xt7mw6695w01 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7mw6695w01/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660404  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  4, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  4, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7mw6695w01 section xt7mw6695w01 T"3T- -

T

Vol.LVII, No. Ill

'I

I

"VI

'I

TT

l

Inside Todays Kernel

Tl

T

Centraf established ot
Center: faqe Two.

'Poison

Voting Demi president defends club's
activities: faqe four.

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KY., MONDAY, AmiL 4, I6

Eight Tagcs

i

i

'

it

'in

:

hi

m

-

J

'm

v

in Tie Handlebars Is

Campus police Friday began tagging motorbikes,
cycles, and motorscooters parked illegally, like
this one on the drive near Frazce Hall. Maximum
fine for any parking or moving violation is $2, but
that soon will be changed, according to campus

Worth $2 In The Wallet

police. A crackdown was ordered, University officials said, because of concern with the safety of
students. About 24 citations were issued over the
weekend. Story, another photo, page eight.
Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

Six Given Oswald Awards
At Special Dinner Sunday
By RON HERRON

Kernel Staff Writer
Dr. John W. Oswald nave
away the first awards to bear
his name Sunday evening at the
and
Research
Undergraduate
Banquet.
Creativity
Six "Oswald Award" plaques
were handed out, one to each
winner.
The winning paper in the biological sciences was "The Effect
on Zea mays,"
of Photo-perio- d
by James Zieman.
Thomas Baker took the fine
arts award, for his painting,
"Road Landscape Our Lady of
the Freeway."
"One Damn Thing After Anstory by
other," a short
was the
Evola,
Christopher
winning paper in the humanities.
Two plaques were awarded
in the physical sciences, for
"Beams on Elastic, Plastic Foundations," done jointly by Ben T.
Qui nn and Otis G. Newman.

tditor discusses
cos'; p9e Four

Iowa

child custody

Advantages of foil sorority rush outlined in University Soapbot: faqe Five.
Kentucky

Relays scheduled this week

end: toqe Six.
Wildcats lose two baseball games to
Tennessee:

Page Seven.

'Legalize' War
In Vietnam,
M orse Urges
By BILL KNAPP
Kernel Staff Writer
Sen. Wayne Morse
Saturday urged President Johnson
to obtain a declaration of war from Congress or bring U.S. involvement in Vietnam within the "framework of international law," by
taking the crisis to the United Nations.
Speaking at the Law Day
banquet here Saturday night, is taking us down the road to
Sen. Morse said, "We must stop war, not peace.
"A declaration of war brings
expanding the Vietnam war" by
reducing it to a holding action immediate change in your rela"while the noncombatant memtions with other nations before
bers of the U.N. fulfill their the ink dries, and ourallies would
under
the U.N. not respect our position," he said.
obligations
charter to undertake to arrange
"With a declaration of war
a cease-fir- e
and to enforce it." we would
mine
probably
"I never thought my country Haiphong harbor, but the French,
would napalm (fire bomb) civilian
British, Spanish, and Italians
villages," Sen. Morse said, "nor wouldn't lower their flag to such
did I ever think I would see the a blockade because they do not
day when the President could
Continued on Page 3
send boys to death, except for
immediate defense of the country,
without a declaration of war from
Congress."
Sen. Morse maintains the U.S.
has no legal position in the
Vietnam crisis, and pointed out a
clear distinction between the
NATO and the SEATO treaties.
"In NATO the terms of the
treaty itself make clear that no
further constitutional processes
Outstanding law students
are necessary in case of an attack
were honored Saturday at their
a treaty partner. Such an
upon
college s Awards Luncheon, part
attack creates a state of war, of the
campus Law Week celeinsofar as the United States is
bration.
concerned," he said.
Sen. Thurs"But this is not the case ton Banquet speaker
B. Morton
presented
under SEATO, which specifically
the awards.
provides that an armed aggresThose recognized for having
sion shall be met in accordance
attained the highest grade in their
with the constitutional processes
class and subject were:
of each country," Sen. Morse
Ed Abel, Business Assocsaid.
iations; Doug Hubbard, CommerSen. Morse pointed to the
cial Law ; Ron Endicott, Compar- intention of the "founding
fathers," cited the "Federalist
Partial text of Sen. Morton's
Papers", and quoted President speech, page five.
Woodrow Wilson's 1917 address
to Congress: "I am powerless to ative Law; Eugene Mullins and
declare war without a declaraLarry Newman (tie), Constitution of war from Congress."
tional Law I; David Mason,
Criminal Law; and Steve Frocht,
Sen. Morse said President
Johnson has not sought a declaraFamily Law.
Laurence Crause, Labor Law ;
tion of war because it would be
Continued on Page 3
an open admission that Johnson
(D-Ore- .)

