xt7m901zdt0j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m901zdt0j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580117  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 17, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 17, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7m901zdt0j section xt7m901zdt0j Pollster Questions
Exam Week Habits
s.
Thine are hopping around the Marsarrt I. Ktn Library
Upwards of 8.0X) m hol.us arc picp.um their last ditch fuht for
survival in next work's day of reckoning.
How are they preparing? Do thrv cct an c.ulv sf.rt? Do they
cram? Do thry Just foicrt about it? The IVilt-C.ot thfe Interesting
answers this wee:
Frank (riwell. a
senior from IliUhinv grt a
head start, hut usually j md up crammiuc- "I get to bed bv I J o'clock'
every night." he aii r.
use fighting It."
"I stay up real late." said Marian Van Horne. an Arts and Sciences
' Finishing term papoi s and t r Hits to
Junior from
ratrh uj
on
assignments keeps me huy during the last week then
e
the final week I have to trim. With lots of coffee,
tablets,
the radio and a lot of walking around. I usually manage to stay awake "
F.rmcl Wilson likes tostartrarly.fi tl(1""t cram. I don't use pith or
'1 don't cram much," said the coffee."
Lynn Duckner. a Commerce JunAgriculture junior from Russell
I always have to ior from Madlsonville. said he had
Springs, "but
cram some. I just naturally stay been working on his ' finals slnci
rinht after Christmas, but I'll end
awake, so I don't use any stimuup cramming. I don't set to bed
lant."
Mary Lykins. an Arts and Sci- much during that last week. Stay- ences sophomore from Vancebur:
"I start right after Christmas, and
never stay up past 12 o'clock. Since
the-day-

j

it

nre-me-

d

two-wee-

k

-

last-minu- te

stay-awak-

i.

