xt7mkk948f85 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7mkk948f85/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19400312  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1940 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1940 1940 2013 true xt7mkk948f85 section xt7mkk948f85 DC91 s

Fhe Kentucky Kernei

The World
Whirls On
By JIM WOOLDRIDGE

Russo-Finnis-

ld

Viipuri.

Now Finland's Verdun has fallen;
her defenders are in retreat. And as
the Finns retreat toward the capital, their position becomes less and
less defensible, for the Karelian isthmus widens in
e
fashion as
Is roes toward Helsinki.
But Finland may not lose her war
after all. Last weekend the Swedish
government announced that negotiations for an armistice between
the two warring nations were being
begun after several weeks of dinlo- rnatic correspondence between Helsinki and Moscow through the Swedish foreign office. Both nations preferred to negotiate throueh Sweden,
because neither wished to give the
Impression that she was weakening.
After a few days of bickering over
the green table, nothing definite developed. It was said that the Rnviet
wanted a large section of Karelian
isthmus, including nearly half of
the Mannerheim line, as their nriw
of peace. Since the Finns refused to
grant a demand of an even smaller
amount of territory at the threat of
war in the beginning, observers
.doubted that they would acquiesce
to a larger demand now that they
had seen the Red army's worst.
Backing up Finland's refusal was
the combined English-Frenc- h
war
council. They offered to send a
expeditionary force to
Helsinki immediately if the Finns
want it. The Allies point out that
they would be fulfilling the Conven-aof the League of Nations by aiding a fellow member who asks aid
against invasion by an outlaw
tion.
If an Allied expeditionary force
should go to the aid of Finland, it
would necessarily have to travel
cross Sweden. So Sweden, when
she heard the proposed plan of the
Allies, warned them that, if thev
were going to send any force at all.
t send a large one. large enough
to stand off not only the Russians
but the Germans as well. Sweden's
fan-lik-

ipped

nt

government fears that the minute
Allied soldiers start for the Scandinavian peninsula. Hitler will rush
his "blitzkreig"

KERNEL

Y

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Carl Mydens, a news photographer broadcasting from Helsinki
recently, likened the
h
war to a football gam?, and concluded his review with, "Last week
Russia sent in her first team and
the war went into the last quarter."
Myden's simile is apt. Russia's "first
team" has reached scoring territory
struggle
after a desperate mid-fiet the almost impregnable fortress

t

TUESDAY ISSUE
SEMI-WEEKL-

VOLUME XXX

Z246

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY,

men arrive.
Hitler, the Swedes say, wants to
nd the
h
war ricrht
away, either by the proposed armistice or by sending troops into Scandinavia. He is beginning to need supplies from his treaty partner, Stalin,
nd he can't get them as long as
the Russians have war on their
hands and millions of soldier to
feed.
ROME German foreign minister
Joachim von Ribbentrop conferred
with Premier Mussolini for an hour
and a half yesterday on the Allies'
offer of troops to Finland. He was
nderstaod to have informed II Due
of Germany's situation after six
months of war and of Fuehrer Hitler's plans for furthering the war.
Diplomatic officials point out that
Ribbratrop's visit was very well
timed since Italy has become some-whestranged from Germany since
Hitler's offensive treaty with Russia. Italy's recent dispute with England over Italian ships bringing coal
ut of Germany to the Fascists
made the situation ripe for a friendly gesture from the Nazi foreign
office.
HELSINKI A late press release
from the Finnish government offices states that the national foreign
minister, Risto Ryti, is now in Moscow as head of a Finnish delegation
which is attempting to arrange an
armistice between the two warring
Rations.
Fear
the negotiations
'or a truce are failing spread
through the capital when news was
received that the Soviet press and
radio had violently attacked Ryti as
the symbol of a capitalistic governh