C
Ticfce

Med-ic-

Craig Love won the award in
the social sciences, for his paper
on "Conformity and Its Relationship to Reference Croups."
Before awarding the plaques,
Dr. Oswald said it was the first
lime an award had been named
for him, and he had first been a
little frightened by the idea of
being in midstream of such a
project.
He expressed a special interest
in the undergraduate, ". . . not
as inhibited as the graduate student, w ho is beginning to narrow
down," he judged.
"As we (the University) grow
bigger," Dr. Oswald continued,
"we must preserve the opportunity for the individual student."
The undergraduate research idea
may be the thing to provide that
opportunity," he said.
Richard W. Sanies, keynote
speaker, emphasized the value
of the program to faculty as well
as to students. He is program

Candidates To Debate
SC Election Questions
A debate between the candidates for
of Student
Congress will be held following the presidential debate at 3 p.m.
Tuesday in the Student Center Theater.
Both John O'Brien and Carson Porter, candidates for President
of Student Congress, have agreed to the debate which will be open
to all University students.
Marsha Fields and Oscar Wcsterfield will discuss their ideas
on the role of the vice president in policy problems coming before
the Student Congress.
Tom Post, of the Off Campus Student Association and director
of the debate, said the candidates will also present their opinions
on other issues relevant to the vice presidential election.
Some of the major issues to be discussed will be Student Center
Board-StudeCongress merger, a book exchange, and strengthening
the summer employment service.
Elections for both executive and representative positions will
be held Thursday. Ballots will be marked by hand.

director of the National Science
Foundation's
Undergraduate
Instructional Scientific Equipment Program."
"It's a time for faculty members to sit down and think very
closely about w hat we are doing,"
Dr. Samcs said. "In the final
analysis, we honor the students
because of the need we have for

them."
The really sharp student could
keep a professor on his toes, he
pointed out, if he were honest
enough, and brave enough to
complain a little about the weaknesses of the particular course
or method of teaching it.
"We're learning the methodology of learning," he said. "We
forget that there's a little bit of
fifth column here the person
who really learns from undergraduate study is the professor."
"You find that if you keep
up undergraduate research very
long, you have to read outside
of your field."

if
v.

,

Law School
Recognizes
28 Students
.)

"i

.

.

nt

i

--

SEN. WAYNE MORSE

v

"

ATTORNEY MELVIN BELLI

* T

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday. April 4.

2

A fifteen

16

Questions

'Poison Central'
Established Here
SCHNEIDER

By ANN

Kernel Staff Writer
i

jtiK.

the run)
t !"ixi v.X i Xt

v

which rru
i: hordes

jvivns
v'.j;!

be

arJ

Dr. Mail Liukt:-.tl;:o:ti of
the l"k Institute .! Lr.ir;:-r.HT.ti- l
Tovk1vV ai.d CVvupa-tun-- l
.

Hxpcr.e.
e:r.'hivi

thai

Sa
v

a.Ui-tjcn-

is reUastvl

il

c :i

poison information dur.r.c March
Foison
which was Na:n-.r.a-l
Control Wed.
Diiiir.,; that w k, and also the
rest of the eaj. rrprfstr.tati e
22-2- 9

fro :n t hi s a froc t ra

x

1

arvm ixi t he

state talking to aiious
about cr.iror.r.xntal jviscns.
Dr. Locifiii explains that the
porch is Uikirrd to meet the
nerd of the pwip being
"If one of the uF b
.
to a FT A protp he
ouV3 stress preciu-tioaar- y
he
rv.tsures to keep chil-cbfrom
all oinc poisooous
trea.t-roesubstances, xnd first-ai- d
until the 8octo cooes.
If 7ralir to a farm or
rrou . Dr. Lucies says
the yf al ti will discus prob3 kt.s
r
to theor axea, such as
partiw-Iapoisccs in irectuiies. paints.
iShi other irjiustnal material.
Poison Central w as crarured
in lrS2, a.nd smoe that turve has
served pnmarJ as a supporter.
s

spe-akicr-

si.

