xt7mw6693q4k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7mw6693q4k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19150923  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1915 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1915 1915 2012 true xt7mw6693q4k section xt7mw6693q4k THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
formerly THE IDEA

State University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, SEPT. 23, 1913,

VOL. Will.
"AG" STUDENTS WIN THE FAIR
PRIZE
Stock-Judgin-

AT STATE

FAIR

Contests

g

Show Ability of K. S.
U. Students

FAIR GREAT

CO-E- DS

ELEVATE

WANT TO
THE MASSES

while our ears were constantly filled
with much prating about hard times,
seven young apostles from the Home
Economics Department fared forth
success throughout.
very this summer, backed up by Uncle
This was
much in evidence when it was real- Sam and the Agricultural Extension
ised that 98 of 115 classes of horses Department, to check the tide of diswere won by Kentucky breeders. Ken- aster Jn Kentucky by their gospel of
tucky came first in the number of balanced rations and peace in the aliprizes won, Missouri second, and Ten- mentary tract.
These young women were placed in
nessee third, Illinois fourth and Ohio
seven different counties of the State,
fifth.
Friday night was the outstanding and each was told to work out the
show of the week, with Commissioner problme which she found there in a
of Agriculture's five thousand dollar manner that would beat suit local
stake for
saddle horses and conditions. From the reports of their
classes for women riders, which again work, it appears that instruction in
remindB us of Kentucky's reputation the Department of Home Economics
enables one to give expert advice on
and how well she deserves it.
The State Fair is strictly an enter - a variety of weighty subjects, ranging
d

Ing of stock is a rich man's game, itD,es And when it comes to questions
acts as quite an educator to the aver-o- f economy, the Ladies' Home Jour-ag- e
farmer' boy and especially is itnal naB nothing on them in expounding
valuable to the Ag student who getsto Innocent victims how to furnish an
excused from the first week of school entire house with two old wooden
how to make twelve lovely
in order to attend. There are arrange-D0Xe- s
ments made by the Commissioner ofchrlstmas presents from one old
to entertain the students en skirt, and how six families can
interested in. live stock and corn, with1,ve on chicken for a month, and still
Those winning inave bones left over for the dog.
this year's contest are:
The young women engaged in this
work were: Miss Linda Purnell, in
Draft and Light Horse Classes.
First, $15, W. J. Harris, Nolan, W. BeH County; Miss Johnnie Cramer,
in Jefferson County; Miss Lei ah Gault,
Va.
Lawrence County; Miss Mary Bur-Second, $10, E. C. Kirtley. Frank-rier, In Rockcastle County; Miss
fort, Ky.
Kathleen Sullivan, Madison County;
Third, $5 L. D. Taylor, Louisville.
Miss Elizabeth Farra, Whitley Coun
Beef and Dairy Cattle Classes.
First, $15, Jas. H. McConnell, Ar- ty, and Miss Katherine Mitchell, in
lington, Ky.
Warren County.
The first three mentioned were apSecond, $10, John T. Campbell,
pointed to their respective positions
Campbellsburg, Ky.
Third, $5, E. C. Kirtley, Frankfort. for a month's term, and will return
to school on October 1. The other
Swine and Sheep Classes.
First. $15, John T. Campbell, Camp- young women received their appointbellsburg.
ments for the month of June only,
Second, $10, W. J. Harris, Nolan, W. and have returned to the University,
Va.
sunburned
and chlgger-bitten- ,
but
Third, $5, Jas.. H. McConnell, Ar- happy at the result of their summer's
lington, Ky.
experience.
Corn Class.
First, $5, F. H. Johnson, Louisville.
STAFF MEETING.
Second, $3, F. T. Street, Cadiz, Ky.
Third, $2. N. N. Terry, Fulton, Ky.
The meeting of the staff of The
Sweepstakes.
Kentucky Kernel will be held this aftFirst, $25, John T. Campbell, Campernoon (Thursday, September 23) in
bellsburg.
rooms of the Jounalism DepartSecond, James H. McConnell, Ar- the
ment at 3:30. It is essential to the
lington.
success of the paper this year that
Third, W. J. Harris, Nolan, W. Va.
all members of the staff attend these
C. Kirtley won the $50 silver cup
E.
meetings which will be held for a few
presented by the American Saddle
weeks only.
Horse Breeders' Association for the
J. FRANKLIN CORN, Editor.
best judge of three and
saddle horses.
man, J. T. Gooch, to work IndustriousAll of the young men are students ly In arousing enthusiasm and enrollIn the Department of Agriculture at ing new members and all Freshmen
the University.
are urged to join one of the societies.
1

