xt7m901zdd96 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m901zdd96/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19191107  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  7, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  7, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7m901zdd96 section xt7m901zdd96 The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY

VOL. X.

NOV.

Kentucky-- O,
Mg vanderMii Eleven
uipiayed by wildcats
Blue and White Hold Vaunted Commodores to 0 Score
Before Homecoming Alumni in Most Thrilling
Game Ever Played on Stoll Field, While
Kentucky Line Proves Best in South
0--

Staging a battle the like of which was probably never witnessed before
on Stoll Field, the rejuvenated Wildcats clawed their way through the
score, left
vaunted Commodores last Saturday, and holding them to a
them dazed and bewildered by the lightning attack and fierce defense of the
Blue and White warriors. Outweighed eighteen pounds to the man, the
to the ilnal
Wildcats outfought the Tennesseeans from the first kick-of- f
alumni, gathered to witness what was
whistle, and brought the
expected to be a forlorn hope, to their feet time and again by brilliant attack
or daring tackle.
Entire Kentucky Team Star.
There were no individual star3, every Wildcat winning a name and a
place in Kentucky's list of football heroes who,,have fought and won for
the honor of the Blue and White. Especially did the Wildcat line prove Itself
to be the best seen in action on Stoll Field in years, and according to statements by Coach McGugin and Captain Cody, of the Commodores, the best
in the South today. Captain Josh Cody and Lipscomb, who had been
heralded as the most powerful pair of tackles in the South, were played
off their feet and swept aside by Server and Murphree, eclipsing them in
every department of the game. Kelly, at center, tore through the Vandy
offense time and again, throwing the Commodore backs for losse3. "Dood."
Downing, Combs and iColpitts, at guard positions, never failed to open holes
when called upon and were in the game at all times.
Heber and Green, in flank positions, broke up play after play by their
brilliant work along with "Red" Culp, who probably played the best defensive
game of any Wildcat. Culp was in every play and was the surest tackier on
the field. Shanklin and Prlbble rarely failed to respond with gains of several
yards when called upon, Shanklin, though handicapped by injuries received
some time ago In practice, carrying the ball for several good runs. Captain
Dishman, playing safety on defense, accepted every Vanderbilt punt without
a fumble, and demonstrated his ability as an open field runner by returningthe ball a substantial distance on each attempt. Fuller, who replaced Dish- man in the last quarter, gave a good account of himself while in the game.
The work of Tom Zerfoss, however,
Wildcats Threaten to Score.
At no time did Vanderbilt threaten was the outstanding feature of Coacli
Kentucky's goal, and the punting abil- McGugin's machine. In fact, the Comity of Tom Zerfoss was the only thing modores owe the tie score to the
which enabled the Validy team to splendid punting of the eldest of the
He punted for a
make a3 good a showing as they did. Zerfoss brothers.
Twice during the game did Wildcat good average, slightly exceeding that
scores seem imminent, once in the of Green, and occasioned the remark
third quarter, when, after the Ken- of a former Wildcat warhorse that lite
tucky backfield had carried the ball punting, even if it had been done on
to the
line, the Commodore's a dry instead of a wet field, would
line held like a stone wall and the ball have deserved a write-up- .
Tho line-ufollows:
went over only a foot from the goal
Kentucky (0) Position Vanderbilt (0)
line. In the fourth quarter, after
L. E..
Zerfoss
Shanklin had recovered a fumbled Green
L. T.
Cody (Capt.)
punt on the Vanderbilt
line, Server
L. G
Bailey
the 'Cats again failed to make first Downing
Early
downs, and Green attempted a drop-kic- Kelly
Colpltts
-- JR. G.
Hendricks
which fell short of the goal.
Murphree
.R. T...
Lipscomb
Vandy Weak on Offensive.
Heber
.
R. E.
Adams
Vanderbilt showed admirable form
Culp
Q
Latham
on the defense, but, like the Wildcats,
Shanklin
L. II..
Borryhlll
they were weakest on the offense.
Pribble
Wiggs
The Commodore line played good
Dishman (Capt.) R. H
Wade
ball, nlthough It did not come up to
Scoring.
the mark set by the Wildcat for- Berryhill, at left half, andjKentuckv
wards.
Latham, at nuarter. were Vandv'n vanderbilt
I
hest backfield men.
(Continued on Page 7)
home-comin- g

one-yar- d

d

k

V

7, 1919

No. 7

Vanderbilt- -0
NEW COVENANT

OF FAITH.

