xt7mpg1hk129 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7mpg1hk129/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1957 journals ky_farm_home_science_v1_8_num_3_3_3_summer_1957 English Lexington, KY : Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington. This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Kentucky farm and home science. Special progress report. v.3 n.3 summer 1957. text Kentucky farm and home science. Special progress report. v.3 n.3 summer 1957. 1957 2014 true xt7mpg1hk129 section xt7mpg1hk129   5 v‘     4   ->*1‘· ·g:‘»i*‘;V Aj; ‘   JW.)   1   ";1.   'T   .;:. EQ A V   .; * GY.   l   P`   :. N l
x ·* -- .
g- .· A A 4 >. ·
  A 4 _ _ - Volume  
a 4 A     VA . J   AV  V_  4 V V A_ Number 3
V   A-   A 4. V .A / Summer 'I S
ggk `I . · _ A A ’ _
yi. V   .;E·. -A ~. '4_ A ' . A -
iii 2 ‘ " . ~ V .
\ rv . _~· `  anx   > vi; _. l` V `         ` _ A   V . _ `
5.h,r . _ { A AA   —· _ 4 .   A, VA A I
  A ’{4A 4 4* `V 4 ’     ` ‘  `·} *· A “`:
{ A: i · E' V_       F AA  A A ‘  YM A
\;‘ I ` ·· Ai, vv 4 ‘  gbfy · =- - =  " A- > _ ~" ` {-·¢‘ » _ x ··¥`
.4 ; . · » ~ v· · A A A..A   AAAAAAAAAAA . 4   4 —   A -
s · 4 x   A ;=   V““ ‘»**·   =*-V;V=· -   V e·`‘ >A V. . ’ .` "·»  EEZ.:-. > ‘ 1 ..4 . ’ *· ` A   ·
- ¢"’ " ,; · ~1    --·» * " 4V 4*- · " .' A ·‘A /
M4] _V   IF . · { V {A 24_;~°%A;;.    42;*; mq--   _ A  
m   . " ·   Q`.   A       - *- wx *-F ` ‘
¥, Ki _ A   ( QI.) 4;; ' Am   AA_,\A_?.·     .v; _ _ I  .1; M. 1
"~ * ,.. V"*·, _. " .4 ‘·_ fw}   `..·;‘"“A ’A I ’     *   - ` ·.~ { ·. 134*
\` `· .·, —A Qin A A v. A .-cx :5 , 4  Axe    r xy R} · 1, 4 ..¤
  A   A _ _~_   .4 , _A ..A_ { ug N ..5; _  __A ;.   r_._¤ 5_,@_;3! \ \
I N »;;}t Q I ·.-_`/Ii` A" li`- / :44 xyla :!w,‘ jg, Q Ti H   { L. _A. si-, ti _ ·
wi']? -‘ I b A   ‘_ Af- f E. -··· 4 ·*      » ’   · A   · ‘ ‘ DOCtOI'S
41‘ ~ M -· _·y. ~·__.  ·~.: . I A ·     *~ ·  'riig 4.4-; ‘;_ ·.· .
ia.-H; U'. " 2 V .> ‘ " ·*  `     -4  °i~;F·'1'“°9'·"‘·"?F
. QA - ` J . ‘   '%i‘ - » "'A V
LV`} ’ "*: V• V` ‘ V: ` V       V V 7   4
# V _ AA V4 .._A ~ 4A .... ._*_     » ` ' <. .
M! V5   ‘ - " 4;7;, ’ _  ·¥_.;,,. .i*V   PX W kx   i4 Rdlllfdll
* V · . » r ·; -. A 4- 44    * .
» in   W.   A A _qA(§+§;A,:’{,·_ *A  542 _     {  _ __ _. 4 4
‘ Pjgi A   ` z .52- - ' A, A"A   " ·   *°. ·x L   r . '
V ~     4* 4-wév-V     ·»,_4   *5%. ·  4‘ '*'-i U b . .