1

Queen Candidates

Mardi Gras
Planned For
February 8- -

IX. IE

The eleventh annual Mardi Gras
Dance will be held Saturday. Feb.
dance, rVolrXLIX
fir in the SUB Ballroom.-Th- e
NrumTcr 11
University of Kcntuckytcxington, Ky., Friday, Jan. ITI-Vfponsored by the Newman Club
is open to the public. Tickets may
be obtained from Newman Club
members and presidents of campus
groups. They are $3 per couple.
Logan Collins and his orchestra
will play for the dance which is
scheduled to last from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. late permission has been
granted to women.
A queen will be chosen from the
Margaret
following candidates
Combs, SAE; Lynda Chase, Cosmopolitan Club; Helen Jo Howard,
KAT; Sandy Stephens, SN; Janet
The IntcrfratiTnity Council
Jordan, ZTA; Carol Yates, PSK.
Janet Calhoun, TKE; Mary Elthrough the pledges of the
len Barber, DZ; Jean Weather-forfraternities collected
ADPi; Helen French, Canterbury Club; Diane Edney, Tri$7,709.21 in last week-end'- s
angle; Anna Owen, Jewell Hall;
(EDITOR'S NOTEr Two UK. students, Dan C. Woodward. sale of light bulbs for the polio
Betty Bernard, KS; Betty Whallen, 22,
graduate student in Engineering, and Harry V. McChesney drive.
AGD; Nancy Ladd, LXA.
Betty Jo Parsons, KD; Ann III, 22, second year law student, were drowned at Lexington
Lawrence Hall, who Is IFC adLewis, DDD; Jesselyn Arvin, Dil-laReservoir No. 3 last Friday afternoon wlicn the ice on which visor to Junior IFC and head of
House; Judy Tucker, KA;
Dale Primrose, XO; Jo Ann How- Woodward was skating broke. McChesney went through the the light bulb sales campaign, said
this figure was about $1,000 above
ard, KKG; Linda Hurst, KS;
ice also when he attempted to rescue Woodward. A third last year's sales total.
Brenda Light, Patterson Hall;
"We were about ready to leave . Hall added that the per capita
Eleanor Camp, PGD; Nancy Cox, student, Mike Warrington, was
PKA; Jane Haase, AZ; Zee Faulk- with them at the time. This is his when Danny said he wanted to try sales average for each pledge was
ner. Keeneland Hall;. Nancy Hub- story oi tne tragedy as toia to out his ice skates. He said he considerably higher than last year's
thought the ice was strong enough average in view of the fact there
bard, SX; Susan Haselden, DTD; Andy Epperson.)
'Danny and I had finished because he had skated there were about 100 fewer men parand Carol Wishnia, AZO.
classes that afternoon and decided Thursday. After 'he got on the ticipating in the campaign.
to go to the reservoir to look for ice, it did seem alright."
The light bulbs for polio drive Is
the flocks of ducks that usually
"About 200 or 300 feet out. sponsored by the Lexington Junior
hang .around there this time of Danny hit a rotten spot" in the Chamber of Commerce. Crutcher
EXAM SCHEDULE
year. We saw a duck on the ice ice and went through. I said to Lagrew, local head of the March
The final examination schedthat, apparently, was either crip- Harry, 'Stand on the bank and of Dimes, observed that there was
ule for this semester appears on pled or dead.
talk to him and I'll go for help,' a substantial increase in the per
page 3 of this issue of the Ker"We drove back to a phone and but he said he was going after capita collections by those who
nel. Since some schedules in called up Harry and told him to him. By this time he was already worked on the drive.
circulation are incorrect, stubring his black Labrador Retriever on the ice and I couldn't stop him.
Lagrew
Omega's
dents should use either the one that we needed to get the duck. Harry got almost all the way out pledges said Alpha Tauper capita
had the highest
In this issue or one printed and Harry was a good friend of our's, to Danny and then the ice broke
distributed by the Kernel earlier whom we had hunted with several under him. He went through at amount of money turned in. The
an average
this week.
times. After Harry got there, how- almost the same pot as Danny, ATO's hadLagrew added of $54.42
per man.
that six
ever, "Gem," (the Labrador) re- because the ice was weaker than
fraternities had 100 per cent parever now."
fused to go out on the ice."
"When I saw Harry go, I didn't ticipation among their pledges.
know if I should try to save them
This is the second year for the
Dickey Says:
or go for help. Harry had gone light bulb sale. This year's averthrough the Ice and he only age collection was about $8. above
weighed around 145. 1 weigh nearly last year's per capita figure. The
220. Anyway, I grabbed a tree total collection for last year was
(Continued on Page 12)
about $6,850.

Icy

Net $7,709
For Polio

eservoir

VAN

IIORNE

awake stablets don't help me. so I
usually go to the gym and work
out awhile."
-I review a lot." said Mary

FratMen

Two --Students

d,

CRISWELL

--

p.
L

V

'
.

twenty

WILSON

LYKINS

Holmes Kaufmann, an Agriculture
senior from Lancaster. "The day
before the test I outline my notes.
I don't cram, because it never has
helped me. but I stay up until t
a.m.. sometimes. Never later,
though."

rd

--

University To Oppose

,

i

r.

Offered For
French Tour
'

7A

representing the University at the Southeastern Conference
meeting in Tuscaloosa, Ala., which ends tomorrow. Since all!
teams already play each other at least once during the regular
Dr. Dickey thinks that
additional play in a tournament
isn't needed to select the SECs
team in the NCAA meet.

criterion." he thinks. No school
ever- received more than $1800
from the tournament. Dr. Dickey

feels that no

The UK president believes that
study committee will probably be
.set up to meet the red shirting
issue. Red shirting is the practice
of holding a player out. of action
in intercollegiate games for one
year, then using him in a later
year.

jseason,

Dkkey-al-

Class Credit

-

UK will oppose the proposal of some Southeastern Conference schools that the annual basketball tournament be revived,
said President Frank G. Dickey this week. Dr. Dickey is

so

more clas time should be missed
by the players during the second
semester than is already missed.
He said that players already mLss
six days of class during the regular season. If they should advance
schedule to
from the round-robi- n
the NCAA tournament, they could
miss as much as five more days,
riaying an SEC meet would require an absence of
days in addition.
Those who favor the revival of
the tournament say that it would
bring added revenue to the schools,
Dr. Dickey stated. "This is a poor
two-and-a-h-

alf

7

-

;

.said.
a

--

NO KERNEL
Because of final exams and

vacation, the
Kernel will not be published for
the next three weeks. Next issue
will appear Friday, Feb. 14.
between-senieste-

rs

.vr

Tragedy Scene
This Is Reservoir No. 3 where two UK students drowned last Friday
night. In the background Is the boat In which two firemen are earrh- Ing for the body of Dan Woodward which was found late Saturday
night.

j

KAUFMANN

Numerous other comments were
received from students on their
favorite subject final exams. Nona
of them were printable.

