xt7m639k4s55 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m639k4s55/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1919 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. II, No. 3, 1919 text Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. II, No. 3, 1919 1919 2013 true xt7m639k4s55 section xt7m639k4s55 I 
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BULLETIN . 
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY  
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SUMMER SESSION
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JUNE 23 T0 AUGUST 2 ,
 
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UNIVERSITY CALENDAR ;l
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‘ _ 1919. N
Sept. 11, 12, 13 Thurs. Fri. Sat. Examinations for entrance  
Sept. 15,16 Monday, Tuesday Registration for first sem-  
ester.  
September 17 Wednesday Instruction begins. Ig
November 27 Thursday Thanksgiving holiday "
December 20 to
January 5, 1920 Christmas holidays i
1920.
January 24 to 31 Sat. to Sat. Mid-year examinations
` February 2 Monday Registration for second sem-
ester.
February 3 Tuesday Instruction resumed. `
Commencement Week  
June 6 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon. {
June 7 Monday Board of Trustees meets. I
June 8 Tuesday Class Day. ,4
I June 8 Tuesday Alumni Banquet.  
June 9 VVednesday Fifty—third Annual Com- V`
mencement.  
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I
 ~ OFFICERS AND FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SESSION A
 A FRANK L. McVEY, Ph. D., LL. D.,
 _ President of the University
I,  JAMES THOMAS COTTON NOE, A. M.,
~ Professor of Education _
Y. Director of the Summer Session
PX EZRA L. GILLIS, A. B.,
I Registrar
I GEORGE MARSHALL BAKER, A. M.,
  _ Associate Professor Education I
I MINNA McLEOD BECK, A. M.,
{A \ Assistant Professor of Art and Design
? FLORENCE J. BEDELL, B. A.,
J Supervisor of Home Economics, Atchison County High School, Kansas `
gl STANLEY ATWOOD BOLES, A. M.,
I Director Physical Education and Athletics
  PAUL PRENTICE BOYD, Ph. D.,
‘ Dean College Arts and Science, Head Department Mathematics
CLARE BROVVN CORNELL, Ph. D., ‘
Acting Head of Department of Psychology.
, JAMES MORTON DAVIS, A. M., `
Professor Mathematics,
4 LEHRE LIVINGSTON DANTZLER, A. M.,
N Professor English, Head of Department
  JOHN BORN DICKER,
; Instructor in \Voodwork ·
II HAROLD I-IARDESTY DOVVNING, B. C. E., S. M.,
  Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Il N. R. ELLIOTT, B. S. in Agr.
I Horticulture
~ EDVVARD FRANKLIN FARQUHAR, A. M., ,
Professor of English
I VVILLIAM EDWIN FREEMAN, A. B., E. E.,
I Professor Electrical Engineering
WILLIAM D. FUNKHOUSER, Ph. D.,
{ Professor of Zoology and Head of Department
I EDVVIN STANTON GOOD, M. S.,
I ' Professor of Animal Husbandry, Head of Department
  JOI·IN SHERMAN HORINE, M. E..
Assistant Professor of Drawing
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McNEAL C. JAMES, B. S. in Agr., A. B., .
Professor Agricultural Education ',
THEODORE TOLMAN JONES, A. M.,  
Professor of Latin and Greek  
CINCINNATUS DECATUR KILLEBREXV, M. S., V  
Associate Professor of Physics ;
MARGARET KING, A. B.,  
Librarian of the University  g
EDMUND KINNEY, M. S. in Agr.  
