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The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

i

LEXINGTON, KY

VOL. XII

MARCH 24, 1922

No. 22

infrinfrinniijinniijii(

"THE FIRST
TO BE GIVEN

AND

LAST"

MARCH 27

Cast is Composed of Mrs.
Cave, Mr. Mikesell and
Gus Gay
The second of the Little Theatre
evening programs will be given Monday and Tuesday evening, March,
27 and 28 at 8:15 o'clock, when John
Galsworthy's play "The First And
Last" will be presented.
The characters In the play will be:
Mrs. Sallle Bullock Cave
Wanda
Mr. Gus Gay
Larry
Prof. W. H. Mikesell
Keith
Mrs. Cave Is well known In dramatic
circles In Lexington having taken
part in and directed many plays. Mr.
Gay will be remembered as a prominent Stroller while a student in the
University he played the leading roles
in several of the annual Stroller productions. Professor Mikesell is head
of the Department of Public Speaking of the University and his appearance will be of interest to students
and faculty members.
"The First and Last" is a three-scen- e
play with an English setting. It
portrays with vivid and tragic style
the limit to which one will go in upholding the honor and fame of family.
It promises to be one of the best
plays given in the Little Theatre this
season.
As an attractive feature of entertainment, Tom Young, a student in
the Art Department, will present his
Marionette show, wliich has been presented successfully before the Faculty
Club the State Legislature and the
Sophomore chapel.
The new set of scenery which has
recently been made for the Little
Theatre by students of the Art Department under the supervision of
Miss Belle Bates, will be used for the
first time.
The first night will, as usual, be
primarily for the faculty and townspeople, and the second night for the
student body;

CLASS TRACK MEET TO
BE HELD APRIL

10-1-

1

Track Men Eligible for all
Events Scheduled Except
Relay Races
A few days ago Coach Buchhelt
tacked up a little notice on the bulletin
track meet that
board of the lnter-clas- s
will be held April 10 and 11.
The notice reads as follows: "A
class meet between the Freshmen,
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors will
bo help April 10 and 11 at 4:30 o'clock.
This will include all track events except the relay.
The first four places will score
points as follows:
5 points
First Place
3 points
Second Place
2 points
Third Placo
1 point
Fourth Placo
AH trackmen are eligible to compete in any event. The following is
the list of the events:
100 yard dash; 220 yavd dash; 440
yard run; 880 yard run; mile run;
Two Mile run; 120 yard high hurdles;
Pole Vault:
220 yard low hurdles;
Running High Jump; Running Broad
Jump; Shot Put; DIbcus; Javelin.

KENTUCKIAN NOTICE.
The first of the month the business manngor of the Kentucklan
mailed statements to nil fraternities and other organizations on tiio
campus. Tho work on the Kentucklan has been progressing fino
so far, but at tho present thv.r. the
work has beon held up due to a
payment wo owe tho printr.'
If you want to see tho annual out.
at an early date, seo Unit your
pays tho bus'nrfM
organization
manager before Aprl 1.
C. V. WATSON.
Business Mgr.