(Cdltorlal)

The citizens of Lexington show
their loyalty November 4, by
approving by overwhelming ma
Jorlty, the bond issue designed to
supply $75,000 to supplement the
$100,000 for a Memorial on our
Fiscal Court, thus completing Lex
ington and Fayette's quota of
$$100,000 for a Memorial on our
campus to Kentucky's immortal
heroes of the European War.
What can be more expressive of
their love and gratitude for the
men who have given their lives for
democracy than a memorial which,
in forthcoming years shall inspire
the young men and women of Kentucky, future citizens of America,
with higher ideals and reverence
for their duties to the State and
Nation for which their boys have
died?
The people of Lexington have
proved their confidence in the University and their interest in the
patriotism of the men who having
graduated or were yet under train
ing in the University, in the midst
of their work of preparation, laid
aside all other obligations and
joined the ranks of the nation's
fighting forces.
ed

EXPERIMENT STATION

TO

OBSERVE ARMISTICE

DAYjypSITV

Model Farm and Home Ec

Display Attract

Attention

silver-tongue- d

blue-eye-

n

FOOTBALL
SERIES RESULTS TO DATE

NOTICE.

There will bo an Important meeting
of the Kernel Staff Monday at the fifth
hour in the Kernel room.

ON TO DANVILLE
ON TO DANVILLE

"How shall she know the worship
Kipling.
The student body answered the
poet'3 question Friday morning in
chapel when it selected Jane Gregory,
Dorothy Mlddleton, Isabel Dickey,
Elizabeth Klmbrough, Clara Blocher
and Helen Taylor as the six most
s
winsome and charming
of the
University.
For the first time this term the
chapel was crowded. The exercises
were presided over by Emery Frazier,
who 13 noted of old for his
oratory. The unsophisticated
Freshman hearing Mr. Frazier praise
them would almost believe that he
actually loved the ladies.
Now, Just a word as to the fair win- ners of this contest.
Jane Gregory is a little
Freshman who has won the hearts of
all. She hails from Lexington and is
a pledge of Kappa Kappa Gamma fraternity.
Dorothy Mlddleton came in second
with a smile for everybody. "Dot" is
also a Lexingtonlan and a member of
Kappa Kappa Gamma. Ever since she
set foot on the campus in 1917 she
lias been a winner. This is her fourth
victory.
Isabel Dickey makes her bow for the
third time. Since her Freshman year,
191 8, she has never lost a friend and
has gained them so fast that her prospects for a straight record are bright.
"Izzle" Is a member of Alpha XI Delta
and comes from Walton.
Of course, Elizabeth Kimbrough Just
curled those eyelashes upward and
smiled, then everybody "fell." This
is her second victory. She's a Sophomore and still "running strong."
"Lizzie" conies from Cynthiana and
belongs to the Kappa Kappa Gamma
fraternity.
Clara Blocher is a lawyer. If she
wins her cases like she captures
hearts, she'll make a fortune. Clara
Is a pledge of Kappa Delta and came
to U. K. from Owensboro.
Helen Taylor is an old favorite, this
being her third victory. Helen halls
from Bowling Green, and Is a member
of the Kappa Kappa Gamma fraternity.
s
of the Past.
Popular
191G
Edness Kimball, Nancy Innls
Mildred Taylor, Lillian Gaines, Edith
Sachs, Ruth Weathers. Elizabeth Petty, and Virginia Stout.
1917 Mildred Taylor, Mary Gray
we would do her?"