Russo-Finnis-

at

that

PLACE

CHANGED

FOR

ARE ANNOUNCED

TALK

Designation Of Rank
To Be Decided

Mathews Will Speak

Friday

High

From a field of 30 candidates,
members of the ROTC advanced
courses selected 13 sponsors Wednesday and Thursday, March 6 and
7. to fill positions as honorary officers in the University regiment.
A committee comprised of Lieut.
Col. Howard Donnelly, Mai. William
Blanton, and Joe Reister will meet
at 4:30 p. m. Friday, in Room 203
of Alumni hall to select one of the
sponsors to serve as honorary colonel and three as honorary lieutenant colonels of the ROTC regiment.
The remaining nine will fill positions as captains for the companies.
Regimental sponsors chosen were
Alpha Gamma Delta Mary Bryson,
Ashland: Chi Omega Caroline Con-an- t,
Lexington; Kappa Delta Louise
Ewan, Lexington; Chi Omega Jean
Jackson,
Lexington;
Delta Zeta
Virginia Rich, Covington: and Kappa Delta Betty Wells Roberts, Lexington.
Kappa Kappa Gamma Elinor
Rounsavall, Lexington; Kappa Kap-

pa Gamma Margaret Trent, Lexington; Kappa Kappa Gamma Peg
Tallman, Miami, Fla.; Chi Omega
Dorothy

Ann Young. Gencoe, 111.,
Independents Margaret Abel,
Park, N. J., Peggy Denny, Lexington; and Jean Marie McConnell,
Danville.
Mary Louise Weisenberger, Midway, sponsor of the Pershing Rifle
company, and Jane Baynham, Lexington, sponsor of Scabbard and
Blade, will hold honorary positions
on the staff of the colonel.

SPRATT TO PLAY
AT ANNUAL BALL

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Courtesy

ks

Xa-vi-

er

Railey, Joe Jackson, Ted Cozine,
and Vernon Albert, ticket sales.

Langston Hughes
Coming To Town

Frosh Women
Will Meet
Today At 4 p. m.
Dean Sarah G. Blanding
yesterday that a compulsory meeting of all freshman women will be held at
4 p. m. today in Memorial
hall.

Group On Curriculum
Vetoes Suggestion
A proposed
recitation
course in physics, which was to
have been offered In conjunction
with the 51 lecture series, was voted
down by the University curriculum
committee. Prof. John Kuiper, chairman of that group, announced yesterday at a meeting of the University Senate.
Reasons given for the action were
1) since it was to have been available only to "good" students, it
"would not provide academic aid
to those who needed that aid most,"
and 2) such a course would tend to
interfere wtih the synchronization
cf an already congested schedule.
A student legislature resolution
which would permit optional class
attendance to all upperclassmen
with standings of 2.2 or better, has
been referred to the University's
rules committee. Dr. Leo Chamberlain, Senate secretary, said last
night. The petition, provided it is
passed by the rules group, will be
brought before the Senate at its
April meeting, Dr. Chamberlain explained.
The present rule governing the
dropping of classes by students was
altered to read as follows:
1) Up to November 1 in the first
semester, March 20 In the second
semester and through the tenth
class day in the Summer Session,
students who withdraw from a class
or who are dropped from a class
will have no mark recorded. After
these dates, students who withdarw
or are dropped from a class are to
be given WP or W or E, as reported
by the instructor of the class.
2) Tn computing standings for all
University purposes a WF shall be
treated as an E.
one-ho-

Legislature
Will Convene
Wednesday
The student legislature will
meet at 5 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon in Room 204 of the
Union, Bill Duty, president,
'
announced.

ur

Union Will, Honor
Basketball Team
Members of the championship
Wildcat basketball team will be hon
ored at the weekly Sweater Session
in the Union ballroom this after
noon.
There will be a short program
and a snecial Wildcat
Grant Lewis, house committee chair- man, announced. As usual, the session will be from 4 to 5:45 p. m.,
open to everyone, and free. The
practice of allowing both men and
women to break, started last week,
will be continued.
Over 700 students attended last
session, Lewis said.
s