d

WAR

WITH

FRESHIES

SQUAD OF CATS

PRACTICE

230-Pou-

The Kentucky State Fair of 1915,
the fifteenth annual opportunity of the
farmers of this State to present their
own and nature's handiwork, was a

a judging contest.

JOINT MEETING

LARGE

EACH

DAY

Seven Home Economics Plans Are Made to Arouse Sophs Discipline New Men Bogie,
Tackle,
Girls Do Extension
Grown Arrogant With
Interest and Enroll
Latest Addition to
Work in Summer
Protection
the Team
New Members
While cropB were being devastated
by ruthless armies over the sea, and

SUCCESS

T CONFLICT IN

LITERARY SOCIETIES
HOLD

No. 2

RECEPTION ON FRIDAY RED PAINT IS APPLIED MEET
In order to formulate plans for the
year, the Union and Patterson Literary Societies held a joint meeting last
Saturday evening, September 18, in
the Patterson Literary Society hall.
The meeting was called to order by
O. M. Edwards, and nominations for
chairman" being declared in order, J.
T. Gooch was elected by acclamation.
Devotional exercises were conducted
by M. U. Conditt, who read a chapter
of the Bible and led in prayer. After
the devotional exercises the organiza
tion of the meeting was completed by
electing W. C. Shinnick secretary.
The purpose of the meeting was set
forth by (Messrs. O. M. Edwards and
L. Nelson as follows:
That there
must be something done to arouse literary enthusiasm among the students
of the University, that not only must
enthusiasm
be aroused, but some
means must be devised by which we
may place the societies upon a practical basis; that the funds in the treas
uries were exhausted and financial
embarassment Is suffered every scholastic year because of the lack of
funds. It was also stated that the
president and the deans were backing
the societies and that the Freshmen
and others were desirous of joining
the societies.
Many plans were suggested by
which the emergency might be met,
and after due consideration the assessing of initiation fees and dues
was decided upon, viz:
(1)
Each
new member should be charged $2.50
initiation fee and be exempt from further fees for the ensuing collegiate
year. (2) Each old member should
pay $1.50 annual dues, to be paid In
two equal installments at the beginning of the first and second semesters,
respectively.
A plan of campaign was adopted al
so, which
as for the chairman to appoint a committee of two, one mem- her of the Union Literary Society and
one member of the Patterson Literary
Society, to get a list of the names of
the Freshmen from the Registrar and
divide them equally between the mem- -'

Ul

tD

OUU40ireo.

.oooia.

secretary
of
the
Union Literary Society and F. O.
Mayes, secretary of the Patterson Lit
erary Society were appointed as the
committee.
A reception for the new members
will be given at the Cafeteria Friday
evening. There will be several speak- era present, Including H. W. Towne,
who Is an Instructor of the School of
Music, lately established In the city.
Mr, Towne has had several years of
platform.
All members are urged by the chair- B. Chamberlain,

nd

BUTLER

OCT.

