xt7m901zgk5n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7m901zgk5n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670308  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  8, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  8, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7m901zgk5n section xt7m901zgk5n Inside Today's Kernel
Try out t are underway to select
College Bowl team: Page Two.
IPC elects

president:

a

UK

an SAE man as its new
Page Three.

A soapbox writer takes Kentucky's
education system to task: Page Five.

A

Vietnam

discusses the

r

at last agrees to

arbitration of its faculty dispute: Page
Seven.

Rupp controversy: Page Four.

KIE HH

Richmond flowers the younger, the
track star supreme: Page Six.
St. John's University

letter-write-

I

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I

1

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 19(7

Vol. 58, No. 113

ligcs

Eight

20 Hold Peace Vigil In Snow
5. Keep the silence till 12:50, then shake hands
Nearly 20 silent people stcxxl in the snow yeswith and greet your nearest companions.
terday protesting war.
The usual noon traffic passed by. Knowing
They intend to keep up their silent vigil every
Tuesday noon while school is in session "until glances and smiles or quizzical surprise covered
Americans stop killing and being killed in Vietmost people's faces.
nam."
Hut for a low buzz among groups of three
The air was brisk and the snow was wet.
One
icicles pelted the steps of White Hall and four, little was said by the passers-by- .
Dripping
before which members of Citizens for Peace in student yelled, "Kill the Cong. Hum Hanoi" as
he walked by. Another asked, "What's this? A
Vietnam stood in a single line.
freeze-in?- "
were quiet. It was part of the agreement.
They
Suggestions for participation read:
Some stopped to talk with campus police, four
1. Feel free to come when you can and to of whom were
posted nearby by University adleave when you must.
ministration for the "protestor's protection."
2. Stand or sit quietly.
Mrs. Hobert Frampton, a member of the peace
3. Engage in quiet meditation.
4. Avoid the use of signs and placards out of
group, said after the vigil concluded, that more
respect for other participants who may not share people than she expected turned out, adding she
would have been happy to see five or six.
your exact views.

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of campus peace groups met at noon Tuesday for the first of
their weekly peace vigils against the war in Vietnam. They stood in the snow in

About 20 members

,

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,

silent protest while campus police, upper right, watched for trouble. There was
Kernel Photo by Bill Gross
none, only an Occasional jeer.

Community College Faculty Compare Favorably
By LEE BECKER
Kernel Staff Writer
More than 95 percent of the faculty in the University
of Kentucky Community College System have masters
degrees or higher.
A national figure for similiar schools is approximately
60

percent.
"I don't think we really can compare faculty, ' said
A. J. Hauselman, administrative assistant for the Community College System.
However, if a comparison were made, he said, it
would have to be made in terms of the faculty at junior
colleges and other community colleges.
Compared to the main campus faculty, few community
college faculty members have doctorate degrees. Mr.
Hauselman attributes this to the fact that a doctorate
is mainly a research degree, and research is not the purpose of these colleges.
"When evaluating faculty, we must not only look at
degrees," he said, "but at where the faculty received

them, and what kind of distribution this produces."
The system's faculty represents 64 different institutions, with only 51 ot the 182 faculty members having
received their highest degrees from UK.
The rest of the faculty are from throughout the
country; thus the student comes in contact with people
of different backgrounds, Mr. Hauselman said.
Faculty recruiting is done through the directors of
the individual colleges and with the assistance of the
Community College office. The deans of the colleges
are asked to advise in this matter.
...
Through this process "we give the student at least as
good faculty and education as he would get the first
two years on campus," Mr. Hauselman said.
The system has not had trouble getting faculty, he
said, because the Community College movement appeals
to many teachers, and not everyone is interested in
doing research.
The major source of faculty is people who have just
received their masters degree. Many of the faculty also
come from other community colleges and junior colleges.

"We have the same problem in recruiting faculty in
the community colleges that everyone else has because
of the law of supply and demand," Mr. Hauselman said.
"We are often competing with business and industry,
but, if we start looking early, we don't have problems."
e
instructors
The system does employ
who have other jobs but who desire to teach classes
in the evening or at other times which fit into their
schedules.
"Often individuals take other jobs for personal reasons, but still have the desire to teach."
Mr. Hauselman feels that sincethesepeoplehaveboth
good academic backgrounds and actual experience in the
field as it exists today, "they are able to make valuable
contributions to the educational and professional development of the students."
"Tart-timinstructors do not mean poor instmction,"
he said. "It can mean better instmction."
The administrators are aware of two problems arising
Continued on Pare 2
part-tim-

e

18 Leaders
Criticize
Draft Panels

Wiggs' Fire
Damage Runs
In Millions
The lire that totally destroyed
Mr. Wiggs, a discount department store on the New Circle
Hoad, was still burning Wednesday morning, the Fayette County
Fire Department reported.
Units of the city and county
lire departments were on the
scene battling the blaze that
laused an estimated $1 million
to $2 million damage.
County fire officials received
the alarm at 5:04 p.m. Tuesday.
Engine companies raced to the
scene to be faced with the worst
fire in recent months
One county fiieman, James
Holloway, was injured. The customers and employes in the store
were evacuated

An editorial on the proposed
draft revision is on pone four.

