xt7n2z12pr1w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7n2z12pr1w/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1933 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 25, No. 2, 1933 text Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 25, No. 2, 1933 1933 2013 true xt7n2z12pr1w section xt7n2z12pr1w L,   ‘"'‘     ‘*‘¥    
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  SUMMER SESSION 1 Q3 3
 giéfj .
  First Tcrm: ]une I2 to july I5
  Second Term: ]u1y 17 to August 19
 
  FEBRUARY, 193;
  `unu
  Published by the University of Kentucky, Lexington. Entered as Sec-.
[   ond-Class Matter at the Post Office, Lexington, Ky.,
i   under the Act of July 16, 1894.
[   Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Sec-
,  Qi tion 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized J1me 30, 1920. _
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JANUARY JULY
, S BI 'I‘ W T F S S M T W" T F S `
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- 29 30 31 ....   ....   23 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 _
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- FEBRUARY AUGUST ‘  
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L 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1
` 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 1 ·
26 27 28 ....   ....   27 28 29 30 31 ....  
A MARCH SEPTEMBER I `
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1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 7
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 . 1 6 :

 BULLETIN
  i University 0f Kentucky
 *
*· 
yy SUMMER SESSION 193;;
  ]*`i1·stTe1·1n: June I2 to July I5
i Second Term: july 17 t0 August IQ

 I
, C O N 'l‘ E N T S
2 Page
1 Admission ...............,,........»...........i...,... . ..... . ....,,........i............................,..., . 22
V Beauties of the Blue Grass ....,............,......i,..........................,.......r........~ 14
Q Changes in Registration ........................._.,........,......................................... 25 ;
1 College of Agriculture Schedule ..... ~ ............,.,...................,,..........,.......... 4 S, G1
; College of Arts and Sciences Schedule ........................ t ............>......... 39,57
{ Col-lege of Commerce Schedule ............,....................,.......,,l...,...r............ 53, 64
T College of Education Schedule .....,,..,...............................................,...... 50. 62 `
College of Engineering Schedule >.l_...._.,,_........................r........,,........... 49,62
» College of Law Schedule .............t....,......,.........»................ . .....>.....,..,...»... 50. U2
§ Designation of Courses ..,...t......,...,,..............,.............,....,....,.. . ......,....,.... 24
Ex-Service Men ......................................._.............t,...........t......,,................. 19
Explanations and Abbreviations ........,,..........,.......t.......,,.,.......4............ 38
l Extra—Curricular Events .......,...,.........,...t............................t.....4............... 3
Faculty ..,...............................t.....................t.....................,....»....,......,.........t.. 7
Fee for Change in Classification ....,.............. . .................................,l.... 25
` Fees ....................,.............,.........,.t...............,....,.»..................,.....,,,....,t.......,,.. 21
General Information ...,......t......,...................,t...,,......... L ......,......,................ 1<1
I General Requirements for a Degree .........,...t,.............t................t.......,.. 27
' Late Classitication Fee .........._.....,..........,............... . ..............,...........,,..... 25
Late Registration ...,._...........i,...........,..,..........i.........,..............t..............i.,. 25
_ Marking System ..i.................,....,.........t.._........................,....,,..................   25
1 Museum of Geology ._.....i...,..._.,.,.............._......................,,...................,..... 18
A Officers of Administration .........t.................,...,......................t..... . i,......,. ti
1 Officers of Summer Session ...ii..........,.............................i.......,.............. G
Y Physical Plant of the University ..............,.........,...,........,..............,, . .... 15 l
I Placement Service ..................................................,.......................i.....,t.... lit i
, Public Health Courses ......._,.......,..........,...........i.......,....,........it,...t...».... 130
  Reduced Railroad Rates .........i.................................,.......... . ...,....,..........i 2-1  
Q Refunds .t.................,i...,...,........................,........ . ......................,............f........ 24 .
Z Residence Requirements for Graduation .............,.....................».......... 27 Qi
` Requirements for Graduation:  
  College of Agriculture .................................,._................................i... 30  
College of Arts and Sciences .....................................,............... ; .... 28  
College of Commerce .....,.......t,.......,.,..........................................i...... 35 ‘
  College of Education ...........................................,.........................,.... 31 1
1 College of Engineering _....,..................,......i..........................i........... 30 {
  College of Law ..........,..............................................._....................li... 31  
l The Graduate School ......,.....i....._..........,............................,..,......i..... 35  
Q Room and Board ........,............i....................................... . ...,................,...... 26  
  Schedule of Lectures and Recitations ..__....................,......................... 38  
1 Summer Session Calendar ..i.,.........l..._........,............... . .....,.tt....,....,......., 5  
I Student Load ...................._.t,...,........._i......,....._t....................,...........l,.......,. 21 3
Teachers’ Certificates ..i....,........t..t,,...........,............,..,....,,............r........... 33 F
l The Summer Session ..,,tt.........,.._,i........A,.cl.t.......,..........i,............,t..........i. 14  
Training School ......,........._,.___,,,._,_,____,__,,_,,,,__.,,,,._.._,,,.......,...,....._,__...,...._... 20 i
4 University Commons .........,........,...........i..................`.. . .....`.......,.............. 19  
I `
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e

