xt7m639k6c17 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m639k6c17/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650226  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 26, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 26, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7m639k6c17 section xt7m639k6c17 Inside Today's Kernel

Jim ie man
LEXINGTON, KY., FRIDAY,

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History

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Hamner, Bolton Win
SC Design Contest

According to Hamner, "Tacks
can be stuck in the homocete,
without damaging it, to hang up
the notices and posters."
Total cost for the bulletin
boards, which would stand about
eight feet high, would be about
$600. The site for the board has
been proposed along the dirt path
between
the Administration
Building and the Anthropology
Museum.
The bulletin board consists of
two smaller units, each with one
kiosk providing board space, and
a large unit with three kiosks.
Barry Porter, Student Congress representative who has
headed the bulletin board project,
suggested last night that several
of the smaller units be made and

Pocke-Tutor- s,

d

placed in different areas of the
campus.
One would be placed near the
area of Holmes, Blazer, Keene-lanand Jewell halls. Another
would be located in the Quadrangle, and a third would be
placed in the Law
Building location.
The smaller forms could be
constructed for $87 and $127, the
latter figure being the cost with
a bench added.
The bulletin boards would be
bolted to the surface of a concrete
square along a proposed sidewalk.
If the forms had to be moved
for any reason, they could merely
be unbolted and relocated.
Student Congress decided to
reccommend the plans to Vice
President Robert Kerley, who will
make the decision whether to construct the bulletin boards.
Porter said that the idea for
the boards came from a discussion on the unsightliness of posters and notices nailed to trees
and buildings on campus.
He said that if the boards
were constructed, he would ask
Maintenance and Operations to
remove any posters and notices
not located on the bulletin boards.
Porter said that if the plans
are okayed, "the boards would
probably be ready sometime in
the fall."
d,

College-Commer-

$19.95.
An accessory to Pocke-Tutis a short, wire push button control, costing $9.95 which turns
on the machine when tilted in
a certain direction.
"I got the idea about a year
or

ago that it would be handy to
have such a thing; for instance,
to study during coffee breaks at
work if you're a student and work
Markey told the news- part-time- ,"

College Of Nursing
Names Dean's List

For First Semester
Nineteen students with an academic average of 3.5 or better
were named to the Dean's List
in the College of Nursing for the
first semester.
The following
named:
Mary

K.

women

were

Lacy, Sarah Dodson

Moore, Janice Joseph, Betty Pet-ti- t,
Lois Calvert, Janet Portwood,

Huey, Kathleen Parker, Nancy
Sisler, Sharon Angles, Pamela
Allen Combs, Susan Donohue,
Virginia Sue Craves, Jean Kab-leCarol Rowlinson Klopp, Pat
McGary, Joyce Sutkamp, Pat
Thomas, Pat Treadway, and Donna Yancey.

Mardi Gras Dance Set Tonight

The 50th annual Mardi Cras dance, sponsored
by the Newman Club, will be held in the Grand
Ballroom of the Student Center from 8 until midnight tonight.
The Mystics from Louisville will entertain.
The affair will have a special air this year as
the club is celebrating its Sesquicentennial on the
University campus. Distinquished alumni and past
presidents of the club have been inv ited.
A trophy will be presented to the "favorite
professor" and the Mardi Cras Queen; Prizes also
will be awarded to the four queen finalists.
Nominees for queen and favorite professor came
from campus organizations. Voting was held Tuesday and Wednesday.
Tracy Shillito, last year's Murdi Cras Queen and
current chairman for the affair, will crown the
favorite professor. I le, in turn, w ill crown the queen.
Finalists for Mardi Cras Queen and their nomi

Gold-wate-

Violent winter storm hits
third of nation: Poge Seven.

eastern

University student auditions for New
York Metropolitan Opera: Poge Eight.

Lexington mayor seeks
project: Poge Eight.

seek revenge in remaining

two games:

Poge

Six.