\ . 4,}- 4 _ #$.4. .4   A Af A Art- :4)./?%§.¢ _   `égy  .1;.. · v_ I' CIIIZGUOII
A V ._ 4-- }A?·*··. .`_;A. "   _,  _.. ‘r A_
'Q " » A " V A»" ‘§` `ify,   -4 by   Vg 3,; ki" `AYA · I
AV , 4 A A   t~··’;  ¤·*A~. < ~   VV ·A .4.»;.;-  ,.;»V*A---1* ·<‘ I ’ · .=..» A. ;.  - ‘   4   · A. . A - . . . .
· {MAK ·   —;’?:; A   ? y.;   .... `    AA; ‘      - ?¥*7`44.Y·     AA .4 A A * · A  V`  A
  WA: ;. .4 , ’_g§  _A.A . AAA. A A..A A ......... A .4.   _{_.·.»     _._V; =   ·Y_. {  
-1.);. .·`;·— A {AA, .·=V ’ ".4;'   ..A.   .. .==¤» »L;A .¢  ¥’ZZi‘i.».@??;°i€°V;;4A  · ' .
·»· ·’ I- · A     `  A- A.  .·‘*     V` f A   ’   V· * V· - - 4- -»   44 4. - . A
Lrg ·   ’ ’ A » ’ *‘  ".=‘§<=z*z·.$;j;*;?=*-;€‘?¢V‘¥°A  4.  ~· .  A.A.  ‘·>»" -4; ~.:-A . A    : .. -
          V     ’A‘;   ‘V‘'V    :’:   `
Iv A` {NA. at _'  Vyg?4 ‘»   . -.4;.4;   · 4 A   4  A»   V .. .v _'  
A ` i A , I '» (W Atw .K. 'zgy     .     AAA.;  A f   ` ` .- A4
  * ;   19- I  °’ A-=·     ··—-’ ? T. VAQZ    Ai;   ’ ’ ·-·.—   . A. 5
‘» V `      A> .4=-~A~      V  V 4   4   V z '" 1
V     . A    3*  - ...A  =-· ; .A...·-=     -··__···   .4·4=-     A   4 · A  {   4 4 A V ·A
  -··==       ·A...   AAAA AA  •-4-?-=- ‘‘-‘‘ -¥ -—·-:   ‘· ’ A.A’     = 4 A A 2
#;@?3K   ..,.A   _,   =-·-  Q 4 ·A · A 4 1 A. A AMA AAAA 7.__ `
—¢   'V··:;;~~_»,A...... A. - ’ ’ ' V ' ;’ ‘ ' .A A A ”” Y
4 44 .-.. .   A.  ..... . my Aj.....— ,~. . 4 z   A A;
    I A ‘e—»m AAA.,,,_,_ _ · H:"`*~·»-. I     f A ` I   M AM · I
" `      AA, -’ - »A ` `’`’'   V  44 44 4      ’ V ”`    _ 4 ‘
   4_A-:4 -·.A. A 4   ; y       A A   ...A A
  AA,_‘   A_``_- ` ·   *`AVA.° ' °  QM"   *'€*-.é ”   AA   V    A A ·¢ AA _ A_,__l [ · V   "“ ’`'°‘ ‘ V*. ·
  " —-·- 4 4 ‘· yi ‘ A. A v_A;yA   X ·  ` M,   M  /_  A U )  
’ A```A.   4 “ A V » 4 ’`V·   '   L ' ‘“ ` '  rim-¤ .   V '  
  ·.··*   ` 4 “`T**¤V ’   . ~’i* 4   4 A A A--• ° `X  =.A   . 4   A   ' °  A: * ‘
4; A.A.     ··‘ `   - 4 #67 *`l, 4 AA‘  .3 A ° ' 4-     Ay ”
·· I;. . :,g__.,_.'__;A _» _ _ A ·<‘ ' .,,. -   _ . ' » 2,:}* A 'V   [ ` . _.y·4  ’.¢·  4 .