51 SENIOR ENGINEERS
TRIP

TO TAKE AHHUAL

Leave April 9 for Inspection
of Manufacturing Plants
In Chicago and Gary
Fifty-onsenior students of the College of Engineering of the University
will go to Chicago April 9 and remain
anuntil April 16, on tho twenty-thirnual inspection trip to a number of
largo manufacturing plants. Professor W. E. Freeman, dean of the college, will have charge of the party
and will be accompanied by J. Born
Dicker, superintendent, of shops, Dr.
D. V. Terrell, head of the Department
of Civil Engineering, Professor L. E.
Nollau, head of the Department of
Drawing, and Professor L. S. O'Ban-non- ,
assistant professor of steam engineering.
The following men will leave Lexington at 6:30 o'clock Sunday night,
April 9, and arrive at Chicago at 7
o'clock Monday morning: G. B. Akin.
J. F. Baugh, G. Baumgarten, H. J.
Bean, R. M. Bennett, G. W. Benson,
N. O. Belt, L. F. Blschof, W. G. Bobbin, C. R. Bourland, R. H. Craig, J.
W. Crenshaw, H. T. David, W. B.
Davis, S. D. Fendley, L. G. Fitzgerald,
W. D. Futrell, C. R. Gibbons, B. B. Gibbons, H. Glenn, S. S. Gregg, Y. C
Holbrook, W. G. Kefauver, J!. R. Kelly,
R. C. Little, W. G. Miller, A. Muth, F.
W. Nessler, G. K. Nicholson, J. W.
Owens, T. B. Propps, T. M. Riley, C.
R. Roberts, A. P. Shanklin, J. M.
Siler, J. J. Slomer, L. Sopor, S. M.
Spears, W. K. Stokes, D. L. Thornton,
O. F. Threlkeld, A. H. Voelcker, H. W.
Walling, N. M. Wllkerson. R. 0. Wilson, S. T. Wilson, N. D. Witt, R.
G.
C. .Young1. B. A.
Woodward,
Meadows, W. A. Nesbit.
Among the many interesting places
to be visited are: Armour and Company, Union Stock Yards, American
Bridge Company, Gary, Ind., Illinois
Steel Company, Gary, Ind., Western
Electric Company, Sears Robuck and
Company, Municipal Pier, Chicago
Telephone Company and Crane
e

d

Little Theatre Notes
Next week "Op O' Mo Thumb" will
bo presented at the Thursday matinee
In White Hall at 4:00 p. m. Tho cast
will bo composed of May Coloman,
Gertrude Collins, Harriet Felsonthal,
Josephine Flthlan, Mary Louise Covington, and Aubrey Smith. Students,
faculty members and friends of the
University are cordially Invited to attend. At the conclusion of the play,
tea will be served In the Woman's
League room. Mary Louise Covington will be hostess of the afternoon.

SUMMER

DATE FOR PLAY CHANGED

CAMP WILL

BE OPENED JUNE

15

Basic Course
Men Will Enter
Camp Knox

Twenty-Fiv- e

The R. O. T. C. summer training
camp at Camp Knox for the Basic
Courses in Infantry,
which opens
Juno 15, will accommodate 25 men
from the University
of Kentucky.
Students from only the freshman and
sophomore clnsses are admitted into
this course.
The United
States
government will pay all expenses for
while in camp. His
the student
transportation there and on return
will be paid as well.
The plan of the camp program is in
teresting and liberal. In the morning
the cadet will attend classes and other
work In military sciences and the nf
ternoon will be given over to sports,
such as wrestling, boxing, baseball,
tennis and swimming. In the evenings
there will be dances, parties and picture shows, all of which are given by
the government free of charge on tho
part of the cadet. During the five
weeks of the camp, which will close
July 25, there will he many trips and
excursions of interest.
It is the wish of the officers of the
to send to
Military Department
splendid, reCamp Knox twenty-fivpresentative men of the University.
It is an exceptional opportunity for the
students and for the University. The
training received in the R. O. T. C.
camp develops strong college spirit,
stimulates the desire for discipline
and instills a lively feeling of competition in the student.
Sophomore
All Freshman
and
cadets who can possibly attend the
traning camp are requested to turn
their names into the Military Department as soon as possible as a report
must be made to the officials of the
camp by April 1.
e

'

UNIVERSITY DEFEATS

DEBATE

Hays, Neal and Peal

Suc-

cessful in First Contest
of Season
The University of Kentucky represented by John L. Hays, Sidney Neal
and W. H. Peal, opened Its debating
season with a victory over Georgetown
College, Friday evening, March 17,
1922.

Tho team went to Georgetown Friday afternoon and were entertained
at tho homo of Colonel T. K. Schuff at
his country home two miles east of
Georgetown. The contest was held in
tho chapel of the College, and about
three hundred people were present.
Gorgotown was represented by Marvin
Adams, W. H. Loptein and George
Ragland, Jr. Tho Georgetown team
showed quickness and ability, but
lacked tho careful preparation nnd
study of the subject shown by the
University boys.
Tho subject was the samo as that
for all tho debates of the season except that of Harvard: Resolved that
the United States should adopt as a
permanent measure the threo per cent
law of 1920, known as tho Dillingham
Bill. The Judges wore Prof. H. V.
of Frankfort, Dr. McQuarry
of Transylvania, and tho Reverend
Mr. Bass of Georgetown.