Tournament

All-SE- C

Dr.

BUCKNER

A plan to give University credit
to students making a summer
study tour to France next summer has been approved by Dr.
M. M. White, dean of the Arts and
Science College.
.In a Monday afternoon conference with Dr. Adolph E. Bijje,
head of the Modern Foreign Language Department, and Prof. Cal- in Evans. UK French professor.
Dean White agreed to grant three
hours credit in French to student
taking an eiuht week languace.
study tour to France next summer.
The travel troup will be composed of high school and college
students. 1'rof. Evans, one of the
tour chapcroiics, said a quota of
It) tdudrntH has been set to make
have already
the trip. Thirty-fou- r
feigned up to go. Most of these
are Idgh school students, he said,
but room for six college student
i available. He added that previous Instruction In the French
language Is not necessary for the
(Continued on Page 1?)

* THE KENTIT.KY KERNEL, Friday. J.in. 17. 19"8
oy ukk Dioier
LITTLE MAN ON LAMHU3

12

Wildlife
Is Feature
Of Speech
The University of Kentucky

ENGINEERS"

r

fastest growing
Electric Power Systems
offers you

De-

CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES

Society are sponsoring a program
by Robert C. Hermes, wildlife photographer tonight.
sented in Memorial Hall at 8 p.m.
His program will feature a motion
picture and commentary concerning the wildlife of Venezuela.
Hermes, naturalist, artist and
photographer, has twice won first
prize in International Grafiex contests. His. still pictures have been
published in a number of national
magazines, Including "Life", and
"National Geographic."
His talk is second in the series
of Audubon Screen Tours, presented in Lexington and in other
selected cities across the nation.
Next jn the series will be a
story of "Animals at Night in
Color" to be presented by Audubon
lecturer Howard Cleaves on Feb.

I

"THAT PlDNT TAKE

LONG-rlO-

HE

W'P

UKf

YOllERMfarW

CIVIL

One of America's

partment of Zoology and the Lexington chapter of the Audubon

l

ELECTRICAL

MECHANICAL

Stimulating technical and adminitrative engineering carters,
ovailoble in Michigan, Indiana. Qhio, Kenfycfry, Ienffge,
Virginip, Wetf Virginia and New York City.
Our Representative will discuss these opportunities
with you on your campus:

19 FEBRUARY 1958
'

Contact your placement office for literature and appointment.

APPALACHIAN ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY
member of

American Gas and Electric System
Kingsport Utilities, Incorporated
Appalachian Electric Power Company
Ohio Power Company
Indiana 4 Michigan Electric Company
Wheeling Electric Company
Kentucky Power Company
Electric ScrvTce Corporation
American Gas and

12.

Nave To Give
Piano Recital
FIND OUT what It's like to

Harold Nave, pianist and UK

graduate .student

will be

i

presented In a recital tonight, Jan.;
17. at 8 p.m. in the Laboratory
Theatre of the Fine Arts Building.
The recital program is as follows: Prelude from D Minor English Suite, Bach; Sonata, Opus 110,
Beethoven ; Passaeaglia, Aaron
Copland; Carnaval, Opus 9, Schu-- 1
iliann.
Nave has been organist at Felix
Memorial Baptist Church for over
two years. He will appear as
soloist with the University Orches- tra, playing Schumann's "Piano
Concerto", in the spring concert.

be

with IBM

j

i

i

i

i

j

campus interviews for 1958 graduates with
....

