xt7mpg1hjp03 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7mpg1hjp03/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591029  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 29, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 29, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7mpg1hjp03 section xt7mpg1hjp03 New SUB Addition To Be Finished By 1962
By MIKE WENNINGER
for a million and a half dollar addition to the
Plans
Student Union Building are being drawn up, Dr. Frank
D. Peterson, vice president of business administration,

said Tuesday.
lie said the project should be completed by the end
of 19C2.

The 0,000 square feet . addition, which will doable
the site of the SUB, will be built onto the rear of the
present balldlng and will' extend onto the Intramural

field.
More floors cannot be added to the present building
because Its foundation Is not strong enough to hold
them. Dr. Peterson said.
"Part of the addition will have three floors like the
present building," Peterson stated. -- Some of the Interior
of the old building will probably be remodeled to make
It and the addition look uniform.
The Campos Bookstore and the University post office
will be moved from McVey 1111 to the addition. Dr.
Peterson said students might not have boxes in the
new post office. Instead, their mail may be delivered
directly to the dormitories.

The .SUB ballroom, grill, and cafeteria will be enlarged. Private dining rooms which can be serviced
from the cafeteria will be added. Under present arrangements, private dinners and banquets are held
in the ballroom and food must be carried upstairs
'from the kitchen on the first floor.
A lounge and dining room for the faculty and several
conference rooms will be Included in the addition.
Dr. Teterson said the planning committee for the
addition is considering doing away with private offices
for student organisations which request office space
In the SUB. Several large office rooms (such 'as are
used In banks and Insurance companies), with a desk
for each organisation, may be used In place of private

.

offices.

"It's time we go modern," said Dr. Peterson. "Certainly the student organizations have no business as private
as that of the bank vice presidents, who handle business
transactions In open office rooms in many of the larger
banks. Private offices for such things are antiquated
and a waste of space and money."

IB

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, OCT. 29,

all-purpo- se

2

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI

The planning committee is also debating whether or
not there Is an actual need for a chapel and recreational
facilities in the SUB.
future, an
Dr. Peterson said, "In the
recreation building may be substituted for the Inadequate
recreational facilities presently In the SUB."
When asked how the SUB addition project was progressing, Dr. Peterson replied, "We have been programming it for the last 14 months. I appointed a committee
which studied the needs of the present building.
"There have been three stages In the planning. First,
It was decided what is needed. Second, it was decided
how much space is needed and how much is available.
We are now in the third stage which is making the
layout.
"A conference has been held with the architect to
discuss arrangement or the rooms in the addition.
Dr. Peterson noted that the SUB, built during the
depression in the 1930's, cost $277,700, but now an addition
of the same size will cost a million and a half dollars.
About $300,000 will be used to Install an air conditioning unit for the entire building.

No. 23

1959

New Policy Revamps
O
X

'

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Jr Ji.JJL.LL JJ.JJ.Ji. HS JJ. JJ. HX

A major change in Commencement exercises at the University
will go into effect June, 1961.
Seniors will have to remain nine
days after final examinations to
attend Commencement and receive
their diplomas In person.
Examinations no longer will be
given to seniors in advance, as In
the past. Seniors will have to attend class for the full 16 weeks
f the second semester.
The change was passed unanimously by the University Faculty.
UK President Frank O. Dickey
said he did not believe the change
will have much effect on Commencement attendance. He said
it will mean student musicians
and military cadets, prominent in
past exercises, will not be
to remain for the event
The procedure Is followed In
ssany major universities of the
country, according to Dr. Dickey.
He also said the event would be
"considerably streamlined' perhaps without an outside speaker.
Dr. Morris Scherago, chairman
of the faculty committee advising the change, said, "The important "thing is for students to
get instruction.
"In the .past they have missed
two weeks and the change gives
seniors a full 16 weeks of instruction in the Becond semester. In
the past advance tests worked a
hardship on teachers to prepare,
give, and grade a week early."
Dr. Dickey also said these early
re-Qui- red

.

in

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J2.JJ.JJ. Hy

examinations disrupted the

JUL

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New Grill Will Be Near Men's Dorms

be-

to

attend class but didn't, Dr.
Scherago said.
..
The faculty disliked haying. to
give special exams to seniors.
There Is no disadvantage In the
new system. Dr. Scherago said,
because students who want to attend still will and those who do
not want to attend will not
.

anyway.