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Tret.

Srrvicr

WASHINCTON-Propone- nts

to!

7J

of voluntary national service have
attacked the reports of two government panels studv ing thedraft
tor their failure toconsider voluntary work as an alternative to

4i'
1 "-

'-

conscription.
Eighteen leaders of student
organizations have informed the
President by telegram that they
are "appalled that the two ad-

Kernel Photo Dy Randy Cochran

FIREMEN

BATTLE THE OUT OF CONTROL FIRE AT MR. WICGS DEPARTMENT STORE

visory groups make no provision
in their recommendations for a
move toward voluntary national

service."

Continued On Pugr

7

* J --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

WYdncMlay, March 8, l!)(i7

Tryouts On
To Select
Quiz Team

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Tlie Student Center Forum
Committee is now holding practice sessions to obtain a team to
represent the University in the
General Electric College Howl
in May.
A team of four members will
be chosen from among nine stu-

2q,

dents: Fred Christensen (Trojan
team for 2 years); Steve Fruth
(Haggin Hall); Bob Howell (Les
Karen Kemper
Miserables);
(Keeneland Hall); Dave Mathews

'

Newest Attraction

at

tlft
t'Cr

KAY

WALSH

The

ALEC McCOWEN

Pi replace
Miss Lucy Lovell
Demonstrating the
o
Latest
NIGHTLY

TODAY and THURS.

Go-G-

Jam Session Saturday
3-5

GO

GEORGE

ROCK HUDSON

At 2:00 and 8:00 p.m.

(Phi Gamma Delta); Charles
Nichols (Farmhouse, Trojans one
year); Bruce Reynolds (Delta Tail
Delta); and John Westerman (Science Inc.).
Laura Muntz, forum committee chairman, said that these
students were chosen according
to their participation in the UK
Quiz Bowl. "VVc kept an accurate account of individual
scores on each player from the
second round on," she said.

THIS WEEKEND

BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN

ytysse

MARCH

14,15,16
RIDERS WANTED

The final four team members
will be selected according to
their performance during the
practice rounds by the Quiz Bowl
Team Committee and Dr. Robert
Thorp, associate professor of
Journalism, who is moderating
all the practice rounds.
In answer to the criticism
received by the Forum Committee on their choice of team
members, Miss Muntz said that
her committee tried to keep as

mill b

dtnittj to

undr

18

Continued From Page 1
part-tim- e
faculty, he said.

from

"As much as they try, because of their schedules, they are
not as accessible to students as
e
teachers," and, for the
same reason, they are less able
to serve on faculty committees
full-tim-

yy

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of

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1963 Volkswagen. Excellent condition, low mileage, radio,
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Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
as the Kernel
published
since 1915. continuously
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
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accurate a mathematical tabulation as possible.
"There is no way of taking
a campus of 14,000 students and
choosing one team. We had to
choose from the people who had
shown an interest," Miss Muntz
stated. "And I feel that we do
have some of the sharpest minds
on campus."
There will be nine practice
rounds in all. The last four or
five will be for the final team

Community College Faculty Praised

WANTED
AdmiQnc

Kernel Photo

CLASSIFIED ADS
Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding; publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113, Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed In The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not Include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.

TO A MOVIE

3 DAYS ONLY

ell, Karen Kemper, Dave Mathews, Charles Nichols. Bruce Reynolds, and John Wcstcrman.

Laura Muntz, far right, briefs eight students trying
out for the UK College Bowl team. They are, from
the left, Fred Christensen, Steve Fruth, Bob How

PEPPARD

NIGEL GREEN

GUY STOCKWELL

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MMSM
STARTS FRIDAY

DAILY

2 SHOWINGS

bj,

The system the committee
used was to divide the number
of questions answered by each
person in different areas by the
number of rounds they played.
"Along with this," Miss Muntz
added, "we considered how well
they contributed to bonus questions and how they participated
as a team member. Therefore
there were one or two intangibles considered."