m

ct

for

izcncs

nvformation icrittrs K
around the state.
It j a part of the state-unl- e
FYivn Cor.trol Program which is
.atr.fl o;.t m :.: ,ctn nw iththe
State rVpijtr.xnt of Health.
If a phician or other trained
person ha a case in clung
poison, and can $ct no information on the poison from a
hospital or information crater,
he can contact Foison Central.
Poison Central can offer an
explanation of treatment a:xl
jjmptoms. information on composition of the poison, emergency
can get
analysis, and if
m t ouc h w it h e pert s and re searc h
centers around the nation.
Dr. Luc lens estimate that
in liro Pctscci Central handled 33
to 35 calls a month dealing with
natural and syctheiic poisons
found in the home, on the farm,
in the citA. and in industry.
Poison Central is new planbining to brpn publishing a
news letter to be sent to
monthly
techmcaJ persons dealing with
the composition, storage and
handling, clinical tciiiccJogy, diagnosis, and treatment cf various
poisons.
Also Poison Central is developing a Registry of Clinical
Toxical ogy and Yeierinarx
unique in the country,
which fathers and correlates data
on poison on a statewide basis
for consultation and disinbution
to agencies.

the eifht reponal

Tou-oolcg-

y.

Campus Happenings
ZTAs

Kappa Sigs

Officers cf Zeta Tau .lpha at
L'K are. president. Judy Smith;
ic-president. Jeanne Ferrell.
Joanne
secretary.
Schick elh correspr-ndinsecretary. Pns Carter; treasurer.
Cheryl Robson. assistant treasurer. Jane Robers: rush chairman. Ann Blartmann. pled.e
trainer. Shirley Wilson.
H:use
Nancy
president.

cf
elected ofrk-rr:gma are George
Kappa
president. K:n Kesshng.
v
j.t president. Jim E ssen.
Gene
. Jeff Points, treasurer.
Reve-ntl-

An-o:u- iu.

fairer,

recc-rdini-

:

4

i
E-t-

Nichols and Jeff

.h

Alpha Gams

MjLi.

Ga-i-

Delta

-.a

JO'fc'ii

poison

FYnson Cr.til.
l"k
hclpr.c to inJVein tiaintx! per-timl all ott the tife abo;t
A

ha.s

Th:mass:-n-

ntual

.

chairman.

elected new cfSoers for l?yZ. Linda Ra.nkin. hist orian reporter.
are president. Marx
Li2 How ard, standards chairman.
De an 1st
president. Francie Fenickc music
Bobete Sch;iff.2rjd jcepiresident. Cmr: Huston, publicity chairBeth Brand eriburr,. ruih cr.a.r-ma.- n man, Marva Ga .
and Pari ell erc delegate.
Maganre chairman. Marraret
Nancy Dorton. b:mse cLairrr.r.. Denham. sorority appreciation
Pat Roan.
chairman, Diane C:dman; repre-sentat.
R:tm .m and
to alumnae. Barb
Susan Blair, recording secretar. Hanna. s:ial
Mary
Linda Stexens. actrxities chairin g secret ar, Kathleen Godnji. man. Donna Part on.
Actiities cvxhairman. Linda
editor.
Fiero. activities. Cruii.. schcarship chairman.
Denis e Wis el. piard. Yict:ra Joy
Bluerrielein.
Vette-r- . charcaun. Jane Wells.
chaim-an-.
Mary Faraci. and
Intramurals. Laura Milium, recTcrnendations
serial
Dznna Dietnch, Nanc Rudr..k
standards chairman. Naicv C a
merril'ersiup chairrruLn. Sje
use the
Dcrtcn. semi; leader. Ca.r.cn
O'Brien, and l.brarian. Er bar-B- e
rend.