Classes for the morning will be dismissed Tuesday near the end of the
third hour and students and faculty
of the University of Kentucky will assemble in Chapel where the "Victory
Day" celebration will be held, the exercises beginning promptly at 10:30
o'clock. At the eleventh hour of the
eleventh day of the eleventh month,
Hamilton Holt, editor of the New
York ndependent, will be speaking on
"A Declaration of Interdependence,"
discussing some of the things that he
saw in Europe on his trips. Mr. Holt
visited the battle fronts on his first
trip and on his second, saw the birth
of the League of Nations, of which his
address will be principally concerned.
The following tentative program for
the exercises has been arranged:
National Hymn.
Introduction of the speaker President McVey.
Address, "Declaration of Interdependence" Hamilton Holt.
Song University Glee Club.
All the veterans of the world war,
survivals of the Civil,
wars, aviators, men from the
army, navy and marines, civic, college
organizations
will
and charitable
honor in some way, the first anniversary of the signing of the
According to the reports of the
plans which were made at the meeting of the local po3t of the American
Legion held in Judge Wilson's office
Saturday morning, this will be one of
the biggest events ever held in Lexington. A half holiday will probably
bo declared at noon for school chil
dren and business people who will
gather In downtown districts to wit
ness this occasion.
There will bo a big parade through
the principal streets terminating at
the Woodland Auditorium or at the
Courthouse on Cheapsldo where appropriate speeches will be made "to
celebrate the dawn of victory, to honor
our soldier dead and to emphasize the
spirit of Americanism."

Freshmen, 0; Juniors. 0.
Sophomores, 0; Seniors, 0.
Sophomores, 6; Juniors, 0.
Freshmen, 0; Seniors, 7.
Sophomores, 0; Seniors, 0.

BY ADMIRERS

CONTEST CLOSE
CLASSES DISMISSED

One of the striking features of the
Style Show given under the direction
of the Shriners, in Lexington, is the
Experiment Station booth. A model
farm, showing in miniature the work
ings of an
Blue Grass es
tablishment of 150 acres, with crops,
cattle, poultry, from which a net annual Income of $5,000 should bo derived, is being shown. Ten tons of
soil were used in making the base and
teal crops appear, Just beginning to
hoot above the loam.
In another booth Is demonstrated
how poultry cun make money, and the
home economics department
has a
unique display for the housewife and
her husband.

INTER-CLAS-

ELECTED

Hamilton Holt to Speak on Frizzy Presides With Silver
Tongued Oratory
Declaration of

Spanish-America-

FEATURES III EXHIBIT

KENTUCKY'S FAIREST

j

(CoatlBued o

Page 2)

d

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2

STRAND

CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING

STRAND ALE AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

THE

"THE DEST ORCHESTRA

OPEN 10 A. M. TO 1 1 P. M.
Children, 9c plus lc war tax
AdulLs,$18c;pIu8 2c war tax

THE SOUTH"

IN

HOME OF

"ONLY THE DE3T IN MOVING PICTURES"

PERSONALS
AMATEUR NIGHT PROVES jPATT HALL
Miss Kate Woodruff, of Eminence,
wns the guest of Miss Lucy Holt for
the week-end- .
Miss Kathleen Hennlck was the
Riiest of Miss Margaret Harbison Satin rdny.
Miss Anna Mae Dawson spent the
week-enwith her parents in Cynthi-ana- .

KENTUCKY'S FAIREST
ELECTED 1Y ADMIRERS.

THE CLASSY PLACE
FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS

j

IT

PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT, GOLD-WYAND SELECT PICTURES

(Continued From Pago 1)

I

Miss Conncll Is Awarded

j

Prize; Original Skit
Also Wins

.On Hnllowo'en night students and
faculty members of the University enjoyed, In spite of the Inclement weather, one of the best amateur performances ever presented by the Stroller
organization, In the opinion of Judges
and officials.
On the program were those chosen
Wednesday and Thursat the
selec
day afternoons from thirty-threIntions?, Including nearly seventy-fiv- e
dividuals. This was the greatest number of applicants the Strollers have
ever had. Four Individual and three
t
skits composed the program,
try-out- s