` Associate Professor of Agronomy  
JEAN G. MACKINNON, M. S. l
Professor Home Economics
COLUMBUS RUDOLPH MELCHER, A. M.,
Professor of Gorman  
McHENRY RHOADS, ;
State Supervisor of Secondary Education  
4
GEORGE ROBERTS, M. S. il
` Professor of Agronomy, Head of Department
JAMES R. ROBERTSON, Ph; D.,  
Professor of History and Political Economy in Berea College »
CHARLES ALBERT SHULL, Ph. D.,  
Professor Plant Physiology, Head of Department of Botany ll
GORDON THURMAN,  
· _ Assistant in Engineering Laboratory  
FRANKLTN ELLIOTT TUTTLE, Ph. D., S
Professor Chemistry, Head Department I
EDVVARD XVIEST, Ph. D.,
Professor of Economics and Sociology, Head of Department
ALFRED CHARLES ZEMBROD, A. M., `
Professor Modern Languages, Head Department
RED CROSS LECTURERS
R. J. Colbert, Assistant Division Director, Lakes Division I
Dr. J. N. McCormack, Secretary State Board of Health  
Elwood Street, Director of Social Service Z
Shelly D. Watts, Supervisor of Field Organization `

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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§ Cztlcndzir of the University ....__..........__....,,_.,__._,.,,..4___,_,_._A___,_______,__ Cover 2
  Faculty ........._...........,..,,........._.....,.,______.,____._._,,,_____,,______,_________,______,,_______________ 1
J · General Statement .........A.__...__.,____...._,___,,_,_________4___,_________________,_________,_______,_ 5
I Advantages and Special Lectures ..._l_._..,_.____.,_..,____l__.l_______,___,_____________,____ 5
Q Admission .,..__....__,___,_________,_______,_____________________l,________________,_____________________________ G
E Credit .__...__.,___,__,,___l__,___________________________________,_________________A_________________________________ 7 _
I Smith-Hughes Courses ,.,_______,__________r_______,l_l,________,_,____,,_________________,,____________ 7
Grztduztte `Worla ______,___,___,___,,___,__________________________________,_____________________________________ 7
· Patterson Hull and Bourcling V_...___...._____._,,._______.,,________,,______,_,_,l_,____,_________ 7
l Courses and Fees ......,.A.__...,.___._.....l....._...,______...,...__..,l,_____,,___,______.,,,,_______,,___ 7
E Depztrtnients of Instruction ______,_,,______.,,_.,__,__,,_________.___________,,_______.,__.______..,. 8
V  Agriculture ......_........_._.,.._____...._..__.......i.._.,,________,_..l,_____,,_______,_ii,.______,,.,,._____.,, 8
Art and Design ,__.,_.,____,,_______,,__,,________._____________,,____________________,,____,,_______,_________ 8 I
  Botany ,.............,,.............._..... _ __,...,_.__._._..._,____,_,.,......,_.,..___...,,._..___.,._,..____....,,_, 8
I Chemistry ,________________,_________________,_______________________________,_______________,______________________ 9
Q Economics ....>....................................................._....,......_i,......_..i..,....._..i.,....... 9
1 Ecluczttion ......,.....__.,......__....,.......,.__.i,.__.,......__..................._i.............,....._...._.,.. 9
  Enghieoriug ..........._,..__........,._........,_................,.._......_..................................... 10
I ldnglish ....,___`,i....,..._..._...,._.._...,_____...,,_,__._..,,...___,.......____....._....._.,....._,........_..... 11
F French ....i........,..................................i........._..................................................... 11 _
{ German ......................_,...._....._,.....,................_.........................................,......... 12
History and Political Science .,..................._................................................ 12
Home Economics .............,..............,.......,..................................................,.... 12
1 Lutin .........,......................F.i..................................i.....,..............................,....... 13
Mutheniutics ...............................i................................i......,............................ 13
Physics ............`.............................................`.....,.........................................c... 14
V Physical Education ..................................i..................................................... 14
; Psychology ..,..r...........,....c............i....................................................,............. 15
i Zoology ........................>.................i..........T.......................,................................ 15 ,
; Ainericun Red Cross Institute ......................................»............................. 16
A Bird’s Eye View of University ...................................................... Cover 3
  University Organization ...............................,.................................. Cover 4

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 GENERAL STATEMENT
Y THE PURPOSES OF THE SCHOOL
J The Summer School of the University of Kentucky will be in
session June 23d to August 2d, a period of six weeks. The work of
_ the summer session is designed for teachers, students and persons
A _ seeking information and training. \Vith the instruction are to be given
a number of special features during the six weeks of the session.
From the program of studies it will be possible to make up plans of
work suitable for teachers and workers in many fields. The entire
plant of the University is available for use, including laboratories,
libraries and buildings. The faculty of the University of Kentucky
for the summer session of 1919 has been greatly enlarged. VVork will
be offered to satisfy the demands of teachers in every iield of school .
activity. lt is no longer necessary for the high school teachers of the
State, the city superintendents and members of college faculties to
. ` leave the State for university work during the summer. The Uni-
versity of Kentucky is meeting the needs of the State in Agriculture,
, Engineering and all the Arts and Sciences. The multiplication and
standardization of the high schools, the enlarged curricula of second— _
Y ary schools and the new aims in education demand teachers qualified
~ in many subjects and trained in the theories and practices of modern
education, and the summer school of the University is organized
` largely to satisfy this demand.