2

Early yesterday morning Freshman
The advent of somewhat cooler
numerals were discovered painted In
weather has put some additional
various prominent places on the campus by the vigilant Sophomores, who "pep" into the already high Wildcat
immediately procured several .gallons prospects, and a noticeable increase
of war paint and proceeded with the
in the daily attendance of students to
work of obliteration.
When;
the
watch the football men perform were
Freshmen objected too strenuously to
the ungentlemanly conduct of the the important changes on Stoll Field
Sophs a general paint smearing con during the last week.
test between the two classes was the As yet Coach Tlgert and his four asresult.
sistants have not worked the men at
While the Sophs were engaged in
.,
u
4
t.
t.
tneir worK on the new dorm, they trying to drill them in the separate
were met by a shower of small stones
divisions of the game. Dr. Tlgert has
from the hands of the Freshles, peevconcerned himself principally
with
ing the Sophs and resulting in a small
the line, while "Jim" Park and William
Later In the day, at Rodes, former star halfback, now conChapel hour, the trouble was renewed,
nected with the Experiment Station,
and an obstreperous Freshman, yclept
are taking care of the backfleld diviFoster, had his head painted red by
sion. Assistant Coach Tuttle has
the Sophomores after he had "kicked been placed in charge
of the Freshthe bucket" containing the fluid, spat- man
outfit. Lieutenant Arthur Un
tering it plentifully on his enemies.
derwood, commandant of the battalion.
Both classes are clamoring for re - '
.and former West Point end, is assist- ven?n
ing 'Dr. Tlgert with the linesmen.
The chief work which has been done
COMMITTEE SELECTED so far consists of blocking, punting
TO HEAR MEN WHO DO and tackling. A dummy has been set
NOT WANT TO DRILL up on the south side of the field for
the latter practice.
At a special meeting of the' faculty
Dr. Tlgert said yesterday that he
iteld last Friday afternoon a number of
expected to begin some hard scrim
Important questions were decided. A
mage today. Park, with the scrubs.
committee was appointed composed of
'and Tuttle, with the Freshmen, can
Mie deans of the University which was
furnish the Varsity all the scrimmag- charged to hear any students who de- -'
ing they will want.
sired to present reasons to show why
E. E. Bogie, of Mt. Sterling, the
"hey should be excused from drill.
mass of football talent, arrived
Those who are compelled to work and
this week, and is showing up well in
can not make arrangements to drill
practice. About thirty pounds of ex- in the mornings
with Company E cess baggage
will be trained off the
should go before this committee as big
man if possible. Bogie will try for
this is the only way that this part of
a position at tackle. He does not apthe University course can be escaped pear excessively stout, but is
built
by any Sophomore or Freshman.
solidly and has the ability to move
Power to give over the Chapel to fast.
The 8tudent
welcomed Captain
week t
hour "Dutch" Schrader to
reeular
the afternoon
ffg aeglgngte(1 to a commttee headed rQM .ntr oar v
1
ovll
by Prof68sor c. R. Melcher. It Is De.
CRUBe
student8
GV6ry b0t'
take a morQ actl?e lnterest In
occasionally farther,
,
meetms
AU of the 0080,168 bel,evo that the
free-for-al- l.

.U

IkL 2

7d

T T.Jl!"

?T?

A resomtjon waa also pa8Bed pro.
Ingthetw 0.yearAg
hb,Ung Bpodal 8tU(Jent8 Qr
r
Ing the
Agricultural course
from Jo,n,ng fraternltle8.
two-yea-

JUNIOR CLASS WILL
MEET THIS AFTERNOON
The Junior class will hold a meet- ing In Chapel Thursday, September
30, at 3:30 p. m. for the purpose of
electing officers for the coming year.
Every member of the class should be
present at this meeting.

ends is going to prove highly successful. Thompson is showing up partlc-rlHis
well ta this department.
nb,my tQ run down punt8 , the cause
of much favorable comment from the
side lines.
Crutcher also Is being used In this
capacity and everyone Is predicting a
come-bac- k
for the Louisville man.
Coach Tlgert says he Is working harder for him than he bus ever done before and is in almost every move
madt ,n tne Practlce
y

(Continued on Page 3)

* MM

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Meet Me at
FIRST-CLAS-

'DADDY

LONG

LEGS."