IS

The date for "The Thirteenth
Chair" tho Stroller play which was
announced for March .11 has been
changed to April 20 nnd 21. This
by tho
change was necessitated
absence cf Prof. Carol Sax who was
called homo because of the death
of his father. His absence delayed
the painting of scenery to bo used
in the play, as he was supervising
this work.

International Authority on
Lrbor Questions Pleases
Chapel Audience

COLLEGES ARE AIDING
FORMER SERVICE

MEN

Special Mining Courses Are
Given at University
of Kentucky
The United States Veterans Bureau
has under its jurisdiction about GOO
disabled former service men who have
been placed in training in the Univer
sities and colleges in the Lexington
District. These men are being given
elejnentary education and instructed
in mining work, electrical work, agri
culture, law, engineering, commercial
business and a number of trader rA
crafts.
The work in elementary education
at the University is being taught la
what is known as the guidance school
which is for the training of- men who
are not advanced enough to carry
regular courses. The Veterans Bureau
has leased the building at 33S Harrison
ave. and has supplied teachers to in
struct men in these branches,
A special mining course has been
established at the University for tho
benefit of men who have had five years
or more experience in mining and win
desire to fit themselves for mine engineers, mine foremen and minor executive positions in the mining Industry.
Special facilities for teaching practical electricity and mechanics have
been Instituted by the University and
about fifty former service men am
taking advantage of the oportunity to
gain information along these lines.
There is a great demand for skilled
men in theso lines and the men who
complete this course will find very
renumeratlve employment.
There are about sixty men onrolled
in tho University who are specializing
in agriculture. Theso men are mostly
the owners of land In Eastern Kentucky and it is their intention upon
completion of thoir course to follow
tho vocation of
agriculture or some speciality relative to
agriculture.
-

Juniors

in Mining Dept.
To Make Inspection Trip

Tho third annual inspection trip of
juniors from tho Department of Mines
and Metallurgy to manufacturing
plants at Knoxvlllo, Tonn., nnd Birmingham, Ala., will start April 2 and
end April 9. Professor C. S. Crouso
will conduct tho party and have
charge of tho arrangements.
Tho following will leave Lexington
Saturday night: Paul Cain, C. S. Car-toH. M. Clay, P. C. Embrath, T. H.
Hagan, Owen Kelley, C. H. Hahoney,
G. M. Patterson, W. H. Roll, R. W.
Sauer, and M. T. Skldmoro.

r,

One of the most entertaining nnd
enlightening addresses heard in tho
Chapel this season was the lecture
given Wednesday morning by Whiting Williams, international authority
on labor questions. Leaving his position as
of tho Hydraulic
Pressed Steel Company in Cleveland,
Mr. Williams
donned
workman's
clothes to get the workingman's point
of view on these questions. Since this
time he has labored as a miner, steel
worker and shipyard employee in tho
United States, Great Britain, France
and Germany.
In prefacing his remarks Mr. Williams stressed the fact that the common laborer is the basis of the industrial structure and that his mind must
be understood If one is to grasp the
situation in its true character.
To
get ths one must keep four big things
in mind, first, the tremendous importance to labor, of having and holding a
job. "This," he said, "is where the
whole
industrial
labor
question
starts." The demoralization of not
having a steady job is one of the
problems which these classes have to
meet.
The second queston concerns the
physical condition of the job. This
implies that, unrest and Bolshevism
are much more likely to occur where
men's minds and bodies are daily being exhausted. Glasgow was cited as
the most revolutionary of European
cities and this is due to the fact that
living conditions are so bad.
Thirdly, he spoke of the spiritual aspects of a job that gives workmen
their
Pride in one's
achievements and praise for the job
tend towards promoting
satisfaction
and . enthusiasm.
The
fourth point emphasized the mental
attitude. Machinery is .ust as difficult
to cope with as the human mind.
t.

well-don- e

CDACH

PARKS WILL CUT

SQUAD

0F50HEXT

WEEK

Strong Competition is Expected After Players
Are Tried Out
Last Monday afternoon baseball
Coach Parks walked Into tho gym
all bundled up like an arctic explorer,
where he was greeted by a volley of
'qulrles of: "Any practice today,
Coach?"
Owng to tho inclioment weather
practice
outdoor
was suspended
temporarily and the pitchers and
catchers went through a brisk workout n the gymnasium. Outdoor practice will bo resumed as soon as tho
weather permits.
Coach Parks reports that ho has
about fifty men out for tho team, his
biggest problem being to develop'
several good pitchers and catchers out
of the material he has on hand. Nodefinite information could bo given
out as to those who will make the
squad this early In the season, but
Coach Parks stated that if tho weather
permitted outdoor work this week ho
would be able to make his first cut of
tho squad next week.