Today's SUB Activities
Superintendent of Schools,
Room 126, 8:30 pjn.
College Chamber of Commerce,
Room 128, 5:36 pjn.
Little Kentucky Derby Committee, Room 204. 5:30-7:3- 0
pun.
Registrars -- Luncheon, Room
205, 5

.

pjn.'

Agriculture Research Exhibit,

Room 206, S pjn.
Tobacco
Chemist Research
Conference, Ballroom, 8 am.-- 4

Faculty members of the committee were: R. E. Black. R. W. pjn.
Registrars
Meeting,
Boughton, "E. E. Elsey, C. F. Elton,
Music
Room, 4 pjn.
M. A. Hatch, E. L.. Newbury, Sallle
KSEA Meeting, Music Room,
E. Pence, Erwin Sasman, D. C.
6:30 p.m.
n,
Seaton, Earl P. sioan, W. A.
University Committee on Study
and M. S. Wall.
of Religion, T Lounge, 3 pan.
One value of the new system acDutch Lunch, Football Room,
cording to Dr. Dickey, is providing 84 teaching days in each 12 pjn.
YWCA-YMC- A
semester which is something the
Halloween Picnic, Castlewood Park, 5:30 pjn.
University has been moving toward for some time.
The 1960-6- 1
calendar also Includes a 10 day spring vacation held May
7
with Commencefrom April
ment June 5. Summer school will
Final exams in 1961 will be begin June 20 and end August 11.
1--

Tol-ma-

23-2-

1--

Education Meeting
Begins Here Today
Two presession meetings of the
UK Education Conference will be
held today on campus.
The Kentucky Association of
Registrars and Admissions Officers will meet for a luncheon In
the ballroom of the Student Union
Building. A business session at 1
p.m. in the SUB Music Room will
be conducted by the association's

Colleges, Secondary, and Elementary Schools will meet in conjunc-

tion with the Education Confer-

ence.
UK President Frank C. Dickey
will open the first conference session at 10 a.m. Friday. An Invocation will bo given by Dr.
Adron Doran, president, of More-hea- d
State College. Music will be
Irmina, provided by the University

I

president. Sister Mary
O.S.B., registrar at Villa Madonna
College, Covington.
New teacher certification
quirements will be discussed
representatives of the State

Author To Speak
Dr. llallctt Smith, professor of
English at tie California Institute of Technology, will speak
on' "Values in Our Society" In
the Lab Theater of the Fine
Arts Building Monday.

The building formerly used by the Athletic Department at the old
football practice field will be converted Into a. grill, it was announced yesterday by Dr. Frank D. Peterson, vice president in
charge of business administration. He said the grill will serve students who live in Donovan Hall and on Fraternity Row, plus the
575 men which the new dormitory will accommodate. Dr. Peterson
.said It 1ft possible that the new grill would be open at night.

Uni-

versity schedule.
Classes have been disrupted
cause seniors were expected

--

SC Leaders Charge

Faculty Manipulation
Two Student Congress leaders
accused certain members of the
faculty of "unfair and gross
manipulation" of the congress in
.

a letter to the Kernel yesterday.
The letter suggested that if the

present control of SC ' continues,
the assembly should be called "the
Faculty Sounding Board."
Phil Austin, acting president of
SC, aad Taylor Jones, ineligible
president, sent the letter to the
Kernel.
"However, If we are going to
have a Student Congress," the.
letter said, "it is imperative that
its powers and duties be defined,
that the role of the faculty be
defined, that the role of the student body be defined, and that the
position of SC in the makeup
of the University be defined."
Unless these changes are made,
Jones and Austin said they would
resign.
(The letter, In its entirety, appears on today's editorial page.)
Jones said Tuesday night that
the- Executive Committee of SC

should not have any members of
the faculty with a vote. At present,
the vote is equalized four from

the faculty and four from the student body.
Jones and Austin also criticized
the method by which the SC constitution is passed by the faculty.
The letter said:
"We fail to understand why a
constitution adopted for Student
Congress by the students must be
passed by the faculty, but if the
faculty insists on reserving this
power, we humbly request that
they use their omnipotent power
and take some sort of action regarding our constitution sometime'
before the first snowfall."