"Daddy Long Legs," the biggest dramatic success of this and last season,
will appear at the Den All Theater
Friday and Saturday and Saturday
matinee. The play, which Is a dramatic version of the "Daddy Long
Legs" letters, written by Jean Webster, a niece of the late Mark Twain,
was produced nearly two years ago at
Bowers' Theater, In Chicago, where It
weeks to capacity
ran twenty-fiv- e
business.
It has Just ended an entire year's engagement at the Gaiety
Theater in New York. Last winter,
during a limited California tour, the
play smashed every record in the
history of the state by running for
five weeks at the Columbia Theater
The significance
in San Francisco.
of this achievement is realized by a
knowledge of the fact that no other
play In the theatrical history of California had been offered prior to the
"Daddy Long Legs" engagement for
a period of time greater than three
weeks in any
theater west
of Chicago. Mr. Miller is sending to
this city one of the most brilliant
casts he ever assembled, and the play
has the additional advantage of exceedingly elaborate and costly stage
settings. Seats now on sale.
(Adv.
two-doll-

ADA MEADE.

Don't miss "Dickie" Gardner, the
world's greatest ad libitum comedian
at the Ada Meade this week. Little
"Dickie'' is the smallest man who
ever boxed Jess Willard and comes
from a long line of stage favorites. He
is the fifth generation of the famous
Gardner family of comedians. "Happy Jack," who made such a hit here
last year when he introduced "I've Got
a Sneaky Feelln' Round My Heart"
o Lexington, is Dick's uncle, and the
sponsor for the team of Gardner and
Revere. Don't miss this little laugh
drama. He's the gink who made the
(Adv.
Sphinx smile.
THE COLONIAL

THIS WEEK.

23 Charlie
September
Thursday,
Chaplin in a Keystone review, "His
Ambition."
Friday,, September 24 "The Soul of
Peace," three-ac-t
Lubin drama.
25 "What
Saturday,
September
Happened on the Bermuda," three-ac- t
Edison drama, with Gladys Hulett,
Pat O'Malley, Augustus Phillips, William West, Harry Linson and Lawrence White.
Sunday, September 20 "His Crucible" with Neil Craig. Edmond Cobb,
John Cossar and Grant Foreman.
(Adv.

TIE

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

COLONIAL

Stories, Introducin Darius Theodore Skinner, the
Correspondense Skule Detectiv.
(BY M. PI8QAH.)

The correspondense

tektiv asparations.

skule detektiv

Suddenly Darius Theodore Skinner,
for this was the detektiv's name, tho
up till now it had remained disclosed,
rose from his revolvln desk chair, and
with the sang froid that had distinguished all his actions, walked across
the room and faced a closet door,
which until this moment had remained
immute.
He opened the door with a Jerk
and there was disclosed to his eyes
for the seventh time that day over a
dozen disgises. He had bought them
"at greatly reduced prices to all our
graduates' from the correspondense
skule and had tried them on many
times to show them to his friends.
Darry T. (as he was nown to his
friends, a very select few, tho to the
masses he was Mister Skinner), took
"Disguise No. L" the office boy's
disguise, from the closet and retired
to put it on. He had
to an
just put it on and had returned to
his main office and was arranging his
wig when the sound of steps were
Someone was comin up the
herd.
stairway leading to his office and his
regular office suit was in the
was at the head
The
of the steps directly In the path of
the approaching visitor.
Quick thinkln, which had caracter- 'd his work and had obtaned faver-abl- e
comment from his correspondense skule teachers, saved the day.
He sat down in the office chair,
drew a cigaret from his pocket and
begun to smoke in a office boyish
manner.
The (sound of footsteps suddenly
seased and the detektiv in his excitement let his cigaret go out. Knowing
hat if lie moved an inch, that the
skreak of the desk chair would betray
him, he pressed his hands firmly on
arms of his chair and sprang lightly to the floor. The chair did not emit
a sound and the only noise resulting
from his Jump was the racket made
by the cooler falling from a shelf and
breaking a glass.
Darius T. Skinner, the famous correspondense skule detektiv, crept
across the room to the door
leading to the stairway. He leaned
slowly over and placed his eye at the
Another eye looked frltend-linto his across the intervening
space. Evidently his visitor had de
anti-roo-