PRESIDENT TO RETURN
Word was received yesterday that
President and Mrs. Frank L.
would return to Lexington from
Louisiana today, arriving at the
C & O station at 8:25 p. m.
Mc-V-

ey

Candidates Chosen
For YW Positions
Election Set For Wednesday
In Y Rooms Of
Union
YW officers for the coming year
will be chosen by members at a
general election to be held from
10 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. Wednesday
in the Y rooms in the Union building.
Candidates are: president, Louise
Galloway, Lexington, and Gladys
Kilpatrick, Lexington;
Betty South, Frankfort, and
Janet Fergus, Lexington; secretary,
Doris Zenger, East Hampton, N.
Y., and Jean Ewers, Somerset; and
treasurer, Jennie Puckett, Indianapolis, Ind., and Billie Raymond.
Louisville.
Retiring officers of the YW are
Barbara MacVey, president, Marion Valleau, vicepresident,
Janet
Fergus, secretary, and Ann Odor,

treasurer.

Originally announced to address
Alpha Chi Sigma, national professional
chemistry fraternity, in
Kastle hall, Prof. J. H. Mathews,
head of the department of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin,
will speak to that group at 8 p. m.,
Wednesday, in University High auditorium.
City and county police and judicial officials, local civic leaders,
members of the state highway patrol. Federal Bureau of Investiga
tion officers of Louisville, and the
general public have been Invited
to hear Professor Mathews speak
on "Scientific Crime Detection."
The speaker, who is one of the
few scientists in the United States
to investigate crime from a scientific viewpoint, has gained nationwide recognition for his assistance
in solving a number of murder mysteries.
By means of lantern slides Professor Mathews will show how certain murder mysteries have been
solved and the identity of the criminal established.
At present Professor Mathews Is
giving a course in the use of scientific methods In criminal identification at the University of Wisconsin.
He has made extensive lecture tours
under the auspices of the American Chemical society throughout the
United States.
Preceding the lecture. Professor
Mathews will be guest of honor at
6:30 p. m. in the Union building.

ENGINEERS
FOUR

TAP

STUDENTS

'CARNAL' KERNEL
Initiation To Be Held
DUE WEDNESDAY
Mock Issue Of Wildcat

Is Completed
"Kentucky

Carnal unbiased,

and unnecessary,"

Wildcat

magazine's mock issue of The Kentucky Kernel, will go on sale Wednesday morning, John Ed Pearce,
director, said yesterday.
This edition, which will be a
replica of The Kernel from a humorous angle is distinctly dfferent,
Pearce said. The front page will
be made up in newspaper style and
numerous pictures and Illustrations
will be used throughout the publication. Even the- scandal column
will be illustrated with photographs, Pearce announced.
In addition The Kernel mockery, features include the continuation of professor's grades, the latest
in campus social affairs, "bigger
and better" joke, poems, and the
musical column.
The magazine may be obtained
at the University post office, book
store, or the Union building, according to Pearce.
-

Monday
Four students were pledged to Tau
Beta Pi, engineering honorary, at
spring tapping ceremonies in Memorial hall last Friday. Thev are
John Abbott, Sulphur; Carl Staker,
Maysville; Robert Gaines, Hopkins- ville; and Jack D. McNamer. Har- rodsburg.

Initiation service for the pledges
will be held in the Phoenix hotel
Monday night. March 18, and will be
attended by C. H. Spencer, national Tau Beta PI president, and R.
C. Matthews,
national secretary.
The two national officials will discuss with local members plans for
the national Tau Beta Pi

conven-

12 Coeds Will Model;

NYA Time Sheets
Due By Noon,

Dance In Union
To Follow

Thursday

Twelve coeds have been selected

Dean T. T. Jones requests
all NYA workers to have their
timesheets in his office in the
Administration building b y
coon Thursday.

ALLEN

I

RECEIVES

FIRST KING PRIZE

Guignol's Faulconer ..

Scientists

To Meet

Here In April
Dr. W. R. Allen of the zoology
department last week was awarded
the first annual King prize for the
best paper presented to the Kentucky Academy of Sciences at its
meeting last year.
The prize, $50, was inaugurated
in 1939, and will be presented annually by Fain W. and Blanche B.