` LOCATION
Lexington, called the capital of the Blue Grass, is a beautiful
little city, and a delightful place to spend the summer. It is ac-
cessible from all parts of the State, and may be reached over the
following roads: Queen and Crescent, Southern, L. & N., C. & O.,
L. & E., now under the management of the L. & N. Railroad.
I SPECIAL LECTURES
` In addition to the regular work for teachers in the courses out-
lined in this bulletin, a number of popular and scientific lectures
i will be given free of charge during the summer session. President
Frank L. lVlcVey will deliver lectures of special interest to teachers.
Members of the faculty will give popular lectures in their special
iields. The music for the summer session will be in charge of Dr. `
C. B. Cornell who has had wide experience as a director of music
and instructor in public school music and community singing. During
the session there will be several lectures on community singing and

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music appreciation. Opportunity will be given for all students to take
part in choral singing.
Beginning June 23rd Dr. Henri Charles Neel, Professor of Romance
Languages, Syracuse University, will give a series of lectures on "Tl1e I
Most Notable Features of French Life."
The engagement of Professor Neel for the summer session at the
University of Kentucky for these lectures on the most notable features
of French Life will be appreciated by the students of the summer
school and the public at large. Professor Neel is a noted lecturer `
and his theme is timely and interesting. . ,
The following is an outline of the subjects:
lst. ;Family Life; School Life; Social Life.
2d. France, it picturesque country—side; legends; queer customs;
survivals, etc.
3d. Chief Epochs in French history; Caesar and the conse-
quences of Roman conquest; the rivalry between France and England;
the story of Joan of Arc; Louis XIV; the Eighteenth Century.
A 4th. French Industries; chief exports; commercial situation and `
, relations with the United States; how French art helps Frenclrin-
dustries.
5th. French Science; an anecdotal survey of the discoveries of ~
Pasteur, Fabre, Lavoisier, Laplace, and others. X
6th. Chief Movements in French Literature; the Epic; Chanson l
de Roland; the Renaissance; the Seventeenth Century; the Eighteenth  
Century; the Polemics upon questions of religious, political and  
judicial freedom; the Romantic School; the Realism. {
7th. This entire lecture will be devoted to the study of a repre— L
sentative author, say, Racine or Moliere. t
Dr. Julian Morgenstern, of Cincinnati, Ohio, will give the follow-  
ing lectures to students of the summer school:  
Tuesday evening, July lst--The Creation Story.  
4 Wednesday evening, July 2nd—The Paradise Story. I
Thursday evening, July 3rd—The Flood Story. l
Dr. Henry E. Jackson of tl1e Bureau of Education, VI/asliington, -
D. C., will give a series of lectures on the general subject of Community l
Organization which will deal with the problems of reconstruction.
. These lectures will be of special interest to teachers and school ad-
` ministrators and are designed especially to help Kentucky prin-
cipals, superintendents and teachers. I
ADMISSION
No entrance examination is required for admission to any of the
courses, but instructors must be consulted concerning prerequisite
  preparation in some courses.
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CREDIT IN THE SUMMER SESSION
Students who have full entrance credits to the University will
. be given credit toward degrees for college work in the summer
school.
Four semester credits will be given for one double course con-
_ sisiting of two hours a day for the session. Two semester credits
will be given for a single course of one hour a day for the session.
. No student will be allowed to make more than six semester
credits in the summer school.
AGRICULTURAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Exceptional advantages will be offered in the summer school to
students who are qualifying to teach Agricultural and Vocational
Education under the provisions of the Sinith—Hughes Bill. Professor
McNeal C. James will offer courses in Agricultural Education and
· in Educational Psychology which will especially nt students for the
organization and presentation of vocational work in the high schools
of the State. Courses are also offered in Horticulture, Soil Fertility, .
Animal Husbandry and Farm Crops.
, GRADUATE WORK `
E Graduate work will be offered by special arrangement with the
> heads of departments and the Chairman of the Graduate Coininittee.
