both
be present.

Membt rs

must

organizations

The Y. W. C. A. Freshman group
will meet on Thursday, April 8, at
o'clock, In the Woman's building.
(Continued on Page Four)

3

* Best Copy
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Tage Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OmCIAL NtWBPAPBR OF TH1 iTUDEKT OF
THt finvRITT OF KMTUCKT
Intarad ai lha Pna Oflica at Latinftrm, Kantueky, u
end cum mattar undar th Act of March . in.

(c

MEMBER

Lexington Board of CommTN
Ktntuck Intarcolleiiata PrtM Aaaoclatlon
A marnbar of th
Major Colin Publication, rrprrorntrd by
J. Norm Hill Co., 410 Lxlnltol Ava., Mr York City; lit E.
Warkrr Drlvt, Chicago; Call Buildmf, San Franclaco; Ml Waat-oo- d
Blvd., Loa Anirlra; 1004 Bccond Ave, Baatua.

A.

CO MP LET E CAMPUS COVERAGE
EXKVTIVI BOi

M. Spencer
Ross J. CHtPELLrF

George

Editor-i-

n

Chief

Managing Editor
Newt Editor

David II. Salyers

Business Manager

Ike M. Moore

TELephonee: Newt, 0 a, m. to 4 p. m, Univ.
Business. 9 a. m. to 4 p. m., Univ. 74. Sunday and alter hour, city 2724 or 7542.
136.

HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN

THE STUDENT UNION AND
The ceremonies which are planned for this
afternoon to formally inaugurate work on the
student union building, should furnish an in
centive to every student to picture in his mind
how the campus will look, both externally and
in intrinsic ways, when that structure is com
pleted and becomes an integral part of the Uni
versity scene.

The picture thus received would vary, naturally enough, with the individual. On only
one phase does The Kernel believe the pictures
would and should look alike. The reference is
to student government, and that anyone who
has been in contact with it, no matter how dis
tant, has failed to recognize the utter lack of
coordination in our present form, we seriously
doubt.
In the first place, our student plan of govern'
ment is founded on a fallacy. That easily recognizable fallacy is to the effect that the sexes
the men students and the women students are
to be differentiated between when it comes to
matters of student government and rights. The
Kernel believes that a student is a student,
whether he be man or whether she be woman.
Thus, The Kernel does not believe that final
powers of government should rest in a men's
council for men, and a similar female organization for women.

The picture that comes most readily to our
mind when ruminating over the student union
building and its ultimate completion has as its
principal subject a central board, an association
of students of the University of Kentucky, an
association wherein a central board call it
is empowered to act for the
what you will
good of all the students, not just for men and
not just for women.
As to details of such an Association (right here
we'll set a style on it) it will suffice to say that a
secretary preferably an alumregular
nusassisted by some eight or ten or twelve student leaders of both sexes will handle student
problems, both of a routine and of an emergency
nature, holding elections, handling student
funds for all occasions, and in general acting as a
balance wheel to keep the multitudinous campus affairs in equilibrium. Under such a system,
to employ one example, five appointees could
not name a queen to reign over an affair that
essentially belongs to the entire junior class. . .
full-tim- e

Just as sure as the student union building is
completed, such an Association will come into
being. Its formation will be just as natural as
the law which decrees that mortar will hold the
stone of that building together.
But what of the time interval until the building is completed? The Men's Student Council
is in the same predicament as the fellow who is
all dressed up with no place to go. It is empowered, yes, but how about enforcement?
The women's governing group, the Association of Women Students, because of closer surveillance over dormitories and sorority houses,
is able to do good, often distinguished work,
considering what it has to work with. When
these two organizations are able to merge into
one under the outline so roughly sketched
above, is it not logical to presume that they will
function many times more efficiently and effectively that they do at present?
Until the new form of government becomes a
fact, students will continue to be

