xt7mpg1hjp1p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7mpg1hjp1p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591028  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 28, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 28, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7mpg1hjp1p section xt7mpg1hjp1p Apathy Is Characteristic Of Soviet Worker
By DON MILLS

ceive the same salary

the manager has lost nothing since he is
only an employee of the state. A
person must eat somewhere In
Russia and the money all goes Into
the same pot.
A Russian In Moscow ordered a
big meal of several courses, had
wine and vodka, and then got up
and walked ' out without paying.
No waiter ran after him.
At a service station we were
given a gallon of gasoline, not
because of generosity, but as the
Russian said, because it was too
much trouble to fill out the papers
since we wanted to pay with
money.' All gasoline is paid with

The day will come when the
Soviet Union will hare the highest
standard of living in Europe
not because of her system of
socialism, but because of her natural wealth.
.Then, she will push America, a
country that-haequal natural
wealth. It will be capitalism versus
s

communism.

America's capitalism will oat
produce Russia's communism be
cause of the lack of Initiative,
waste, corruption, and Inferior
specialisation found In the Soviet
Union. Here are some simple examples.'
Service in restaurants is terrible. Often, it would take over
an hour to eat. Walters stood in
the corner laughing and talking
among themselves. It makes no
difference to them if a customer
.

walks out.
There, is little tipping. They re

coupons.
At the same station, an employe was transferring gas from
one tank to another by bucket.
There was so much gas spilled
on the ground that a lighted
match would have made the place
rubble.

er
Stealing from the state Is
problem. One of the most
profitable Jobs In the Soviet
Union is managing a store. It Is
said. In all fields of work much
time and money Is lost through
administration where tots of paper
work and supervision Is required.
Jokers say It takes three Russians to keep one working.
The quality of work is poor.
Workers were slapping paint on a
wall with little care. There Is
little competition for a painter
to be better than another. In the
U. S., the quality of work by a
painter is Judged by higher wages
and employment.
In the USSR, if a person is fired
from his Job, he gets another.
Every person has the right to
work there is no unemployment.
The attitude is, "If they don't
like the way 1 work, the worse
thing that can happen Is going to
another Job."
an-oth-

A disgruntled student
said, shade tree. Reports say that much
"Why work hard? We don't have grain is left on the ground for the
enough money to buy the expensive rain to ruin. The Russians must
goods, anyway."
be made to believe that everything is collectively owned by the
Now, the Russian government Is
''
well aware of thes problems. Fac- people.
to
It Is undesirable
tory newspapers give publicity and
work harder since that extra work
prestige to the best workers. Hard goes
to the state and not into
workers get free trips to the Black
their pockets.
Sea or some other resort area.
Despite the lack of Initiative,
Factory walls are adorned with
photographs of efficient workers. the Russians do work. Their
Other laborers receive production labor force Is large since women
medals. The director said, "If a do almost as much work as men.
worker does not fulfill his ex- Once the luxuries of life come Into
pected output, his wages are de- sight, people will have a greater
interest In work.
creased."
The greatest dissatisfaction in
Despite the rewards, the prob- the
Soviet Union is the low standlems have not been solved com- ard of living.
The Russian people
pletely. Efficiency Is not nearly as are tired of promises
even
high as In America. The chief the youth dont want toand for
wait
trouble Is on the farms where the future.
it is more difficult to Instill a
This is Mr. Khrushchev's No. 1
desire to work. It Is hard to meas- problem. He must quickly pro
ure Individual production.
vide his people with nicer, cheaper,
Farmers prefer to sit under a and more plentiful goods.
for-the-

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Vol. LI

niver sity of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 28, 1959

i

Meetings Today
I

'

,

r

.
I

a

1

I

II."11"

New Head Resident
Keeneland nail's newnead resident, Mrs. JHarlon Aylward, right,
and her assistant,' Mis Suzanne Shively, familiarize' themselves
with the daties of their new positions.

