xt7msb3wwp24 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7msb3wwp24/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19681014  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 14, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 14, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7msb3wwp24 section xt7msb3wwp24 Ti
Monday Evening, Oct.

K

MENEL

MTOCECY

The South's Outstanding College Daily

14, 1908

UNIVERSITY

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LX, No. 31

Alumni Group
Studies Kernel
By LARRY DALE KEELING
committee of the Alumni Association met with
the Board of Student Publications in a special meeting Saturday
afternoon to discuss The Kernel.
The committee, set up at the here. The whole plulosophy of the
last meeting of the Executive paper is downgrading to the inBoard said some of the alumni stitution."
Dr. Cifford Blyton, chairman
expressed concern over the content and policy of The Kernel of the Board, told the commitand the direction in which it tee that the Board welcomed an
exchange of ideas.
is going.
h
"We do want a
"It's not our job to tell you
what to do or how to run your paper and I think we have one,"
paper," Frank Ramsey, chairman he said. "There are things wrong
of the committee said. "I want with it but it's not all bad."
to get the facts of the case and
Freedom Difficult
present it to the Board"
He said the facts he wanted
Dr. Lyman Ginger, a member
were who was responsible for of the Board, told the committee
what the paper does; how is is the Board of Trustees and the
financed; who the individuals
Senate have granted complete
were who worked on it and their freedom on the
campus freedom
positions in the chain of com- of speech and freedom within the
mand.
faculty.
"I feel some of the news stories
"This makes it very hard to
have been slanted and some of tie the editor's hands."
r
the editorials shouldn't have been
He said although the Board
in there," he said.
does not always agree with the
The committee is made up of direction The Kernel takes in
Ramsey, a former UK basketball
certain areas, it does not censor
Judge Jim Sutherthe paper.
land of Bloomfield, former Ker"Academic freedom on a uni- nel editor Jack Cutherie. Courier- Journal columnist Joe Creason i versity campus is good, replied.
and Mrs. G. D. Beach of Frank
Ramsey, "but what has the stu
dent done to earn that freedom?
fort.
A

five-memb-

top-notc-

Kernel Photo By Dick Ware

Slfrwitini"iwttr

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Five members of the Alumni Association met with the Board of
Student Publications Saturday to discuss the "content and policy"
0f lhc Kernel. ) Judge Jim Sutherland and Frank Ramsey two
of the five, Betty Cox, editor of the Kentucky Review; Charley
Reynolds, advisor to the Kernel, Dr. Stuart Forth, vice president
for Student Affairs.
(L-R-

Lexington Peace Council
Supports Halstead Visit
By DAHLIA HAYS
Kernel Staff Writer
The Lexington Peace Council
Sunday night unanimously approved the resolution requesting
University Senate approval of the
proposed campus visit of Fred
Halstead, Socialist Workers'

Party presidential candidate. In
another action it also decided to
collect food to save starving Bia-frafrom death.
In addition to the Students
for a Democratic Society (SDS),
which invited Halstead to speak
at UK on Oct. 27, the Peace
Council is the third campus organization to support the resolution.
Hearing Expected
Earlier this week the United
Campus Christian Fellowship
(UCCF) Council and the Community Alliance for Responsible
Social Action (CARS A) announced their support of the proposal, which is expected to be
brought before the Faculty Senate Monday afternoon.
Council member Bill Allison
stated that although "some people on campus will not like his

views," courtesy
should be shown to all the
didates on the ballot.
Is On Ballot
Halstead is on the ballot in
Kentucky and in 20 other states.
Mike Fallahay, SDS spokesman, said that his organization
does not, as The Kernel said Friday, consider Halstead's visit to
UK a test of the University Senate's relevant speech policy.
"We realize the possibility
that it may be a test, but that
is not our purpose in inviting
the eight speakers here," said
Fallahay, referring to Halstead
and seven others who have been
invited to UK by the SDS.
SDS Statement
Fallahay added that the SDS
would issue a statement, probably by Wednesday, to clarify
their purpose in inviting Halstead.
The Peace Council also voted
unanimously to take part in an
anti-dramovement, scheduled
for Nov. 14, by various political
groups across the country.
One proposal was that a Black
(Halstead's)