-

* mum-

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mum

mMMtai

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

1

Society!
Kappa Kappa Gamma Dance
Invitations linve boon Issued by tho
active members and pledges of Kappa
Kappa Gamma fraternity for their
dance to bo Riven at the Phoenix Hotel
on Saturday evening, March 25. Thp
list Includes girls from other fraternities, from Lexington and other
towns, and chapter bids have boon
sent to various men's frnternitles and
other friends.
Phi Delta Theta Dinner Party and
Dance
Members and pledges of Phi Delta
Theta fraternity will entertain with
a dinner party at the Lafayette Hotel,
Saturday evening, April 1, followed by
a dance at the chapter house on Maxwell Street.

Robinson, and Clarence Mosoloy.

with a dance Snturday evening at the
chapter house on North Broadway, St.
Patrick season decorations wore used,
the rooms being adorned with green
tulle and ferns. An Irish harp festooned with shamrocks was hung over the
fireplace In the drawing room. A
buffet luncheon was served in grnen
bnskets and the favors were shamrock fans. An orchestra furnished
the music.
Members of the active chapter and
the pledges, who wore hosts, nro:
John E. Casner, Glen II. Tlnsley, Otto
V. Elder, Cortex J. Lemon, Jack
Byron Williams, Merritt T.
Skidmore, Joseph Helm Johnson,
Louis T. Pottinger, Jessie G. Oillum,
Ned Underwood, Thomas A. Ballan-tine- ,
William D. Suell, 'Harold L.
1).
Winstead,
Brentllnger, Thomas
Arthur J. Bradshnw, Basil Frost, O.
Barry Anderson, Warren F. Haydon,
Mnrshall Barnes, H. B. McEwen, J. F.
Freeman, S Ernest Johnson, William
H. Roll, T. B. Barnes, A. F.
J. W. Blue and M. D. Winston.

TRIANGLE PLEDGES
Triangle Frnternlty nnnounces the
following pledges:
E. E. O'Hara, '23, Willlamstown, Ky
W. P. Ballinger, '2.1, West Point, Ky.
L. R. Burroughs, '21, Willlnmstown,
Ky. L. Strow, '25, Benton, Ky. J. II.
Butler, '25, Morgnnflcld, Ky. II. B.
Little, '25, Benton, Ky. C. T.
'25, Willlamstown, Ky.
Arthur
Nutting, '25, Louisville, Ky.
Bon-so-

The Woman's League of the University entertained with a tea nt the
Practice House Monday afternoon In
.
honor of Mrs. Mary Schonck
The hostesses were members of
the homo management class, Fannlo
Heller, Georgia Terry, Carolyn Turner, Anna Bess Sargent, Henrietta
Uhardt, Edith Alexander, Margaret
Creary, Julia Willis, Miss Virginia
Croft and Miss Margaret Coffin. Receiving with Mrs. Woolman were:
Miss Maybelle Cornell, Miss Frances
Jewell and Lula Blakey.

Sigma Chi Dance at Centre
fmnl.nlMiia nn,1 IrwIK'Iflllnla
for the
have received invitations
Sigma Chi dance to be given in the
Gymnasium at Centre College, Fri-- J
day evening, March 24.

One of a Scries of Sunday Evening
Sermon-Lecture- s
on
What the World Believes
By MR. WARD

Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church
NORTH BROADWAY AT CHURCH STREET

Next Sunday
7:30 P. M.

Lecture followed by Social Hour Refreshments
10 A. M. Special Discussion Classes for Students.