’ PATTERSON HALL AND BOARDING
Y Patterson I-lall will he open for women for rooining. Meals will
b be served in the University cafateria at a minimum cost. There are
, several good Iioarcliing houses coiiveiiieiit to the University where
b board may be had at from $§=!.{lO to $5.00 per week. Rooms may be
had in town convenient to the University.
COURSES AND FEES
The work in the summer school is given in Double and Single
Courses. A Double Course means that the subject is taken two hours
~ a day throughout the session. A Single Course is taken one hour
a day for the full session. The fees are as follows:
Single Course ........................-.......----..-»--..----..-........-.. $ 5·00
_ Double Course ......................................................»...»... 7.50  
Ong Double and One Single COHTSS ...................... 10.00 ‘
Three Single Courses ................................................ 10.00_
INFORMATION y
For information address the Registrar, University of Kentucky, i
Lexington, KY.
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 DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION
AGRICULTURE
Professors Roberts, Good, Associate Professor [flimsy, Mr. Elliott
Horticulture-:.—Tl1e origin, history, characteristics, adaption to
Kentucky conditions and management of orchard and garden fruits.
The practical details of propagation, seed selection, transplanting,
spraying, etc. Such information relative to the production and
handling of horticultural and vegetable products as are of importance
to the teacher.
Soil Fertility.--Nature and sources of plant food, crop require-
ments, manures and fertilizers, crop rotation, the effect of different
systems of farming upon the productiveness of soils.
H Animal Husbandry.—A discussion of the various breeds of live
stock; production of animal products and a study of the principles
underlying animal nutrition. V
Farm Crops.—A study of the various farm crops, grasses and ,`,
other forage crops, their adaptation, management and improvement.  
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ART AND DESIGN  
rlssislmzit Professor Bowls
Art Appreciation and History of Ar·t.—This course will consider
V general art principles and their application to city planning, land-
scape gardening, architecture, inte1·ior decoration, costume design as
well as to picto1·ial art, sculptu1·e, etc. Lectures, reading, discussion.
Single course.
Elementary Drawing and Painting and Art Structure.—A combina-
tion course dealing with fundamental principles of design and giving
.f a training in drawing from cast and still life. Double course.
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BOTANY  
S Professor Shall  
.° General B¤tany.—A general survey of the plant kingdom, includ- Il,
l ing clasification, structure, function, distribution and uses of plants.
  Methods of collection and preservation of materials for class use.
i A course adapted to the needs of teachers of Botany in the high
, schools of the State. Double course.
A Plant Physiology.-—A study of the main processes of plant life.
  The laboratory exercises are simplified as to apparatus needed, so
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as to adapt them to secondary school work. Teachers will iind this
work valuable in opening up a more interesting type of laboratory
work for high school classes. Double course.
CHEMISTRY V
Professor Tuttle
3. Inorganic Preparations.—A practical laboratory course de-
voted to the preparation of inorganic compounds from the crude
material. Prerequisite, one·half year’s work in General Chemistry.
8. Quantitative Analysis.—A laboratory course accompanied by
lectures and class-room exercises. Gravimetric and volumetric
methods of analysis are studied in detail. Prerequisite, Chemistry 4.
9. Quantitative Ana|ysis.—A lecture and laboratory course de-
voted to the analysis of ores, alloys, etc. Prerequisite, Chemistry 8.
11. Agricultural AnaIysis.——An introductory course in quantita-
tive analysis arranged for the students in the course in agriculture.
The elements of quantitative analysis are studied with special refer-
ence to the constituents ot soil, fertilizers and agricultural products.
V Prerequisite, one year‘s work in General Chemistry.
ig 12. Advanced Agricultural Analysis.-—A laboratory course hav-
li ing for its object the complete analysis of fertilizers, feeds, soils and
ll agricultural products. Prerequisite. Chemistry S or 11.
I- 14. Advanced Quantitative Analysis.——Tl1e analysis of iron and
steel, slugs and rocks. Prerequisite, Chemistry 9.
ECONOMICS
1’roj`<·:;sor ll`i<·sI’
Principles of Economics.—A study of production, distribution, and
consumption of wealth; the application of principles to some social
and economic problems. Single Course.