ft

College Reports Cite

Insufficient Funding
they have long provided citizens
of this country."
Due to budget cuts, many of
these institutions are postponing
desirable expansion in certain
programs, delaying improveport this year, according to two ments and considering steps
which may limit their enrollments
reports released Sunday.
or raise the cost to students, the
The reports, by Dr. M. M. OIR states.
Chambers of Indiana University
The survey warned that it will
and the Office of Institutional become harder and harder "to
Research (OIH) were released by
compensate for years of rethe OIR, a part of the National duction, postponement, and in
Association of State Universities some cases,
neglect."
and Land-CraColleges.
All of the 61 universities
The OIR reported that despite which responded to the OIR survey commented on the effect of
a large increase in appropriations,
budget cuts, emphasizing the "sethe nation's state and land-gran- t
rious threats to quality and edfaced with dangercolleges "are
ous threats to their quality and ucational opportunity that inadeto the educational opportunity quate state support is creating."
Special To The Kernel
"Public higher education still
is not receiving the support it
must have to keep up with rising
costs and demands," in spite of
a record $5 billion in state sup-

speaker be invited to
that day. Muhammad
Ali (Cassius Clay) was one of
anti-dra- ft

UK for

several names mentioned.
In a third decision, also unanimous, the Peace Council laid
the groundwork for a fund drive
which will seek to relieve the
starvation problem in Biafra.
Funds collected in this effort
will be used solely to combat
starvation in that area. It was
emphasized they would not seek
to help Biafra in its struggle for
independence against Nigeria.

Judge Sutherland told the

Board of Student Publications
the committee represents a group
of people wlio want some answers.
"Paying The Bill"
"If we're paying the bill, we
feel like some of the things that
are taking place ought not to,"
he said. "I think you young people ought to realize that without
the taxpayers you wouldn't be

Not Earning Freedom

"The taxpayers are. affording
you that freedom. You're not
earning any freedom at all unless
you're working your way through
scIjooI. It's being earned for you.
You have to be responsible about
this freedom."
Ramsey said that because the
administration allows The Kernel
Continued on Page

8, Col. 1

Derby Nets $500 For Charity
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity's Pushcart Derby weekend
attracted hundreds of participants and observers and earned
over $500 for the Cardinal Hill
Crippled Children's Home.
The money for the charity
was earned through the "Ugly
Man" contest, won by Zeta Tau

the weekend, said Lambda Clii
Alpha "feels we have more than
just a social role. The main purpose is to help. We wanted to
give some money to charity, and

tliis is the way we cltose to do
so.

It was the 15th annual Pushcart Derby sponsored by the
fraternity.

Alpha sorority's entry, Gary Gab-barpresident of Sigma Phi
Epsilon fratenuty.
Each vote for an "Ugly Man"
candidate cost a penny, and the
Creek organizations raised funds
for votes through various prod,

jects.

A dance was held Friday night
as a part of the weekend festivities. Profits from the dance also
go the the Children's Home.
The pushcart races in front of
the administation building,
highlights of the seek end, were
won by Theta Chi fraternity and
Chi Omega sorority. Triangle
fraternity had won the event
several years in a row before
this year's upset.
Linda Lockard, a member of
Pi Beta Phi sorority was selected
Derby Queen. Her candidacy was
Sigma
six) n sored by Kappa
fraternity.
Twenty-eigh- t
fratenuties and
sororities participated in the
weekend events. The two puslr-car-t
winners will be lionorary
losts during next year's competition and will be ineligible
for competition.
oiked
Ken Foree, who
closely with the preparation for

M

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Kernel Photo

Proud
Pushers

Dy Dave

Herman

Proud members of Theta Chi fraternity's
Lambda Chi Derby pushcart team lo'J
aloft the trophy they captured in competition with 14 other fraternities Saturday. Hie
pushcart victory highlighted a wetienJ hrt
netted over $500 (or charity.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Monday, Oct. H, 1968