Jazz Gub

Persons Interested in starting
a jazx club at the University will
meet at 7 p.m. in Studio A on
the third floor of McVey IU1L
The purpose of the. meeting Is
to determine the amount of student interest in such a club.

-

if
if

Faculty--

Woodwind

Quintet.

Dr. Carter Davidson, president
reof Union College and chancellor
by of Union University, Schnectady,

DeN. Y., and a native Kentucklan,
partment of Education. The state will speak to the conference. His
director of Selective Service Sys- address will be "Education The
tems will discuss recent develop- Humanizing Force of the World."
ments In the selective service
Eleven affiliated educational
system.
groups will meet during the conThe Kentucky Association of ference, which ends Saturday. . '
Junior Colleges will meet at 4
p.m. in the auditorium of the
Mid-Ter- m
Taylor Education Building. PreGrades
siding - will be Dr. Earl lEays, ' Charles F. Elton, Dean of Adpresident of Sue Bennett College, missions and Registrar has anLondon. Dr. Irvln E. Lunger, nounced that mid-tergrades
Transylvania College, will adare due In his office by 9 ajn.
dress the delegates.
Nov. 17.
The Kentucky Association of
m

V

'0 (j

'V
4

(I

?

Dorm Council

New men's residence hall governing council members are seated
from left Tommy Luscber, Tommy Wilson, Jim Thomas, Johnny
Mills, and Ted Morford. Standing from left are Charles Wright,
B1U Bratton. and Willis Haws.
.

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct. 29, 1959

2-- TIIE

Missiles Are Tested

-

v

At Secret Center
TULLAHOMA, Tenn. (AP)
"There's so much secret stuff
here," the Air Force lieuaenant
colonel said nervously, "that when
we talk to outsiders we have to be
so cautious not to give something
away."
It's not that the big supersonic
wind tunnels at the Arnold Engineering Development Center are

1!

II

It.

GOLDFARB

PRICE

ZACIIEN

RANCH

I

ft

I.Ml.llH

Qualities Of Both Sexes Receive
Critical Analysis From Students
it does seem that too many boys campus. After visiting other

By Carole Martin

Assistant
recent
raised some
qualities of
A

Managing Editor
letter to the Kernel
controversy as to the
both sexes on cam-

pus.

Although the letter was concerned with inconsiderate coeds, it
Etirred up a few comments about
the male populace of UK also.
In order to get an evaluation of
both groups, we asked two girls to
discuss the male student body In
general and two boys to discuss
the coeds.
Oerrl Ranch, sophomore, KKO:

"I consider myself fortunate to
be able to say that there is not
one UK man I have met, that I
haven't liked.
"All girls like neat dressers and
appreciate nice manners, and there
seems to be an ample number of
males on this campus with these
attributes.
"I don't profess that there isn't
enough social hie on campus, but

-

pals.

"Take notice the next time you're
in the grill, grns, nave you ever
seen better- - manners or neater
dressers?
"Any girl on campus knows that
the boys are real entertainers you
know dates at the Adams' House,
Danceland, Joyland, Circle, Johnny Almond's and the Buffalo (on
Friday afternoon).
"And then there Is always the
movies I
"However, there are too many
men on campus who don't date.
UK men Just don't swing out like
they used to."
drive-i- n

Stuart Goldfarb, junior, ZBT:
"Although my interest in. UK
girls is rather monopolized by one
particular girl, I think there are
a few comments I could make.
"Most of the coeds here are con-

Robert Murphy Resigns
Job As Trouble Shooter
WASHINGTON, Oct. 28 (AP)

Robert Daniel Murphy, a diplomatic trouble shooter for three
presidents, has decided to quit
as under secretary of state to take
a Job in industry.
The Milwaukee-bor- n
Irishman
will leave about Jan. 1, ending a
colorful 39 year career.
Murphy told President Eisenhower of his decision yesterday.
Eisenhower reluctantly accepted it.
Administration leaders had been
hoping until the last moment that
Murphy would stay on, either in
his present post, the highest a
career officer can achieve, or as
ambassador to West Germany.
er
But Murphy, a gangling
with a soft smile, decided
that after nearly four decades
as a diplomat, the time had come
to quit. Friends said the main
reason was money.
As under secretary, he now
earns $22,000 a year but his job
in private business is expected to
pay much more. Murphy declined
to disclose what his new job will
be except to say it 'will be con
six-foot-