University students may have paper.
received advertising brochures
"Or you could study on the
and order forms for a nonexistent bus to school," he continued.
"We haven't explored all the
device.
A copyrighted story in the
possibil.des."
The Northwestern paper disDaily Northwestern, newspaper
covered the possible fraud when
at Northwestern University, disAl V rom, the paper s editor, recovered that brochures advertisceived a brochure. The Northpocket-size"study device"
ing a
which conceivably could be used western Daily's story prompted
for examination cheating had investigations by police, post ofbeen sent to students at four fice authorities, and other newsUniversities UK included.
papers.
The brochures reportedly were
Markey said the brochures
sent in
envelopes were sent as a "test mailing to
about two weeks ago.
sample student response." He
DarrellN. Markey, 27, of Seat- said he sent 2,000 brochures, divitle, the promoter of the device, ded among UK, Northwestern,
admitted the product had not Tulane, and Oregon State.
been manufactured, "though we
Markey said his company,
have a prototype."
Study Aid Products, has received
no orders yet for the apparatus,
Markey denied in an interview with the Daily Northwestthough some order blanks have
been returned.
ern that the device, called
had been designed for
"We asked the students for
comments," he said. He added
cheating.
The device, which is battery that most comments had been
viscontrolled, is a pocket-sizederogatory, intimating that the
ual prompter in a small packet. device had been designed for
A roll of paper inside moves past cheating.
a transparent window at the top
of the gadget. It is advertised at
d

WINNING DESIGN FOR BULLETIN BOARDS

Assistant Managing Editor
The winning design for a proposed set of bulletin boards was
presented last night to Student
Congress,
A wooden model of the boards,
was set up and explained by the
designers, Richard Hamner and
Ralph Bolton, both architecture
majors.
The proposed plans call for
three precast concrete forms, two
of which are provided with benches. Homocete, a new waterproof
material, would be embedded in
the concrete.

pro

J6

million

Brochures

hand-address-

By KENNETH GREEN

challenges

Four.

Readers discuss society and Founder's
Day: Page Five.

'Study-Devic- e'

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major
Poge

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Six.

UK Students Receive

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Baseball team plans 25 games: Poge

Four.

Wildcats

University of Kentucky
FEB.

Vol. LVI, No. 85

Iditor discusses Centennial Ball: Page

r,

nators arc Suzanne Huffincs, Haggin Hall; Janet
Kington, Chi Omega; Sandra Lay, Alpha Xi Delta;
Bonnie Linder, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Sherry
Smith, Kappa Sigma.
Professors nominated and by whom are Dr.
Michael E. Adelstein, Alpha Xi Delta; Col. James
P. Alcorn, Alpha Tau Omega; Dr. Harold B.
Binkley, Delta Gamma; Dr. Christian, Kappa Sigma; Dr. Ward Crowe, Fa nn house and Alpha Cam-m- a
Bho; Dr. Wayne II. David, Phi Delta Theta.
Dr. James Gladden, Delta Zeta, Holmes Hall
and Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dr. John K. Kennedy, law students; Dr. Pierce Keeneland, Figma
Nu; Dr. N. J. Pisacano, Alpha Gamma Delta and
Zeta Tau Alpha; Dr. Douglas Schwartz, Kappa
Delta, and Dr. Amry Vandenbosch, Chi Omega.
Dress is semi formal or costume. Prizes will be
aw arded to the best costumed male or female. Door
prizes also w ill be awarded.
Denny Mitchell w ill be master of ceremonies.

He said the advertising said
nothing about cheating on examinations.
Markey said money sent by
students would l)e returned "if
we did not get enough orders."
Virgil Worthington, assistant postal inspector of Seattle,
said the product's originator
would be questioned on his entire sales procedure. Worthington
said he would investigate the
possibilities of mail fraud and
false advertising.
Markey said he had a business partner Robert Nemyre,50.
It was not known how many
brochures allegedly were sent to
the University. Adrian Bradshaw,
postmaster of the University
branch post office, and William
Cecil, postmaster of Lexington,
said they had not detected the
brochures or had not received
any complaints.
Walter McCabe, general
manager of the Lexington Better
Business Bureau, said his organization had received no complaints from students.