Movie Review

Movie Depicts Society Vs. Arts
of course, honest and orignal

By GARY REXROAT

Movie Critic
Sit back ladies and gentlemen
and prepare yourselves for a
journey such as every movie producer this side of "The Graduate'1
has tried (and I use the term
loosely) to depict.
And that is: "Man and His
Struggle With the Rat Race," or
if you prefer the pseudonym,
"I'll Never Forget What's
Thus should have run a prologue to the latter movie wliich
is currently showing at the Turf-lan- d
Mall Cinema.
To make absolutely that you'd
catch the message of this movie,
..the opening scene featured Orson
Welles as Andrew Quint, an executive who was to have been an
assistant editor for a small but,

this case, society prevailed at
the expense of originality and
sensitivity, but guess such is
life.

One might wonder if what
one of the characters said about
there being "no room in this
world for art and literature" is
gradually coming true.
The photography was very
good in many places but the
sound-trac- k
was not as excellent
as I had hoped since it was done
by Francis Lai who also did the
score for "A Man and A Woman."
In one particular scene though,
when Andrew was in a semiconscious state and dreaming,
the combination of sights and
sounds was extremely effective.
The movie, as a whole, came
off as a pessimistic reiteration of
the existing war between traditions and society, and
lity and the arts. It sparked here
and there and was just about to
catch fire when somet lung would
inevitably happen to drag it back
into the groove it had started for
itself.

f

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Orson Welles packs his ax to work in a scene
from "I'll Never Forget What's 'Isname."

College Kids Look
For Campus CuHure
By ANN BRUFLATT

"Carmen Baby,"

the answer to the "Charade" is "Father

Goose."
And thusly, the local movie headlines speak for themselves:
the answer to the guessing game of what's on at the movie
downtown is a new fairy tale.
Friday night. I don't have a date. Sitting around, staring
at the blank walls. Oh well, might as well study notliing else
to do.
album that combines the minds
By SHAWN FOREMAN
In bursts a freshman with a starry-eye"I'm here to be educated
"H. P. LOVECRAFT, II" of the group called II . P. Love-craand obtain culture" look on her face. "Hey I'm tired of sitting
600-27and anyone who cares to around. Let's
is a new
(Phillips PHS
go to the movies."
lend an ear.
Great heavens. Is this girl for real? I thought she was from the
It's effective use of stereo mecca of
Kentucky Lousyville? Oh well, it's worth a try. Better
phasing is enough to please anythan studying.
one who likes "moving stereo
"Okay I'm game Betty. Go find a newspaper."
sound," and its choice of songs
She returns a minute later and begins to scan the entertainment
is enough to pierce the minds of
page. "Let's see. Is 'Ulysses' still on? I heard that was a good
even the folk fans.
movie. What! It's not showing any more? I thought it would be on
II. P. Lovecraft, II contains
for at least three weeks.
nine cuts, some familiar, some
"There's the 'Odd Couple' but I've already seen that. Same
new, but all with the twist that thing for '2001.' I know. Let's
'Blood of Dracu-l- a,
Monday night 50c
go to the drive-i- n.
is only II. P. Lovecraft's.
'Shoot out at Big Run.' "
Another recent album is
Tuesday night
"SPIRIT" (Ode Z 1244004). All to "Oh me, what about a game of checkers?" As we sat down
our game, I thought about last year movies like "Gone With
Champaign Night
the way from the opening song
for Ladies
the Wind" that had been around for not months but years. These
"Fresh Garbage" to the close of
for several viewings but not over three or
side 2 "Elijah," they put out the movies were interesting
Wednesday night
four. I was tempted to go see "Jungle Book."
sound of today's music. Their
Oh me, it looks like another semester of studying and checker
sound is clean, and in the Lou'
games.
Adler (producer of the Mama's
and Papa's) tradition, balanced
Continuous Music 7
perfectly and crystal clear. The
Spirit album can be classed as
An exhibit of more than 20 paintings and collage compositions
NIGHTLY
"Soft Hard Rock" (if you have to
by University of Kentucky alumni will be open to the public
a tag on it).
put
In general the cuts range from at the UK Alumni House, Rose and Euclid streets for two weeks.
at the Pub
The exhibit, titled, "Alumni as Artists," has been arranged on
Formerly
the HendrixCream style to the
balconies of the Alumni House center hall.
soft style of Elektra's Zodiac.
4-- 7
Friday
TGIF JAM SESSION
READ THE KERNEL
21
Must