The

cha-irma-

,

.

M

af

V

m

v'
ioung,

Lnn

LsmnS

Tm
FiSAL

X

Paris

fit ioi

A UK

the

Owensboro; Janie Claire Barber,
Morehead; Linda Smith, Louisville; Mickey Levy, Lexington.
Betty Hendry, Huntsville,
Ala.; Patricia Jo Stacy, West
Liberty; Ann E. Harris, Fairfax,
Va.; Stephanie Ann Grizzell,
Metuchen,
N.J.; Jaye Anna

coed could be named
Lexington to-

new Miss
morrow- evening.

Eleven w omen from the University have been nominated to
ie for the title. The winner w ill
be the city's entry in the Miss
Kentucky pageant of the Miss
America competition that is held
in September in Atlantic City.
Maria Scale Fletcher, 1962
Miss America, has been named
as the mistress of ceremonies.
Selection for the contest will be
based on talent, bathing suits,
evening wear and the interviews
with the judges.
The new Miss Lexington will
receive a x0 scholarship as part
of her prizes.
The nominees from UK are
Stephanie Lxn Lewder. Henderson. Barbara
Jean Banken.

Ct V

ytttir

t

tDOUs MUL IS, Tfe
Sc Soli Mii.Vt. Loom I?t,

4

yuh

iUt6emt

tt

i

Jack

Tony

Lotnmon-Carti- s

NatalleWood

"The Greatness"
TtSUODT WUUfSCI'

FKM

At 1:00, 3:40,

.

.

WLW! VXSiUl

620,

9: 00

NOW!
trf?

fi I
ft

V-- J

tr

COLUM3.

.fT?
a 4 iTj

pct-tk-i-

-.

A

s

EATJ

t

'

A

nnnnriH

IIVUUII11I
1
sMArrnOM

Tun

)

g5ll.I.NC.!.RS
C0LUV51AC0L0R

.

You Can Still Join The

University Groups Leaving for

EUROPE
THREE WEEKS

Mcy

12-Ju-

ne

2
23

$659
$698

Aug.
Phone Immediately for Application
LEXINGTON TRAVEL CENTER, Inc.
g.

179 EAST HIGH STREET
266-315-

Ltam Europe from behind th

IN EUROPE

1

VILLAGE CLEANING
A.SD SHOIT

ST.

CENTER

1031

NEW CIRCLE
ROAD

Easter Special!
FREE
ORCHIDS

With any $3 order of
(Offer good while they last)
LAUKDEIEO TO PERFECTION

5

for $1.19

tx.

VILLAGE CLEANING
CHASING
FRII rLRKUNG

CENTER

counter.

25000 JOBS

student
applicant receives a $250 travel grant and a paying job
in Europe such as office, factory, sales, resort, farm work,
etc. Send $2 (for handling
and airmail) to Dept. O, American Student Information
Service. 22 Ave. de la Liberte,
Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
for a 3tvpage booklet giving
all jobs, details and travel
grant application forms.
Luxembourg-Eac-

Shirts

Cttw, I A. XJ

:.

Young, Princeton; and Gwynne
Deal, Wheelright.
The 12th nominee is Cheryl
Kay Hughes, a senior at Lexington Lafayette High School.
The contest will be held at
8 p.m. at Henry Clay High
School auditorium.

8th Great Week!
.

HAVE YOU HEARD?

London

'OR?

Bank en,

11

BinBinB

Dryclcaning.

S331

ci...

Eleven Coeds To Compete
In Miss Lexington Pageant

GROUP JET FLIGHT

New York

picture are Barbara

.:.:..

StcpJianic Ann Grizzell.

second row,
and Jaye
Lowder and Linda Smith, third

Janie Barber
Stephanie

row. Absent from
i ...
r
r

nominees from UK arc left to

Miss Lexington

.