Wool-man-

Funk-house-

It

"JA.TAN A RELIGIOUS QUANDARY"

Phi Kappa Tau Banquet
Theta chapter of Transylvania and
Kappa chapter of the University of
the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity entertained Friday evening with a banquet
In the Palm Room of the Phoenix
Hotel in celebration of Founder's Day
The following program
anniversary.
was given: Founder's Day Ritual, The
Large Pearls,
Star, John Casner;
Small Pearls,
Howard Stephenson;
Robert Grannis; The Dipper, Jack
Atkerson; The Great Bear, George
Elliott.

COME

always so delightfully rendered, and
There nro letters of poetry,
who nre so gracious about encores
There nre letters of tone,
that there is always a warm welcome
But the best wny to "letter"
at this club for them. Tho last feaEx.
Is to "letter" alone.
ture was n one act play which to onlookers was much too short. This was
Soph: "Which Is correct, n herd of
given splendidly by Misses Chenault camels of n drove of cnmcls?"
and Conroy nnd Mr. Gans.
Fresh: "I thought they always enmc
Altogether this wns voted the most in pneks."
The senior home economics stu- delightful meeting tho club has had
dents entertained with a luncheon in this season and our commercial club's
honor of Mrs. Mary Schenck Wool-ma- slogan is very apt in this instance
SENIOR INVITATIONS.
nt the University Cafeteria Mon- "Come again and often." N. D. '03.
Several seniors have failed to
day. The table was tastefully deco
place their order for senior invitarated with spring flowers and a deLOST A wrist watch marked L. V. P. tions. As a special favor to these
was served.
licious luncheon
Return to Laverne Purcell, 116 E. seniors, we have extended the time
to April 1.
Maxwell.
The Woman's History Club of Mt.
Leather 50 cents. Paper 20 cents.
Sterling held a most enjoyable "UniPayable in advance.
There are meters of poetry,
versity" meeting last Friday.
The
C. C. Watson Phone 2691
There nre meters of tone;
program included Miss Jewell who
Gerald Griffin
But the best way to "meter"
gave a most interesting talk; Prof,
Comm.
Is to "meter" alone.
and Mrs. Lampert, whose music is