King of Wickcliffe. The only stipulation, for eligibility is that the
paper must be presented by the
author in person.
Doctor Allen's paper, which will
be published! in full by the academy
In its "Transactions." deals with
the subject "Science and the Human Mores."
Dr. Allen stated that his paper
was an attempt to show that all
through the realm of nature there is
a behavior pattern that Is followed
without deviation. This pattern is
found in chemical compounds, the
rocks of the earth, the forces of
rain sod wind, the planets and the
living plants and animals, he said.
Dr. Alfred Brauer, professor of
zoology, and secretary of the academy, announced that the 27th an
nual meeting of the organization
will be held on this campus Friday
and Saturday, April 26 and 27.
program Includes
The two-da- y
divisional meetings, business sessions, and a general symposium. A
dinner will be given at 6:30 p. m..
Friday, in Lafayette hotel.
Faculty members, who as division
al officers, will receive title for their
respective sections are Dr. J. S.
experiment staiion. chair
man, division of chemistry; Dr.
Vincent E. Nelson, department of
geology- and geography; Prof. D. E.
Sout'h, department of mathematics;
secretary of the Kentucky chapter,
American Mathematics association;
and Prof. Jarvis Todd, assistant
professor of physics, secretary of the
Kentucky section, American Association of Physics Teachers.
-

tion to be held here next fall.
The Initiation will be followed by
a banquet, to which all Tau Beta Pi
members and alumni have been Invited.
Requirements for membership in
Mrs. Dorothy Park Clark and Mrs.
the fraternity are standings in the Isabel McLennan McMeekin.
upper
of Kentucky's latest novel.
of the junior class
or the upper
of the sen- "Show Me A Land." will be guests
ior class.
at the fifth weekly Union coffee
hour at 4 p. m., Thursday, in the
TO GO TO CINCINNATI
Music room.
No definite program for the hour
Prof. E. Z. Palmer, commerce col- is planned by the Union forum comlege, will attend the meeting of the mittee, which will be
host to the
Cincinnati chapter of the American writers. It is intended to give stuStatistical association on Thursday, dents an opportunity to become acin that city. Professor Palmer is quainted with the writers who pubof the Cincinnati lished their book under the pen
group.
name, Clark McMeekin.

Students To Meet

Clark MacMeekin

one-eigh- th

one-four- th

--

ct

r

i"

over-flowi-

n

The characters come to life on a
stage devoid of scenery: a fact
which is scarcely noticed by the
audience and which serves to make
the typical small town people stand
out.
Costumes of the early 1900 period
are worn by the characters and are
charming and simple, rather than
ridiculous as such costumes usually
appear in retrospect
Language
used by the folk of Grover's Corners is easy flowing and naturally
expressed, without stage artifice or
tricks.
J. B. Faulconer as stage manager
explains the play and helps the
players keep the New Hampshire
atmosphere. In a long line of Guignol plays J. B. has always turned
in creditable performances but this
is the best and most difficult thing
he has yet done.
Not a single character was miscast or weak In his performance.
The uniformity in interpretation of
the spirit of the early 1900's by such
a heterogeneous cast is little short
of remarkable.
Good performances
are turned in by every member of
cast including the choir.
the
Outstandingly convincing In their
leading roles are Dorothy Dyer
Rodes as Julia Gibbs. Margaret
Cohert as Myrtle Webb, Archie Dot-- 1

to parade the latest in women's
fashions at the first Union spring
style show to be held at 8 p. m..
Friday, In the Bluegrass room, and
Great hall. Union building.
The models are Lois Duncan. Janet Chanslor, Virginia Smith, Elinor
Rounsavall.
Do Ann Young.
Harriett Taft. Ann Harding Dav.3.
Mary Jane Watt. Jean Harprirg.
Peggy Denny, Mary Agnes Penny