.

scientious about their appearance,
some to the extreme in fact.
rs
"They are swingers' and
for the most part, but quite
a few of the upperclassmen are a
little too clanlsh.
"This may be one of the reasons
why so many of the boys rush the
new freshmen and transfers every
fall they haven't had time to

nected with international affairs.
Today, at the age of 65, Murphy
became eligible for full retirement pay. This will average about
$15,000 a year.
Murphy's departure will leave a
big gap in the state department's
top echelon. A younger career dip- -, Xorm cliques."
lomat, Deputy Under Secretary
Livingston Merchant, is expected
to move into his spot.
But associates acknowledged
Murphy will be sorely missed, not
only for his capacity for hard,
detailed work but because of his
ENDS TONIGHT
resourcefulness and flexibility In
eMPi eB
attacking problems.
Tnis combination of characteristics led President Roosevelt,
Truman and Eisenhower to call
on him for personal diplomacy.
fJ

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as

creates the nearest thing on the
ground to true space flight.
Improvements In the convenIt's what the engineers test in
them, the missiles of tomorrow, tional wind tunnel, which were
the vehicles of future space ex- first aed, came from combinations of huge fans and motors
plorations.
Testing the models in the wind that the engineers call a comsystem.
tunnels determines what Is wrong pressor
By forcing an airflow through
with the design before it reaches
get
the production stage. Is the air- nozzles, the testing crew caneight
flow smooth. Is the weapon strong a powerful stream of winds
enough, can it resist the extreme times the speed of .sound to direct
against their models with much
heat?
of a
"We work the bugs out while the same effect as the nozzle
fire hose.
the weapons are still in the cheap
To push the speeds up to near
stage," explains the AEDC comMach 10, a pipe full of compressed
mander; Ma J. Gen. Troup Miller Jr.
are
This Isn't easy. Just keeping air and a big vacuum sphere to
compressed
the hurricane generators abreast used. When the airsquare Inch Is
of the fantastic new speeds the 4.000 pounds per
rocket men work with Is a terrific turned loose. It swooshes from the
pipe and through the test section
task.
When bulldozers began break- to the vacuum.
Winds driven by electric aro
ing through the pine forests for
explosions reach speeds from Mach
al
this project nine years ago.
engineers still talked of 10 to 20 and temperatures soar
speeds only a little faster than to 40,000 degrees.
A new tunnel under construction
Mach-1- ,
the speed of sound.
25. Just
Now the engineers speak in will reach above Mach
how much above, the Air Force
terms of Mach 20, 20 times the
speed of sound, and even higher will not say.
Mach numbers associated with the
most secret projects.
A missile model feels its first
breath of wind in the tunnels of
the Oas Dynamics Facility. The
missile may only be of toy size,
but it must withstand the brutal
Typewriters, Aiding Machines
forces of space travel at simulated
Service
speeds of 500 to 25,000 miles an
Sales
hour.
and Rentals
At a second laboratory, the En- -

secret.

good-looke-

with

MFD!

col-

and meeting coeds there,
I have always been glad to return
to UK and its swingin' girls."
Brenda Price, Junior:
"I really haven't given it too
much thought lately, but most of
the boys on this campus are real
leges

stay in the dorms- and don't date
on weekends."
"I don't know wnat could be
done to remedy the situation, because so many of them dont even
try to date although some might
like to do so."
Jon Zaehen, junior, LXA:
"I think the women here on the
average are courteous, considerate,
and friendly.
"Though some men will disagree with me, I say that this is the
rule and that inconsiderate, snob-ls- h
girls are the exception.
-A few girls wouldn't think of
saying thank yon, and others keep
their dates waiting for long periods of time, still others want to
do only as they like.
"Perhaps the biggest problem Is
the fact that most girls have no
conception of the value of money
and expect too much of their dates.
"However we are fortunate that
these examples are rare on our

glne Test Facility, engines and
fuels to push the missiles go
through their first paces, simulating powering a missile from takeoff, through space and back.
Later the engines can be mated
with the full sized craft for tests
together in the third unit, the
Propulsion Wind Tunnels, which

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- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct. 29,