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n

Beta Chi chapter of Kappa Kappa.
Gamma fraternity was hostess to a
number of pretty parties this week
Rowe, national
for Mrs. Richard
president of the fraternity, who was a
guest at the Kappa house on Harrison
The festivities included a
avenue.
bridge party at the house Monday afternoon; tea at the home of Mr. and
Alpha Zeta Dance
Mrs. Joseph S. Botts in Fayette Park,
The members of Alpha Zeta, honorTuesday; and a banquet at the Phoefraternity, have
ary agricultural
nix Hotel Tuesday evening at which
issued invitations for their annual
alumnae, active members and pledges
dance which is to be given Friday
were present.
evening, March 31. at the Phoenix
Hotel.
PI Pledging
Tau Beta
The pledging of six new men to
Alpha XI Delta Dance
Tau Beta Pi fraternity was the most
An informal dance was given by
important event at the lovely dance
of Alpha XI
given by Alpha chapter at the Phoe- members and pledges
Delta fraternity at their chapter house
nix Hotel Friday night. The pledges
Saturday evenare always kept secret until the pledg- in Lyndhurst Place on
were used
ing takes place in the middle of the ing. Pink roses and plants
according to decorate the house and an orchestra
evening. They are chosen
Punch was
to class standing from various depart-Halse- furnished the music.
evening.
L. Royden, Civil Engineering served during the
The hostesses were: Roxane TrimThose so honored this year are: Herble, Dorothy Blatz, Elizabeth Brown,
man L. Straus, Byron Williams and
Pennington,
Halsey L. Royden, Cicil Engineering Lois Pearl, Kajtherine
Ellis,' Shelby Northcutt,
Department; Willis T. Downing and Elizabeth
Mary Elizabeth Crafton, Sara
Paul Ballinger, Mechanical EngineerElizabeth Guthrie, Lillian Alliing; Merritt Skidmore. Mining EngiG ingles,
neering.
The hosts for the dance son, Elizabeth WilliamsNell
Bell,
were: J. W. Crenshaw, G. W. Benson, Lula Blakey, Mary Archer
Elizabeth
Murphy,
Lee
Burks, R. H. Craig, Georgia
J. W. Owens, J. E.
Kathleen
Noe,
Rowena
W. B. Davis, T. M. Riley, S. M. Spears, Lovett,
Holmes, Laula
C. R, Bourland, G. K. Nicholson, and Edwards, Elizabeth
Morris, Sarah
Hubbard, Elizabeth
D. L. Thornton.
Morris and Helen Beasley.
men from
The guests included
Pi Kappa Alpha Banquet
Founder's Day an- each of the fraternities and several
The
franiversary of the Pi Kappa Alpha fra- girls from Lexington and other
Saturday even- ternities.
ternity was celebrated
ing in the Palm Room of the Phoenix
Sigma Alpha Epsllon 'Dance
Hotel with a banquet in honor of Mr.
Sigma Alpha
of
The members
Frederick D. Lotter of Cincinnati,
Epsllon fraternity were hosts at a
memprlnceps of District seven. The
on South
bers of Alumnus Rho chapter, Omega dance at the chapter house
evening. The
chapter of the University, and Kappa Limestone Saturday
tho
chapter of Transylvania were pres- fraternity colors were used in
as effective decorations and ices were
ent. Dr. E. Conley Elliott acted
detoastmaster and responses from each served. This was one of the most
chapter were given. The tables were lightful affairs of the week.
Members of the active chapter and
arranged so as to form the letter Pi
pledges who entertained are:
and were decorated with the colors
William G. Kafauver, Robert Lavin.
and the flower of the fraternity, garH.
net and gold and lillies of the valley. Norman Witt, J. R. Pepper T.
Hagan, Gerald Griffin, G. M. Patterson, B. C. Rogers, Roscoe Little, John
Freshman Dance
Russell,
The class of 1925 entertained with Whitaker, A. T. Rice, Milton
Roberts,
its first anual dance Saturday after- John Tlnsley, Earl Martin,
BaBll
noon in Buell Armory. The programs John Strode, John Albright,
green Preston, J. Miller Dundon, Gardner
were white booklets tied with
leather cords and the armory was Bayless, Sam Caldwell, John Dundon,
beautifully decorated in the freshman C. H. Cates, Henry Jackson, Raymond
Jenkins, Raymond Morrallee, Harry
colors, green and white.
The guests were received by the Layman, Pat Ryan, Paul Adklns, M.
Walter Ferguson, K. Eblen, Owen Kolley, Cecil Page,
class officers,
Finnic.
Gordon
Martha Bedford, Nan Chenault and William BlUlter,
Ted Brewer, assisted by the commit- James Wilhelm and Thomas Herndon.
tee, William Jarvis, William Tate, and
Charles B. Robinson, who has comJ. C. Baughman.
There were several hundred stu- pleted a course at the University, was
dents and their guests present for this entertained with a supper party at
successful event. The music was tho Candle Glow Inn Sunday night by
Harry B. Tllton. Mr. Boblnson refurnished by a saxophone sextette.
turns to his homo in Cambridge, Va.,
soon. Tho guests wore Dorothy Blatz,
PI Kappa Tau Dance
Minnie Mao
Kappa chapter of Phi Kappa Tau Dayslo Lee Tlnsley,
fraternity entertained delightfully Robinson, Joseph Grimes, Charles B.

J

y

Card-wel-

l,

But he's really trying out
for Sales Manager
baseball
who comes
THE freshman who sticks is out for a lesson
learning
manager and

fifty-secon- d

1

Published in
the interest of Elec
trical Development by
an Institution that will
be helped by what
ever helps tho
Industry.

which, whether or not it wins that honor for him,
should win some honors in after life.
lie will learn that his plugging on the diamond,
his efforts four years hence to get the upper hand
on his first job, and after that his striving to climb
into the managerial and executive class are all
part of the same game.
Now, just as ten years from now, he will have
to do many things that are hard, many things that
are unpleasant. The more willing he is, the more
work will other men put upon him. But by that
he grows.
The rewards after college are given on about the
same basis as now. They go to the man who besides
doing his main job well, still has the time to reach
out after other work and the spirit that masters it.
Here is where this comes home to you. Don't
be content with standing high in the classroom.
Support your college activities and go after some
campus honors too. This broadening of your
interests will become a habit that in after life will
prove a mighty big help.