Lovecraft Pierces Mind

five till nine

curb or

magazine, carrying an ax into
his office where he proceeded
to tear the living hell out of his
desk.
This could have meant only
two tilings: either he wanted
a new desk, or he was going
to quit the rat race and become
the poor starving assistant that
he was supposed to have been
before he "sold out" for the
luxuries of money. And sure as
a knuckle sandwich after telling
Vince Lombardi to go to hell,
Andrew was sacrificing his money
for his pride.
Andrew had problems though.
He couldn't quite shake all his
old worldly possessions: one former employer, three lovely mistresses, a wife with whom he
began divorce proceedings, and a
partridge in a . . uh, well, that's
not the same story.
Anyway, this story dealt
mostly with Andrew's unsuccessful attempt at true identity.
It was a sad attempt at true
identity. It was sad too that in

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9--

'ALUMNI AS ARTISTS'

The Orations

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PRODUCER

Every show presents its own set of unique production problems
and "Under Milk Wood," which was the first UK student production by the Department of Theatre Arts, was no exception.
ine piay Dy Dylan 1 nomas
was composed of a series of vig
operation of actors and pronettes based on the lives of the duction staff.
townspeople of a remote Welsh
Director, Michael Walters,
fishing village. Because of its developed a transitional device
episodic nature, "Under Milk which separated the many unWood" required maximum co
connected
without
episodes
breaking the lyrical flow of the
This now was accom- Tiie Kentucky
Y Precisely timed
The Kentucky Kernel. University Pllsned
University ol Kentucky. Lex- - trances for actors into Specific
lnxton. Kcntwkv AnwA Kn4
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. Areas defined by a Complex
ttZtyVJ
luting plot shifting focus to
periods, end once during the summer various parts of the multi- session.
Published by the Board of Student platform set.
Publications, UK Post O trice Box tutt.
The unit set, a series of clap- ocgua as ine uaaet in lttve and
pUbilShed Continuously aa the Kcnuil hftarri nlatfrtrm. anA .Luatlnni
.
since 101ft.
r..luu,M ...u (.iviiuvui,
herein is in- - designed by lorn Ilogers, created
Advertising
a
ih r.aH..
tended to hlnpublished
false or misleading advertising should numerous acting areas, lhese
be reported to Ine fcditors.
areas combined to suggest, rather
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
than depict pictorially, a small
Yearly, by mall
tg.17
Per copy, from nles
$.10
Welsh village.
KERNEL TELEPHONES
The student production was
Editor. Managing Editor
1321
Editorial Page Editor,
a step in the right direction. The
Associate Editors, Sports
1320
News Desk
3447
'Kernel' Art staff appreciates the
Advertising, Business, Circulation fcsig
new move.

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PANAVISION. METR0C0L0R

SUPER

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Presented By Students At UK

Kernel py.

funny!5

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KENTUCKY
FIRST RUN
IN LEXINGTON!

66 Pure

STANLEY KUBRICK PRODUCTION

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NOW SHOWING!

NOW SHOWING!

psychedelic roller
coaster of an
experience."
MCM

Kudos For First Production

to enter!

L

FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT

IN COLOR

COLOR by DcLuxe

....

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Oct.