j

e

onn-ac-

as follows:
"The Prodigal Son," Luctle Moore;
"A Lesson In Hypnotism," John Head,
assisted by Albert Shreves; "The Romance of a Hammock," Virginia GrifProgram,"
fith; "The
Jane Bell, Sara Metcalf Piper, Eugenia
Young, Martha McClure, Emma Lee
Young, Catherine Tucker, Anna Bell
Hall; "Who's Afraid," Louise Connell;
"The Gazelle and Swan," Katherino
Reed; "How the Ham Saved the
Homestead," Jane Gregory and Clari-be- l
Kay, Brooks ("Tubby") Jewett,
Frank Widekemper, George Oldham
and J. W. Selph.
Miss Louise Connell, of Paris, a
freshman in the College of Arts and
Science was awarded the prize for the
most clever individual selection and
"How the Ham Saved the Homestead"
received the prize for the best one-ac- t
play. This playlet was written several
years ago by Bill Shlnnick and revised
for this presentation by Mary Turner.
'
After the amateur performance the
students and their friends were entertained at a party and dance in the
Gymnasium Building by the faculty,
assisted by the Y. M. C. A., and the
Y. W. C. A. Buel Armory was U3ed
for dancing, and in the gymnasium
which was lighted by pumpkin lanterns
and gay with black and yellow fesbooths and
toons, were fortune-tellinother attractions befitting the occasion.
The second floor was also decorated and hot chocolate and oughnuts

week-end-

WARREN BROS.

Martha McClure last week-end- .
Miss Hallie K. Frye spent the weekend with her parents at Waddy.
Misses Anna Brackett Owen, Martha
Buckman and Gertrude Wallingford
attended the wedding of Miss Florence
Johnson and Mr. Bradley Bowen at
Lancaster, Saturday.
The whole evening was

were served.

a delightful affair to all attending and
wa3 one of the most successful ama-

teur nights the Strollers have ever
A meeting will be held next week at
which time the name of those admitted as members of the Strollers
will be given out.

592

Established
1899

"

Records
Musical Instruments
Player Rolls
Sheet Music

The E. C. Christian Music Co.

205-20-

7

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE
FOR FRUITS, CANDIES, NUTS

PHOENIX BLOCK
Now is the time to have your Fall Suits and
Overcoats Cleaned and Pressed.
The way Becker cleans them can save you the
price of a new one.

BECKER DRY CLEANING CO.
C. It. McGAUGHEY,

Proprietor

"CLEANER3 THAT SATISFY"
PHONE

LIME AT HIGH

G21--

Cropper's Laundry
(Incorporated)

114 N. UPPER

PHONE 210

Groves, Cox & Co.
store,
invite you to their
A new front, new interior arrangement.

had.

PHONE

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishing
Pianos a Specialty
Lexington, Ky.
East Main
-

"EVERYTHING NEW"

Stmt, aaaMfaUMaDtH

Isabel Dickey spent the
with her mother, Mrs.
Dickey, in Nicholasville.
Miss Maude Asbury visited her
brother, Mr. Charlie Asbury, on the
Winchester pike, last week-end- .
GROCERS
Misses Sally Coleman and Elizabeth Davidson were the guests of Miss
LUNCH GOODS OF ALL KINDS
Ila See in Mt. Sterling.
ALSO FRUITS
Miss Lucy Cracraft spent the weekend with her lister, IMrs. Thomas
COR. HIGH AND LIMESTONE 8TS.
Duffy at Midway.
Bracket was the guest of
Miss Bess
Miss Louise Smiser last week-end- .
Mi3s Ella Brown was the guest of
Miss Elizabeth Kimbrough, Saturday.
Miss Sallle Burns visited Miss

L. P. GRAVES, Prop.

'

McGurk & O'Brien

d

BIG FOUR
TAXI CO.

n

CANDIES AND LUNCHES

Miss

week-en-

CALL 441

Aeollan-Vocalio-

E

Phone 982
Address WILBUR R. SMITH, Lexington, Ky.

Co!kfe.Eut M

.