EuroD

;

5

ci-rr-

IViSTJIflDS

,r

a

r

ie

Trea-surers-

r

I

S MINUTES FROM
UK CAMPUS

h

The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky. LexSconJ-ington. Kentucky,
pottage pid at Lexington, Kentucky,
rubhshevi five times meekly during
the school ear except durunf holidays
and exam periods, and meekly duruvj
the unmer semeter.
Iiblihe4 (or the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of StudeiU Pubiicatmns, Prof. Pul
Oberst. chairnan and londa Cassamay.
ecretary.
lWun as the Cadet In ISM. became the Kecord In A. and the Idea
in
kblished conunuously as the
Kernel since ItlV
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearl)', by mau 47.04
IVe copy, from file 9 1
KT.RN1X TO XT HONES
EdiUv, kxecMUe Kdttor, kianaa-uv-e
VSX
KdU
N
IVU, Sports, Women's Editor.
tSSH
Socials
AdverUsuvc. Busmeca, CirculaUon lil

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

Morse Talks War
At Law Program

Continued From raje 1
support our position in Vietnam.
Sen. Morse sees the NATO
treaty as outmodetr'likesomany
military policies of history, designed to cope with past problems more than with current or
future ones."
At the Law Day awards
luncheon Saturday, Sen. Thrus-to- n
Morton
outlined a
course of action to be taken
to save NATO which urges
President Johnson to go to Paris,
"and only Paris, to sit down
with President Dc Gaulle and
talk over the problems of NATO."
"It seems to me the President
of the United States, who has
a great reputation for salesmanship and persuasion, could indeed
convince the president of France
that the NATO alliance is imperative not only from a military
standpoint but culturally and
economically as well."
Sen. Morton called upon the
U.S. "to recognize European aspirations for changes in the Atlantic alliance, and to bear part
of the burden for the impasse
in which NATO finds itself as
a result of events of recent
weeks."
"Dc Gaulle has raised some
appropriate questions without
the
providing
appropriate
answers," Sen. Morton said. "It
should be the task of U.S. diplomacy to suggest answers in
response to the questions which
President De Gaulle has posed."
Sen. Morton urged the U.S.

Whs I oil
mm

to come to grips with the problem of how to put European
fingers on the NATO nuclear
trigger. He suggested programs
of technological collaboration
within the alliance as a means
to keep NATO alive in the face
of withdrawal of French forces
from the alliance and ordering
its troops from French soil.
To strengthen NATO, Sen.
Morton urged the U.S. to "seize
this opportunity to bring Spain
into NATO," "to compose the

.)

Greek-Turkis-

quarrel," "to

h

Mini

im-

prove relations with Portugal,"
and "find a NATO voice for
West Cermany."
Melvin Belli, noted trial
lawyer and third featured speaker,
called attention Friday to the
"revolution in the law, through
in the last 12 years.
"In the last few years, the
courts, notably the U.S. Supreme
Court, have extended the Bill of
Rights to the states, changed
drastically the law concerning
search and seizure, insured an
accused's right to counsel, and
refused to admit coerced confessions, all within the last five
years.
"In so changing the law, the
courts are not coddling criminals,
but are protecting the rights of
the accused," Mr. Belli said.
"Lawyers are not hired by
noble folk and must be extremely
ethical to compensate for their
clients, for behind many lawyers
their is a crooked layman," he
said.

''
' "''

1

ith

Correction
election
Student Congress
officials incorrectly reported a
candidate's name in Friday's
Kernel.
not
Randy Mabry,
Randolph Mahny, is a candidate
for a Congress representative post
in Thursday's election.

Miz

Dftz Bzz
121

A YARN SHOP

Run-ners--

Walton Avenue
Beatrice

Lexington,
E. Barnes

Ky.

10-- 5

Open
Closed

is

Closed.

M

II

M

II

J

M

HONDA

PBIZE

"50"

MOTORCYCLE

'HONDA 50" model CA 100 courtesy of
NICKENS HONDA, 1156 Industry Road.

unND
THRU

IHH
nil PRIZES

TRANSISTOR
POCKET RADIOS
look
Because you meet the nicest people on a HONDA
best wear WEBSTER clothes! This semester be a
your
Contest and
real BMOC! Enter the Webster
the wonderful world of 2 wheels (if you're the Lucky
join
Number 1 Winner!) Or a beautiful, powerful pocket Transistor Radio to the next 5 Lucky Winners. It's so easy.
Nothing to write. Nothing to buy. Just fill in an Official Entry
Blank in the store lobby. GRAND DRAWING will be held on
SATURDAY, MAY 7th. Full details available from any
WEBSTER sales advisor. Come in today and drive out a
sport! ENTER NOW!
WIN-A-HOND- A