WORLD REPORT
From the Wire of the Associated

partment of Housing and Urban

NATIONAL
FRANCISCO -- George
C. Wallace issued the campaign
platform of his American Independent party Sunday and said
he would review it plank by
plank for the nation in speeches
between now and election day.
The 13,000-wor- d
statement of

Development.
But he said in an interview he
believes that with the new separatism "will come a certain
sense of security and solidarity
for those Negroes who haven't
felt it before, and this can be an
instrument for some very positive results."
Weaver added, however, that
"one of the great dangers of this
is that it will be embraced by
whites and used as an example
for trying to push for separate

SAN

the

candidate's

third-part- y

Press

prin-

ciples contained few surprises
among its programs to end "the
fearful and inept leadership of
our national parties."
Wallace said he was the document's chief autlior and guiding
spirit, and the text does reflect
the one-ma- n
flavor of his party
by its sometimes use of the first
person "I."
The former Alabama governor has voiced most of the platform's provisions, though usually in less specific terms, in numerous campaign speeches and
interviews.

institutions."

YORK -- Universities,
NEW
large charitable organizations,
government and business must
remember, Sen. Edmund S.
Muskie said Sunday night, "that
frustration over an unknown force
provides fertile ground for demagogues."
The Democratic vice presidential candidate, a Maine lawyer of Polish descent, said at the
General Pulaski Committee dinner: "We sltould recognize that
the protests of students, black
people and angry middleclass
whites are all related to a common frustration with our massive and liighly organized socie-

WASHINGTON Robert C.
Weaver, the nation's first Negro
cabinet officer, predicts a temporary thrust toward racial separation in the United States.
"I've always fought for integration, and I still do," said the
secretary of the De

ty."

14, 19G8- -3

Critically Cramped Med Center
Must Grow Up. . . No Other Way
Only eight years after its formal dedication, the University
Medical Center is critically
cramped for space and refusing
to accept some qualified students
because of the problem. Theonly
direction in wliich it can grow is
up. Current plans call for the
addition of two floors over all
but one wing of the structure.
Dr. Alvin L. Morris, assistant
vice president in charge of development at the Med Center,
says there may be some very
tall buildings and the virtual
elimination of parking space, except for hospital patients, to ease
the situation.
Students Turned Away
The Medical Center's 49 acres
already are so crowded that many
qualified student applicants for
the Colleges of Medicine and
Dentistry have been turned
away. Dr. Morris said, "We
would like to have 100 students"
entering medical classes, but the
college cannot accept more than
80.

Some research projects have
been reduced or eliminated,
partly because of a shortage of
laboratory facilities, according to
Dr. Morris.

will be built on 350 acres.
The Medical Center property
was cut out of the UK experiment
Station Farm. The Agricultural
Science Building and a huge
dormitory complex have taken
up the open spaces near the
Medical Center.
Prefab Lab
Temporary measures to ease
the cramped situation are being
taken. A prefabricated laboratory
building is nearing completion
on a parking lot near the Center.
Some classrooms and offices
have been moved across the street
into the old Center Motel and
Town House Motel.
Other demands on the Medical Center are expected to eat
away even more of the space.
Plans including a new College
of Pharmacy, a life sciences library, an animal research facility and expansion of most existing programs are among these
demands.

"Severe limitation" onneuro-scienc- e
research was recently
eased by converting a locker room
into a laboratory. Some clinical
services included in the original
plans have never materialized.
Dr. Morris said a planned
clinic was never begun because of lack of space.
Also, several existing programs have never achieved full
development. Dr. Morris said
the use of computer facilities
has been impeded by lack of
space. Basic science units operating in support of the medical
and dental programs have not
achieved their planned scope.
Shuttle Buses
Dr. Morris said the University
Hospital "lacks adequate housstaff members who
ing for ll
must sleep in."
Parking spaces are another
problem cited by Dr. Morris. He
sees shuttle buses to the hospital
as the only solution.
Dr. Morris, wIkj was not on
the Med Center staff when it
opened, said he did not know why
more land was not appropriated.
While the UK Medical Center has
49 acres, the University of Toledo Medical School, for example;
on-ca-