and Peg Tallman.
Dorothy Hilienmeyer. president cf

Guignol Triumphs In Current Production Of 'Our Town That Catches
Spirit Ot Homespun New England Life By Excellent Directing, Casting
By LOUISE C ALBERT
Under protest I sign my name to
a review of Thornton Wilder's
three-aplay, "Our Town," produced by Frank Fowler and presented at 8:30 each night this week
on the Guignol stage.
I protest because: 1) the manuscript of the play itself is good;
2) Frank Fowler has produced a
triumph beyond reproach and adverse criticism; 3) no dramatic critic
could find words beautiful enough
to express the appreciation and en- joyment I felt in the play.
The drama opened last night for
a week's run at the little theater
and I, although no prophet, would
SOW''"
bet my last hamburger lunch that
the cast will look out on a house
packed to
every night,
if ever a play demanded a two
week's run on the University campus, "Our Town" is that play.
In the homely, honest atmosphere
or Grover's Corners, N. H., the
rowier-picke- d
players live a play
that is as unsophisticated as rain
a fragile, touching triumph among
Courtesg Lexington Leader
Guignol productions.
. . . plays the Stage ManPersons
who
doubted
Frank
ager.
Fowler's ability will flock to "Our
Town" to acclaim him for the best
piece of producing and directing the Bluegrass have known since the
University has seen, and one of days when this was the "Athens of
the best that Lexington end the the West."

II

Spring Fashion Show
Wiil Be Held Friday

ONJRIME

Herald-Lead-

Above is shown Dr. Frank L. McVey's "Monliegan," an oil painting now being
shown in the first complete exhibit of the University president's work ever held on
the campus. The display includes several dozen sketches and paintings. It opened
yesterday in the music room of the Union building and will continue for two weeks.

Tau Beta Pi Planning PHYSICS COURSE
Engineers' Dance
Jack Spratt's "Rhythm and Rime" IS VOTED

orchestra, featuring vocals by Evelyn Rene and Jack Horner, will
play for the Engineers' St. Patrick's
day ball in the Union ballroom Saturday night, March 16.
Under the auspices of Tau Beta
Pi. engineering honorary, the dance
will include six
and a
special dance for engineers only and
will last from 9 till 12.
Tickets for 75 cents can be bought
at the information desk of the
Union or from members of Tau
Beta Pi, Harry Weaks, dance com
mittee chairman, announced.
Jack Spratt, known as "the beau
brummel of the ballroom" and "the
sentimental gentleman of swing"
plays regularly over an NBC hook
up and has been featured at the
Gibson and Netherland Plaro hotels in Cincinnati. The "Rhythm
and Rime" orchestra recently played
opposite Kay Kyser at the St.
Junior Prom.
In charge of plans for the affairs
are Harry Weaks, general chairman; Floyd Brown, publicity; Fred
Fisher, decorations;
and Ernest

SCIENTIST'S

At University

As-bu- ry

What They Think

People should be allowed to develop other interests besides the
regular courses.
ncuc-v- ,
Yg ucajllimu
111
i uf,"
the eg college I haven't seen any required courses that weren't needed."'

NUMBER

FOR COMING YEAR

Langston Hughes, Negro poet and
novelist will give a lecture-readin- g
at 8 p. m. Wednesday, in Dunbar
high school auditorium. The proment.
gram will be open to the public at
no charge.
Winner of several awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship
for creative work, Mr. Hughes is a
playwright as well as author and
By BOB AMMONS
poet. His first play ran for eleven
months on Broadway, and his books
have been translated Into several
QUESTION
foreign languages.
He is being brought to Lexington
"Do you approve of the practice by the Lexington branch of
the Asof having departments establish a sociation for the Study of Negro
set curriculum with many required Life and History.
subjects and few electives?
BECKLEY TO SPEAK
I'lcyd Brown, Enginering junior
"They should have a rather set
Sam Beckley, graduate student at
curriculum for freshman and soph- Eastern State Teachers college, will
omore years, when students aren't lead the regular weekly luncheon
sure what they want to do, but af- meeting and discussion group at the
ter that they should be allowed to political
science department
branch out."
Thursday noon in the Union cafeteria.
John Wiikirson, A & S senior
'Fix it so that students have a Mr. Beckley will discuss the right
wider choice of electives and would of courts to review legislation and
net have to take the revolting cour- declare it unconstitutional.
ses that some departments force on

them."
Jrannelte Graven, A & S freshman "Yes. Faculty members know
better than the students what
courses are most valuable for them
In preparing for their vocation."
Adrienne Mason, Grad
"No.