Specialists Discuss
Area Development
which offers more services than
constitutional limitations, can be presented by traditional
include
petty Jealousies, lack of coordin- 50 bed hospitals.
The school was sponsored by
ation and finances, and even resistance by some local groups, com- the Bureau of Community Service
munity ; leaders were told at UK in the University's Sociology Department.'
:
Monday.
Dr. Irwin T. Sanders, Harvard
- In six separate sessions of the
educator and former head of the
University's "Community School
for a Day," specialists in govern- UK Sociology Department, was the
ment, religion, education, health principal speaker.
He said the American method of
and community affairs discussed
ways the various elements of com- solving many problems through
munity life could be organized to action outside the governmental
framework Is now being indirectly
assist in development programs.
endorsed by communist governThe lack of church participation ments in Bulgaria and Yugoslavia.
in rural development was one of
the problems discussed.
The need for evaluation of
county health resources and for
Notary
will
the development of area health atThereticket be a in thePublic
SUB
booth
the
programs involving several counties
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today
was discussed in another session.
and tomorrow to sign absentee
Dr. Edmund Pellegrino, chairballots.
man of the department of medBallots may also be notorized
icine at UK, outlined a sample in the office of the dean of the
program for a community health Law School.
center developed in New Jersey,
Problems

of area development

Notary Public

Coed Turns

No. 22

The Pitkin Club will meet at
noon in the Maxwell Street
Presbyterian Church. The Rev.
Troy Esllnger will speak on "An
Authority for Life."
Pi Mu Epsilon, math honorary,
will have a business meeting at
"
4 p.m. Thursday.

,

YotCS TO Meet

Every Other Week

Student Congress voted Monday
night to meet every other week because of a lack of business for it to
'
act on.
SUB ACTIVITIES
SC Secretary Margie
Students Party, Room 128, moved that the congress Triplett
meet on
3 pjn.
the second and fourth Mondays
Little Kentucky Derby Comof the month. The motion ' was
mittee, Room 2C5, S pan.
passed unanimously.
Agriculture Research Exhibit,
A special meeting may be called
Room 206.
by the Executive . Committee, If
State Department of Educa- special business comes up which retion, Music Room, pjn. quires immediate attention.
Medical Center Breakfast, In other business, Frank Brab-so- n,
Football Room.
representing Sigma Nu. moved

that SC buy a

.

The
machine, said Brabson, would prevent trouble such as marked last
spring's election, and still enable
anyone Interested in voting to do
so.
.

.
i

voting-machine-

,

.

.

'

0.
Such a machine would cost
Tha cost could be borne Jointly by SC, the University, and the
Science
Political
Department,
Brabson said.
lie was appointed a committee
of one to study the voting machine
proposal
$1,-20-

Shawneetown Trecia Roberts Is Named
Assistant Head Of Holmes
Will Elect
Trecia Roberts,
from tries
and
assistant
England
Councilmen head resident atthe Hall this these she Roberts interests.of
her literary
Miss
Monticello,

22,

Miss

visited,
liked
especially,
because of
Shawneetown residents will year.
She Is considering personnel
choose 12 representatives to the
She and Mrs. Dorothy Rodes,. work now and feels her
Job here
Married Students Governing Coun- the head resident, direct the 299 Is a good beginning.
When asked
cil in the Shawneetown general girls living in the dorm. Miss Rob- what
she thought about
Miss
election November 4 and 5.
erts, an English major and phil- Roberts said she felt UK, were
there
The announcement was made osophy minor, graduated from too many activities on campus and
Monday night'- by Mrs. Ellen Centre College at Danville last not enough time to attend all of
Disque, chairman of the election year.
them.
She spent the past summer
committee, at the council's regShe also said that since she
graveling in Europe- with some
ular meeting.
friends. The group travelled by hadn't been here very long, and
Ballots will be
Wednesday to residents of the car since they felt they could see didn't know enourh about the
campus, she couldn't comment on
project for them to Indicate their much more of the country this
it as a whole, but she is Just
choice for councilmen. The ballots way.
England, France, Germany, Italy "crazy" about Holmes Hall and
will be collected and tabulated
and Greece were the main coun the girls.
Thursday,
,
is

new
Holmes

-

-

distributed

n

In other council business, Mayer
Joe Sharp Installed recently
elected councilman Rex Johnson,
Russelvllle, as representative from
Johnston House.