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TODAY and TOMORROW
culture B!dg., not later than Monday,
Oct. 21. 198.
There will be a University Senate
meeting in the Court Room of the
Law Building at 3 p.m., Monday.
Football
films of the Kentucky-Orego- n
State game will be shown in
the Student Center Theatre at 7 p.m.
There is no admission charge.
The Central Kentucky Concert and
Lecture Series will present Goldowski
Opera Company's production of "Carmen" in Memorial Coliseum at 8:15
p.m. UK students will be admitted by
ID. all others by season ticket.
The Student Center Coffee House
Series will present "Patchett and
Tarses" in the Student Center Grille
the week of October 14, 8 to 9 p.m.
Monday through Thursday and at
8:30, 9:30, and 10:30 p.m. on Friday.
Tryouts for Theatre Arts Produc-

Today
"Study of Oils" by Ben Mahmaud
is on display at the Student Center
Art Ganery. The exhibit will run
through October 25.
Angel Flight will have Its try-ou- ts
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday in
Baker Hall from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Tomorrow
"The Invisible Empire (Ku Klux
K.an)" will be shown at the Koinania
House at 412 Rose Lane. It will be
open to the public and the admission
is free.
The draft Counseling Service provided by local reserve officers will be
available for students every Tuesday
and Thursday afternoon in Room 3U7
of the Student Center from 5 to 7 p.m.

tion, "Loves

Labor Lost" by William
Call

Shakespeare will be Monday.
Ext. 2GH8 for details.

Coming Up

UK Placement Service

The International Classics series will
present "Darling" on Wednesday and
Center at
Thursday in the Student cents.
7:30 p.m. Admission is 5J
Fred Dart will give an euphonium
reci til in the Agricultural auditorium
on Wednesday.
rtetent paint. rigs by Suzuki will be
exhib.ted from October 13 to November 10 in the Art Gallery of the
Fine Arts B.dg. Ga.lery hours are
Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Any student who earned high school
credit in a foreign language and who
is planning to enroll this spring
semester for the first time in college
in that language must take a placement examination before
Applications for the examination
must be made in the University TestOld Agri
ing Center, Room 304--

Register Tuesday for an appointment
on Wednesday with Ashland Oil and
Refining Co. Accounting, Bus. Adm.,
Economics
'B.S.): Law: Chem. E.,
Civil E.. Elec. E., Mech. E. (B.S.).
Will niterview Juniors
Citizenship.
and Chem. E. Seniors for summer employment.
Register Tuesday for an appointment
on Wednesday with Marathon Oil Co.
Check schedule book for details.
Register Tuesday for an appointment on Wednesday or Thursday with
Bell Telephone System American Tel.
& Tel. Elec. E., Civil E., Mech. E.
(B.S.); MBA. Bell Telephone Laboratories Elec. E., Mech. E., Cicil E.
(B.S., M.S.); Math (with 12 hours
physics or computer programming experience). Cincinnati & Suburban Bell
Engineering, Liberal Arts, Bus. Adm.

Tp.ViQ&ZZ1

lip

Southern Bell Engineering,
(B.S.).
Liberal Arts, Bus. Adm., Acct., etc.
(B.S., M.S.). Western E'ectric Elec.

E.. Mech. E., Chem. E., Met. E. (B.S.,
M.S.); Ind. E. (B.S.) Math (B.S.,
M.S.); Liberal Arts. Bus. Adm., Acct.,
etc. (B.S., M.S.). Citizenship.
Register Tuesday for an appointment
on Wednesday with Corn Products Co.
Chem. E., Elec. E., Mech. E., Chemistry (B.S ). Citizenship.
Register Tuesday for an appointment
on Wednesday with Kennecott Copper Corp. Chem. E.. Civil E.. Mining E., Elec. E., Engr. Mechanics,
Mech. E., Met. E. (all dgerees).
Register Tuesday for an nppoint-me- nt
on Wednesday with U.S. Naval
Ordnanr-Check
Station (Louisville)
sobedu'e book for details.
Register on Wednesday for an appointment nn Thursday with National
Cash Register Co. Elec. E., Engr. Mechanics, Mech. E. (all degrees) ; AcB.S., M.S.);
counting, Economics
Bus. Adm., Computer Science. English. Journalism (B.S.): Chemistry,
Math, Physics (all degrees); MBA.
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''171 l

tMfa,Jfc,M,MwMiiu..