WHEN IN A HURRY

Pianos
Player Pianos
Columbia Grafonolas

HOME-MAD-

d

DELIGHTFUL PARTY

g

Ashhrook, Nancy Innls, Mary Rlcketts,
Josephine Thomas, Juliet Leo Riaque,
Mary Downing, Dorothy Middlcton,
Molloy,
Ann
Francis Geiscl, Lulu
Swinny and Marie Collins.
191S 'Ann Molloy, Dorothy Middle-ton- ,
Helen Taylor, Mary Heron, Nancy
Miss Lois Ammorman, of Cynthlana,
Buckner, Isabel Dickey, Dorothy Walguest of her sister,
was the week-enker, Lucy Young.
Miss Jane Ammerman.
1919 .Dorothy Middleton, Elizabeth
Misses Laura Lee and Minnie Jame- Kimbrough, Isabel Dickey, Ella Brown,
son and Mary K. Hamilton, of CynHelen Taylor, Loraine West, Dorothy
thlana, were guests of friends at PatWalker.
.
terson Hall this week-endMamie
Berkele,
Edna
Mis3es
LEXINGTON, KV., BUSINESS UNIVERSITY
Storms Dunn, Thelma Wright and
Incorporated and Successor to
Florence Brown were the guests of Wilbur R. Smith Business College
Hall, Sunday.
friends at Patterson
BOOKKEEPING
Miss Elsie Potter visited Miss Lora
5
aWslMM,PhQMrapiiy
1
TYPEWRITING and
Robertson, Saturday.
i
TELEGRAPHY
Mrs. Connell, of Paris, visited her
SCHOOL BOYS ud COLLEGE YOUNG MEN
daughter, Miss Louise Connell, MonCan AHead AFTERNOON er NIGHT
day.
Can ewploy a part of their time each Af tcraoom
or Night and Saturday by pursuing a Practleal
Miss Eliza Spurrier was the guest Coorae without interfering with their regular
studies, as each student is individually taught in
of friends at Patterson Hall for the Bookkeeping, Shorthand, and Typewriting.

We are mighty proud of our success

our

growth into a foremost store for YOUNG MEN
especially College Men.

We're grateful to all who have been instrumental in our progress. Grateful to those who
responded to our ideals of clean merchandising,
enlightened

service-givin-

g

and better

value-givin- g.

See the new ideas in

OVERCOATS, LEATHER COATS, SUITS, NEW
HATS, SHOES AND HABERDASHERY,

ETC.

N

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 3

DR. CORNELL DISCUSSES
DEMAND FOR SERVICE

Call 80

Psychologist Attributes Labor Trouble
To Absence of Frontier.

LEXINGTON OMNIBUS AND BAGGAGE

University Book Store

TRANSFER CO.
The Authorized Railroad Transfer Busses and Taxi Trucks
Meet All Trains
PROMPT SERVICE

clinpcl
Tuesday urged on the students tho
tremendous present need of personal
Bervlce.
Ho attributed
tho nation
wide labor troubles in great part to
tho fact that our country no longer
has a frontier. Tho "Great West" is
now a civilized land and there is no
place where pioneers can go to work
off that natural unrest which Is constantly wellng up within vigorous men.
"College students should get the
true spirit of service," said he, "and
do all in their power to contribute to
the happiness of their individual
Dr. Cornell, In his tnlk in

III,

for

Fountain Pens
WWW

DaeBmant xMani
lUnin

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junn

Building: University

3

I

I

University Boys

www
II III
II II

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

I

TW

CIA.

aiore
233 West Short
J.UWI1

WE BELIEVE IN YOUR WILDCATS
ALSO

High Class
Haberdashery
1

College Boys Styles in Our Special Designed Clothes

1

DOBBS FIFTH AVENUE HATS
MANHATTAN SHIRTS

STUDEBAKER
AUTOMOBILES

Game.

Sewanee-Kentuck-

j

Kodak Hooks

Orange-White.-

(Sewanee Purple.)
According to the Sewanee Purple,
the work of their tackle, "Bill" Cough-ton- ,
was all that prevented Kentucky
from running up a tragically high
game.
score in the
"The team work of Kentucky was excellent," it states, "and while the two
teams were evenly matched individually, this team work on the part of
Kentucky was what spelt defeat for
the Purple and White. There is no
doubt that the Kentucky linesmen outrunners. The
played their open-fielWildcats deserve credit for having a
team.

Meeting Place

Pennants

Members of the Poster Club will
bo given an opportunity to enter two
big contests, one offering a prize of
five dollars for the best postcard de
sign substituted, and another offering
dollars. Come III
a prize of seventy-fiv- e
Jo the meeting of the club in tho Art
Building Tuesday night at 7 o'clock
and hear the details. Other matters
of importance will also be discussed.
White Mathematics Club met Tues
day afternoon at 3:30 o'clock in the
Mr.'
Civil
and Physics Building.
in the
Armentrout, a graduate student
department, made a talk on "Mathematical Inversions."