25th- -

"What Happened
on the Bermuda"
A Gripping

thria act Edlton Drama
with

GLADYS HULETT, PAT O'MALLEY,
AUGUSTUS PHILIPS. WILLIAM
WEST, HARRY LINSON
AND LAWRENCE
WHITE

magic,

the door

opened and the visitor walked in, looked around and stood still.
He was a stranger! The detektiv
nowed this at a glance, tho he did not
impart his knolege to his visitor.
The stranger wore a slouch hat and
a loose fittln coat. His trousers were
torn at the left knee and bespattered
with mud. As the mud was on the
back part of his trouser leg, the detektiv nowed that he had been running. He did not tell the stranger that
he knowed this, for that would have
been a gross error In detektiv work.
Darius T. Skinner, the great correspondense skule detektiv, had been
caught in one of his disgises and in a
predikament.
He was nonpulsed and
confounded; unable to think or act.
"Air you a detektiv?"
asked the
stranger, at last breaking the silence
which until this time remained unbroken.
again won for the detektiv.
He remembered his disgise
and assuming a boyish expression
which he had not thought of before,
he replied in a
voice.
"Why, certainly, of coarse not at
all though. I'm the office boy of this
here establishment.
The detektiv is
in there In his antles room," replied
the dlsglsed detektiv with a loud laugh.
T11 call him immediatly."
He was a
great joker.
The detektiv made his exit and returned in his regular office suit. Ah,
a! Had he succeeded in fooling the
stranger by his disgise? Not by a
tug full. While in the
he
'iad failed to put his eye to the key- Ie. Had he done so he would have
seen the same frltened eye that he
d looked Into but a moment before.
(To Be Continued.)
Qulck-thlnki-

n

high-pitche- d

anti-roo-

PHILOSOPHIAN
SOCIETY.

anti-roo-

anti-roo-

-

Saturday, Sept.

As if by

set at his desk and looked blankly at both eyes were removed,
the blank walls of his office In uttered shegrln. He had Just got his
deplomer from "The New York City
School of Scientific Detecting," and
they had sed in bold type and fragrant
language that after six months of correspondense in this "justly famous"
skule that he would be able to handle
the nottlest tangel that came to his
It however made no proattentions.
vision for obtaining work except "on
reputation" and so far he hadn't none.
He thought of the $17 and eighty
cents that he had spent for the
dektive mind which the skule
had promised to give him. This was
So far he had had but one
turrible!
visitor, and he had come to collect
the rent, takin the horse hair sofer In
part payment.

The Philosophian Literary Society
held its first call meeting Wednesday
night in its room at Patterson Hall
to discuss plans for the coming year.
The officers for 1915-1are Ina Darnall, president; Marie Becker, vice
president; Josie Lacer Hays, treasurer; Mary Hamilton, secretary.
Much enthusiam and interest was
displayed last year in the society. The
play, "The Kentucky Belle," which
was given, proved quite a success,
and with the proceeds,, additional furniture for the room was bought.
It is the purpose of the society to
give another play this year in addition
to the regular work of literary nature.
A definite series of authors will be
studied at the weekly meetings, and
musical features will be added.
The society extends a cordial Invitation to each new girl in the University to become a new member.

y

'ey-hol-

.....

y

.

r

Y. W.C. A.

Hungry Hollow Detektiv

MUSIC.