Teenage America

Former Miss

4

KERNEL

tditor. Managing Editor
Lditoiial

6.aosl win mi fciiks w

$8.00
$.10

TELEPHONES

Page Editor,
Editors, Sports
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2321

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* Till: KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wrdiirl;iy, Match

l7--

,

Student (Government Monday
night inflated the budget of the
Lexington Tutorial Program by
$255 and gave a $306 shot in
the arm to the UK soccer team.
Hep. Steve Cook presented the
budget request of the Lexington
Tutorial Program, originally $330.
He cited the work accomplished
for grade, junior high, and high
school students, adding "they
have run completely out of
money."
Mood Program Gets Underway
After debate, the assembly
Julianna VVcnzcI, an educational sophomore, lias a sample of her trimmed the original request by
blood taken by Carol Furcolow, a Medical Center technician, as $75 and granted the money. The
the hospital's appeal to students to become blood donors gets $75, asked by the organization
for refreshment expenses already
underway. A booth is in the Student Center this week.
incurred, was tabled until SC was
presented with the bills.
The $306 allocation, requested
by Hep. Hafael Vallebona for the
soccer team, seemed at first to
be headed for defeat due to precedent.
Chris Dobbyn of Sigma Alpha Epsilon was elected president
SG President Carson Porter
of IFC Tuesday night over Dave Ratterman of Phi Gamma Delta said he was not
opposed to subby an
margin.
whole;" and constitutional revi- sidy for the soccer team but
Before the voting began, howsion.
thought they should seek funds
ever, the executive committee
Dobbyn has formerly served elsewhere explaining that "a preproposed a motion which would as chairman on the scholarship cedent has been established of
suspend the election of the other committee and represented IFC denying funds to athletic organiofficers until April 18.
in Student Government. He will zations.' He cited SG refusal of
Of the eight nominees for the take over as president
a similar request made by the
four offices of president, vice
rifle team last year.
president, treasurer, and secretary only five could qualify for
office under the constitution.
The office of president was
the only office which had two
qualified candidates.
The executive committee,
which is made up of the four
officers, proposed that the new
president form a constitution revision committee to revise the
X-rapresent document.
y
Both proposals passed.
The new constitution is to
be submitted to IFC by April
4. Nomination of officers is to
be held on April 11, and voting
will take place the following

IFC Elects SAE
As New President

Rep. Cook came to the aid of
the request saying "precedents
don't really exist Ijccausc they can
be changed at any time."
Approval of the request gave
the soccer team: 16 jerseys
$S1.6 1, 16 pairs of pants-- $ 10.S0.
16 pairs of socks
$35, a first aid
kit -- $25, practice halls $ 17.30,
game balls $73.50.
The two allotments, totaling
$561.21 will be take n out of the
SG contingency fund. They will
leave the fund $233.26 to operate
on for the remainder of the year.
The only other legislation introduced was a resolution a? king
a progress report from the committee investigating The Kernel
and Board of Student

Vice president Marsha Fields
announced that student government elections will le held April

6.

She said applications and
rides lor campaigning proceduie
will be available March 20. Applications will have to be returned
by I p.m., March 27.
GUARD THOSE YOU LOVE

GIVE TO THE

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SOCIETY

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week.

It is possible that the revised
constitution will not be accepted
by the council, and the old qualifications still hold.
"Due to the confusion that has
resulted over candidate qualifications, we felt it best to spell them
out so more people would understand them," Vice President
Hobby Spaulding said.

mm'

lti

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I

One of the qualifications
which raised a "lot of discontent," Spaulding said, is one
which requires all candidates to
have a grade average for the past
semester equal to the all men's
average for that semester.
This would mean that each
candidate would have to have
earned a 2.29 or better this past
semester.

candidates

"The

really

weren't aware of the qualifications," Spaulding said.
Dobbyn was elected on a platform calling for improvement of
rush; "improved communications
and relations within the fraternity
as a
system and the Creek system

FLOWERS
For Any

Occasion
CALL

mi

c ii

l i: n

F L O It I
Dial

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417 East Maxwell

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Student Government Votes Funds
For Tutoring, UK Soccer Team

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* The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

wednesday, march

1894

8, 1967

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walteb

M.