Dr. Oswald Lauds
Founders Activities

University President John W. tend to you and your associates
Oswald said today Founders their warm thanks for the fine
Week "was a resounding suchospitality you accorded them
cess."
during their visit to Lexington.
In a press conference this mornThe message continued, "while
ing, Dr. Oswald extended his the) sincerely regret that their
personal thanks to all persons schedule did not permit them to
"who made possible the highly stay as long as they would have
successful Centennial ceremonliked, they were delighted that
ial events held in Lexington from they had the opportunity toad-dres- s
the men and women of
Saturday through Monday."
"With the exception of the your University."
Dr. Oswald said the events
convocation, all events were precisely as planned," Dr. Oswald of the past weekend made signisaid. "The convocation was
ficant contributions to the obin deference to the Presi- jectives of the Centennial by prodent of the United States, who viding a stimulus for students,
honored us with his presence faculty and alumni, an accentdespite his great burden of res- uation of the University's position in the national academic
ponsibility." he said.
Dr. Oswald stated, "I wish community, and an interaction
to thank the convocation audibetween the University comence for the understanding of the munity and the citizens of the
decision which placed honoring Commonwealth.
our nation's Chief Executive
above our own program objectives."
Dr. Oswald was asked his
opinion of an editorial concerning the convocation in Tuesday's
Kernel w hich claimed "The event
"Theory is know ledge that is
was a bust." He replied he would powerful," Dr. Glen Heathers of
have expected an editorial more New York University told College
of Kducation students yesterday.
in line with "the great signifiDr. Heathers, professor of educance of the occasion."
cation at NYU, said the "key to
Dr. Oswald added, "More recent statements in the new spaper educational reform" is the
student. Teachers
by students participating in the
planning of both the conv ocation showing students how to underand related Founders weekend stand their subjects in terms of
events indicate attitudes quite theories, principles, and law s will
make
different from the editorial."
students,
President Oswald said the he said.
Information is trivial in conhundreds of notes received from
trast with theory. Dr. Heathers
alumni and friends of the University throughout the world w ho stated.
He also said, "We do not decould not be here for the weekend confirmed that the program mand that a student gain excellence before going on to somewas a milestone for the Univerand the state.
thing else and we put toomuch
sity
Included was a message from emphasis on grading on the curve.
"A
curve means
Marvin Watson, special assistant
to President Johnson, Dr. Os- that a teacher is lousy and it '
show s that man students do not
wald stated.
It read, "President and Mrs. really understand w hat the) have
been taught."
Johnson have asked me to ex

Theory Cited
As Powerful

bell-shape-

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* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Feb. 26,

15

The Lively Arts
Mr. Henry Kurth spoke in Ihe
Iab Theater of tle Fine Arts
Building yesterday as a guest of
the Fine Arts Committee and the
English Department, on "To-

...

is

manu-

scripts and art work for its spring
issue. In order to publish Stylus before May, a deadline has
been established for March 22,
the day University students return from spring vacation.
Resides short fiction and poetry. Stylus regularly prints selections from art work submitted.
Manuscripts should be typed,
In all cases
fiction double-spacethe original manuscript should
not be submitted unless a copy
has been retained by the author.
Obviously this cannot apply
in the case of art work, all of
which will be carefully returned to the artist regardless of the
editors' decision.
Pocty, fiction, and art for the
spring issue of Stylus may be
submitted directly to Editor Joe
Nickell, to the English Department office on the second floor
of McVey Hall, or to the Arts
Editor of the Kernel in the
Journalism Building.
Stylus is the University's only
student literary magazine, published each semester, edited by
students under the support ofthe
English Department.