WEBSTER CONTEST SPECIAL
Sta-Pre- ss

regular $5.95

"1
I

Casual Slacks

2 for $11 00

Famous "KORATRON" treated for extra protection and
Two popular styles Dacron & Cotton
or "FORTREL" and Cotton twill. Choose from a
poplin
variety of colors in all sizes!
crease-resistanc-

Wife

MEN'S
WEAR

lOI W. MAIN STREET
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
Open late Monday nights

Wednesday
Phone
252-758- 8

Sale of Winter Yarns and Kits!
Take advantage of these
Big Savings NOW!
The Campus Bee Hive

'

S13T

Law Students Honored
Advocate
Oral
Mitchell,
Award; William G. Kenton, Roy
M. Moreland Award; Barry Benton, Lexington Legal Aid Award;
and M. Eugene Mullins, Lawyers
Title Citation award.
The Clarence Darrow Society's top award went to Scotty
Baesler, outgoing president of the
Student Bar Association.
were Marshall F. Loy,
and Grause.
Elected by the faculty to the
Order of the Coif were Lawrence
Grause, Marshall Loy, James
Auritt, and Don Clapp, with five
others to be elected followingthe
outcome of final exams.
Dean Matthews of the College
of Law announced that the faculty is establishing a chair in
Professor Moreland's name, a
chair of law. Professor Moreland
is retiring after this semester as
Professor of Criminal Law after 43
years on the faculty here.
The Student Bar Association
announced that officers for next
year will be Clyde Richardson,
second
representative,
year
Dwayne Schwartz, third year
John McCann, treasurer, Miss Truitt, secretary,
Frank Reeves, vice president, and
Mitch McConnell, president.

Wliu

1

,"

Continued From Page 1
Mike Cox, Charles Simmons, and
Charles David Emerson (tie),
Legal Bibliography; Paul Blair,
Taxation I; Joe Bill Campbell,
Torts I.
AnnTruilt received the Kappa
Beta Tau award for outstanding
service rendered in founding the
school's new legal sorority.
Phi Alpha Delta legal fraternity presented their outstanding
May Graduate award to Wendell
Roberts, andoutstanding December graduate award to Robert
Barrett. Professor Roy Moreland
was presented an award for his
outstanding contribution to the
fraternity.
Delta Theta Phi law fraternity
honored Professor Garret W.
Flickinger for his efforts in getting
the fraternity chartered and organized on campus.
Phi Delta Phi law fraternity
presented the Harry Chesney
Award to Mike Livingston, and
the McEwcn award to Dale Mitchell for his outstanding achievement in moot court.
Winners of the Moot Court
Board awards were Mitchell and
Escom Moore Jr.
The Student Bar Association
established an annual award to
be presented in Professor James
R. Richardson's name for excellence in trial practice. Steve
Frocht was named this year's
winner.
Barlow Ropp was named winner of the Professional Responsibility Award.
Other award recipients were:

1900 -- 3

1,

HONDA HEADQUARTERS in LEXINGTON is
1172 Industry Road, Behind Eastland Shopping Center

* "Political Affluence Has Its Problems Too, Harold"