UESDAY, MARCH 12, 1910

Now On Display In Union

ROTC SPONSORS

forces across Den-

mark and into Sweden before the
Franco-Britis-

I

the Union board, is supervising arrangements for the show. Ala.
Vcgeler, University radio announcer, will act as style commentator
during the show.
Displays of both men's and women's apparel will be arranged
ballroom. These will be open
to the pubic at 7:30 p. m. John H.
Morgan. Kernel business manager,
is in charge cf the men's division
and Miss Hilienmeyer will arrange
the women' section.
James Morrissey and his
student orchestra will furnish music for the show and the dance
which will follow la the ballroom.
In connection with the spring
show. The Kernel will publish a
spring style Issue featuring the
latest In men's and women's vogues
and giving timely advice on Easter
apparel
Committees working with Mus
Hilienmeyer on arrangements are
program: Jane Ann Evans. Martha
Ringo. Barbara Shelton, Mary
Bennett, and Josephine
f;
decorations:
Mary Francis
in-t- he

E:iz-abe- th
Bal-dau-

Hatfield. Eleanor
Williams,
ard
Mary Pryor; publicity: Ann Cecil
Hermann. Jane Birk, and Audrey
Gamble; and general arrangements:
Dorothy Vaughn. Mary Lou Allen,
and Katherine Morrison.

Political Scientists
To Hold Initiation
Phi Sigma Alpha, political science
honorary will hold a dinner meetin
and initiation Thursday. Truman A.

Morris, president announced.
The men to be initiated incIut'D
Jack Lovett. James Overby. Sam
Beckley, John Ward. Milbum Keith.
Uhel Barrickman and James
Ba-she-

Following the dinner at 6:30 p. m..
members and interested students
will discuss the pro and cons of a
third term question.
DELTA SIGMA CHI MEETING
Delta Sigma Chi. professional
men's Journalism fraternity. wi!t
hold a special meeting and initiation at 7:30 tonight in the Kernel
newsroom.

Kampus
Kernels
Women Interested in assisting
with housework and rare of
children for room and board are
asked to apply at the dean of
women's office immediately.
Anyone desiring soda fountain
employment at night see Dean
T. T. Jones at once. Experience
necessary.
Men, who desire employment

and have experience in printing
shop work, call at the I'M office in the I'nion building.

UNION NOTES
Today
Keys, 7:15-- 8 p. m. Room 205
Omicron Delta Kappa,
son as Dr. Frank Gibbs. Douglas
p
Dick and George Gibbs. Katherine m.. Room 204.
Dance committee, 5 p. m., Rcoin
Taylor as Emily Webb, J. R. Fritsch
as Charles Webb, and Jean Beard 127.
Junior Chamber of Commerce.
as Rebecca Gibbs.
The story is that of any two av- 6:30 p. m.. Room 9.
Modern Music concert. 3:30-- 4 ?
erage families in a small New England town. It concerns their every-- d m.. Music room. Recordings of
a y existences, marriages, and Charlie Barnett and his orches'ra
McVey exhibit.
p. m.. Mu.ic
deaths. It is American homespun
room.
life and the matter-of-fac- t,
Sweater session. 6 p. m., B.:.-roophilosophy has been
carefully preserved and emphasized
Wednesday
by Mr. Fowler in directing the play.
Officers Reserve Corps, 6:30 p. ni..
As important as any part or
9.
character are the lighting and sound Room
6
Student Government,
p. m..
effects which are superb. In the
grave scene the lighting on the faces Room 204.
Music committee, 6 p. m.. Room
of the actors makes them appear 127.
dsad. In another scene the newsAlpha Lambda Delta, 6 p. m..
boy pitches imaginary papers onto
imaginary doorsteps and the exact Room 206.
Student standards, 4 p. m. Room
sound of newspapers hitting a porch 127.
is produced by the sound effects
SuKy try outs, 6 p. m., Room
man, Jack Fierabend. Morrow Cox
205.
is in charge of lights.
"
To be complimented for putting Room 204. Election'of
off cers
the audience in the early 1900 mood
Independents. 7:30 n. m r,'
and spirit immediately before the 206.
opening of the first act is the choir.
McVey exhibit,
p. in.. Music
Harriet Abraham. Ruth Bray. Bet- room.
ty Dunn, Mary Mulligan. Mildred
Thursday
Ann Payne, Ada Perkins. Billy RayStudent
mond, Katherine Taylor, and or- 3:45 p. m.. welfare committee, 4 30.
Room 204.
ganist Nancye Mohney.
(Continued on Page Four)
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* Tilt t N
K