,¥ b_4;jf;.A _.AA.4   ’“s4 ,   · A { · A -A  V .  V V O YL ._~   A A   \A,.   4 ?&AA;~_,,AA ,, _ A
I    · ~ A { A   " 4   .25 Q fb. ,,. ‘ -“‘ ‘ ‘ {   ' A
    =·4     * i V   V ~ . E14 · \'- A4   A·.   . Q! V
44 z`   ;i`.4A’“ '4 A A ’ -- ' ‘ -A . A V A ' V 2 li -
A 44.44 4     ‘=-‘ im? ‘‘444 rz?4-3--:14 ~..4     -V ·V AA A A A ' ‘   " Q, ~ V- A   { A A; I 4·A-
»A4me.·4»?   _ ·:¤.¢;¤:V   :>A A. ;4 A J ‘ I A A W   A     . - ( · f ·V
  A4’_4 Aw A   _. .,;-;-44- V ,V  ~.   A       V A4   2- . 
w ,  A.   »‘:-==é?.é·.A_:AA   gf', 5 . · V " " 4 i; * 4— _A <   `L _ 4 ; ¤“ · ',   ' ' V
   ‘  ’V   ef-4A;   V  A V‘   V' A V [*4* ‘·· A   ’ All i ’
‘   _A  =»;<*  .._... A-    -4; w A. ' V- --.,44   A ·A -"’ V . ~ - V' I ( V ‘
>A _· .:_   A...;{,v u   •§,_,y ;A &.;_Ag_· $,4 ·_Q A   _, I -· · lg Ay`,. • 4. . I 4. » A
4* 3 é`  =‘»   *g¥Z$f2Q}¤»-%•€<’*€’**;'§f"£’$’>-»·;4w¥¢’V*%144*'*?§-V.4:* "’ ‘ .   V — ..,.. *   ( . i 4 -   . 4
  *4. =.__&,:..2;A·.A.*$3:.,.-iii-    _ ~ 4 AI   _   A  A _  Q A      
$6*} . A;, A..4V- -4j’.=‘     ·V?{,;;· ·$*A’ "  A-*=·t‘   ·· ·¤» - -4 _ AA · - A A -‘ . V A A-I A . { 2 =
REQ? .     7-` 4   4' ;·~A AAAA A V · 4 .   _ _;A _   · A- h —

 / .
I AND (ZZ/ZL? " 
` . _ i eg
Volume 2, Number 3 ................. Summer 1957 -
A report of progress published quarterly by the Kentucky Agricultural I
Experiment Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington `
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT Material appearing in this publication may be
STATION reproduced without further permission, provided 7 `
FRANK ]. WELCH ................................................ Director that full acknowledgment is made of the source * '
W. P. GARRIGUS ................................ Associate Director and that no change in headings or text is made _
H. B. PRICE and WII.I.IAI»I A. SEAY .... Adm. Assistants withgut approval by the aurhop
]_ ALLAN SMITI-I ................................ Agricultural Editor Address Correspondence about articles in this pub.
Kgntucky Farm and Home- Sgigngg lication to either the authors or the Department of
iesmr c. DUNCAN ................................................ Editor Public lufcimcricu aud Educational Aids. Expcri- .
OmNNE JOHNSON & BETTY F. EIIEniIAIIDT Asst. Editors lll€lli $l?lil0l`l Blllldlllg UIllV€fSl£Y of K€I1tl1Clbt¤i¤wdffr(»m the 1912,
· · - ;. , ` , , , an 9 6 e itions o tie American.
_).x, Of Kentucky are d1sadVantag€OllS1y Sltuated relatwe Medical Directory, published by the American Medical Asso-
mm ciation, Chicago, 111.; and publications of the U. S. Bureau of
, -. 1Social Science Analyst, Agricultural Marketing Service, the Census.
. USDA. 5U. S. Public Health Service, Division of Public Health
y + 2Associate Rural Sociologist, University of Kentucky. Methods, Standards of Adequacy in tlie Supply of Medical
_ 3This study is a cooperative endeavor of the Department and Public Health Personnel and Facilities \Vashin ton:
. H
rt. of Rural Sociology, Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, 1942), processed; quoted in Frederick D. Mott and Milton I, _
University of Kentucky; and the Farm Population and Rural Roemer, Rural Healtlz and Medical Care (New York: McGraw-
Life Branch, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Hill Book Co., Inc., 1948), p. 155.
 u¤¢¤r 1,000
._ [
- @ |•OOO"l·499 Number of Persons lOl-ll   
~   ·¤¤¤—·.¤¤¤ l *’°' '°“’*‘°‘°"  
’++++ · —;   i Z  °’.;1‘j”YQi
_ &i§§§§§§§i§§§§§ 2,000 und over lND‘   - P  t" 4-is  i`
, i"'   'Y g ***4* i s
A & Principal Medical Service Center _ H _  E V'U;`Fl; i it afs: ) . E - 5; OHIO; .
v·· ,     M" f  .