Grant,

Steve Hocco, Editorial rage Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

William Knapp,

Business Manager

The Draft Overhaul
sweeping draft proposals
advocated Monday by President
Johnson seem to be an honest attempt to update and make fairer
the call for young men to military service. The President announced in his message to Congress that he plans to make fundamental changes in the draft by executive decree.
Although Johnson's proposals
are based primarily on the report
of the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service, there
remain several basic differences in
the two reports. First, Johnson proposes a kind of lottery to determine which young men are drafted
for military service. Secondly, the
Chief Executive's report leaves undecided the question of deferments
for undergraduates and the decision on whether to eliminate local
draft boards. The President's report did call for an end to deferments for all graduate students,
except those preparing to be physicians, dentists, or ministers.
The 20 member commission,
which was appointed by Johnson,
recommended that a random selection be used todecide who is called,
but not a lottery. Obviously, this
is quite vague and needs clarification. The commission also called
for the elimination of all student
deferments and the replacement of
the 4,100 local draft boards by 300
to 500 area centers.
Admittedly, the proposals of the
President and the commission will
The

--

undergo considerable criticism before Congress prior to the June 30
deadline when the present Selective Service law expires. Already
drawing much opposition is Johnson's proposal for a lottery system.
But this is the purpose of Congress, and there are numerous questions which should be asked concerning the various proposals.
Fortunately, both the President
and his commission agree with the
theory of taking those in the 18
to 19 years-of-ag- e
group first. These
men adapt more easily to military
training and their lives are not uprooted nearly as much as someone
in his mid-20'If a young man is drafted at
18 or 19 and his tour of duty is
ended at 21, he will have a much
clearer perspective as to whether
to attend college or not. Should
he attend, he will be seeking a
higher education for earnest reasons, and will not have the worry
of the draft. Upon graduation, he
will feel freer to select the job for
which he feels best suited, and there
will not be the temptation to obtain a job to which is attached a
deferment, although he might not
be particularly proficient at, or
s.

happy with, the job.
Should the young man be considering marriage and the beginning of a family during his college

years or following
will no longer be
worry of what will
wife and children

graduation, he
faced with the
happen to his
should he be

drafted.
We would hope that the President will decide to adopt the recommendation of his commission that
all student, deferments be discontinued. The elimination of student
deferments would end the reign of
students as "sacred cows," a situation which has never been fair.
Institutions of higher learning will
benefit in the long run, because
more mature students will attend
classes, and there will no longer be
students in school merely to evade
the draft. In addition, the old complaint of the poor that only those
who can't afford a college education are selected will be ended,
should the commission's proposal
be adopted by the President or
Congress.
We also favor the commission's
recommendation to eliminate local
draft boards in all states. The local
board is out of date, as is the
school house and the hamlet's tiny post office stuck in the
rear of someone's house. The commission has proposed that much of
the selection now done by local
boards be done by computers, and
it seems this will project greater
homogenity in the Selective Service System.
In addition, we must endorse
the commission's proposal that anyone who wishes to enter the Reserves and Guard units with a
one-roo-

1--

"Brer Rabbit ain't goin' ter be sassy no more!"
"Brer Rabbit ain't goin' ter be lossy no more!"
"Brer Rabbit ain't goin' ter do nothin' no more!"
"Dis is de end! Brer Rabbit is dead!"

Letter To The Editor

m

Rocks From The Ivory Tower
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I read with great dismay your
editorial of Feb. 16, "Has Rupp
Choked?" and suggest that an
appropriate title might also have
been: "Rocks from the Ivory
Tower." My dismay was, however,
tinged with humor as your editorial
occasionally bordered on the ludicrous with its non sequiturs, ad
Hominem Rupp arguments, and
ax grinding against
Kentucky's favorite pastime, college basketball.
Your editorial states "We do
not question the authority of any
athletic coach to dismiss from the
team any player . . ." yet in the
following sentence "the Kernel
must seriously question the legitimacy of Coach Rupp's actions . . ."
The Kernel berates Coach Rupp,
an eloquent spokesman for a game
in which he has done wonders,
as "a true bureaucrat," a man
"carrying a childish grudge," and
a man wanting "to hide behind
cliches" and "dish out plenty of
double-talk.- "
The Kernel appears
at the popularity of baspiqued
ketball at UK and seems to want
to cleanse itself of any complicity
in this popularity. ("We have worshipped the athletic god long

A

classification should be denied acceptance. Only men not yet classified could join these units.
It is widely admitted that to be
accepted into a Guard unit or the
Reserves, "it takes pull." By reclasfusing to allow those with
sifications into these units, much
of this unfairness likely will be alleviated. Joining Guard and Reserve units, until now, has meant
virtual immunity from the draft.
1-- A