Professor Whitehead ha said: "The justification for a university is that if preserves the connection between knowledge and the zest of life,
bv uniting the voting and the old in the imaginative consideration of learning." The experience
of several colleges, where such "uniting" of faculty and students to consider educational polio-iin effect, seems to indicate its value. Professor
W. R. Agard in the Wisconsin Daily Cardinal.

TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OmCtAL

NEWSPAPER OF THE CTTOEKTS
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

PCRLISHm
EXCEPT

OF Til

DURINO THE 8CHOOL YEAR
OR EXAMINATION PERIODS

HOLIDAYS

En"w1 st th

Pout OITW at Lrxinctsn. Kenmrty.
mutter nndr the Art of March 3. I87fl.
MEMBER

fias

as wrond

Kentucky Intercollegiate Pre Association
Islington Board of Commerce

nnamm real

natiohal

1

uCK

L

V K 1. K N F.

Not Another, Car In Sight,
But In The Wrong Area Tsk!

the Kernel himself realized, at
last, that he had appeared silly
tossing the
around and
did not have the guts to do it again.
It seems to me the Kernel knew
darn well that only Martin Dies
would have dared to say that Stanford students were dominated by
Mosrow! When the Stanford Council said that to sanction support
would not be consistent with its
established policy of opposing student
partisan
participation
in
causes, he could not have used the
same smelly "line"! It seems to me
he knew that when the former
President Herbert Hoover who Is
head of the National Finnish Relief Fund and whose home is on
the campus, was rejected by his
Alma Mater in his "Finn Plan" that
that was to much for the Kernel's
stomach: Why, even Dr. Roy Lyman Wilbur who was President
Hoover's secretary of Interior and
is now President of Stanford in denouncing the Council's action could
only meekly say that It "made a
mistake in trying to act like the
U. S. Senate."
All evidence indicates that the
Stanford students, the American
Student Union, the National Student Federation of America, the
United Student Peace committee,
cur own maturing student legislature, etc., prefer living for demoo-larnot dying for K!
O. P.

2)

av

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John H. Morgan

Xews Editor
Husiness Manager

Patricia Hamilton

Managing Editor

I

Fditor-in-Chie- f

hi

Sports Editor
Society Editor
Advertising Manager
Proof Reader

JOE CREASON

LAURA LEE LYONS
CHARLES A. SMITH
MABEL LOVENS
WYNNE MoKINNEY
AGNES JENNINGS
JACK TREADWAY

Circulation Manager

BEH WILLIAMS
LOUISE C ALBERT

JIM CALDWELL

Guisnol This Week:

Standing Room Only
ovrr until this veck has the need for a new.
larger, and more adequaiclv equipped Guignnl
i heaier
leeii so urgent. Guignol and its staff.
I
i lie superb production
of "Our Town." demand more adequate production facilities.
Ortaiulv when the little theater under the
guidance of Frank Fowler can rival professional
production of "Our Town" it is high time the
tatnpu pledged support to the Guignol drive "for
a new building. That support need not be in
funds, but in attendance at play. The curreni
pla proves the little theater's worthiness ol
bat kin" bv the student bodv. I.. C.