-;-:-:-: ’   _ ?i§§€§.?l;i$§§??‘;f      ’ * t§.:lt~¤
,, A 2-3+2- I. I-2-Z-1-2-.     _____,   hy LQ}, ::1= ·<·: gg- ‘;?.£t.':*.;: ,
` ;ZgZ;Z;Z _;:;:;:;:;:;:;:_ :;:;-;:;:; :::::1:5;:; ;;§;·,;~ `;_···{_r;-;;__;  " '   W.VA-
X P __j*j°j*_‘E¤E;E;E5E5E;E;E3E§E§:j _E§E§E§E¤? _`”$ ??§§; Eiiis?ilh‘?‘iE¥¥L%$;-Siiiii? -   __  
 .       .  
N ILL  _.;:5:;;'._$€?_;_    i%‘??‘     $· ,.;,;;.;:§€i§E§§;§&;:z¤;;;§§§§§;:;..
     _-_-_ .,, ..., t u::::::· 1:;. ·:::;z: _ 5:;:, ·:i:¥:·:·:¥:·t¥:·:·‘·ti:¥:*:·:·:·:·:TZi‘¥Z
ei, , :;:;:;:5-· ·· ·-·-·_:gw;tf§pg; ;.;.j·  ¤¤"=¤¤ ¤¢2s2g2z¤$ ;=_;;;;;;;;·§_;t;;,     ...,.,,.§=i¤%¤€=5aizggzgaigs§a§2§2§2§2§2§2§2i2;;;.__
· .       `igl Q `’`i¢   `’°;" €`TT`$"€'TT “‘"Z‘°'` \ ,.
~ ··-:-:-:-:·:- .2 ,.._ ·::i:.;::·.:cw ‘ :E=E:==$·"·`*=;§=2rE=E=2=E¤E=EErE=1¤;=:·;·;rE¢E¢E;¥=§·"" "‘
L   . -L  M   if   “   “*Z§;2§i€§"   ;¤;2§%§E§§§ii2§;;r;?€§€iiilgili.i???i¥$$i?EEQEQEQEQii€i?$$€?€?°"’" A VA'
’ ILL- ZEZEZE- W ”"i‘;f"""’“· ' .::'  ’¥?%§?  -—@.;.  
i ¤ ` .-...::3;,*       ll`-  ).’g·:%r; ·1_•yzi    
"' \·.. *·¤:E: ‘: .·¤:¢?> ‘ \¤=·.=·=·——~‘~·'=-‘%¤§§f ·-  ·; ;   §pl'ir¤é¤r ,  
J   l )‘¥:::? K. `i'v·“"  .-sat-L -... -» · -A—·  we  ·*~· I * ,  
;_ T ·• .;:5;:- :·.t?· -:-:;_.;:;:;. aq»=»q;sv»tt .;.m-_ BO,,Q;,·- L!*$°°“  a;_¤_·1:,·e:·=-·~+.;    .  at
•\· :::::gAD}JE5·_•   {A"  “rAm; ·~;.-i:4:;§ .. l' ¤ $! '·|  ai.;     V
r » M0 " °*°§*‘*° i:·¤*¤’?’?:?’;  V M·¤:¤L€$¤<>¤¤ ·  ‘ A" __
' Q  §:;._.§:§_._._._._._.`:¥:¥:¥:§:§:§ ` ' "` " ` ‘ - ` """"""
` We a t3,¤a.q¤..,. =E=§=E=E= E¤E=E=E¤E=Er4
L
" This map shows the division ol the state and portions of in each area in 1955. As a state, Kcntut·ky`s population-
i_ adjoining states into "medica1 service" areas, as well as doctor ratio is 1,139.