LEXINGTON

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your Interest Is In:

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2-22-

Ph.D. DEGREES

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Business

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Contact your
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I

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SOME FACTS ABOUT IBM

r

The growth of the company has been spectacular
since its inception in 1914. This has been especially true in recent years, as business, industry,
science and government have turned increasingly
to automation through electronic computers.
Such growth naturally provides many opporcollege
tunities for advancement to
policies and practices
graduates.
lay a firm groundwork for rewarding, enjoyable
and secure careers.
At IBM, for example, individual merit is
quickly recognized by increased, responsibility
proj
and remuneration. Through "small-team- "
well-qualifi- ed

IBM-compan-

StetlniHn Deluxe Hi eh I'idtlity Twin- Speaker Portable in exciting ntw "At
n
tache Cmmj styling!
leather
cae with
closure conic it)
tan, white or Hack. Model 4D JO.
Sur-v-lo-

zip-mou-

COMPONENTS
CONSOLES
TAPE RECORDERS

"Everything in

Hi-Fi-

"

J. M. HIStE
&
405

ASSOCIATES
S.

Upper, Near Maxwell

Open Fridays 'til 9

Ph.

y

If you cannot attend interviews,
write or cell fo manager of the
nearest IBM office:
IBM

Corp.

713 Allendale Dr.
Lexington, Ky.

ect systems . . ."cordial
relations . . . excellent financial rewards . . . outstanding company-pai- d
benefits ... the potential
exists for
careers.
educational and training programs are among the
employee-manageme-

well-establish-

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nt

IBM-sponsor-

most advanced in the American business
world today.

IBM laboratories and manufacturing: facilities
,.
are located in Endicott, Kingston, Owego,
Yorktown, N. Y.; San Jose, Calif.;
Lexington, Ky.; and Rochester, Minn. Sales and
service offices in 198 principal cities throughout
the United States.
Pough-keepsie-

DATA

TV

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INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS MACHINES

CORPORATION

PROCESSING

UfCIRIC

Itl'l

AKITIRS

VHIIARy PRODUCTS
SI'ICIAl INSURING PRODUCTS
SUPPUIS
TIMf IQUIPMINT

* TUT.

FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE, FIRST SEMESTER,
(Effective for all colleges except Law)

k!.H ( KV

KIKNII.. InM.n. f.in.

17. PIV- S- I

1957-5- 8

All times arc Central Daylight Time

7:30-9;3-

clft,,"

fir,t

iZO58

I

5

hioh

00

Thurday-4:0- 0

Mil

Tu,day or fl

or

on Monday

Wednesday-9:0- 0

P'"

flr,t

6n

Thursday-3:0- 0

Tuidy

Classes whioh moat
or flrs on Monday or
Wednesday. 10:00

Pw
Classes which meet
n Tu,6day or

TrJ'
12258

.".

Classes which meet
flr on Monday or

flrt

Thursday-2:0- 0

:00

Wednesday-1- 1

Pm'

1:00--

"

liir.$'.lo

1

3

Classes which meet
Classes wnlch saat
first on Tueiday or first on Monday or
Thursday. 9:00
fadnasday-- 4 :00

Classes which meet
first on Monday or

Thursday-12:0- 0

Wednesday--

1

Classes which meat
first on Tuesday or

Classes which neat

Thursday-10:0- 0

:00

.

.

Iv.-- v

p.m.
Wednesday-3:0- 0

-

a.m.
Classes which meet

first

on Tuesday

:00

Thursday-1- 1

.

Classes which meet
first on Tuesday or

od'

"

a.m.

Classts which Mat

rw
1Z153

on Tuesday
Thursday-- 1 :00

on Monday

or

12458

Thursday-5:0- 0
I

Wednesday-- 8

Pa

I

GARY GORDON
349 SOUTHLAND
PHONE

7-45-

:00

Monday

or

45

or

Classes which meet
first on Monday or

fi'lf

;00

Wadnesday-1- 2

a.m.

Mufuol Insurance Co.
Mufuol Fir Inturanc Co.
Lif Inturonc Co.

p.m.