Good Iowa Values?
Child custody cases usually arc stable." The court said the Painters'
home, in contrast to the
routine court matters, rarely attracting public attention. But a recent
atmosphere of the boy s
one in Iowa has interested a great grandparents' farm, was "intellecmany arsons in that it may involve tually stimulating."
a court test of constitutional rights.
The court based its rulings not
on facts (Painter has a steady inboy
Custody of an
come and a good education and has
has been awarded to his grandnot been charged with misconduct
parents rather than to his father on
toward his son nor any one else) but
the basis that the father's life is
"too bohemian. " The ruling ignores on the justice s emotional av ersion
the established principle that a to a bohemian style life over the
e
pattern of
child always is placed with a sur- traditional family-lifIn its riding, the
Midwestern Iowa.
viving parent unless that parent is
court even stated the grandparents
found unsuitable.
home wou'd be more conducive to
The court found photographer
development of traditional values.
Harold Painter unsuitable because
We are not certain that an enhis life was "bohemian and un- - vironment
promoting traditional
v allies is better than one which is
intellectually stimulating. More important than that, however, is the
fact that the father has been
We note in passing the formation
stripped of a right he normally
of
University of Kenwould hav e because of his personal
tucky Athletic Teams Supporters.
beliefs. It is even more incredible
Inc. whose avowed purpose is to that the condemnation on the basis
"promote L'K athletics and athletic of his agnostic beliefs came from a
within
state high court of law.
programs
schools." This means, we presume,
The precendent, that persons
bally hooing and rec ruiting in behalf
holding minority views and exof the University football and basthese views to their children
ketball teams by former "stars " and posing
risk loss of custody of their own
a host of rooters who never themoffspring, is apalling.
selves wore varsity jersies at any
The Iowa justices who unanicollege.
mously backed giving custody to
It is a satl commentary on the grandparents were surprised by
modern values that the University
the national attention focused on
is first the central point for the
the case. But those who would play
formation of
rather than God in forcing minds of others to
conform to their molds rarely see
University of Kentucky
Academic Program Supporters, Inc. the faults in their logic.
eight-year-ol- d

U-KAP-

S?

Letters To The Editor:

Reader Reviews Activities
Of Young Democrats Club
To the

Editor of the Kernel:

To set the record straight in
answer to the editorial of March 30
"rejuvi nation of YR,YD" I should
like to review what Young Democrats have done this year.
the club
In the fall of
activ ely supported the bond issue
going into Lexington shoppingcen-ters- ,
meeting people and asking for
their vote. Additionally, Young
Democrats aided the local Fayette
candidates by canvassing door to
door, addressing envelopes and
working at local party headquarters.
The club now sponsors guest
shakers forums, including Frankfort attorney Clifford Smith Jr., and
Bill Beam, Louisville advertising
agent. Speaker for the next meeting
is Edward
Pricharri, prominent
Frankfott attorney who was instrumental in draftingthe proposed new
constitution. That meeting will be
at S p.m. April 12 in the Law Building. L cry one is invited.
As for the lack of
mentioned, I feel the record
belies the charge. Of course, our
dub has not made national headlines. Young Democrats exist only
as an administrative arm of the
party.not as the policy makers. We
have and will continue to w oik in
this capacity. Our job is to git
candidates elected through hard

work
show

just that and the records
that we do a pretty good job.

HERBERT DESK INS JR.
President, UK Young Democrats

Who Should Pay?
Mr. Galbreath

concern with
the eventual fate of the Univ ersity
Marching Band show s deep loyal-it. However, I am inclined todoubt
the usefulness of sending the band
to basketball or football games, be
they during NCAA finals or the
regular season.
I wish it to be understood that
I am not against anyone's band; I
am merely against the use of state,
federal, or student activity monies
to finance band trips. If the band
wishes to finance its own trips, or
to finance its trips through donations, good.
However, the student and
are already in such short
supply that many otherwise wotth-whil- e
projects cannot be financed
(education, for example). II the
athletic department wants theband
at games, let them finance it.
I
seriously doubt that the priof a "quality
mary criterion
musician in selecting a school is
the number of baud trips 01 even
the cvistance of a matching band.
RUSSELL M. NORTON
s

y

state-dollar- s

AtxS

Junior

(

Plugging Political Leaks
Trying to get Congressional
action on a campaign fund reform
bill is a little like trying to get that
proverbial hole in the roof fixed.
When the sun is shining when
election pressures are off the roof
doesn't leak, and doesn't get fixed.
When it's raining when it's election year nobody wants to climb
up on the roof and get wet.
So when in January of this
election year President Johnson said
he would seek to reform "present
unrealistic restrictions on campaign
contributions," to ban "the endless
proliferation" of campaign committees and "to attach strong teeth. . .
to the requirement of full disclosure," a good many people
thought he might have been merely
indulging in some oratorical ruffles
and flourishes.
To their surprise, though, it
appears Mr. Johnson was not fooling. Instructed by the President to
draw up a strong campaign fund
reform measure, the Justice Department did so and has been circulating its draft on Capitol Hill to
test Congressional reaction.
The law now requires the filing