the ratio of the number of persons to each "activc" doctor
J • ·
\ KENTUCKY FARM AND HOME ScraNc1;—SU>1xn;1i 1957 3
O
7~__

 ..   A -2 A ll *3 ‘  .~ ‘ K
Gr  V M, ¤.~/, -.7~’ .',(Q_ l  r' . V _ ,
A.  ’ A ·‘   A @4 ¥’§°"fY7.   ·-,  ‘= Z $‘·}·'_‘· ,     . A *4.- l
&·_ gp  at ,‘ i.,   J   ,4  'nZ,d,•*,*i’{ X t   , _ ·
~' ."’ “   , Ji"/·.~ g   -,.1**:*   "•'f ` __ A; ,,.-    if _      ia ,. T~     , J·
  .   (K     A       ` L -A=~-=       »     · _
  ,      i2;"f’   ;~      ‘ J - ‘i1 `&·`
. ‘ A   A   A -
»   :~    iE4 - · “  ‘`i’2             `SA
¤*”" ’ . .tA. c , . v_,,4   A  ``,`     £;" s I`°:lE    ’‘”    iE:‘;‘`   e   _.   ·-
if  ’  ' Q. t   '   '’' ‘    _A A _ __ _ "—   E ’*·f  
M e l , __VI   W VV t   Ivz, V _,l-, A V V _____v.   ·=AA.   ’·vAAAA Z   ,,__;   +• 4
*  ?P?f* ;~Z<’>" A   V· ` A " ` ` ·   °-‘· i   '‘‘`'‘ ‘   ‘`‘°    
*?   ,~A¤   A  _A .   ‘»=’V‘‘ “`:AA  A *·· V _   '·`· · A     *7
· ··_   ’ * T »‘;r·»A·‘·»e >»   ·A,A A zz * -{A-=,.r,   · . -» . .A ·» -   ‘*· * A   AA Z, ,
    IJ-=i·it.t1 .A·‘‘         ’“ ···* H I _ { _ V V V ll VVVV   VV       i. ii ·_   __V_ l   Q i
  _A,7     A[;VA.    VV.=’   =v·   ’··:‘AAA   A-i-‘.    AA~· ~     I »   '`“‘’     ;=V   _       ~~    ‘‘‘  s   AAA.     ef
Fig. l.- More knowledge of Kentucky’s rainfall character- irrigation would likely be most profitable. Records are _ l
istics may help to determine those areas where supplemental available for an average of 66 years, "”
BETTER PLANNING OF CROP PRODUCTION MAY RESULT FROM .. .
K lyR°flIStdy  
Ollllllfj { RID 3 ll or
Variation in amount and frequency during the growing _
season influences possible need for supplemental ""<` l
irrigation in various sections of the state _ tif
By GENE A. BRAMLETT and DANA G. CARD Grant Dam in Boone county. During the ]une-]uly-
llamfall in Kentucky is fairly uniform compared Augugtbpenod tg; gtgté ageraiégas li P élgzglés tif]
with the wide variations which exist across the nation. VME; Btgveen Tu mc ei Z; damn O   mc _€S ·
¥Vithin the state, rainfall varies from season to season, at evt nam` 6 gener? um gfmy Waih Or ta?_m_ _ _
from year to year, and from place to place. Moderate Cgeagzllllsi 6 migmge Him; inovgug SO? begs {O3]
fluctuations do not greatly affect farming activities, t € 10 _wF2'lfuU?1gt]€t ep eng 427 Cho er I?§;1?h’
but when the variations are unexpectedly extreme they iwemgc Iam S bof t G Sta? gas M lgcigsf Wé; 6 Hg?
can upset the best-laid farming plans. Such was the Mgcst aglggmf Emg TCGWG ai aytc 1; fav]? _
case recently, when three straight years of drouth COuuty’ `_ 5HCh€S' 1   genera ’ Wes Gill neg ug y L
caught farmers overstocked in several areas of Ken- aims mcege t 6 ug est average mm a urmg __
tucky. Excess rainfall in western Kentucky during the t GSB mont S` ei
early part of the 1957 growing season delayed plant- Difference in Leeqrien *‘
ing in several areas. Current studies are attempting The accompanying graph (Fig. 2) shovvs the rne_ _
to discover just hoyv much variation can be expected dieni urnounts of rainfall received during August at ’
during various periods of the growing season at num- 24 locations in or near Kentuclde having the longest "
erous locations in Kentucky, and to state the results neriods of record The average length of record Wes 44
so that farmers can use them in planning crop pro- 66 veers, ranging from 40 years ut Mayfield to 94
duction. For example, knowledge of rainfall fre- years at Lexington The stations are arranged in order. 9*
quencics and amounts could help determine whether of the median amount of rainfall in August In gen_ we
supplemental irrigation would be profitable at various eral, stations vvitli the lovvest rainfall are located in l ·
locations m the Stuff" the western part of the state and those with the highest
Average Rainfall Tendencies rainfall in the southeastern part of Kentucky. The M.