BARNEY MILLER'S

Your Comfort"

Elvis

DINNER

683 S. "Broadway
PHONE

4-43-

73

MR. AND MRS. JOHN INNES, PROPRIETORS

Private Rooms for Parties
Reasonable Prices
"High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"

Buddy rfolly

SUGARTIME

The McGuire Sisters

-

THE

IX7

LONG-PLA-

Y

OF THE WEEK

WARM"

by Johnny

inn) .II A

iO

Mjthis

.

x

EAST MAIN OPPOSITE ESPLANADE

Instruction classes in the Faith and Practice of the
Episcopal Church
THE VERY REVEREND RAY HOLDER
Dean of the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Kentucky
First Session Sunday Evening, February 9th
.

6-7C.-

CANTERBURY HOUSE

472 ROSE STREET

ru

-- J

17

r

i

Q

405

Presley

What Does the Episcopal Church Believe

LUNCH
W1

BEG OF YOU

PEGGY SUE

,

ed

Elvis Presley

-.

'

Home of the College

BREAKFAST

DON'T
I

Rorcts, who had previously been
so" clectrd t0 membership, was also
HptevS
initiated three members yes- By fueling Carpenter
terday at their regular winter ln,t,atedand Sell in the fall, rather than
ceremony on the UK campus,.
D. VV. Carpenter, physics major, in the spring semester, the society
and M. Ft. Sell, political science has honored them for especially
major who will graduate in Juno, high achievement,
were initiated. Mrs. Jill Bryant
Other members of the class of
1937 who were elected to membership were r Misses' Bottle VT Combs,
Julie Ann Hawkins, Sandra J.
Peterson, and Mrs. Nell Lopan
Folks
Cox. Arrangements are being made
for their initiation by chapters in
the areas where they now live.
for
Sci-

vy

f.i'"

!

"Air-Condition-

From

Wednesday-3:0- 0

Phi Beta Kappa, Arts and

un A7IOUUJI
".'

Music
As You Like It

p.m.

A&S Group Initiates

DR.

headquarters

Wednsday-2:C- 0

Thursday-8:0- 0

a.m.

-

p.w.
Classes whioh meet

or first" on

a.m.
Classes whioh meet

first

first

V-

'

p.m.
a.m.
P."
Classes which meet Classes which meet Classes which meet Classes which meet
first on Tuesday or first on Monday or first on Tuesday or first on Monday or

Friday

-- -.

:50
Classts which mfX
9:45-1- 1

--

UL

SOUTH LIME

i

ACROSS FROM SUB

* Shining Example

The Kentucky Kernel

The "weekend "activities" of

University of Kentucky.

Mm
proposm

matter nndef
t Lexlnslon. Kentucky m iecond cl
the Act ol March 3, 1879.
Tublifhed weekly during nchool except holiday! and exama.

Entered at the Post Office

THREE DOLLARS,

A. SCHOOLJY'EAR

FRANK C. STRUNK, Editor
ANN SMITII, News Editor
DAVE ALTEMUEHLE, Managing Editor
ED FORD, Sports Editor
JAMES BLAND, Makeup Editor
Andy Epperson, Makeup Assistant
Tracy Waldcn, Society Editor
Jim Hampton and Norma Shelton, Feature Editors
Bob Smith, Assistant Sports Editor
Ray Cravens and Vernon Vinding, Cartoonists
Charlotte Bailey, Exchange Editor
NORMAN McMULLIN, Adv. Mgr..
PERRY ASHLEY, Bus. Mgr.
JOHN EGERTON, Promotion Manager
JOHN MITCHELL, Staff Photographer

FEPORTERS David Allen, Gilbert R. Rarley. Sally Burke. Neal Clay, Ann
Crutcher, Donald C. Deaton. John Egerton, I3ill Hammons, Jane Harrison. Betty
Ann Holtzclaw, James Hudson, Barbara Lake. Hal Leichhardt, Don Leslie,
Richard Littrell. Nancv Meadows. Dan Millott. Paul Ntckles. Guerney Norman,
Sally Osteen. Bobbv Perdue. Alice Redding. K. E. Robinson. Paul Scott. Virginia Snodgras. Judy Trivette. Larry Van Hoose, S. C. Wayne Jr., Jean
' W'eatherford, Joan Weissinger, John N. Whitt.

sec :
.