It

Half of nan I misunderstood beat least half of mart Is feeling Fordham University
and paaftlon.
SCHOOL OF LAW
This may be wrong, but It appear
with Theo Nadeutein
to m that literature, it creation,
JEW YORK
and
tudy, criticism and understanding
Case System
constitute a great science. And it
Three-Ye-ar
Day Course
SrEAKlX'G IN SUPERLATIVES:
does not have as an excuse "scienFour-Ye- ar
Evening Conn
By RALPH E. JOHNSON
procedure"
or "laboratory
tific
subtle gesture is the raise of an eyThe most
methods. The science of literature
Mamfcar
th AaaMlatloa a
ebrow... the most irritating gesture is a bored
the general to the specific while
Law Schaala
Is little constancy of thought In man. Men may claim prinThere
the hard and fast methods of the College AmarkM
wave of the hand. . .the most significant gesture
Degree er Twe Year oi
ciples, religious and scientific beliefs, yet no man Uvea without doubting mathematician (scientist) Is more
is the wearing of a fraternity pin... the most
College Work with Good Grade
his own reason no man lives up to the principle he believea ha ha. or 1pm deductive for they work from
Required for Entrance
juvenile gesture involves a thumb and a nose. . . There Is no man who fully understands himself; there la no man who the specific to the general.
Tranaerlpi ef IUaer Mutt Ba Purnlahad
is an inviting nod understand another.
If understanding of man Is ever
the most welcome gesture
Moraine, Early Afternoon and
to be. It will come from literature
A great science ha existed for centuries, the adenca of philosophy.
towards the cocktail room... the most surprisEvening C Isaacs
not psychology, for It
literature
ing gesture is a swift kick in the shins... the Out of that profouudest tnought ha coma the answer to almost every that shape men, hence the study of For Further Information address
mind, yet It ha been only in the past that vast and Inclusive subject will
CHARLES F. DAVIS, Registrar
most inviting gesture is a pucker of the lips. . . riddle to which man ha aet hi
233 Broadway, New York
tew years that a science dedicated to the riddle of man ha been formu-.at- ed give understand lng.
the most entertaining gesture is squeezing the
psychology.
heartbeat's hand in class under the lab table. . .
With astronomy, physics, chemistry, and geology, aa science well
and the most nonchalant gesture is blowing a developed and able to contribute facta to aid the psychologist in his resmoke ring.
search It la strange that man ha found out no more than ha has. To
date the only real right the psychologist has to call hi branch a science
Formal Obligation
female you la that he used scientific methods
DON'T LOOK NOW, BUT-i- hu
in hi attempt to ascertain the' m aa narrow an are of the great
just pulled the chair out from under is our working of
circle of truth a he possibly can
You provide the words and music
the
chaperone, you clownt
Far into fluid apace man ha pro- confine himself. How much wider a
Arrow provide the glamour. If you go
sweep
must work In, His
jected himself and has learned of includesthe doctor, circle.
formal, it is obligatory to be correctly
the whole
IV E CAN DO WITHOUT:
CAMPUSOUNDS
star and universes. Natural law
But back to my original statedressed and that calla for an Arrow
1. "Ah, why don't you grow up?"
have been formulated undeniably ment. Emotionally people are not
collar, dress shirt, and tie. We suggest
correct. This great comprehension stable until toey have passed the
2. "I don't mean to be catty, darling, but"
of the phenomenal must, and does quarter century mark and then
the new Lido or Kirk, two dress shirts
I just result from tremendous minds yet they begin to settle down. But prior
3. "Sure, he's probably a swell buy
of distinction. Your dealer will oblige.
comto that time their minds are in
is it not Strang that these
can't stand him, that's all."
prehending brain cannot pierce turmoil and quandary. What to be4. "Your term papers were due this morning."
in inches that separate external lieve, what to believe I The mystery
of religion as it appears to conflict
man from his aouL
5. "How did he ever rate her?"
with science. The mystery of life
Medicine Least Understood
That science closest to us medi- and death. To be a realist, fatalist.
THEORIES:
Deist, or Methodist, or not to be.
cine and Its subordinate branches
Know AU Truths?
We are told
is the least understood.
Should man wander out Into
And this lack of constancy la beto flatter beautiful wimmen
space he would most certainly learn cause of a lack of truth.
Cold
not on their beauty, but their brains. . .
something. If he takes a compound scientist believe they will eventually get at all truths bu