Dllrlllg l»\l)l·ll and A/ItlyV il] il rcccllt 22-y€;_ll· pgl·lOd_ 1 T.l]C II'lCd1illl is .21 pOSltl01'l 8\'€I'1lgC   (ll\'ld€S tllii S€l'lG$ ([+4
at- state tl\'Cl'ill.[t’ martin was vs; r..ChtAS and mea of ¤¤¤*e1“ Hem me aw Pee- O¤¤·‘·¤’* of the   hud r
_ _ __ _ _ _ _ more ram than the median amount, and one—half of the years .;»1,
from 5.54 inches at Mt. Sterling to 6.50 inches at had less rainfall than the median
• (
4 Krwrucxr FARM AND Horns SCIENCE——SU)I1\IER 1957 {
F

 INCHES during August. Similar readings may be made for
‘ _` 7 each of the 24 areas studied.
if 6 Q, To illustrate another use of the diagram, notice that
"     Franklin-Russellville (station 5) has a wider range
1,____. 5   -···· ·‘      about the median line, as shown by its corresponding `
_ 4 .··'·-···"' n Q1 and Q3 values, as compared with Lexington (sta-
le   tion 6). This indicates that August rainfall in the
L. 3 _,.__/ F ranklin-Russellville area lluctuates more widely than
( 2 {_` /;·\/·\ /,.____¢""°"'·-W Q1 at Lexington. In other words, dry years and wet
‘ .»" ' ` years came less frequently at Lexington. _
1
~»
_' O Roinfoll During Growing Seoson
“»·`# I2 2 4 5 6 7 a 9 |O|1 I2 1314I5 I6 |7|819202122232*1
smnom Numara Rainfall tendencies during August do not neces- `
or Fig. 2.- Minimum and maximum amounts of rainfall re- Sully iedieete what happens during other menths ef _
__ ceived 25, 50 and 75 percent of the time at various loca- the growing season. In Table 1, the state is arbitrarily
`L tions in Kentucky during the month of August. divided into four rather large areas. Average Q],
fl'; :1oTslxgvlgEnungatlitl-:il1iEioitg`ri;»iclli;ill?Etianitgilltivglatlii 3?Ml;g£l:::é median and   values have been determinedifrom
.—T_, Siege“g5l&,,i;E3:;iinS,l;§)}iei,li;,`ll;,:;·§ev,;i1ii,;ii.i¥I$, Dgiligekieggiei diagrams similar to that of Fig. 1, but for different
clnnatl; 14Lr·rmeettm; 1%L0uisa-Catlettsburgg 16-Letfonnetu-st. menths ef the growing $onSon· It should be noted
**** 13332 1ftL”r€1aE.X2Hl‘§"2$$35232‘J.'3{°2ii‘il¥11’.2;ll&¥s“é¥Et§`C}Il1Z{3`ZI that the Qi. median end Q3 figures in the table are
, - Size;-nsburg-Eubank; 23—Williamsburg-Mlddlesboro; 24—Berea-Beatty- rough averages of a few somewhat typical values in
i the area. Their interpretation is the same as the
iw median amount of rainfall received during August Valuosln Fig 1· _
4 » fiillged from 2.64 inches at Cairo, Ill., to 4,.30 inches Dnnng MnY» lnno» IUIY and AngU$t 2W€1`€1g0 1‘€l1l1-
‘ in the Beiee__Beettvville Mee fall, as shown by the median, was greatestlm the
·*+r Lines Q1 and Q3 represent the minimum amounts southeastern part of the state. During April, Sep-
_v of rainfall received 75 and 25 percent of the time, tember and October average rainfall was greatest 111
 ii iespeetivelv In other words, of the total years of western Kentucky. .However, average rainfall 1n west-
7   ieeoids at eaeli location, 25 percent were below the ern Kentucky declined from April through ·October.