'
:

Parking Dilemma
'there's

',

rumor going around that the University may try
to prohibit students iroin bringing cars to school with them.
parking
Supposedly, this would solve the
problem.
.The rule has been in effect for several years for freshmen
and sophomores.
Whether or not there is any aruth in the rumor, the Ker
nel wishes to express its opposition to any such move. It will
solve nothing and will work innumerable hardships.
The majority oFtlie ears parked on campus belong to the"
staff, faculty, university employees and daily commuters.
'Most of the student cars parked on campus belong to people who live across town or in oner of the nearby towns.
What would be the results if such a ruling were made?
It might have a little effect on the daily parking problem,
but the difference would be negligible. The Coliseum and
football crowds would continue to cause parking woes.
students would find it necessary to ride a bus
everytime they wished to go downtown or home. Dating would
' become a problem. Too, their wouldn't be enough places within walking distance to solve that problem and the administration will do nothing about providing a night-gril- l.
jobs across town or who need
Students who have part-timtheir car in carrying out the job would be without work.
There is another solution, at least a temporary one, which
has been sidelined on several occasions. Each time this proposal has been made a committee to study it has been apanypointed. That's the most effective way to pigeon-holthing.
The proposal is this.
The intramural field and part of the baseball field could
parkor more, concrete, open-ai- r
be used to build a
ing lot. It could be financed by floating a bond issue and it
wouldn't be very difficult to sell bonds- on such a project.
Charge students five dollars a semester for day parking and
during football games and Coliseum events charge one dollar
per car. Surely, it wouldn't require many more than ten years
to pay for it.
That would allow students to park near the campus and
do away with the bad public relations for the University typified by the private citiens charging 'one dollar to park in a
'yard six blcxks from the event..
for being so
Some people will criticize the Kernel-staf- f
presumptuous as to think they can solve a problem which has
plagued the school for years but which the administration
couldn't solve. They may be justified.
But it's about time someone did something instead of talking about it. Taking the cars away from the students isn't the
'answer, certainty tne aDove suggestion is a possiDie soiuuon
worth considering.
a
Out-of-tow- n

e

-

e

five-stor- y,

-

fa..

IV.

--

towards the fiRht against polio.
.Pledges of twenty fraternities sold
lieht bulbs for the March of Dimes
sales In town.
in
This year's figure is an Increase
about $1,000 over
total.
The senior jroup of IFC might
take a few lesson from their
Juniors. Seldom do they ever
achieve anywhere near this amount
In any of their drives. It might
be because they are too sophisticated."
The pledges are to be
for their efforts. It required some sacrifice on the part
of each of them in makinsr the
rounds. Their efforts will help put
a little more licht on the nature
a worthwhile project.
of polio
door-to-do-

or

-l- ast-year's

com-'mend- ed

...

With winter bringing snow, sleet
and ice from time to time, the sidewalks on campus become somewhat slippery. It might be appropriate to spread some sand 6n the
sidewalks. An ounce of sand my
serve to prevent a serious injury.

J"
'

"the""

$7,703

Tood Tor Thought:
J.

r

Let's Ttthc It Auay From Him

a

ever-growin- g

t

TOURNEY

Junior IFC added a total of

SEC Tourney Foolish

LETTERS:

Writer Calls
QfliflsiWlfQ
s

Dr. Dickey is attending a meeting this week of the presidents ol "Southeastern Conference schools.
-- At this
conference one of the principal issues will be
to revive the Southeastern Conference basketball tourna- rs
agoi- ment which was done away- - with a
The latest count showed that the majority of the coaches
favored 'it. There are any number of motives for reviving the
tourney.
Several of the weaker' schools would like to see it start
anew becausq in tourney play anyone of them might knock
off Kentucky, thus giving one of them a chance to go to the
NCAA tourney. As it stands now, the regular season play decides-that
issue and lew schools have much of a chance of beating the Wildcats.
Other schools are interested because of the money which
the tourney puts in their rollers. And it might be a considerable amount if the meet is held in Memorial Coliseum or
Louisville's Freedom Hall.
Dr. Dickey opposes it because, he says, it will mean that
the players will miss three or four more das of classes. That
could work a hardship on many of them.
- We support Dr. Dickey in his stand and aclcLpn "amen" to
the one Coach Rupp uses. He says, "why throw away three
months work for three nights' play."
That's a possibility. The Wildcats can probably beat any
team in the conference twice, but it's asking too much of any
team to expect them to beat the same club a third time in
few-yea-