in False Alar:

sent fire engines screaming to the no consolation In committing suiBy REX BAILEY
Wednesday Associate Editor
scene.
cide, Miss Carr proceeded to call
Not only did they send two fire the fire department to apologize.
Have you ever heard the saying
She received some relief when
'Where there la smoke there is engines, but also one ladder truck,
a first aid truck, and the assist- they told her that she had done
fire?"
Juanita Carr, ' freshman Alpha ant fire chief's truck. A total of the right thing and "whenever
Zl Delta pledge, has heard the 18 men from three fire sations you see smoke again call the department but not that smoke."
expression many times too many, answered the alarm.
But the fireme,n added, "Honey,
The firemen were somewhat be
fact. Last Sunday afternoon
in
Miss Carr looked out her window wildered when they reached their due to your aspirations as an
In Jewell Hall and noticed huge destination to find that the amateur fireman, every fireman In
billows of smoke pouring out from "huge billows of smoke" were Lexington was fully clothed and
coming from the heating plant's on his truck ready to take off."
behind Kennedy's Book Store,
j
When asked if she would ever
Almost Instantly she grahbed a smokestack.
While the firemen were bewlld- - turn in any more fire alarms. Miss
phone and called the Lexington
fire Department. She reported to ered and probably a little angry, Carr said, "I sure would, but I
the fire department the smoke as Miss Carr ' was looking for the would be sure it was a fire and not
she saw It, and they immediately nearest hole to Jump in. Finding a smokestack."

f

.

Holmes Hall Assistant
Trecia Roberts Is busy at her new position as assistant head resident of Holmes Hail. Miss Roberts, graduate of Centre College,
helps Mrs. Dorothy Rhodes.

* f

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1939

2-- TllE

macy
Pledge Cias3
Picks Heads

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS
--

UN Seminar Trip
Set For Nov. 4

Today's
whliY Schedule
.

,

p.m. Music Humanities.
Thirty-seve- n
students win leave
p.m. Dinner Concert.
Nov. 4 for New York on the United
6 p.m. News Digest.
Nations Seminar trip sponsored by
8:15 pm. Sports and Campus the University YMCA and YWCA.
News.
The trip will include attendance
6:30 p.Jm. Reading the Writer.
at sessions in the U. N. headquart6:45 p.m. UN Story.
ers, a guided tour of the head7 p.m. Ways of Mankind.
quarters, and a luncheon in the
p.m. Music Magazine.
7:30
U.N. delegates' dining room.
'7:55 p.m. News.
8 p.m. Musical ivlaste rworks.
Students also will have an op11 p.m. Sign-ONews.
portunity to see various attrac- tlons In New York.
The group will travel to New
York by chartered bus and will
stay at Hotel
Taft on Timen
will return to Lexlng- Square. They
4

C

The Kappa Psl, professional
pharmaceutical fraternity, pledge
class elected its . officers Tuesday
at a meeting' in the Pharmacy
.

Building.
Officers are president, Jlmmle
Wayne liOckhart, Corbin; vice
president, Laythe Sykes, Elkhorn
City; secretary " treasurer, Willis
Carson Hampton. Mlddlesboro.
Sophomore
pharmacy majors
pledged by the fraternity are Billy
Lynn Barrett, Princeton; William
Shelbyville;
Hickman,
Russell
Wendell Ray Hollowoy, Eddyville;
Kentucky Beta Chapter of Alpha
Pony miter Lyklns, Lloyd; WilEpsilon Delta, national premedical
liam McDonald, Tllllsboro; Clarnow accepting apence Edward MCGaaghey, Louis- honor society, Is
plications for membership, a chapville; Lee William Ricketts, Manchester; and Gary Fredrick Ride-ou- t, ter official said.
Membership is generally restrictMadisonrllle. "
ed to premedical students who
are William
Juniors
Munfordville; James Edward Walk, have completed three semtprs,
New Albany, Ind; James Edward but applications from related fields,
Moll, Louisville; and Charles Bold-ric- k such as predentistry and medical
technology, will be considered, he
Beckmann, Louisville. '
--

ff

Pre Med Society
Seeks Members

.

ton Nov.

.

.
:

x

8.