Inspection Team
Will Visit UK
o

UK'a Air Science department Is
expecting a two man inspection
team Friday, it has been announced.
The team will consist of a It.
colonel arid a major, who will be
on campus through Monday.
An honor, guard from the Cadet
Police will ' meet the Inspection
team at Blur grass Field, according
to Hal Bishop, Cadet Police
Commander.
Along with visiting the cadets
in class, the officers will observe
a wing briefing that Is to be held

-

-

-

-

Device Is Invented
To Warn Speakers
"This model is
JIM riHLLIPS
A transplanted Texan working bat it could b made automatic by
at UK has literally "belled" long- - installing a timer," William
plained. He estimated the "stop-Jo- e
Kentucky speakers.
Agricultural Ex- - per cost about $5 to build.
Williams,
tension Service specialist In visual
Mr. Williams Is sure the Idea
aids. this. week unveiled a home- - isn't his, but heaid he had never
made device which he calls the seen a similar device. He built this
"speaker stopper."
0ne about two weeks ago and is
It does Just that, but not that using it for the first time during
Im politely. A speaker first sees fa the UK Extension Workers Con- light come on ' which lets ference in progress here
him know, "you have five mln- ..j m&y naye aJ1 50Q of- tnese
left, better start summing up." pprsons after me before the con- i wo minutes later a red ligni jerence is over, but I felt we needed
blinks on, and a speaker with more somethlnz to insOr'e eoual but
than three minutes worth of words jimlted time tor the many reports
left juat won't get to say all of t0
given," the visual aids spe- them.
cialist said.
At zero minutes the "speaker
Mr. Williams came to UK four
stopper" does get impolite.
-Mn trn (r.m Inl.dllP- " T" h.
"
An unmuted electric doorbell
the V,SuaI ,ds ePrt- nlil th MMlrt
rlnr. .nrf It rf.n'l .!
ment of the Baptist Book Store.
t peaker sits down.
He backed up his pride in Texas
Actually. the bell and the warn- by saying he graduated with a
ins lights are controlled from a
degree in agriculture from
switch box in the hands of the
program chairman. A rotary switch Southwest Texas State Teachers
on the box enables the chairman College at San Marcos, which he
to work the panel In front of the thought was a fairly short name
'
'or a Texas Institution.
speaker.
Some 14 feet of cord link the
Mr. Williams holds an MS. de- apparatus parts on the initialgree in agricultural education from
-

man-o-mati- e',

ed

-

h.

-

.

B-S-

-

.

Iowa State University.

model.

By GERALDIXE MILLAR
Exploit a tropical paradise like
Cuba for six years and chaos is
the result. Take an Idealist and
poet, Fidel Castro, to correct this
misery and you have Caribbean

turmoil.

When Dr. Juan Hernandez, UK
language professor, picks up today's newspaper, he reads about
his native island in revolution.
This explosion is expected by the
professor of Spanish because
for them Friday afternoon. The Cuban people are hungry." "the
purposq of the briefing Is to ex"A modern day epic" is what he
plain how the cadet wing funccalls' the triumph oter Batista.
tions.
This is the first of a scries of Castro returned to Cuba In Desuch teams to visit the Air Science cember 1956 with 12 men. He
battled an army of 20,000 which
Department1 this year.
swelled to 52,000 as the dictatorship grew more hated and Castro

JOE WILLIAMS AND INVEftTIOtf

By

Spanish Professor
Discusses Castro

Broadcasting Service
Joins Radio Scries

The UK Broadcasting Service Is
preparing program material for
the "Digest of the Air."
The "Digest" is a series of pro- grams broadcast over WLW radio
from 7:15 to 7:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday,
UK's first contributor to the
series Is Dr. Adolph Bie, head of
the Department of Modern Fore-greign Languages. He has recorded
en

six Interviews with foreign stu-n- te
dents which can currently be heard
Thursday evening.
The subject matter of the ser- les includes Russian economics,
everyday psychology, aspects of
American education, English lit- cratm"e' tne us? and evolution of
U current OU5cvciyuajr wuiu.V
hess trends.