Kentucky's Team Work Won Sewanee

Down Town

Text Books

POSTER CLUB GIVES PRIZES.

Tennessee Issues Challenge.
)
(The
The University of Tennessee has issued her warning to get all football
material in and into shape, and that
Thanksgiving is not far off.

Call 80

The College Store

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

Geddes & Luigart

U. S. L.

Phoenix Block

STORAGE BATTERIES

GEO. GEDDES

KELLY SPRINGFIELD
SOLID AND PNEUMATIC TIRES
"THAT GOOD GULF GASOLINE"
AND SUPREME AUTO OILS

y

GEO. LUGIART

GENE SULLIVAN

"Let's Get Acquainted"

DROP IN AND SEE US

Ours is the Quality Shop

d

well-drille-

hard-fightin- g

Mammoth Garage Co.
(Incorporated)

"RUSHING" BANNED AT NEWCOMB
(Exchange.)
The girls at Newcomb have success
fully evaded the objections of their
faculty to the custom of rushing and
hence preserved fraternity life in their
University by a novel system of bidding. The chairman of the faculty is
to act as arbitrator between the fraternities and their prospective pledges
and the conspIclouBness of a rushing
season is eliminated.
HELD OVER.
Bind my limbs with chains of steel,
Cast me in dungeons old.
But do not hold me after Chapel
While the grub grows cold.
NOTICE

OF PLEDGING.

R. S. WEBB, Pres.

WE FEATURE ONE DAY SERVICE

Fayette Optical Shop
GRADDY-RYA- N

CO.

W. Main St.

313-31- 5

Phone 3972

H. CLAY

Incorporated

ODENBAUGH,

Lexington, Ky.
Optometrist

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE
Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

WELSH & MURRAY PRINTING CO.
COLLEGE STATIONERY
ENGRAVING

DE LUXE
Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

'it

FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS

Competent Home Tailors
Unkn lank

4 Trust lulMini,

2nd Floor
Loxlnfton, Ky.

AND

DIE STAMPING

P. ANGELUCCI

Kappa Kappa Gamma announces the
pledging of Miss Lena Withers of Lexington, Kentucky.

ON TO DANVILLE

EAST MAIN ST.

The finest and most complete exclusively retail Optical establishment
anywhere in the South.
A faithful and accurate Optical Service in all its branches.
EYES examined by an Optometrist intimately familiar with the most
intricate problems of refraction.
The grinding of the lenses, the expert fitting and all other details
are accomplished within our establishment.

Phono 177IY

124-1-2

N. LIMESTONE

LEXINGTON, KY.

* PAGE

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published overy Friday throughout tho College year by thu student
of tho University of Kentucky, for the bcnollt of tbo students,
alumni and faculty of the Institution.

LANDMARKS

body

PRESIDENT

Few students notice,

FOOD

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL la tho oCtlcI.il newspaper of tho University,
It la Issuod with n view of furnishing to Its subscribers all the college news
of Kentucky, together with n digest of Items of Interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington PostoCflce as second-clas- s
EDITORIAL STAFF.
A. GAVIN

NORMENT- -

--

DONALD

Co-e-

DINNING

MARGARET McCLURE.
FRANCES MARSH
MARSHALL,

Editor-in-Chief

Managing Editor
Assistant Managing Editor
Editor
.Squirrel Food Editor
.Sport Editor
..Exchange Editor
Feature Editor

LOUISE WILL
11013 EItT RAIBLE..
ADELE SLADE.
MARY ELIZABETH JAMES.