.- values Shown by line Q1; 50 percent were below (or ln Southeastern Kentucky average rainfall increased
above) the values Shown bv the median line and 25 from April through ]une and then declined. Although
percent were larger than the values shown by the Q3 Wosfom Koofooky fecewed foloolloly Iofgof amounts _
_ i '_ lime For example, at Lexington (station 6) rainfall of rainfall during the early part of the growing season
was less than 203 inches 25 percent of the time it soon lost itsiadvantage as the season progressed.
1 " " Fifty percent of the time the amount of rainfall was Tho lower hmlt (Q1)> _bo1oW Whloh mmfoo goos
 P between 203 and 450 ioehee Twentv_iive percent oi only 25 percent of the time, was highest in south-
if tl`l€   L€Xl11gtO11 I`€C€1V€C1   11'1Cl.'1€S OI` I1'1OI`€ (COm·;m,g,10,t Pugg 8)
¢¢·
,*1. Table 1.- Approximate median and quartile amounts of rainfall for selected groups of weather stations in or near
Kentuckv‘*’
Meutan   i  
> 7 Month West North Central Southeast Q. Q1 Qt Q;t_Y‘"_ig!;;;; L;
_ N April 3.99 3.18 3.82 3.80 2.75 5.24 2.30 4.21 2.54 4.96 2.77 4.53
May 3.87 3.48 3.73 4.08 2.44 5.62 2.25 4.68 2.58 4.97 3.00 5.41
· » jtme 3.53 3.82 3.90 4.28 2.15 4.95 2.68 4.99 2.85 5.08 3.23 5.47
r ]uly 3.22 3.48 3.88 4.47 2.30 4.61 2.40 4.76 2.66 5.33 3.23 5.74
V T August 3.03 3.36 3.24 4.10 1.77 4.60 2.15 4.62 2.14 4.69 2.78 5.29
‘:' · September 2.87 2.65 2.66 2.56 1.59 4.38 1.65 3.67 1.62 4.04 1,00 4.04
QL October 2.42 2.26 2.32 2.29 1.33 3.71 1.32 3.32 1.18 3.49 1.26 3.52
’*  EiK§§H§t1o }oH.TX1{aTs{>nt1&Q@L
Kentucky: Paducah, Cairo tlllinoisl, Franklin-Russellville, Prince- Kentucky: Middlesboro-Williumsburg. Burnsidtz-Greensburg-Eubnnk,
_/=. ton, and Mayfield; Central Kentucky: Shelbyville—Taylorsville, Lex- and Berea-Buuttyville.
ington, Richmond, and Frankfort; Northern Kentucky: Carrollton-
f Km<*rUc1  C . ` \j —»   g       # `      '_:_,.v A ‘ *·-r'   LL!}     v·
`   ~ A "‘"°'" T`¥=*·· t" " a · .a     -
  K   l I $ _.. l A · A _.       ~-
— ··   ..   Eds '··V`}‘  AA  ‘ *T;"AAiA..T°  st, ,__. — A   A ··‘ ·"— 
  ...—  " I      I  _,,   t C I a;. _
1}  \   *:»`~    ` ` ‘ Q  q`   *:%%. 1 ;   {N -‘
      Q       rt¤    -..` *   -.—.   ·..i.»=¤-».:»     AAAI``  —   i‘’   tri   »   a- (....0. ..,....,t .. °‘
.         _·.. xi   _·_.     ‘“`·; ·   ‘‘·*’         ’=-.. ’ °° · °
r       ·     aa <-\-.     **"·*·*·L·¢··*"* Jr
.... .         I    AA    "
    —   .   i   AA  if    A AAAAA ` ’‘;·.      

 *****5 Pe mic 0* S***t·*m*i¤ei·*·*¤* mt 24 **0*** 'lagldrdy ............................ *557*5 1%;*;.23 ........ .................... *5%%
period, 1952
. »· Q - I . . . . . Muhlenberg ................ 52.5 Letcher ........................ 88.5
nstrucuonal expenditures per pupil in average daily . .