/ Principles of Accounting.—An introduction to the science and
,4., adaptation of accounts of a going concern together with sufficient
H practice for efficiency; partnership and corporation accounting; cost
` accounting. Single course.
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EDUCATION . _
Professors Noe and James, Associate Professor Baker
3s. Problems in City School Administration.—A general course l
including a consideration of recent city surveys, city superintendents’ V
annual reports, finances, age-grade distribution, standard units ot l
measurement, and principles of constructive supervision. Lectures,

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class discussions, and reports on assigned readings. Double course.  
Associate Professor Baker. ` {
4s. History of Education.—A general course with particular ref-  
erence to the 17th, 18th and lflth century theorists, emphasizing »]
Milton, Locke, Rousseau and Montessori. Lectures, class discus-  
sions and reports on assigned readings. Lectures will be illutrated  
' with lantern slides. Double course. ‘
5s. Technique of Teaching.-—A discussion of General and Special 1
method, giving the background of psychology, and illustrated with  
lesson plans and the teaching of several subjects. Double course. l
'ls. Agricultural Educatien.—~This course will deal with the  
organization and teaching of agricultural courses in the Kentucky  
high schools. It is designed for those who have had courses in the l
fundamentals of agriculture in some Agricultural College. Double l
course. A ;
Ss. Educational Psychology.—·'l‘he laws of mental development, I
structure and function. Special attention to the laws of memory,  
habit, attention and their application to education. Designed primar-
ll ily for Smith—Hughes students. Double course. J
14s. Principles of Social Education.»A study of the development E
of the social mind with special reference to education. 'f`ext—book, ‘
reading and reports. Double course. 'Z
ENGINEERING  
Professor I·'rr·¢zmo21, .·l.s.<;i.¤/rmt 1’rofrssor Jlorinc *
Drawing 1.—Mechanical Drawing. Four hours a day; drawing  
room. Professor Horine.  
Drawing 3.4Descriptive Geometry. One hour a day; lectures and l
recitation. two hours a day, drawing room. Professor l-lorine.  
Electrical Engineering 3.—Alternating Currents. Two hours a  
day, lectures and recitations. Professor- Freeman. l
Electrical Engineering 7.—Dynan1o Design. Three hours a day, l
drawing room. Professor Freeman.  
Mechanics of Engineering 3.—Kincmatics. Two hours a day, VA
lectures and recitations. Professor Horine. A
. V Mechanics of Engineering 4.—Kinematic Drawing. Four hours :1. ·
day, drawing room. Professor Horine. `
Mechanics of Engineering 6.—Analytical lvlechanics. Two hours a K
day, lectures and recitations. Professor Freeman. %
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  ENGLISH
  1’rofcssor.s· Dantzlcr and 1#'arquhcw·
· 1. English C0mposition.—The object of this course is to give
training in the writing of correct and clear English. Accuracy of ex-
pression is desired rather than proficiency of style. A text book will
be used, but the instruction will also be based upon the study of
representative English masterpieces. Students who take this course
will be given credit for English 1 of the University curriculum. '
i Double course.
2s. The Teaching of English C0mpesition.~This course is de-
' signed for teachers who wish to study the aimsand methods of teaeh—
ing composition in the high school. It includes practice in the writ~
L ing and correction of themes. University credit given. Single course.
i 4s. General Survey of English Literature.—'1‘his course is in-
i tended to give the student a general survey of English literature.
i Selections from representative authors will be studied. Collateral
{ reading and frequent summaries will be required. University credit _
  given. Double course.
I Gs. Shakspere.—ln this course a study will be made of Shaks-
i pere’s development as a dramatist. A number of plays will be studied
  in detail from the standpoint of dramatic structure and characteriza-
4 tion. .¤\:teni.ion will also be given to the method of treating Shakspere
{ in the high school. Students are advised to bring a copy of Shak-
al spore with them. The Oxford edition is recommended. Double course. "
I Ss. Contemporary l..iterature.e~In this course a study will be
made ol' recent movements in the literature of England and America.
University credit will be given. Single course.
Sis. Library Methods for Teachers. —V—— This course aims to qualify
high school teachers to take charge of high school libraries, and to
prepare them to givc instruction to high school students in the use .
of books and libraries. Single course. i`
f fl. American Literature.V—'l`he literature ef America will be
i studied in its relation to national life and thought. The leading
‘ authors will be studied in class, while the minor writers will con-
stitute parallel reading. Single course.