Astern Electric Company
Since 1869 makers

and distributors of electrical

equipment

Numbtr 16 of a

ttrin

4

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Hi

Ml.

3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Ai umni Notes
the University nro scattored through
out Kentucky. They nro prominent in
business and In tho progressions.
Their typo will bo cnllod on more
often in tho next decade to hold pub
lic office.

CLUB CALENDAR

Pnducnh, April
Ct

3

(First Tuesday)

p. in.

Highland
Cincinnati, April I.
Country Club.
Huslncss nicotine
and dnncc.
Denver, Colo., April 6 (First
Thursday)
nt University Club,

X4--

Lexington, April 8,
(Second
Saturday) Phoenix Hotel, 12:30 p.
in.
10,

(Second

Club,

A.

Betwixt Us

In Readiness
For Spring

Kcccntiy nn niumnus, who is a life
member of the Association, sent In
dues for one year and asked that
Kernel bo sent "whore it would do tho
most good." Tho Kernel was immediately started to a rlassmato and nftcr
two Issues, this nluiuntis sent In dues.
The Kernel Is being started to
classmnto this week. A class
secretary has taken this method of
awakening Interest
In tho
Alma
Mnter with his classmates and Is get
ting results. Do n little missionary
work with the Kernel and bring them
into line.

The approach of Spring finds us
in complete readiness to supply
your apparel wants for this new
season.... College men will find
our Spring displays of unusual
interest. We have used exacting
care in selecting garments that
emphasize the spirit and vigor
of youth and they are sure to
meet with your approval.

RELATION STANDING OF CLASS
Tho Class organization Is one of tho
strongest units in any Alumni organization. Tho class secretory is the
keystone. University
of Kentucky
class secretaries are above the average reported by tho Association of
Alumni Secretaries.
Fine work lias
Lee Land Hanks,
Secretary- been done in tho last year and a half.
of
Lumber
The percent of active members has Treasurer
Company, Lexington: "Enclosed And
risen from 11 to 32.
my chock for nlumni duos for the cur
rent year. Would have mailed you
u a the check sooner but It hnd entirely
,3
slipped my mind. " Mrs. Hanks was
Class Secretary
formerly Miss Irene Robertson, '20,
and a young Lee Land, Jr. In the homo
will be one of future stars of the
18C9-S41
9
Peter
when he joins the Wildcats.
'90 Brock

12:30 p. in.

Nev York, April
Monday) at Bankers

X

I

xx

12:30

p. in.

ex-2-

Carrollton, Ky April 11 (Second
Tuesday), luncheon.
Washington April 14, (Second
Friday)
Chicago, April 15. Will be banquet for senior engineers on nnnunl
inspection trip.
Philadelphia, April 15 (Third
Saturday).
Pittsburg, April 15 (Third Saturday).
arrangepending
Indefinite
ments for President McVey's visit.

Smith-Haggar-

8

'91

' '92

Student Loan Fund Grows
X The Fund for aiding worthp students which originated among alumni
of the University as a few hundred
dollars is now not far from the ten
thousand dollar mark.
Plans are
maturing for raising this to $50,000.
Professor W. E. Webb '01, chair
man of the University
Committee,
which now handles all applications for
loans, has started a letter campaign
which is getting wonderful results
Alumni have been among the largest
donors, but civic clubs throughout the
State have taken an increasing inter
.est in the movement and are raising
"considerable sums. One of the first
of these is the Woman's History Club
of Mt. Sterling, where the work was
under the direction of Mrs. Nell W,
Duerson '03. One hundred dollars has
been raised already and Mrs. Duerson says the fund will be increased.
Will Meet
Executive
in June will
The Alumni
be one of the principal matters taken
up at a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Association some time
next week.
A detailed report on legislation will
be made by Herbert Graham, who re
presented the University and the Association at Frankfort during the entire session of the General Assembly.
Ballots for the election of officers
of the Association will be prepared for
distribution April 1. Amendments to
the Constitution will be considered at
the same time. Some action will be'
taken on an extension policy for the
Association.
n