TcTTheEditor:

There was a fairly popular song
a few years ago which had some
lyrics in it that went something
like, "This is a wonderful opporbulihat
tunity for somebody
somebody ain't gonna be me!!"
This pretty well sums up the
general attitude one finds on the
college campuses when you start
talking about the critical need for

such things as science and math
people for the nation's oncoming
struggle to maintain it's independence (perhaps it's existence!).
In a way, it's hard to blame
anyone for feeling this way. After
all, after a person has set his
course in a certain direction and
has decided what he wants to do
in life, it would be hard, very hard,
for him to change to a field that
he would be less satisfied in.
Yet anyone who will take even
a little peek at the number and
quality of science and math teachers, will shudder in horror when
he stops to consider that, this is
our answer to Russian scientific-militar- y
momentum. I don't mean
to critize our present teachers;
many of them are intelligent people, hardly less patriotic than Sam
Adams himself. But the fact remains there are far too few.
This is by far not the only field.
Take a look at the lack of technicians, for example.
Money alone can't buy these
people. We need them; and the
worst of it is-- we need them now!
Five years from now isn't soon
enough. Two or three years from
now is bad enough- - but it's far

better than five.
That's where we come in. Have
we anymore right to gripe than
our uncles who fought and bled
their way across EUrope and Asia?
They were needed, they responded
not gladly, but willingly. Will we?
Jack Marquard
(Muskegon Community
College)

North Muskegon,

Mich.

I've made it a rule never to drink

by daylight and never to refuse a
drink after dark. Henry- - Louis

Mencken

the season.
Too, the NCAA Tourney brings together the best ball
clubs from several conferences and some independents. The
winner of that tourney is the national champion and the teams
competing are naturally
If one of the lower division clubs should get hot and take the SEC tourney, they
would represent the conference in NCAA play. That could
be a disaster for the SEC which is trying to build basketball
top-notc- h.

prestige.

.

There are no really good arguments for the tourney. If it
is revived it will be a step backwards for

the conference
cause of the selfish aims of some individuals.

be-

Ah yes, Spring is in the air! If you don't believe it walk

past the botanical gardens and get that fragrant aroma called
M.O. (manure odor) put down by M & O.
It has been suggested that "Stylus" cliangTthcspelling of
its name to "Styleless."
'

UNIVERSITY SOAPBOX

Law Student Defends 'Stylus, Blasts Kernel Editor
(Ed. Note: This article Is In defense of Stylus which
was reviewed here last week by the editor. Mr. Galphin
is a law student. The views herein expressed are those
of Mr. Galphin and do not in any way reflect those of
the Kernel.)
By MILLEDGE GALPIIIV
Mr. Strunk has made five assertions that deserve comment: (1) that the "sketches" in Stylus are amateurish;
(2) that he cannot understand the portions of Stylus that
he has actually read; (3) that although he may be '"disgustingly dense and insensitive to the finer things'", he
has "become somewhat immune to criticism"; (4) that
the point" is that one may buy a copy of a work by
Hemingway for the same price.
Mr. Strunk is doubtless correct in his assertion that
the "sketches" in Stylus are amateurish. One could
hardly expect to read in an undergraduate publication
literary work, of a professional nature. Yet, I believe that
such creative efforts have value. Matthew Arnold once
eaid:
"It l undeniable that the exercise a creative power,
tbat a free creative actirHy, U the tra fuaeilea! m;
1a ft hi tn h
It U pnrtd to be m bj naa'a