Blues At Newport

by scott nunley

out as dramatic highlights ofthe
production.
If these successes were accomplished primarily by the
actors, and inspite of the set
wards Stage Architecture."
design, is this to say that Mr.
Mr. Kurth is guest designer of Kurth's ideas of plastic units
the sets and lighting for the and modern lighting are inefcurrent Cuignol production, "The fective?
Infernal Machine." An assistant
It certainly is not. Mr. Kurth's
professor at Western Reserve Unitheories have leen proved again
versity, Mr. Kurth is an acknow- and again in triumphant perledged national authority on the formances across the country.
modern uses of lighting and What needs to be pointed out is
that drama was highly successscenery, or "plastic units."
The premise under which Mr. ful for centuries without this
Kurth operates is that set details addition of stage architecture,
should be designed to aid the and not all modem dramas or
actor in his task of communistages can be improved by an
cating with the audience, and overdose of such technique.
that lighting is 75 percent of the
Shakespearean drama was
job.
quite effectively produced under
Rut this modern use of lightan open sky in broad daylight.
ing is not always effective for Creek drama utilized only paint-- ,
every play. Particularly in the ed panels as scenery', character
lengthy opening act of Cocteau's masks for the actors. In their
"Infernal Machine" the pretimes, all of these methods workdawn lighting seemed to lapse ed.
simply into heavy, boring monoThe advocates of "disproportonies of gloom.
tion" and stage architecture
In the second act, Oedipus
would like to say that 20th cenconfrontation with the Sphinx, tury audiences can no longer be
the lighting again appeared as satisfied with such methods after
less successful than it might have the motion and immediacy ofthe
been, separating the two princinema and television.
This is a valid point, but it
ciple speakers with a wide gulf.
On a small stage, intimacy
is not
Richard Burand dramatic pressure are not ton's recent "Hamlet" was
usually a problem. Yet it was an outstanding success, because
difficult to overcome the feeling theater-goer- s
were able to achieve
that Susan Cardwell and Danny that suspension of disbelief all
Howell were two players in a art requires.
America's live drama auditiring tennis match.
At times, such an effect may ences have not lost this ability,
be desired, but "The Infernal and their enjoyment of such plays
Machine" functioned best when
as Cuignol's "Man For All Seathe actors were not forced apart sons" demonstrates it. When Mr.
but rather concentrated in a Kurth declares that the actor is
small area. The fine dramatic the important thing, and then
scene with the Chost in Act One, dominates actor with stage
the torture of Oedipus by the ornament, he is doing himself
Sphinx in Act Two, and the bed- an injustice.
room scene of Act Three stood

Stylus Seeks
Manuscripts
Stylus
requesting

Review

A

which is truly American.
Representing theearlicst forms
of what was to develop into jazz
and Dixieland, the Blues usually takes the form of a lament
with subject matter concerned
with hardship, unrequited love,
and captivity subjects common
to all folk forms, but Blues offered new ideas in chord progressions and 'harmony which
made it unique in sound and
expression.
Blues had managed to survive the onslaught of modification in the folk field because
a few of the
such as "Mississippi" John
Hurt, have lived long enough to
preserve the original state of the
music by standing determined
and indisputable in their authority.
"Mississippi" John and some
of his proteges in the persons of
"Brownie" McChce and Sonny
Terry, the Rev. Gary Davis, and
a young
named Dave
VanRonk, make the trip to Newport for the folk festival more
gratifying with regard to authenticity than it might be otherwise.
Their offerings are
in a Vanguard recording,
"Blues At Newport."
The album includes "Match
old-tim-

blues-sing-

f

BRING THE LITTLE WOMAN

ik

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 405O6. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published four times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Stephen Palmer,
secretary.
ilegun as the Cadet in 1894. became the Kecord in IVoO, and the Idea
in Itt'JS. Published continuously as the
Kernel since li( 15.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail $7.00
Per copy, from files $ .10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
2321
Editor
News Desk. Sports, Women's Editor,
2320
Socials
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

His interpretation of the blues
form, especially evident in "Gam-

i

bler's Blues," is both authentic
and musically satisfying to the
young folk enthusiast.
VanRonk

uation of the best blues tradition
when the
finally pass
out of the picture.
The album cannot be adequately descriled as a whole because of the number of performers, each with his own distinctive
style, except to say they all sing
the blues, displaying it to its best
advantages. Each singer makes
the listener want to hear more
old-time- rs

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2:40 - 5:00 - 7:15 - 9:30

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"foot-wetting-

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COLUMBIA PICTURES

blues-singer-

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of him as is often the case with
composite recordings.
Yet, the album is altogether
outstanding and worthwhile because it offers an opportunity for
for the listener in
"
hopes that the only real American folk music will not fade in
the light of the numerous

box," and "C.C. Rider," (best
remembered, unfortunately, in
their rock n' roll versions), "That-Wil- l
Never Happen No More,"
"Gambler's Blues," and several
more original blues songs.
Generally speaking all ofthe
performers on the album have
been brought up in the strictest
blues tradition and their mode of
presentation is, therefore, easily
anticipated.
How ever, Dave VanRonk provides an unexpected excellence in
blues styling because he is, first
of all, not a Negro and the blues
tradition is uniquely theirs; and
secondly, he is young (27) while
are
the bulk of the
pushing well above the