In the sports pages of the last few days, nestled
among lengthv accounts of high school basketball and horse races, have been items concerning activities of major league team in pring
training camps.
Which means it won't be long before base hits,
abilities of rookies and the potency of the Red
aggregation will be of permanent interest to
sorts writers and pool room loafers.
We haven't seen Joe Friedman lately so we are
a bit handicapped in making predictions. Usually we get Joe to opine on baseball and then
predict the opjxisiie of what he avs.

The Campus

Parking Situation
In Sunday

But. we believe that anyone with the intelligence of a schoollmy can see that in the Amcri
can league it's the Yankees all the way. To predict that New York would lose the pennant
would lie as silly as predicting Hitler would lose
an election in Germany.

Ix.ington Herald leader carried

an interesting feature story commending the
work l Dean T. T. Jones in building up and
niainiaining an adequate system of campus parking control. Tut K.FRrj. also commends Dean
Joncv but wonders if unnecessary time and
iiiiiiKi are not Iteing expended in patrolling a
well-nigdeserted
campus.
last October by the
In a survey conducted
Student Onincil, it was found that
on Monday's, Wednesday', and Friday's (busiest das), parking areas on the west side of the
eampus were only 20 to 40 percent filled Ijetweeii
I and '2 p. m.. yet regulations are enforced
until
4
p. in. On the east side, excepting reserved
spans, areas were barelv TO percent filled during
these hours.
As a result of its findings, the Council recommended to Dean Jones that parking be allowed
a n where on the campus after 1 p. m. Insofar a
ue know, nothing has been done. It is Tiir

'

now-detunc- r

's

Brooklyn, Cincinnati and St.
Three teams
.
Louis
and the bravest of these is the
Yep, from here it looks like the Dodgers
on top, with the Cardinals to place and the
Brook-lvns-

M

K.echnicnien to show.

And is it beyond the realm of the imagination
to see the Dodgers dislodging the mighty New-Yorteam from its pinnacle in the series? We

don't think

understanding that the parking ruling

so.
a

made In du- Board of Trustee, and would
hae to he amended by the Board.
Dean Jones would lie serving the interests ol
economy and the interests of students and faculty
metnlers with cars if he conducted a more thorough survey through his office. If his findings
corrolxirate the Council report, undoubtedly the
.Board will make changes.
is

wishes to argue our predictions,
on over there's nothing we like better
to argue baseball. However, wc must warn
we use "glittering generalities," like the
President Roosevelt yells about.

If anyone

come

than
that
kind

a

If there
anything that makes us sore it is
to get into a baseball argument with somebody
and have them start saying, "Well, look what
DiMaggio baited in 1036," or "His method of
baiting makes him a sucker at the Polo Grounds,"
or something like that.
We like extravagant arguments, where we
make wild, vibrant statements such as "Vander
Mcer couldn't pitch on a sand lot team without
getting knx;kcd out of the box," or "Mckechnie
doesn't know the difference between a baseball
is

Why Should

Murderers

'

Three teams stand out in the National, viz.
Brooklyn, Cincinnati, and St. Louis. Wc reallv
hate to put the Reds in there, but some people
sc.m to think they can play ball.

n

Kirnh

By
ANDREW C. ECKDAHt

Rrosevclt's done it again made another blunder. This time it was in sending Mr. Sumner
Welles to F.urope to get the opinions of leaders
concerning various things, mostly peace. Now
we have nothing against Mr. Welles but he is
sort of a square peg in a round hole. Obviously,
the man for the job was Dr. George Gallup.

Cartoqps

Staff Photographer

Associate Editor

I

Behind
The
Eckdahl

(?

Go Free?

How long will this shameful, disgusting, and
cllow liverod policv of our country rontinue:
ie we to remain unimpassioncd, unmoved,

while Hitler murders and destroys with only
time Ixtwecn present victims and us, while Stalin
eiiuilies a small, brave little country without
moral or legal justification?
talk. Daniop this sniveling
ger lurks near. Ade