n41f

pines
The value of fiction and poetry lies in their power to
in
,dclose new ideas, new feelings, about the universe"ancV
relations. Ever individual perforce sees
its infinite
feels these relations in a different manner. To ignore
creative efforts is to ignore to some extent the universe;
to discourage them, is to discourage man's true function.
It is indeed sad that Mr. Strunk found the "sketches"
utterly incomprehensible. It was indeed unwise cf Mr.
Strunk to close Stylus so abruptly, simply because of its
immediate incomprehensibility. He has perhaps closed
many professional works for the same reason. He should
have remembered that the import of fiction and poetry
is not as obvious as that of a newspaper article. Similarly,
a painting is enjoyed only after an extended scrutiny,
while a cartoon conveys a sudden impact of meaning that
the most senseless individual can understand.
Mr. Strunk indicates that because of hLs pristine
clarity, he has "become somewhat immune to criticism".
Having read this statement. I realize that my comments
will be largely ineffective. But since Mr. Strunk has so
thoughtfully reflected upon the inadequacies . of Stylus
and in particular upon the style employed in the essay
n William Faulkner, it teems only fair to point out the

brilliant style of Mr. Strunk himself. Of course, there Is
no doubt about its clarity. To achieve this quality, he
must have found the phraseology of his grammar school
pa pershelpful." "Maybe so", he says and. "Anyway", and
then, overpowered with childish exultation: "I really
shouldn't gripe, though. My copy of Stylus didn't cost
me anything. A lot of people paid a quarter."
But "the point" of his what shall l" say article H
that one may buy a copy of a book by Hemlnirway for
the same price. With the assertion of what appears to be
his main and most important point. Mr. Strunk has forsaken all clarity, for at the beginninr of his article he
assured us that the price of Stylus was nominal. Whatever Mr. Strunk may mean, an evaluation of Stylus by its
price is superficial.
Of course, we get "more" for our money from the
Kernel than from even a twenty-fiv- e
cent copv of
Hemingway. The former is free and after a joyful reading, it serves as excellent wrapping paper.
Of Mr. Strunk's two views that the price of twenty-fiv- e
cents is nominal and that it is extravagant I prefer
to accept the former one and, I hope that Stjtu fcltfU
continue to appear.

* THE KTNTTC.KV KERNEL, frith v. Jan.

Sputnik Has
A Revelationjam:

HARRISON
"The Sputnik has brought a
forceful mcsa:e to all of us.
!hoe maii.winsj our school
systems." ;ys I). V. Terrell,
of the College of

n?

''.

1

ilran-emerit-

Terrell was appointed by a national Engineering Committee of
Professional Development to
a pronram to promote engineering in Kentucky hich schools.
The Collece of Encineeriiu U
well represented in Kentucky's efforts to emphasize engineering in
the hiah schools.
Through Terrell's efforts, the
Committee for
of
the Future Engineers Club was
formed. This organization is made
up of the Kentucky Society of
Professional Engineer members
throughout the state.
The College of Engineering ha3
five members on the committee in
addition to Terrell, the Chairman.
They are: L. C. Pendley. M. K.
Marshall, J. S. Jackson, Jr., E. M.
Spokes, and S. C. Hite.
The main concern of the committee is the students who have
qualifications and interest in the
field of engineering, but do not
have the opportunity to study scientific subjects in high schools,
because the courses are not offered.
Terrell said. "When the Guidance Committee of K.S.P.E. was
organized several years ago it was
found that many of our own high
school graduates were not prepared tcrentera 'college "of engl
neering due to the poor preparation in mathematics and science."'
He said. "Everyone who wants to
study engineering should have the
opportunity to get the proper
background."
Future Engineer Clubs have been
organized throughout the state in
an effort to stimulate interest in
engineering among high school
youth, to offer expert advice and
assistance to capable students in
training for an encineering career,
and to give a preview of the engineering p r o f e s s i o n.
"American scientific education is
laggin?. and something must be
done about it", said Terrell.
He said. "Industry, Federal. State
and local units must realize the
shortage of facilities and particularly of well trained teachers for
the sciences and mathematics."
op

on

L

V
i

Symbolism
There's a good bit of symbolism in the above photo. The horns extending from the young man's head might express that he "