L1v1ngston .................... 59.5 Green .......................... 91.0
+-9. em-·i¤¤¤¤ et S¢h¤¤i» 1953 Bell .............................. 59.5 Adair ..   ..... 91.0
Percentage of total births delivered in hospital Greenup ...................... 59.5 e5t1c7"][]..[]ZZ[...ZZ ..... 91.0
he Percentage of dwelling units with hot mining water, rayict .......................... 59.5 Lawrence .................... 95.5 .
with private toilet and bath, and not dilapidated, 1950 VVhitley ........................ 59.5 Knox ............................ 95.5
» *·* Full value of taxable real estate per capita, 1952 Logan .......................... 59.5 Laurel ..,.,.,,......,........... 95.5
{ Population Per Physician,   Ly0I1 ............................   Cu1T1b€I‘l;-llld .. ..............  
~ *‘ Residence telenhenes Pei- 100 Population Spencer ........................ 64.5 Metcalfe ...................... 95.5
, e Pereentage of seheel census ehildren in average daily McLean ........................ 64.5 McCreary .... . ............... 95.5
attendance at School, 1953 Gallatin ........................ 64.o Lee .............................. 100.0
. . . Robertson .................... 68.0 Powell .......................... 100.0
. e ,, Daily newspapers circulated per 100 population, 1952 Marion 680 Lewis 100 0 .·
. _ Etiwire feitiiitr wie <¢i·iidi<=¤ **¤d¢i 5 rei i·°°° is- Pulaski ..111iQQZfZfIZ[ZKCfZZZZ 6810 175C1.5.{g11L;`"Q§Z§ZZIZfZiZZ‘Z{Zi1959  
et males 20-44 years old, inclusive) 1950 Owen ___,,__,_,___..,_..,........ 73.0 Menifee ........................ 103.0
P9? Capita 1¤€0m€7 1952 Lincoln .............. . ......... 73.0 Monroe ........................ 103.0 _
’*·‘ Percentage of total births delivered by a physician, 1951 Floyd ............................ 73.0 Clinton ........................ 103.0
Percentage of dwelling units reporting central heating Larue .......................... 73.0 Breathitt ...................... 106.0
4 “‘ equipment, 1950 Bath .............................. 73.0 \7Vayne .......................... 108.5 C
X ll pereentage Ol employed Persons engaged in Service ein, Meade .......................... 73.0 Butler ..... . .................... 108.5
Y Pleymene 1950 glzirlan ..........................   Clay   ...........................  
, Ugg .. ......................... . I. l’1lgO I1 ...................... .
‘*r* Below is the ranking Of eOnntieS> beginning with lillackinridge ................   EVo]fe .......................... 111.0
—» these which ai? mst urban ¤¤·=¤idi¤e to the com- H5?..1l11jjj1l1§1jlllijillilljljl 7915 EE`1TEZ§.{g;;;;`fllllliilliilliilliii1213
posite index built from the merger of all the items on Hancock ...................... 52.0 ElllO({ .......................... 116.0
Y *5 the   abOv€_ In reading the table 1·1OtiC€   Sovgn   .. ...... . ...................   _ll1C1{S011 .......... . .............  
V. _r>* Counties   for the Classification urnost urbanis SO each   ..........................     ..... . ................. . ....  
is given e rank of 4; nine counties tie for “ne>> (Or Grayson ........................ 87.0 Owsley .......................... 116.0
least urban), so each has a rank of 116.
2* The Medical Needs of Kentucky
5 '-'$ Ranking of Counties in Kentucky From (Continued fmm Page 3)
1 Ln the “Most Urban" to "lVI05t Rural" according to the number of persons per medical doctor
C L R k C t R k in 1955, Kentucky ranked 40th in the United States,
0I.\I\ BD 01.1h BD _ _ , _
_ Bourlivon ........................ 4.0 UI`11011 .......................... 27.5 with e ratio of 1,139**- New York mnl¤t<>ts
_ _ Oldham ........................ 19.0 Crittenden .................... 44.0 in the United States. Thus, it appears that the situa-
lessamine .................... 19.0 \Vashington. ....