. 22. Literature ofthe I·3ible.—A literary study ef the Bible by
.  books. lt_ assists to an appreciation of literature generally because
a of the demand that literature identify itself with the highest thought
Q  and feeling. Open to all but freshmen. Single course. _
  FRENCH
 if _ Professor Zcmbrod
 I Elementary French.—Single course. I
_  Intermediate French.—Singlé course.
`  Elementary Spanish.—Double course. ‘

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GERMAN
Professor Mclchcr
1. Elementary §erman.—Gra1nn1ar with easy reading, composi-
° tion and conversation based on matter read. Course will cover es-
sentials of grammar. Single COl1l`S'€>.
I 2. Intermediate German.—Rapid reading of elementary German
with grammar drill, composition and conversation. Selected prose I
I and poetry committed. Single course. I
` 3. Scientific German.——A course in introductory scientilic Ger- I
man intended for students of science and journalism. Single course. i
I 4. Advanced Reading and Compcsition.—A course designed for  
those who have had at least three years of German. The literary merit I
of work read will be discussed, together with the period to which it 1
belongs. Single course.  
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE  
. Dr. Robcrlson,  
  Modern Europe.—A discussion of the history of Europe during I
` the last halt century. Lectures, reports and assigned readings. Single  
course. ,I
United States History.—A discussion of Oll1` relations with foreign `
1 countries with special emphasis on the policies for which we have j
  stood and our broadening lite. Single course. I
`Q Introduction to the Study of Government.~—The fundamental Ii
principles of government and a study of comparative modern gov-  
ernments. Single course. l
' Kentucky I-|istory.4A study of the important problems of the I
American life from a local point of approach. Single course. `
I ‘ HOME ECONOMICS  
Q Miss Rrrlcll Z
I 1. Selection, Preparation and Economic Uses of Food.——Com—  
{ position, uses and preparation of food; the changes in composition as .  
I the result of heat, cold and fermentation; economic buying. Pre-  
Q requisite—Chemistry. Q
. · 20. Dressmaking.—Study and technical practice in drafing, eut— I
. ting and making of simple cotton and linen garments. Study ot cost  
‘ and time,  
_i ‘ Institutional Management.——Management and equipment ot insti—  
, tutional kitchens and dining rooms. Preparation ot food in large quan- I
  tities. One lecture, four hours laboratory. {
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* l.ATiN
V Professor Jones
  1. Beginning Latin.—A thorough drill in declensions, conjugations,
simple rules of syntax. A special effort will be made to show the
close connection betwen Latin and English. Double course.
2. Caesar (SeIections).—The equivalent of four books will be
read, but the selections will be taken mainly from the lifth, sixth and
seventh books which portray the customs of the Britons, Germans
and Gauls. Exercises in prose composition. Single course.
3. Cicero and Gallust.—»'l`he tour speeches of Cicero against ·
Catiline, and Sallust's Catiline will be read. A comparative study of
the orator and the historian. Single course.
4. Virgil.—'l‘he lirst, second, fourth and sixth books of the
_ Aeneid will be read. Special attention to the meter and to mythology.
Single course.
5. Livy or Horace.—The students registered in the course will
1 select the author to be studied. Single course.
1 6. Beginning Greek.#Declensions, conjugations, 1·ules of syntax.
1 English derivatives for Greek words will be noted. Single course.
a lVlATl-lEMATlCS
Z Dcan. Boyd; Professor Davis. Assistant Professor Downing
1 ls. Beginning Algebra.—A course designed for those who have
,1, never studied the subject, and also for those who have conditions in
1 it. Single course. _
1 2s. Second Year .’-\!gebra.—A second course which will be fitted
1 to the needs of the class desiring it. Pedagogical questions will re-
1 coive attention. Single course.
  Ss. Plane Geometry.—This course will complete as much of the
  Plane Geometry as possible. Double course. `
g 4s. Solid Ge0metry.—A thorough course open to Public School
1 teachers and to those desiring to increase their credits for college
1 entrance and to high school students who have been conditioned in
1 the subject. Single course.
1 5s. 'i`rigonomet1‘y.——A standard course in Plane Trigonotnetry.
Double course.