By ELIZABETH WARD
"Blues" is the only folk form

W K AH H 4 toivtSttrRfn SrA w W A

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Feb. 26,

Around The Campus
ALrilA TAU OMEGA
Pledge class officers: president, Terry Shutt; vice president, David Cherry; secretary,
James Heavy; treasurer, Dan
Reynolds; serjeant-at-armPat
Carroll; and Junior IFC representative, Curtis Hancock.
ALFIIA XI DELTA
President, Janie Atkinson;
vice president, Cheryl Miller; recording secretary, Jane Cabbard;
rush chairman, Tracy Shillito;
treasurer, Mary Lee Gosney; assistant, Cleo Vradelis; pledge
trainer, Kyda Hancock; assistant, Ann Winstead; rush secretary, Mary Jane White; social
chairman, Pam Mitchell;
Karen Boyer; journal
correspondent, Cathy Cornelius;
and chaplain, Carol Sue Greene.
Campus representative, Pat
Ellis; marshal, Anne Vaughan;
mistress of ceremonies; Martha
Cobia; scholarship chairman,
Linda Thomas; house president,
Sue Ellen Miller; Quill chairman, Jerinel Nenni; publicity
chairman, Judy Grisham;
chairman, Pat Smith; activities chairman, Carole Williams;
music chairman, Cathy Craddock;
decoration chairman, Charlie
Clements; flowers, gifts, and
awards, Carol Stenken; magazine agency chairman, Beth Bennett; and philanthropy chairman,
Bobbie Allphin.
DELTA TAU DELTA
President, Herbert Ligon; vice
president, Frank Dickey; secretary, William Hamilton; recording secretary, Arthur Walker, Jr.;
treasurer, Richard Ware; assistant, Harley Blankenship; social
chairman, Arthur Litton; alumni
relations, Rick AVakeland; intramural representative, William
Moore; house manager, Joseph
Humphrey; rush chairman, David
Switzer; IFC representative,
Lewis Sutherland; Rainbow correspondent, Roger Auge; historian, Charles Ben Ashley; and
scholarship chairman, James
s,

his-toria-

intra-mura-

ls

Pope.

Pledge class officers: president, Mike Gordan; vice president, Charles Goodman; secretary, David Beshear; treasurer,
Earl Bryant; parliamentarian,
Steve Gray; social chairman, Roy
Harney and Phil Huff; rush chairand
man,- Louis Ilillenmeyer
Robert Goodman; and Junior IFC
representative, Chuck Wood.

DIXIE CASH REGISTER CO.,

'For Living and Giving

HOLIDAY HOUSE
Dial

266-441-

5

DANSK DESIGNS
SELECTIONS

Sam
ry Crins; scrpmt-at-armRail; and Junior IFC representative, Hobby Markham.
ZETA TAU ALPHA
President, Hetty Hendry; vice
s,

president, Linda Rankin; recording secretary, Charlotte Arnall;
treasurer, Reeky Harleston; historian, Gale Houlton; rush chairman, Marilyn Craves; ritual chairman, Angela Tweel; corresponding secretary, Susan Jones; pledge
trainer, Helen Adams; and scholarship chairman, Jeannie

Fer-rel- l.