Students desiring to enter the University Choral Club, University Glee
Club or the University Orchestra, will
please register with Dean Anna J.
Hamilton, chairman of the Music

Children 5c

OPEN 10:00 A. M. TO 11:00 P.

J. H. STAMPER, Jr., Owner and Manager.

IN EVERY APPOINTMENT

S

Go Where the Go's Go.
Admission 10c

Exclusive Mutual and Universal Prof ram of Moving; Pictures

Symphonic Orchestra

The Y. W. C. A. held Its first regular
meeting Sunday evening on tho Patterson Hall veranda. The following
program was given:
Song.
Scripture Reading Ina Darnall.
Welcome Address Elizabeth Farra,
president.
Solo Suzanne Beitz.
Social Service Work Jane Dickey.
Solo Helen Burkholder.
"Why We Should Join Y. W. C. A."
Judith Beard.
The attendance was large, and argued well for a most successful year
In the Association work.

M.

Hair Cut

15c
10c

Shave

(EXCEPT SATURDAYS)
MARTIN'S IARIER
SHOP.
aaement, 139 Eaat Main,
Opposite Phoenix Hotel.

QEO.

ADA MEADE
SUPERIOR VAUDEVILLE
2 NEW SHOWS WEEKLY

3

3 - - SHOWS DAILY -

MATINEE 10c; NIGHT 20c
$1.00

30 PER CENT INCREASE

WORTH

FOR

10c

HOME ECONOMICS DEPT
SAME MANAGEMENT

Evidently the boom in the matrimonial business which was so widely
advertised in the last issue of The
Kernel, has stimulated interest in
the preparation for housekeeping, as
this year's enrollment of students in
the Department of Home Economics
Is sixty-onan Increase of thirty per
cent over that of last year.
Of this number eight are Seniors
and thirty-fiv-e
are Freshmen, an increase of eight over last year's
Freshmen enrollment The number
of women entering this department
with full college credits has increased
seventy-fiv- e
per cent in the last two
years.
The working force of the department has also doubled in the last two
years, and Home Economics faculty
meetings are by no means unusual occurrences.
Miss Mary E. Sweeney,
head of the department, has recently
been appointed head of the Extension
Work in Home Economics for Kentucky. As this new work will necessitate her absence from the University
from time to time, the classes in physiological chemistry, sanitation and
nutrition will be taught by Miss Ellen
Reynolds, in Miss Sweeney's absence.
Miss Reynolds, who has recently
been appointed assistant professor in
this department, is a graduate
of
State, and has done advanced work
in the University of Chicago. Miss
Ruby Stivers, secretary of the department, is also a former State student.
Miss Clara White will assist Miss
Chinn in the cooking classes and Miss
Buckman In the sewing work. She
will also conduct a special class In
cooking,, sewing and
millinery for
Lexington women.
The student assistants for the year
will be Miss Elizabeth Farra, in the
cooking laboratory, and Miss Kath-erin- e
Mitchell in the laboratory of

Join a Literary Society

When you contemplate
securing Life or Accident & Health Insurance
ask the K. S. D. student
representing a conservative, Boston, Mass.. Company to submit a proposition.

You need the Insurance. He will appreciate your Busi-

ness.

406 City Bank Bldg.

Address

household
istry.

and

physiological

chem-

C. E. SOCIETY
TO ENTERTAIN STUDENTS.

WOODLAND

t
The Woodland Christian Endeavor
Society will give a reception to the
students of the various colleges Saturday evening, September 27, 1915.
It will be held in the church annex,
which is opposite the auditorium, and
the hours are from 8 to 11. Everyone is invited.
Thre will be a rally of the Woodland Christian Endeavor Society Sunday evening at 6:30. All students are
cordially Invited to attend.
RECEPTION FOR STUDENTS.
The Epworth League of the First
Methodist Church will give a reception In the parlors of the church Friday evening, September 24th, at 7:30
o'clock.
All the students of the various colleges are invited to attend, and a
good time is promised to all.
i

Join a Literary Society

MURRAY

WELSH

PRINTING CO.
INCORPORATED

College Stationery, Engraving

and Die Stamping Frat and
Dance Programs
Lexington, Ky.