--

ac-ccrtt- ing

agri-ealtmr-

e,"

--

added.
r,
secretary-treasureand
Alpha Epsilon Delta was foundStaley Adams, faculty advla- - '
ed In 1926 at the University of Prof.
Alabama. There are now 15,508 or.
members tn 67 actlTe chapters at
schools throughout the country..
The society is affiliated with the
n,
The UK chapter of Chi
engineering American Association for the Adnational civil
honorary, has selected eight new vancement of Science, the American Council of Education, and is
members.
a member of the Association of
They are Robert Linkner,
Joseph Fister. .Thomas College Honor Societies.
Interested persons should send
Thompson, Glen Bottones', Daniel
name, home and Lexington adShepherd. "David "Cortierd and
dress, phone number, college maRkfcarrf
.H
Vernon Johnson.
' Clotro Rfton
m
A
jor, and classification to C. K.
1959-19V. U aOOK IACK IN ANCtR'
Officers elected for the
i
7,
-O
Cooperstown, by FriCbamllvr Tech.
term are Carleton Oodsey, Davis,
iH "CHAT SIOUX
H TV
president; Joe Johnson, vice pres- day.
UPRISING"
il
and
ident; Chester Myers, secretary;
M I XV Uto
and Arnold Estep, treasurer.
More than 580 tons of trout are
placed in Colorado lakes and
streams each year.
Ep-silo-

personal--

sychological

Sher-rell.IIel- m,

p-

60

F-12-

Married Students Hear
Candidate Discuss Taxes

University married students
should not be forced to pay personal property taxes, according to
Fred G. Irtz, candidate for Lex,
ington mayor.
- "Students should not 'be forced
to submit to double taxation because they attend classes In Lexington and already pay taxes elsewhere, Irts continued.
' This Shatter Of nonpermanent
residents has been brought to my
attention and concrete proposals
regarding it art being prepared,
he added.
"When asked about the proposed
.

.,

complete study of a topography
of "the area.
w
"A tunnel or underpass would
seem to be more convenient for

the students, definitely cheaper to
maintain, and easier to construct
because of the depression in front
of the SUB," Irtz added.

--

Euclid Avenue overpass, Irts remarked that the idea shows an In

CLOTHES refitted, altered,

One woman wished him to be
less than he was. The other
. tried to make him more than
who was. And he had to choose

'between them. Redbook
Magazine presents Stanley

KaufTmann's absorbing new
'novel, '!The Only Place To
'Be," complete in the Novem- ber issue.
iAIso read "Fallout and Your
Family's Health," a comprehensive report on radioactivity. . . its effect upon your
future, your children and all
of humanity.
,In the November issue of .

Redboolc

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Bar-boursvi-

Eight Members

saying "yes" indicated they would
prefer to talk to the agriculture
teacher.
the. check list
Other maiiem
concerned finances and living con- ,
ditions, home and family, health
and physical development, social
and recfeathmal 'activities,
relations,
relations, courtship, sex and marriage, and morals
and religion.

-

Lowell C. Frazier, Corbin. was
chosen president of the Engineering Council in an election last
week.
Other officers chosen were
Oeorge A. Duncan, Auburn, vice
president; Charles 1 White,

Honorary Selects

Study Reveals Teachers
Need Guidance Training
Agriculture teachers should give
a. large part of the vocational and
educational guidance for vocational agriculture students,
to a study released by
UK's Bureau of School Service.
The study was made by "Kearney
Campbell, assistant director of. the
Division of Guidance Service, State
Department of Education.
Tew schools have persons on
their staffs with guidance training who may share these responsibilities with the teacher of
Campbell said.
; However, these agriculture teachers .must have training necessary
to, make them competent for the
job, he added.
The study analyzes how guidance services are . organized in
high schools where vocational
agriculture Is taught; ' Qualifications of the specialized guidance
personnel in these schools, The activities in these spools which may
contribute to guidance, and other
related factors.
a "problem
used
Campbell
check lisf on 563 students in 18
Kentucky 'high schools rto .'determine their problems, icluding those
with. which they were having the
most idlrtfulty.
10 most "prevalent
Six of the
vctatidnal and educational problems "were edncemed "with malting
choices, such "US what to do after
high school, deciding on an occupation, and deciding whether or
not to go to college.
42 .percent of the stu. Almost
dents 'indicated they would like
to talk to some member of the
school staff about some of the
problems they checked) on the list;
52 percent said they, would' not;
and six percent did not respond.
More than 78 percent of those

Frazicr Elected Head '
Of Engineering Council

TEL

4-65-

00

R.0CK,

UtfDSDU

NOW!