We do not

think either the
ident's or the Commission's

Prespro-

posals in any way give a complete
answer to the manner in which a
young man should offer his services to his country. We believe
it is reasonable to expect a young
man to offer two years of service
to his nation, but that he should
enter military service only voluntarily. If the United States cannot
maintain a sufficient military force
on a voluntary basis, something is
obviously wrong somewhere.
But until the day may come
when military service is totally voluntary, if indeed that day does
come, we must recognize the proposals by President Johnson and
the special commission as being a
significant and truthful attempt to
make the call to military service
fairer.

enough.")
Finally, the Kernel stands mock

,

heroically at Armaggeden, or in
peer imitation of Martin Luther
at Worms, and feebly swears: "On
this point, we stand on principle."
This is indeed a nifty transition
from the ridiculous to the banal.
Even literary style left much
to be desired. Awkward expressions
abound, such as "the system's perpetrators" and "castigate the dignity." Can a "system be perpe

trated" or "dignity be castigated?"
The editorial states further that
"coaches pay little attention to
their own character or lack thereof." Really now, does one pay
attention to one's "character or
lack thereof?"
Men who can develop great
athletic performers ("super stars,"
if you will) are rare and make
all our lives a little more enjoyable by doing so. Adolph Rupp
is one of these men, a legend
in his own time. He could not
possibly have achieved greatness
in the delicate field of handling
youthful talent had he been so
"ungentlemanly," "unprofessional" and "unethical" as the Kernel
i
depicts him.
In a peevish burst of icono-clasyou have attempted to drag
through the dust a figure of great
stature, a great Kentuckian,-a- nd
for what? For dismissing a man
who
publicly
challenged his
in a crude and rude manauthority
ner. Had the same incident occurred in the classroom, what. UK
teacher would have acted difm,

ferently?
Never were more appropriate
than now the immortal words of
the German philosopher Schopenhauer regarding the Fourth Estate: "Newspapers are like little
dogs, in that if anything stirs,
they immediately set up a shrill
bark." By "shrill bark" he probably meant a hastily penned interpretation of an event mocking
maturity, perspective, reflection
and, most important, Voltairean
good taste.
21U. Charles Easterly
Pleiku, South Vietnam

* TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

K,

lW7-

-.r

It's March And SG Swings Into Action Again
Wesley, no mean dissident himself, introduced a bill not unlike that of Snyder
in its attempts to satisfy the demands of
SPER as well as in its carefully calculated
political usefulness.
The idea of course was to remove the

By DAVID IIOLWEnK
The past week has certainly been a
busy one for the budding politicians of
Student Government, as well as a somewhat trying one for those of us who have
made an effort to understand the workings
of the University's student legislators and
legislature.
While we were still busy figuring out
the implications of the recent unofficial
referendum (solidly against present representation practices) and the formation
of the new SPEIl (Student Party for
Equal Representation: vociferously against
present representational structures), legislation on the subject appeared in an
SG committee from what at first glance
was a highly unlikely source.

possibility of the present administration
having any connection with reform of its
own practices, and Wesley may very well
succeed.

Rep. Shcryl Snyder, a firm upholder
of the present administration, introduced
a bill calling lor a revamping of the
legislature to insure some scmblcncc of
responsible representation. The bill seems
calculated to remove the only apparent
issue of the upcoming campaign, thereby reducing the prospects for a meaningful election considerably. It was an
adroit political maneuver, as the bill
answered most of the demands of the
campus dissidents.
Snyder had not, however, reckoned
with the disposition of another SG Representative, Ralph Wesley. The indefatigable

Whih all this political byplay is stimulating (after the outstanding record of
this yeai's edition of Democracy in Action
a cribbage game would be stimulating)
it seems that both sides have missed the
point completely.
Student Government has reformed itself any number of times, through any
number of changes in constitution and
national affiliation. Yet all of these changes
have done nothing to correct the flaws
in the structure of Student Government,
and neither it seems, will cither of the
present legislative proposals.
Both of these bills either misdiagnose
or prefer to ignore the trouble with Student Government. This trouble is not
one merely of the structure of the present Student Government but of the present student governing complex: Student Government, AWS, the WRH council, IFC and Panhellenic, the
Student Association, and the Student Cen

ter Hoard. All of tliese groups naturally
have their own spheres of influence. And
all of these groups, which can or do
make policies affecting large numbers of
students are free to act unilaterally with
respect to these olicy decisions. At the
same time many of them are under direct
financial control of Student Government.
This results in an impasse between
the possible and the practicable in that
none of the independent governing bodies
can be sure of being able to implement the
policies which they are authorized to
make. This in part accounts for a con