124" 128 N. Limestone

I

....

$

* THE KENTUCKY
LARGE

S9UAD OF CATS.

(Continued from Page 1)
The work of Rodes at quarter is
brilliant. Rodes' happy faculty of being able to shoot place and drop kicks
between the uprights and above the
horizontal from almost any position
on the field will be a factor in gain-lamany an extra point for the Blue
and White this fall In the big team
contests he Is going to face.
Hlckerson and Dempsey, tne big
Freshman linesmen, are out, but will
require a good deal of work to get
Into the best of condition.
For the Freshmen,
Polndexter,
Mcllvain and Davidson continue in
the limelight for backfleld position.
Linesmen who are being watched with
the greatest amount of interest are
Clements, Simmons and Vanderen.
Gardner, a plucky Eminence lad, is
speedy and is showing up best for
the quarterback position at present.
Coach Tlgert says that he does not
know much about the Butler College
team this year. State defeated the
Indianapolis lads two years ago, 21
to 7, in the opening game of the season. They may spring some surprise
this year. The seven points they garnered then, it will be remembered,
were made after Schrader had dropped
the ball on the Butler
line
and one of their team recovered it
and made a ninety-yarrun for a
touchdown.
Fay O. Townes, the new stydent
manager, is working harder and getting his assistants to put more vim
Into their duties than any manager
that has preceded him in many a day.
Frank Crum, Homer Combest and E.
V. Hopkins have been chosen assistant managers.
g

ten-yar- d

d

Townes also has offered the valuable
suggestion, which will be put Into effect In due time, of giving the new
Barker Stadium a blue and white effect. The small posts around the
field will be painted white and the
large corner posts will be adorned
with a coat of blue. Blue paint will
be administered to the lower half of
the goal posts and a white coat will
be given the crossbar and the projection above this.
Plans are being pushed for a big
day on October 2, when the opening
game will be played with Butler. Hon.
E. B. Morrow and Hon. A. O. Stanley,
the Republican and Democratic candidates, respectively, for Governor, in
all probability will be present. Judge
Barker, for whom the new field has

been named, is down for a speech and
with the others named In attendance,
oratory Is expected to vie with football for honors that afternoon.
With nearly sixty men out every
afternoon in football togs, and the
of
interest being
unusual amount
shown by both old and new students,
football prospects for Kentucky State
have never looked brighter.

SIGN POSTS AND
BULLETIN BOARDS
A story is told of how a man who
later became famous was once lost
In a snow storm when he was a boy

and how he found his way home by
climbing up a sign post and touching
the pointing hand, which showed him
the direction to his home. Ever afterwards in his life he tried to govern
his actions by events which seemed
to bo sign posts pointing to the correct course of action. Poets also like
to use the figure of the sign post and
frequent allusions to this are found
Unfortunately for
In all literature.
poetry and romance, the sign post Is
now only a curious relic of the past.
Bulletin boards, too, were once one
In
f the most important institutions
all cities. In the good old days
newspapers were printed in such
great numbers as they are now, all
notices and announcements were made
on quaint old bulletin boards, with
their "Hear ye," and "Be it known to
all men" notices plastered upon them.
The chief fault with these bulletin
boards was that they reached such a
small number of people, and one does
not regret that they with all their
quaintness have been
en supplanted by the less poetic,
but far more efficient newspapers of
today. A few of these interesting old
bulletin boards may yet be seen on
the campus and to one interested in
antiques and in relics of past days
they present an interesting sight.
Notices to the effect that "Mrs. K.
has rooms for rent close to the University campus," that "J. D. X. has a
'rigonometry to sell, which Is in good
condition," and that "Mr. B., room
35 Old Dorm, Is in the laundry business," may be deciphered among the
mass of notices of all shapes, kinds
and styles, which cover the face of the
board and each other in such a way
that it furnishes for one who has an
hour to spend, an interesting puzzle
to determine what the advertisements
mean. Many other notices may be
found scattered on the ground in all
be-fo-