vy

1-

AFIJOTn Solf-ptSnmicora
fnflnf ujJUiiauio
For Coming Year
c

Six new AFROTC cadet spon- n were elected by vote of the
emire aeiacnmeni yesieraay.
Lana Fox, Diane Marek, and
Pam McDivit, freshmen; and
Helen Oraham, Prlscllla Lynn,
and June Moore, sophomores were
chosen from the 75 candidates
who- attended a tea dance In their
honor on Oct. 22. .
All six of the new cadet spon- -

more renowned.
Dr. Hernandez remembers Jan.
1, 1959 and the defeat of Batista's
army.
He tells how Cubans
breathed freedom for the first
time in six years. Hoped for were
peace and prosperity. Needed was
a chance to rebuild.
Cuba Li a scorched land. Its
people burned their fields to keep

To Be Provided By NSF
Approximately

-

graduate Instructions about these exam- fellowships will be awarded to inations are found in application
students by the National Science material.
Foundation in 1960.
Dnn Splvey, head of the UK
These fellowships are to pro- - Graduate School, advised that any- in sucn a leuow- Mr.
IT
2Z one
offered by ,hrp make hls ,pPiictlon now.
MP
NSF. They are the predoc- - Applications are available In. the
toral fellowships and the cooper dean's office or at the Fellowship
ative fellowships.
Office in Washington.
Last year UK had 11 cooperApplications must be in by
ative fellowships approved with 1, 1960. Announcements of Jan.
the
a
i
m
uoia or nine, inis wu ne award3
made March 15 '
largest number for any southern ,oen .
school except the University of
1100

P vl 1

.

a.

M

m

ot

AfiM and Scences.
'
The cadet wing : now has

17

coed sponsors
These girls represent AFROTC

at all military functions;-marcwith them in all parades;

any of the churches where he
prraches. he pays for the privilege.
Some of his donations amount to
more than $10,000, associates. say.
Moseley went to work when he
was 13 for $3 a week. When he
reached IS, he was averaging $1,-0a month selling weatherstrip-pin- g.
In his first year as a real
estate man he made $21,000.
It was in church that Moseley
ing.
met his wife, the former Lavinla
"We owe all to God," he says. Tobener. '
"Ood was good to me In bring"We are stewards during our life- -,
time looking after what comes our ing us 'together," he says. They
way."
have two sons and six grandchil.
When- Moseley sees a need at dren..
KANSAS CITY (AP)

$2,200 plus fees.

Cooperative fellowships are good
only at UK, but predoctoral fel- Jowships may be used at any ac- -

credited university.
The NSF als sponsors fellow- ships for teaching assistants. UK
has a quota of five for these fellowships which pay $75 a week plus
fees.
To be eligible for a fellowship
an applicant must be a citizen of
the United Slates and have shown
ability and special aptitude for advanced training in the sciences.
Selection is based on academic
records, recommendations, and
scores received on examinations.

Art Exhibit Features
Nature Oil PailltillgS

!

An art exhibit by Walter H.
Stevens and Carl Sublett will be
open to the public Nov. 1 In the
galleries of the Fine Arts Building,
The show will consist of modern
oil paintings based on nature. :

"71
I

MMiaan

i

11

Million-

aire real estate broker Ray F.
Moseley Is a layman preacher on
the side. He likes to preach, and
practices what he preaches.
Moseley, who made his first
million by the time he was 27
has been preaching in churches
le
of all denominations within a
radius of Kansas City.
Invariably, his theme is tith-

00

300-mi-

.

-

0' WIS n

M

'

.Student 'Special

nrnr .ento visiting
vu.'
as hostesses

.nn

.

are

military

.
:
dignitaries.
The detachment will be.repre- sented by its sponsors in the Lex
ngton Veteran' - Da? parade

Nov. 11.

For the personal gift
. . . Your Portrait

Spongier Studio
N. E. Corner of Main & Limi
Phone
72

Just

All You Can Cram Into the Bag .

h

Texas.

for co- The quota for 1960-6- 1
operative fellowships is 10, and
five for the predoctoral fellow- thips. The fellowships are for

-

Millionaire' JPreaches
What He Practices

-

IS Graduate Fellowships

Batista from profiting. Today,
that burned land feeds no one and
rebellion looms. To Dr. Hernandez,
Castro's main problem is to fill
the stomachs of his starving
countrymen.
'
Cabana are hungry for education
too. Speaking with enthusiasm. Dr.
Hernandes relates how "the premier opened 10,000 new schools
this falL Lean-to'- s
but in a tropical climate, that, doesn't matter.
And the teachers volunteers who
are paid with provisions."
Learning was carried out under
Batista. The University of Havana
was closed for three years. Public
schools were without teachers. Intellectuals were persecuted and
jailed, as was Castro himself.
The Inheritance left to Fidel
Castro is a sacked island and a
staggering debt of 200 billion, dollars.
To queries about the new government and Its bewildering premier. Dr. Hernandes answers,
-Castro la an idealist and intellectual, a poet at heart. Can such
a man bring peace to- a nation
with snore problems than Job?"