House president, Carla Baker;
recommendations chairman, Ruth
Anne Dye; standards chairman,
Hrenda White; activities chairman, Linda Grubb; magazine
Jane Rogers and Donna
Patton; social chairman, Patsy
Lang; service cochairman, Barb
Hanna and Chardell Thomson;
publicity chairman, Liz Howard;
assistant recommendations chairman, Nancy Rudnick; and assistant scholarship chairman,
Sandra Dean.
DELTA SIGMA PI
President, Robert Bennett;
first vice president, Bill Scrog-ginsecond vice president, Bill
Matteson; secretary, Don Little;
and treasurer, David Crockett.
New Delta Sigma Pi pledges
are: Jim Neel, Jim Whitlow, Rick
Shewmaker, David Heinman, Jim
Fugitte, Dan Farmer, Charles
Mitchell Jr., Bob Livesay, and
David DeMarcus.
s;

Recipes
Syrup left from canned pineapple? Add a little of it to mayonnaise along with prepared yellow mustard and use it as a
dressing for shredded green cabbage salad

This Is Year Of The Stick

They're absurd, expensive and
unless you're trying to maul a
mugger useless.
Even the man who dreamed
them up breaks out in helpless
laughter when he talks about
them.
Naturally, then, the inexplicable world of fashion has taken
them to its capacious bosom:
Fashion sticks are well on their
way to being the most chic accessories to make the summer
scene.

"They'll be the Hula hoop of
fashion," a Fifth Avenue store

"Sheer lunacy," chortles Thor

Antrim, their originator.

Arngrim, an actor and producer with a puckish imagination, says he got the idea at the

P

beach one summer. He and his
wife, actress Norma MacMillan,
and their two children were ingirl who
trigued by a gypsy-typ- e
used to stalk the sands with a
big walking stick.
"It was far out, but at the
same time very chic," recalls
Arnurim.
He got together with

painter-murali-

signer, who showed the sticks
with his summer collection, says:
"They go well with my summer
suits. They're very attractive. The
young like them; they're no longer
associated with the elderly and
feeble."
He adds, with elegant restraint: "They have a certain
cachet." They have a distinctive
personality, all right.
A polkadot walking stick, held
with insouciance while dancing
at a discotheque, will not be
overlooked.
With the feminine look in
vogue this year, it's possible the
well dressed woman will act ladylike, walk softly and carry a stick.

Hy JOY MILLKH
AP Women's Editor

st

Goldsmith who dethe sticks. An umbrella
signed
company saw the possibilities,
and they were in business.
The buyers who crowd their
showroom these days convulse
Hill

buyer says enthusiastically, as
show windows up and down the
avenue sprout sticks.
The sticks are nothing but the
old fashioned cane in bamboo or
covered in fantastic fabrics,
suedes, animal or reptile skins.
They start at a rock bottom $35
and the alligator number with
sterling silver handles, not out
yet, will bring at least
$200-$30-

'Infernal

Arngrim.

"They say, 'What do they do?'
and I say 'Nothing' and they exclaim 'Oh, marvelous.' I suppose
if the sticks opened up and did
things the buyers would go

away."

Hill Hlass,

award-winnin- g

0.

de

choose

61

before
choosing diamonds
Buy your diamonds with
your eyes wide open to
the real facts about that
stone ! Our knowledge and
integrity aid you in your
diamond selection.

Machine9

The Guignol Theatre Centennial production , "The Infernal
Machine" by Jean Cocteau, will
run tonight and Saturday. Curtain rises at 8:30 p.m. in the Guignol Theatre of the Fine Arts
Building.

Member American Gem Society

PulleR) & Wilder
MOMt

ZIP
40S07

Will Dunn Drug
Corner of
Maxwell
S. Lime

and

The College Store
FOUNTAIN
COSMETICS

DELIVERY SERVICE
DRUGS

Want to spend 45 fascinating days touring the continent?
Leave our S.T.O.P. tour brochure where it'll do the most
good. It's a chance not just to see Europe, but to get to know
it. A chance to hear great music, and see great ballet. A
chance to talk to people to find out how they live, and think,
and feel about things. It's also a chance to relax and get a
tan (the tour includes sunny places as well as cultural ones).
The price? $1,099.30 from New York. And it's
Price based on economy air fare and double occupancy in hotela.

GIFTS

817 EUCLID AVENUE
Lexington, Kentucky

PI KAPrA ALPHA
Pledge class officers: president, Jerry Johnson; vice president, Stewart Allen; secretary,
Denny McGowan; treasurer, Gar-

It could get you a free European tour.

Inc.