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Ui

prfcf

pair for...

* 'V

UK Profees or Comment

"Agriculture Is Ireland' main
! Industry,"
safer-ODwight Scath
of toe UK Dairy Department.
Dc, Bcath spent the school year
165859 at the University College
, Dublin where he taught animal
r.

:

breeding.

moat hnportaat
claa of llTeatork," Dr. SeaXh said.

"Moit af them arc dairy ahort- -

horn, or what we hi

America. c&I!
aoilMng hortruntav
graas to fatten
"The Irish,- j thela livestock because
Ireland U
not a grain, , producing country.
The do not hare corn because
weather is not' bot enough,"
; the
he said.
According to Qr. SeaCh, Ireland'!
;
mala dairy product, is 'butter. He
average Irishman
i said; that the
consumes about 40 pounds of butter
a year. The rest U exported to
!

uc

;

England.

'

t

PSI Initiates
New Members
f

Marine Corps officer selection
aqrd by the International Educa- team, headed! by Captain J. F.
tional' Exchange Program, aald Meyers, Jr., will visit the UK camthe University CUtu. Dublin la pus Nov. 11 and- 12, to Interview
the onfy acbopl la Ireland thai, Uiulcxgraduatos Interested in a
grants a degree In general
ci
Marine Corps commission.
A

Tobacco Chemists
Meet Set At SUB

The 400th Training Regiment In
Lexington has announced there are
openings for a select number of
Junior officers.
All units meet weekly. Officers
and men earn retirement points
and a full day's pay for each- two
The team will be in the SUB hour drill period.
The college Is the largest of the
three branches of the National' and-- will offer three courses to The regiment is a part of the
Interested meij:
University of Ireland.
100th Training Division, and Is
The school is rather old fash1. Freshmen; and sophomores en commaadedi by IX CoL Harold R,.
ioned compared to ours, he said. rolled lm the
Platoon Leaders Class Blnkley.
"Most of the buildings have no attend; two stmmrr training ses- -'
Companies of the regiment meet
;
Central heating.
in or near Lexington. Regimental
stofto of six weeks each at Quantl-c-o,
According U Dr. Seaih the Irlah
headquarters meet on Monday,
Ya. '
aiodoal haa ossJy oja examination '
night at 1051 Russell Cave Pike.
2. Juniors attend one twelye-woa. .year; Tbe exams are glveq In
Col. Blnkley said interested ofcourse, at Quantlco. ,
ficers, should contact him on.
either Jtinei A&fast er 8eptenibr
"I- - dldp't Bee this,: . Dr. Sealbl
Monday night. '
said. "I coulda't tell if my students-wer- e .' 3; Seniors and graduates attend
officer candidate course
getting anything from. njy. a
after-coleg- e
graduation.
lectures.
"There is very little stress placed . There Is also a program available
on a student's attending class. The for wcenrn. Additional Information
faculty, feete thai 11 a student. may be obtained from the team.
doesn't keep up that's his tough
ltfck,H he said.
Dr. Seath aald the aveaxge-lris- h
stvdent knofra a lot about America.
They see An er lean-- aooviea, listen
to American mpslc, and the news
papers carry a lot of; American
aews, he aald.
Dr. Beath, whose trir wm

qoh

-

agrl-cultnr-

-

"Ottle art their

.

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Oct. 28, l59-- 3

Marines To Visit Officers Needed
Campus NovAhl2Hy Reserve Unit

On Irish Agriculture
,

i

3

i

.

"

f

!

-

ak

.