The Kentucky

Scared, Dicky?

A

Iernel

Tlie South's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
MONDAY, OCT. 14, 19G8
in Nixon's mind about the 1960 ESTABLISHED 1894
debates with the late President
Editorials represent the ojrinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Kennedy could have nothing to do
Lee B. Becker,
Richard with his position. Or could they?
presidential debate,
But even taking Nixon's stated
Nixon's aides have made it abundantly clear that Nixon will not rationale at face value, little still
agree to any such arrangement. can be said for his position.
The Faculty Senate, meeting ate Council for study and submisWe disagree strongly with WalThe Nixon camp says it will
lace but maintain that he, as well this afternoon, is discussing some sion to the full senate, said his
not agree to any debate involving
third party presidential candidate as the other candidates, should be important matters, including pos- group is reconsidering points of the
sible adoption of a pass-fa- il
sysheard at every opportunity by proprogram. He said the proposal will
George Wallace or to any arrangetem for electives and requirement probably be before the Senate at
A
ment which would result in
spective voters.
electorate is a basic requirement
changes for freshmen and sopho- their November meeting.
free national netreceiving
While the delay is somewhat
of a functioning democratic system. mores, but they have not planned
work time.
to discuss a matter of extreme understandable in such a complex
Nixon, however, apparently
The official rationale is that would like to avoid
importance to students and faculty matter, and we desire that the
jeopardizing
the public interest would not be his current strong
alike.
best proposal be submitted to the
keepposition by
served by providing Wallace with
to further study the Senate, we do think time is imdiscussion and debate to a
Apparently
ing
the opportunity to gain more na- minimum. This manner of thinkprogram, the Senate did not in- portant. A new adviser program
tional exposure.
ing represents a direct denial of a clude the proposal for a revised ad- is in dire need here, and it is
visery system on their agenda. Jean needed now. Students suffer from
Of course, the fact that Nixon basic tenet of democracy.
And after the disastrous party Paul Pegeron, chairman of the Uni- advising problems daily, and the
is running comfortably ahead of
his Democratic opponent and the conventions, this nation can afford versity Advisory Committee, which Senate should act soon. No further
fact that the memory is still fresh no more travesties of democracy. submitted the proposal to the Sen- - delay should be tolerated.
vote by the
Despite a 280-3- 5
House of Representatives to open
televised
the door for a three-wa- y

Editor-in-Chi-

Advisery Delay

VVal-lace-

r

well-inform-

s's

ed

Kernel Forum: the readers write

6. Despite the fact that debate had
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Altltough I wast strongly opposed to continued for (tours, the SAR members
a bill asking that "Dixie" be played continued to vote against ending debate
at UK football games, the tactics used on the bill. Therefore, discussion most
by those opposed to the bill at a recent of it consisting of delaying tactics by
Student Government meeting cannot be SAR members continued long after everyone had had ample opportunity to speak.
condoned under any circumstances.
A group of representatives who call
Tins was the conduct of the "Students
themselves the "Students for Action and for Action and Responsibility."
They
Responsibility" (SAR) gave a demonstra- sliowed no responsibility and their action of how they represent the students. tions were deplorable. Due to the amount
of time consumed by these representaConsider the following:
1. SAR member Joe Isaacs was one
tives, much of the business to be conof the first to discuss the bill, but stopped sidered at the meeting was left unfinished.
because he was talking about "My Old
J. R Turner
A& S Junior
Kentucky Home" instead of "Dixie."
2. Two SAR members, Joe Maguire
and Tltom Pat Juul, moved that the To the Editor of the Kernel:
bill be amended to ask that the following
In a letter to the Editor, Professor
s