--

Have You Anything to
Sell to K.S.U. Students?
Advertise

It In

THE
KENTUCKY KERNEL
(Formerly The Idea)
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE STUDENTS
WEEKLY 1,510

GUARANTEED

CIRCULATION

READ BY ALL OF THE STUDENTS
AND THE ONLY PAPER THE
STUDENTS READ

3

KERNEL

directions where they have been
thrown by those who wished to make
room for their notice on the crowded
bulletin boards. Interesting as they
are to the antiquarian or to the man
who is Interested In working out puzzles, they are almost usless as
since their place In modern
civilization has been taken by the
newspaper.
In other words, those of you who
have been Inveigled into reading this
far in this Interesting tale, If you have
anything you want made public, advertise It in The Kentucky Kernel If you
want to have It seen by the students.
If you have books to sell or want to
buy some, If you have a laundry agency and want customers, if you have
lost anything and would like to find
It, or if there Is anything which you
wish advertised, insert a classified ad.
In your own paper. It will be read
by all the students and since it will
cost you only a few cents, will bring
you much larger returns than the
notice which you tack up on the bulletin board and somebody tears down
In half an hour. You can Insert an
ad. for one cent a word for a single
insertion of two cents a word for
ee
See
Insertions.
consecutive
Jeff Harris, or call the Journalism Department.
Try it.
result-getter-

s,

'15

'Bill' Noel Leaves For Eastern Kentucky to Work in
Elkhorn Coal Field
The members of last year's graduating class In the College of Mines and
Metallurgy haye all received Imv
portant and lucrative positions in the
various mining and metallurgical districts of the United States. Nearly
all of the undergraduates were located
in good positions during the summer,
and all, without exception, received
offers of employment for next summer.
Walter F. Hanley is engineer with
the Elkhorn Mining Corporation,
which is one of the large mining corporations of the country. This company, which only started business in
June, 1913, has since that time ex$2,000,000 in
pended approximately
tenement houses, tipples and plant
eulpment, and the construction of a
high 'tension line for the carrying of electric current from' Jenkins, Ky., to Beaver Creek, In order to
successfully operate the mines.
H. L. Noel Is assistant engineer for
the W. G. Duncan Coal Co., Greenville, Ky. This Is one of the modern,
mining companies in Western Kentucky and at present is spending thousands of dollars installing the
'atest and most improved type of mine
equipment.
G. C. Rogers, a Lexington man, is
engineer with the American Zinc Company, at Mascot, Tenn., which is the
largest plant of its kind in the world,
and its operations include ore mining
and ore dressing.
W. L. Noel, who is an expert lino- type operator, accepted a temporary
position with the Cincinnati Enquirer
during the summer, but left a few
days ago for the Elkhorn coal field of
Eastern Kentucky whore he expects
to enter the operating department of
one of the large companies of that
field.

It is the policy of the College of
Mines and Metallurgy to train its
men in the practical as well us tho

PRETTY IAD
technical side of the profession and
In accordance with this idea the undergraduate students spent their vacaWhat's his character
Commander:
tion in mining and metallurgical disapart from this
tricts. They received valuable trainPetty Officer: Well, sir, this man
ing and experience In gold mining, cop'e goes ashore when o likes; 'e comes
per concentration and efficiency.
off when 'e likes; uses 'orrlblo language when 'e's spoken to; In fact,
SPORTING WRITERS
from Mb general be'avlor, 'e might bo
LIKE JIM PARK an officer! Punch.
leave-breakin-

Jim Park, football coach at State
and tried out by the St.

University

Louis Browns this fall, is highly

re-

garded by the St. Louis sporting writers. An unsigned letter In the Sporting News, published under a St. Louis