Gs. College Aigebra.—This course covers the same ground as the
usual freshman work. Double course.
7s. Analytics.—Plane and Solid Analytics for college credit.
Double course.
1 Ss. CaIcuIus.—Diflerential or integral calculus covering a sem·
1 ester’s work as usually given. Double course. _
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PHYSICS
Associate Professor Killebrcw
` ls. General Elementary Physics.—Lectures witl1 experimental .
demonstrations and quizzes on Mechanics and Heat. An introduc-
tory course designed for students who wish to become acquainted
` with the results, methods and spirit of the science, whether they in-
tend to pursue the subject further, or wish an elementary knowledge
of Physics only as a matter of general interest. The course also
j· meets the needs of secondary school teachers who wish to review
[ the subject with reference to methods of presentation. Each student
is required to perform and report on twenty-live laboratory exercises. 1
Lectures and recitation hve hours, laboratory four hours per week. I
2s. General Elementary Physics.—This is a parallel course with  
~ ls covering the subjects of Electricity and Magnetism, Light and I
Sound. ls is not a prerequisite for 2s. Students may register in J
either or both of these courses. Single course.
Courses in Physics la, 2a, lb, 5a, Ga, 5b, Gb (for description see
I University catalog) will be offered if as many as four students reg-
ister in any one of them. Double courses. _
, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS ”
` Professor Bolcs "
I 6s. BasebalI.—Theery and practice in batting; base running; T
· proper methods of nelding each position; team work and coaching
methods; study of the 1·ules; physical condition; methods of indoor
, practice. Lectures and practical work. Double course.
·V 7s. Basketball.—Instruction _will be given in basketball with the I
idea of ntting men to coach. The course will cover passing, goal ,
`_ y throwing, dribbling, team play, how to condition a team, and the  
different styles of play used by the leading coaches. Lectures and l
practical work. Double course. I
_ Bs. F0otball.—The theoretical work will take up the rules from {
the standpoint of coach players and officials; the several styles of ll
offense and defense with consideration of their special strength and l
_ weaknesses; generalship and strategy. The practical work will in- {
clude: training, conditioning and player’s equipment; punting, drop
kicking, place kicking, kick off, and forward passing; tackling dummy
and charging sled; special drills for line1nen, ends and backs; fol-
lowing the ball, interference and team work; fulndamental plays,
freak plays, and signal systems. Lectures and practical work. Double
courses. ·
. 9s. Schoolroom Games and Gymnastlcs.——The possibilities of ex-
I ' ercise for elementary grades and high school will be shown. A review

 :1 15
V; of schoolroom hygiene, with emphasis on proper seating, lighting,
  ventilation and exercise. Single course.
>  10s. Mass Athletics.—Methods of arrangement and squad di-
, vision. Practical experience of adults in plays and games, progres-
sively arranged. Particular attention to games that will employ a
·‘ large number in a limited space. Single course. ‘·
_ PSYCHOLOGY
Dr. Cornell ‘
1. Elementary General Psychology.—A beginning course cover-
ing the fundamental facts and laws of normal human consciousness.
The course will include the elements of physiological, descriptive, and ·
experimental psychology. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory.
Ground covered is equivalent of the complete one semester course.
» Double course.
105. Mental Tests.—A course for training teachers in the funda-
mentals of mental diagnosis. Several standard tests will bc studied
` and the student made proficient in the manipulation of at least one
{ scale. This course will be conducted in connection with the Psychol-
g ogical Clinic. Single course.
l
Q zootoev
5 1’roft·ss02· I·'ulllahous<2r
1. Nature Study.——A course designed primarily for teachers who
desire suggestions and material for presenting nature study to chil-
dren in the classroom. Methods of collecting, preparing and mounting
material for study, for drawing and for wall display. The course
deals largely with the more common animals, plants and minerals
\V11l(£]l are suitable for elementary study. Lectures and laboratory.
, One hour daily.
2. Bird Study.—A course in general Ornithology with particular
l reference to the life histories, habits, songs, nests, migrations and
economic importance of our native birds. Lectures, recitations,
_ laboratory exercises and field trips. One hour daily.
3. General Zoology.—A study of types of tl1e principal phyla of
animals with dissections and demonstrations. The first half of the
course is devoted to invertebrates; the second half to vertebrates.
Lectures, recitation