of reports on campaign contributions handled by the candidate
himself or by campaign committees
operating in two or more states. It
is a simple matter to avoid a full
reporting of contributions by setting
up any number of local campaign
committees. The draft bill proposes
to plug that loophole by requiring
all state and local committees supporting candidates for Federal office to report receipts and expenditures.
Another gap in the present law
involves primaries, in which a candidate can spend as much as he
wishes without an accounting. The
Administration's bill would require
full reporting of primary as well as
general election campaign funds.
Predictably enough, some lawmakers are arguing that an election
year is no time to plug holes in the
political roof. But with campaign
costs constantly rising and present
laws tending to make fund reporting
a joke, right now would seem a fine
time for Congress to take a realistic
look at the leaks.
The Wall Street Journal

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

1894

The South's Outstanding College Daily
Univkhsh y of Kentucky

MONDAY, APRIL 4,

Walteh Chant,

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Editor-I-

19G6

Chief

Thunce
Managing Editor
John hi, News Editor
Jidy Chisiiam. Associate News Editor
Kenneth Cheen. Assocte Nats Editor
Henhy HnsKNiiui., Sports Editor
Cakolvn Williams. Feature Edaor
Mahuahkt Uauey, Arts Editor
William Knapp.

Advertising

Matmger

IR-nt- ,

litisiness Staff
Mahvin

IIunuatk. Circulation Matuigcr

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April 4,

1906- -5

LBJ Should Visit De Gaulle, Morton Says

Following is the partial text of
an address given by Sen. Thruston
B. Morton
at tlxo University's Law Day program Saturday:
The crisis in the Western Alliance precipitated by President
De Gaulle's decision to withdraw France from the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization
presents the United States with
an opportunity as well as with
(ll.-Ky-

a

.)

challenge
The

challenge,
quite
us President Johnson has
pointed out, is to hold the Alliance together, not by means of
an array of bilateral arrangements, but through NATO. In
such cases as withdrawal the
case of France and
the case of Spain , bilateral
arrangements should be made
with the objective of tying such
nations de facto into
the NATO infrastructure.
non-NAT-

Programs Proposed
Stimulated by the urgency and

weapons might he planned in
such a manner as to accord
Europeans an important role in
research and development.
In the building of a NATO
dctcricnt the United States might
furnish advanced safct) devices
and other aids designed to
war by accident or miscalculation. Systems nl electronic
locks and other devices might
be provided to prevent the unauthorized use of the proposed
force. Safeguards similar tothose
which are designed to retain the
centralized command and control
of U.S. Nuclear
capabilities
could be built into a NATO
pie-ve-

force.

collaboration
Technological
within a restructured NATO
might provide for equitable procedures for the allocation of contracts
in
the design and
of
non nuclear
production
weapons systems. Europeans
might be given a greater share
in contracts in the Alliance for
small arms, tanks and certain
kinds of aircraft. The United
States might collaborate with its
European allies, for example, in
the creation of an anti ballistic
missile defense system around
key cities in Europe.

significance of the crisis, let us
then seize this opportunity to do
the things which should have
been done sometime ago to accommodate the NATO purpose
and structure to the changes
which have occurred in the world
For
during the past few years.
. . . Collective unified defense
1. Seize this opportunity to
today far transcends the purely bring Spain into NATO. In the
military field. It requires the light of Fiance's withdrawal,
development of greater unity in Norway might be persuaded to
all fields. Ultimately it must flow relent in her stubborn opposition
from a common political will. to
Spain's admission. Spain has
The building of a NATO never really indicated that she
nuclear force might be linked to desires to be included in NATO.
a program for technological colNevertheless, there is ground for
laboration within the Alliance. hope that she would accept. As
The United States could make a nonniember of NATO, she conavailable certain advanced wea tributes more to the strength of
advanced the Alliance than does Norway
certain
available
to the NATO as a NATO member. Moreover,
weapons systems
force.
Spain is, after all, an Atlantic
nation.
A program of technological
2. Use every effort to compose
collaboration might provide for
h
quarrel which
procedures for tlc I