This strvU Is deslgaeJ especially for
sfw danrs. We furnish the- bq to you
for only 50c (loss than Actual cost).
This b9 is food for as long as yon
car to m it. Put ay much laundry
as you can stuff into the bag, including colored places . . . Go In together with your room mate's laandry
to fill tho hag and cut that coat In half!
-

(Wot

ENTIRE CONTENTS
VASHED-DRIED-FOLD- ED

SHIRTS

in hag wiJI ho finished

15c

on reeuost for only

EACH Additional

the Gift That Goes

EYcrywherc

. Lasts for Always

L

KHAKI PANTS

in hag will be
finished on ro-ajuest for only

.

2C

EACH Additional

HANDKERCHIEFS

'
in bag will bo
finished on ro
quest for only
EACH Additlonol

Mi-Lad- y

'BEAUTY SALON
PERSONALIZED

STYLING

PLEASE CALL

FOR

AN APPOINTMENT

Open 'Til 9 p.m. Thursday and
Friday nights
SOUTHLAND SHOPPING
CENTER
Plenty of Free Parking

.

Sometimes a girt end up stored away in drawer. Sometimes a
gift wears out. But the gift that will always please always mean
most is your gift portrait! Let us make a fine picture of you now.
Come in, or telephone for your appointment.

'Your Portrait Deserves the Very Best"

ADAM PEPIOT STUDIO
'

Wellington Arms

510

E.

Main St.

LAUNDRY AND CLEANERS
ROUTE SERVICE AT NO EXTRA CHARGE

Use Either of Two Convenient Locations for This

Wonderful Bargain Offer:
606 SOUTH BROADWAY
529 SOUTH LIMESTONE

3c

* The Kentucky Kernel
University or Kentucky
Entered at th Port Offtc at Lsfnutnn, Kentnrlty at sreond c1a
Published four timet a wrrV during the refular arhool

COOPe RSToy
NRST JF Mnna.

.

th
March
matter
and
yr exceptntholiday!Act of exam.' 3, 1870.

SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Bob Anderson, Managing Editot

Bill Neixirk,

Editor

Stewart Hedcer,

Sports Editor
Paul Zimmerman and Carole Martin, Assistant Managing Editors
Dick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographers
Alice Akin, Society Editor
Dob Herndon, Hank Chapman, and Lew Kinc, Cartoonists
Beverly Cardwell, Circulation
Perrt Ashley, Business Manager
Stuart Coldfarb and Paul Dykes, Advertising Managers
Staff Writers: Jerry Rlngo, Jim Phillip, Bobble Maann, Linda Hocken smith. Robert Wenninger,
George Smith, Robert Perkins, Edward Van Hook, Rod Tabb, Lawrence Lynch, June Byers, Ann
Harris, Beverly Cardwell, Margaret Copehart, At Royster, Jan Berryman, Bob Jobe, Mary
Miller, Herb Steely, Nnrris Johnson, Bob Fraser, Emajo Cocanougher, Michel Fearing, Pat Hulker,
Curtisa Smith, John FtUwater, Garnett Brown, Richard Hedlund, Christa Flnley, Allen Travis,
Sue McCauley, Pbil Cox, Robert Radford, Beverly Pedlgo, and Maxin Catea.

r-

LIHEUP

-

U

.

LAS""

r,r.i:CY-G- 9
H TV

LASH

RIGHT- S-

.

THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Bill

Suit Horn.

Blakeman, News Editor

jsociat

Lethargy In The Library
t
Students making social
in
the vestibule. Rooms that are crowded.
A hot, groggy atmosphere. A perpetual buzz from an accumulation
of whispers and shuffles.
This is the University of Kentucky Margaret I. King Library
today.
It should be granted that a university library, as idealists think,
ought to be just the opposite of what
we know exists at UK. When one
even thinks of a library, he automatically visuali