Thirteen is the magic number
for the tobacco chemists' research
conference to be held in the Blue
Orass room of the Student Union
Building this week!
Thirteen states will be represented and the convention is the
13th annual meeting of the organization. The first meeting on Thursday
at 9 am will have UK President
Frank O. Dickey as welcoming
speaker for the delegates.
JUL the
FHdajr aeadoa, begin.
ning at 8:40 "A stud of the History of the Use of Tobacco" will

''

be discussed by the group.

themahaa been selected for
the two day session.
No

ten-we- ek

it PAYS to ADVERTISE

.

Pbl Sigma Iota, national romance languages honorary, in- -.
ltiatrd 15 new members last week
in the CTJB.
They are Anne Armstrong, Dr.
Calvin Evana, Harriet - Hill, Virginia- Ch'ee, Jean Ooulett, Harriet

Hill, Ann May, Judith McEh-oy- ,
Audrey Kerr, Barbara Franchey,
Joy Ormsby, Nancy Plgg, Patricia
Sumner, Joan Stewart, Belle Ward,
and Ramona Williams.
New pledges are C. Brace Fitch,
Barbara Harkey, Nancy Jones,
and Molly Ryland.

Songster.

Civil Engineers
Hear Dr. Shaver

:

1

uu a

u

Dr. Robert E Shaver was the
guest speaker, at the weekly meeting of the freshmen civil engineering class.
He spoke on the history of the
College of Engineering and discussed the type of stuednt now
enrolling In engineering.

LITTLE MAN ON. CAMPUS

x

Tzsb

far.
?

"V

iii

i"

fWY

FOR A

mim

PRAwlNG TEST

RUGGED

mm

A

mmmm

ill

tOVPOW
1

CLASSIFIED ADS

POPULAR

FILTER

PRICi

S

DUAL FILTER
tlun

WANTED

FOR SALE

FOR

SALE

1958

trade. Phone
FOR SALE

1953

drive. Phone

For sale or WANTED Ride to Lafayette. Indiana
2204t or place thereabouts, this weekend. Indianapolis, Chicago.
Contact Donna
or extension 2273. 2703t
DeSoto. 3 door, fluid Lawson.
220x
Lloyd.

.

FOUND

Chevrolet. Tour door,
radio, heater. Good condition. Priced FOUND Two
pair of glasses. One
and day after 5:30 p.m. glass's case. One leather key case with
licbt. Call
2803t keys. Sent to Dean's office from math,
department. Dean of Men's Office. 2803t
FOR SALE

1953

FOR

Men

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171)701

U 7 iU'U L

* Legal Robbery
No man of sane judgment, unless
. he is bound to his task by an
bond, is going to permit
an oj)jxrtunity of more prestige, responsibility, and most important-mon- ey
to glide past him without
considering it seriously. We would
' rail him foolish, in fact, if he let it
un-frangib- le

escape.

The imminent resignation of Dean
of the Graduate
School should be calculated in this
light; it is an opportunity that we
do not exject him to refuse, and
rightly so. It is one that will probably mean huge dividends, educationally and financially, for him.
Whether Dean Spivey decides to
go to the University of Tennessee or
whether hie is actually considering
another institution doesn't matter
particularly; the truth of the siti
uation is that the University is losing
another of its distinguished educators,
one that has gained the respect of
the UK populace as well as the state
of Kentucky.

Herman Spivey

--

But the fact that Dean Spivey will
resign is not what is so dreadful to
us. To lose one educator is not an
incident that should instill great apprehension. But to add another
educator to the multitude of such men
(and women) who have migrated
from the University to other institutions during the past few years is
alarming.

It
job to gain the
title "distinguished." Only a few UK
staff members are bestowed this honorable dhtinrtion each" year; There
is - admittedly some ; good, natured
,

;

.

r

he

Now the congress has voted to meet
only once every two weeks; with the
decision, the assemby has clamped
another cover over its effectiveness
and organization, since the administration largely takes care of the students' problems while SC is disbanded during the
period.
If student government which never
has been too strong at the University
is going to survive through its cur
two-wee- k

around five.
Meanwhile, other states are wont to
reach out their hungry fiand and
clutch our educators. They don't
seem to feel particularly guilty or
chagrined about it. They have the
revenue and the appeal of better
facilities and a better educated public.
But, where is the University, our
other state schools, 'and our high
schools while this legal robbery is
going on? Is Kentucky, now rankeel
something like 48th in education
among the states, even preparing the
g
loot for them and
them
f
to openly burglarize
our educators?