UNDERWOOD ELECTRIC, IBM,
MANUALS
ALL MAKES
124 N. Broadway
Ph. 25-012- 9

-3

'Fashion's Hula Hoop9

Leave our brochure where
your dad can see it.

TYPEWRITERS
FOR RENT

19G5-

Wile Travel Agency
504'a Euclid Ave. Lexington, Ky.- -j
Please send me your iree orocnure aescnuiny mu ui jruur

S.T.O.P. student tours.
NAME
STREET.

.STATE- -

CITY

ZIP CODE.

PHONE.

Wc Now Carry In Our Art Department

The Complete Line Of

NEW MASTERS ACRYLIC PAINTS
As Well As the Complete Line of

Permanent Pigments Sun Thickened
Oil Colors

IS

THERE AN EXECUTIVE
CAREER FOR YOU IN
RETAILING?

If you would rather have a career

that

is

exciting than work that
regimented
If you have the vision necessary to sec
the opportunity for rapid future advancement in position and income . . .
is

Then

...

INVESTIGATE A RETAILING
CAREER WITH POGUE'S
The H. & S. Pogue Company is a division of
Associated Dry Goods Corporation, which is the
nationally acknowledged leader in quality department store merchandising. Pogue's and its
Suburban Stores represent prestige and quality
to the customers of Southwestern Ohio.

If you arc completing your degree in Busi-

ness Administration, Liberal Arts, or Home
Home Economics and arc interested in retailing, make arrangements through your
Placement Office to talk to us about our
Executive Training Program.

We will be interviewing on

your campus
Wednesday March 3,

1965

P.S. If we miss you on Campus and you would like

KENNEDY BOOK STORE

an interview, please contact:

PERSONNEL OFFICE
THE H. & S. POGUE CO.
CINCINNATI, OHIO 45201

* On This Thing?"
"By The Way, Is Thcfc Any Brake

And It Was A Ball
the Founders Week activities draw to a close and the long
range of aspects of the "second
century" begin to assume specific
shapes, a last look back at the
Centennial Ball
might show a
social change which could be woven into the fabric of the next hundred years.
The University, in the past, has
been called the "country club of
the south," a name we have been
trying to erase for several years.
More recently, criticism has been
leveled at several campus social
organizations for allowing "uncontrolled parties" to take place.
These criticisms resulted in action
taken by an advisory group.
However, the Ball Saturday
night serves as a sharp contrast
to behavior seen at similiar, earlier campus functions. Does this
show of "good manners" indicate
an awakening to the errors of the
past and an awareness of what
must be seen in the future? We
think so, and we would like to
see this type of function encouraged.
Students outnumbered other
at the Ball and added a
zest that would not have been
As

there had just the "older set" attended. The mood of the Ball
provided by an orchestra, not a
band a panorama of entertainmentnot just a single artist
and formal gowns and evening wear not merely, "coat and
tie generated an air of excite-- ,
ment.
Undeniably student reception
to and appreciation of the Ball
is at a peak now at the University. Behavior and response to the
elaborate preparations must surely indicate a refinement in the
student that is more than slowly
emerging.
While future affairs of this magni-

tude are perhaps not feasible, efforts should be made to continue the
trend away from the "uncontrolled
party" and toward the festive atmosphere generated by a formal
black tie.
Evidently students have discovered a means of personal expression rarely found in a social
event. A move to insure further
of this type would
find strong support
undoubtedly
among all members of the University community.

a

self-discove- ry

Letters To The Editor

History Major Challenges
To the Editor of the Kernel:
After reading the supposed "refutation" of my statement of Feb.
10,

said refutation being presented

by none other than the eminent historian Hank Davis, Junior Physics
Major, I decided to clear the mud
cast on my views and, perhaps,
encourage Mr. Davis to clarify his
own broadside. First, I would challenge Mr. Davis to show us how
"Big Business" has been "hamstrung" by our governmental regulation of business, industry, and
labor. I feel that only the power
of business to determine the standard of living of this nation has
been trimmed.
In Mr. Davis' "epistle," I see
that he misread, for his own plea- -

sure, my statement concerning the
depression. In no sense did I blame
the depression on Mr. Hoover. I
did, however, say that the "limited government" phi