X

X

"Our Cause Is Right"
"The Legislature has adjourned but
the work for Kentucky must never
Auljourn," says President Rodman
Wiley in an open letter to the alumni.
"Let us not wait until two or three
months before the next Legislature
convenes to let the people know what
is needed to be done by Kentucky for
education.
"It has always been my belief that
the majority will do the right thing
if they know the facts. Tell the
what Kentucky is doing for Kentucky. By all means don't become
discournged. It is in time of troublo
men and
or distress that strong
women are needed. Our cause Is
right. Let us go ahead to the end
that Kentucky will bo recognized as
groat universities
of
ono of the
America."
peo-pl-

X

X

"Kentucklans" Serve State
Countless nlumni are serving tho
State ns county and commonwealth attorneys, judges, mayors, commissioners, high and low State officials,
superintendents of schools, heads of
departments in collegos and universities and in other posts. More alumni
will be candidates for office in the
next election because of a recognized
fitness for public service. Two have
announced already for Congress.
Ten thousand former students of

o

spring styles.

Is Represented on Campus by
George (Red) Woolf.

grid-Iro-

'93

xx
Committee

Come in for a look at the new

'94
'95
'

'9G

'97
'98
'99
'00
'01
'02
'03
'04
05
0G

'07
'08
'09
'10
'11
'12
'13
'14
'15
1G

Muncy
Maxey
Hobdy
Mrs. Kesheimer
Miss Didlake . .
Davidson
Simrall
Campbell
Vance
Frankel
Daugherty ....
Barr
Whittinghill ..
Freeman
Edwards
Brown
Hillenmeyer
Battaile
Carroll
Terrell
Mrs. Wilson
Duncan
Lewis
Dabney
Bailey
Heller-Nelso-

n

Crum
'18 Hunt
'19 Planck
'20 Creech
'21 Railile
Total
Acting .Secretary
"17

2

5

1

9

0

13

0

17

5

18

7

X

27
38--

10

o

20

28

8

30

19

5

26

24

10

41

28

G

21

39

10

25

43

10

23

41

9
22

30

58

18

31

61

22

G9

83

22
28

36
32
33

G6

2G

87
SO

20
26

93

23

110
121
166
149
132

31
34
48

X4

39-- 3

23
32
28

54

28
30
36

48

36

28

30

101 43
143 47
148 5S
2,177 698

42

.

94

X

(Incorporated)

140

VES T MAIN STREET

Hot Stuff
Shine: "Who was dat good lookin
chicken wid you last night?"
Ola: "Niggar! Dat'a my gal."
Shine: "I means
she's a reg'lar
Vesuvius."

The Game
Joy ride and the girls ride with you;
Stroll, and you stroll alone,
For this is the day of the damsels gay,
Who consider the stroller a drone.

A lumni Directory

Feast, and the girls feast with you:
Fast, and you fast uncheered.
For they like to dine and drink rare wine,
And dance when the floor is cleared.

j

$$$

J$J

$

J

'

$

The F. D. Lawrence
Electric Co.

:
:

I

Cincinnati, Ohio

:

Fourth St.

I

Electrical Supplies
Wholesale
Distributors for the
Electric Co.

J
:

General

WARNER P. SAYERS.

X

James Edward McMurtery '17 is
Sec'y, Sales Mgr.
33
employed in the Division of Tobacco
39
Investigation, Bureau of Plant Indus
32
try, U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Average
Washington D. C.
X
X
Joseph Sammuel McMurtry, '17, Is PIace
Your Subscription
Danville Alumni Are Busv
farming in Harding County, address
Chas. L. Taylor '21 is County
Vine Grove, Ky.
For Any Magazine
Agricultural Agent for Boyle County
X
X
and is making good. He has a way of
John Theodore Faig '94 is President
gaining the respect and confidence of
with RANSOM '05
of Ohio Mechanics Institute, Cincineven the most conservative and
nati and resides at 3345 Whitfield
farmers.
Avenue. For a number of years ProThe Magazine Man
Louis Piper is principal of the Danfessor Faig was Professor of Mechaniville High School and is held in the
cal Engineering at the University of
highest esteem here.
Blandville, Ky.
Cincinnati and left there in 1916 to
Edgar F. Bates '13 is a member of accept
presidency of Ohio Metho
the firm of Bates and Paynter, Civil chanics Institute.
Engineers and Contractors.
He is
X
X
also past Commander of Boyle Post
Victor Emanuel Muncy '91 is another
of the Am