REPORTERS.
ELIZABETH CARD,

MARY

ARCHER BELL,

attempt at frco verso
selected at random from exercises loft on tho typewriters In tho
Journalism room. The Fro3hmcn who
nre studying the touch system, have
done so well thnt they have not quite
reached the point where they have to
depend on "Now Is the time for nil
good men to come to the aid of their
party."
Dear sir; our driver will lwaowwww
Dear sor. our driver will leave five
measured
Jars of in like
Kathleen blank, and ctldle Dash
of Joy
0
Rah, rah, RAH
Lets gibe them thee hOrse Laff.
th e ha HOUSE t at JACK kkk
'1

lie following

wns

ELIZABETH
JAMES A. DIXON, MARGARET SMITH, MARTHA BUCKMAN,
HARRY COTTRELL.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager
J. P. BARNES
Circulation Manager
H. B. LOYD
Advertising Manager UUILt tttprofessor
fj. BURTON PREWITT
My dear motherr, to da y Ig pot a
Assistant Advertising Manager
GILBERT SMITH
letter f rom
ON TO DANVILLE.
we arequeer people dear slrr of Is
ellies equip
The Wildcats have at last come into their own, and by defeating
PLEASURES wo; will be popular
Sewanee "on the mountain," a feat hitherto accomplished only by one other id as a freak
and then playing the much touted Vanderbilt team off Its feet the
qui vlvr.qul vive
. eleven,
following Saturday, have shown supporters of the Blue and White that their
This Is all that Icanxxx write on a
hopes for a championship team have been realized. Playing with the spirit ttypeq
I
that has ever made "Kentuckian" synomynou.3 with gallantry, the Wildcats
can write no morre on a tyoe
have made a decisive "comeback" since their defeats by Indiana and Ohio wruter byt
State, and made a record of which the University of Kentucky should be DARLING, darling darling
Justly proud.
Daxx, damxx, dammmmmmmmnnn!
It seems opportune at this time to comment on the pitiable demonstration of cheering which the team received when it came on the field, and in
"I matched pennies until I lost all
fact, during the entire first half. Does the student body of the University 1 had."
really appreciate its football team, or does it look, upon the Wildcats as
"How senseless of you."
merely a source of amusement? Has it the spirit which will cheer only when
the home team is winning, or that which will light just as strongly for the
Farmer "Do you want a job dlggin'
team when it3 chances for victory seem slim?
potatoes?"
The supporters of the team would be severely disappointed if a football
Ag. "Sure, if it's digging them out
man would suddenly quit while making a run, and yet the students certainly of gravy."
to the cheer leaders
"quit" the team Saturday, responding only
attempts to arouse enthusiasm and, falling down completely on several yells,
Ed "That man over there i3 a proin the first half. This response in the second half was adequate and enthu- fessional forger."
siastic.
"Oh, why don't you have
On November 15, the climax of the football season in Kentucky will be him arrested?"
reached. When the Wildcats go on the field at Danville, Centre will face a
Ed "Nothin' doin. It's not breakdifferent aggregation from the one which she expected during the early part ing the law to make horseshoes."
of the season, one full worthy of Centre's steel and that we may well be
proud of. And while the teams are battling for supremacy on the gridiron,
Burge "Fifteen cents for a pound
"0
the students of the colleges will be matching their partisan spirit on the
Why, I know where I
of sulphur?
sidelines, and we may be sure that Centre will not be found wanting in this
can get it for ten."
respect. Will Kentucky give its football team the support it deserves?
Druggist "That's nothing, I know
Every student of the University, every member of the faculty, should be in
where you can go and get It for noththe stands at Danville, November 15, cheering the Wildcats to victory.
ing "
Football is more than a sport in American colleges today, it has become
an institution. A college is judged, whether justly or unjustly, by its football
Madamoiselle On Dit adjusted the
team as well as its scholastic standing, and it3 school spirit by the support
dimple in her left cheek Into a charmgiven its football team.
ing smile and called, "Say, I bet you
We must remember, however, that we will be guests of Centre, and will
can't guess this one. If they call a
lie judged largely by our actions on that day. Do not let it be said that any
man's wife his better half why Is
Kentucky man or men violated the ethics of good sportsmanship, or lowered
there anything left of him if he marin any way the standards set for college men and women. The Kernel sugries twice?"
gests, that win or lose, the students of the University should march through
Danville with the band and give cheers for Kentucky and the Wildcats, but
Father "Go out In the barn and
admonishes that all demonstration be such as would not offend or violate
good taste or damage the reputation by which wo wish the University of hitch the horse to the old sleigh."
Son "Why not the new sleigh?"
Kentucky to be known.
Father "Wear out tho old first Is
to Danville!
On
my motto."
Son "Well, then, father, you go
I sank at least a dozen ships
THE FRESHIE'S DREAM.
out and hitch up the horse."
Into a sea of blood;
I battered up a Sophomore,
Fished up gigantic submarines,
And skinned his wooden pate;
And stuffed them full of mud.
Don't be afraid of thinking too
JI biffed him one upon his bean,
much. You can't.
And watched his Jaw inflate.
I stopped upon a mountain, and
No longer It was big;
Although It Is well known that
I swallowed half a dozen stars,
I turned a glacier upside down,
Seniors are required neither to keep
Drank from the Milky Way;
And worked a page of trig J
I broke the Dipper's handle off,
nor to learn the letter of the law, it
was rather surprising to hear Miss
And scared the moon away.
I told my sergeant I was boss
Nancy Smock, a dignified Senior, cry,
I tried to stuff a molecule
LORD! what a horrid dream!
"Hold 'em straight" at the recent
Into an atom's eye;
If I live through this one more night, Vanderblle game. We are sure it was
I tried to make a ten in French,
only a slip of the tongue or a profound
I'll eat no more ice cream.
-r- Simp.
play on words.
.
...AND. did It, bye the byej
:

y

Co-e- d

,.

4

PATTERSON'S

they hurry

to and from classes, that quiet corner
of the campus on which' standi the

When Evo brought WOE to all man
kind
Old Adam called her
But when she WOOED with lovo so
kind
Ho then pronounced her
But now, with folly and with pride
Their husband's pockets trimming
The women are so full of WHIMS,
That men pronounce them WIMMIN.
Gosh!
Ain't he some cut up!
WO-MA-

WOO-MA-

The Knight of the Lexington Drug
made an unsuccessful attempt to
strike a match on his corduroys,
threw It down petulantly and remarked, "Alexander says we'll beat Centre
but I wonder what he would have told
Centre if she had naked him."
The Kentucky Kernel says, "Yessuh,
they make a pow'ful to do ovah this
hoah 'On to Danville' slogan, but Ah'm
just telling you that Ah'vo been 'on
to' Danville foh some time."

NOTICE.

.13

HOME.

home of President Emeritus .Tames K.
Patterson. Off tho main highways of
campus life, its solitude Is seldom
broken by tho boistcrousncsa of students, and only subdued nolse3, mellowed by distance, break Its peaceful
seclusion. Shaded by thinned maples,
overrun by dying Ivy, Its air of genteel decay casts a mild spell over tho
casual visitor and reminds him of an
older, leas hurried time, less practical, perhaps, but sweeter In Its gentle thoughtfulncss.
The shuttered windows, tho
stylo of Its architecture, tho
unkempt placidity of tho premises, tho
extraordinary solemlnlty which broods
over it, Join in weaving an intangible
charm that moves the beholder to a
feeling of quaint peacefulness and con
tent.
A spirit of gentle meditation, so
uttely foreign to the rush and tense
glamour of the city streets, seems to
take refuge in this still backwater 'of
the campus, to draw itself aside from
the world of today, to ponder on tho
simple, sane things of life with the
restful certainty of content. A serenity, untroubled by vivid trivialities, a
tranquility of age and wisdom, is
breathed about it and enfolds it lovingly. Like the cloister of a declining
monastery, it seems a fit place for the
residence of the fine old gentleman
and scholar who lives here with his
books and his memories.
We do not plead that you, the stu
dent of today, visit its moldering
walks and grounds in search of this
moody spirit; it would be almost sacrilege to break Its venerable quiet
with the bustle of youth, and profane
Its mellow silence with noise and
ribaldry.
But we do ask a kind
thought, a moment of sympathetic re
laxation, as you pa3s by, a breath of
a more serene atmosphere than the
hectic vapours of this more dynamic
age. It cannot harm you and it will
certainly help and to the kindly.
and
re
cluse, its master, it will bring much
pleasure to know that his work is
appreciated and his influence still felt
among those, unknown to him, for
whom he so long labored in building
thi3 University.
nntl-quatc- d

It has come to the notice of the
Kernel staff that owing to the fact
that this year representatives were
not ch03en for each separate college,
certain of these colleges have formdd
the mistaken Idea that t