"You'll have to increase your weights, sonny
you ever get to my strength."

boy9

before

The Readers' Forum

then-allowin-

us-o-

Doesn't thit xnake

usr

guilty, too?

rent

has to shake off. the
shackles of outside influence which
is dictating how it is to be run and
what is to be discussed.
Until it does, the students may as
well go unrepresented.
dilemma,-i- t

Kernels
Fires With 'Slurry' Combat
Daredevil Aviators Mud
Did you have a hard time interpreting this headline on Page 3
of ye terday's Kerne If If you didn't,
you're somewhat of an imaginative
genius; if you did, you're normal.
Actually, for clarification, the headline should have read;
Daredevil Aviators Combat,
Fire With 'Slurry' Mud
The headline was set incorrectly
and none of our staffers caught the
mistake on page proofs before the
paper went to press. It was a case
where the obvious mistake was overlooked, just as was the unique spelling of doctor (docter) on Page 5.

of Kentucky

k

Box Neuurk, Editor

Stewart Hedcer,

Sport Editor

Paul Zimmerman and Carols Martin, Assistant Managing Editor
Dick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographer
Alice Akin, Society Editor
Bob IIcrndon, Hank Chapman, and Lew King, Cartoonist
Beverly Cardwell, Circulation
Perry Ashley, Business Manager
Paul Dykes, Advertising Manager
Stuart Coldfarb and

Wenninger,
Staff Writer: Jerry Rlngo. Jim Phillips. Bobble Mason, Linda Hockenemlth. Robert Byers. Ann
George Smith. Robert Perkins. Edward Van Hook. Rod Tabb, Lawrence Lynch, Juna
Mary
Margaret Cope hart, Al Royster, Jan
'Bob
Harris Beverly Cardwell, Johnson, Bob I'raser, Emajo Cocanougher, Berryman,Tearing, Jobe, Hulker,
Michele
Pat
Mi'Jer Herb Steely, Norrt
Curtis Smith. John IlUwater. Garnett Brown. Richard Hedlund. Chrlsta flnley, Allen Travis,
Sua McCauley. PbU Cox. Robert Radlord, Beverly Pedigo, and Maxlna Catea.

WEDNESDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Mereda Davis, Newt Editor

MMMBMMMM

MM

--

Entered t the Post Office at Lexington. Kentucky as second claw matter nader tb Act of March 3, 1879.
Published lout times a wet-- during the regular nhool year eaoept holiday! and tumi.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Bob Anderson, Managing Editor

v.

t

count of "distinguished" professors
and administrators who have left UK
in the past four years numbers

The Kentucky Kernel
UNrvERsnr

"

.

It is therefore doubly hard to keep
in this state educators who naturally
are thinking about advancement; the

The equalizing of faculty vote with
student representation on the Executive .Committee stands out as the
principal example; the politicians of
SC are obviously not trusted enough
to decide even what should be brought
up on the floor since each item is
prearranged by a committee that
works under cover.

--

But, unfortunately, the University
is caught perennially in the squeeze
of a political vise when such important items as salaries and appropriations are to be doled out to our
educators. The constitution even has
threatened to do irreparable harm.

Our Unrepresentative S C
Since lastyear's fradulent elections
and the chaos that has existed in
Student Congress, a stout hand of
ascensorship has been laid orr-t' the
sembly which has resulted in
domination of administration ideas
over student ideas.

i

,

jealousy among some staff members
over it. But the benefits of being a
"distinguished" UK staff member are
not always great prestige. The number of these noted professors and administrators who have taken jobs in
other states and at other institutions
is increasing rapidly and with greater
momentum. Other state colleges are
suffering the same problem.

v.

;

"

Rex Bailey, Associatt

to him in civilian, life. vAIl-- lie" needs
to know about1 English carTfoe learned
To The; Editor:,
by watching TV:, So for. a year, the
Ah, the hounds are baying, in
.average student goes to, English, clas,
general, one. does not bark back at barly
passes infantile tests to avoid
one's heels, but when pack of the