 EX’I`R1\-t}lTlll<.lCLYLAlt EVENTS FOR THE 10:53 SUMMER
SESSION
The University believes that an important phase of the student's
training in the summer session is the stimulation and culture received
` from a well arranged extra-curricular program. The following schedule
of events for this coming summer has been arranged.
'l‘he schedule as given here is subject to revision and, it will be
noted, in some instances is not yet complete.
FIRST TERM
Jrxn
Wednesday 14, ~l:00—6:00 p. m. Tea at Maxwell Place
President and Mrs. McVey, hosts
Thursday 15, 10:00 a. m. Convocation in Memorial Hall
President Frank L. McVey, speaker
Thursday 15, 7:15 p. m. Band Concert in Amphitheatre
Friday 16, 7:30 p. m. Faculty Reception for students on
lawn in front of ltlechanical Hall
Sunday 1S, 4:30 p. m. Vcsper Service, Meinorial Hall
Wednesday 21, 4:00-ec;00 p. m. Tea at Maxwell Place
President and Mrs. McVey, hosts
Thursday 22, 7:15 p. m. Band Concert in Amphitheatre
Friday 23, 9:00-12:00 p. ni. Summer School Party in Patterson
Hall
5 Sunday 25, 4:30 p. m. Vesper Service, Memorial Hall
` Tuesday 27, 4:00 p. m. All·University Picnic for faculty
_ and students held at Joyland Park
Wednesday 28, 11:15 a. ni. Convocation in Memorial Hall
  Mrs. Virgil Gaitslcill (Play Review)
  Wednesday 28, 4:0043:00 p. m. Tea at Maxwell Place
2 President and Mrs. McVey, hosts
\‘t'odncsday ZS, and Thursday 29 Radio Conference
Under direction of Eugene J.
1 Coltrane, Special Representative,
» National Committee on Education
` by Radio
Thursday 29, 7:15 p. m. lland Concert in Amphitheatre
1 Friday 30, 7:30 p. m. Lecture in Memorial Hall
Judge E. J. l\Iillington, Cadillac,
_ lvlichigan
` Jn1.r
‘ Wednesday 5, 4:00-6:00 p, m. Tea at Maxwell Place
, President and Mrs. McVey, hosts
Thursday 6, 0:00 a. 1n. Convocation in Memorial Hall
Doctor Harry Clark, Superintendent
§ of Schools, Knoxville, Tennessee,
speaker
3

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111
J   Thursday 6, 7:15 p. m. Band Concert in Amphitheatre
1‘ Friday 7, 8:00 p. m. Play-Guignol Theatre
  Professor Frank Fowler, Director
Qi Sunday 9, 4:30 p. m. Vesper Service, Memorial Hall
1 Tuesday 11, 7:30 p. m. Musical Concert in Memorial Hall
gl Professor Carl Lampert, Director
iQ Wednesday 12, 4:00-6:00 p. m. Tea at Maxwell Place
Q President and Mrs. McVey, hosts
1 Thursday 13, 2:30 p. m. Blue Grass Tour
V ‘ Friday 14, 7:15 p. m. Band Concert in Amphitheatre
1 SECOND TERM '
1, JULY
12 Thursday 20, 7:30 p. ni. Faculty Reception for students on
i, lawn in front of Mechanical Hall
  Friday 21, 9:50 a. n1. Convocation in Memorial Hall
1f Friday 21, 7:15 p. m. "Little Syn:phony," l\Iemorial 11- ’
11 Professor Carl Lampert, Director
  Thursday 27, 7:15 p. m. "Little Symphony," Memorial Hall
1, Professor Carl Lampert, Director
1 Friday 28, 9:00-12:00 p. ni. Summer School Party in Patterson
1 Hall
  AUoUsr
11 Wednesday 2, 7:15 p. m. "Little Symphony," Memorial Hall
L Proiessor Carl Lampert, Director
j Friday 4, S200 p. rn. Play (Outside Talent)
1 Tuesday S, 11:15 a. m. Convocation in Memorial Hall
  Tuesday S, 7:30 p. m. Lecture on birds in Memorial Hall
1 Charles Crawford (jorst, lloston,
. Mass.
  Thursday 10, 7:15 p. m. "Little Symphony," l\iIemorial llall
1 Professor Carl Lanipert, Director
1 Friday 11, 2:30 p. n1. Blue Grass Tour
1 Tuesday 15, 7:30 p. m. Concert in Memorial Hall
1 Professor Carl Lanipert, Director
1 Wednesday 16, 6:00 p. m. Commencement Dinner, University r
1 Commons 5
1 Thursday 17, 8:00 p. m. Reception for graduates _
1 Friday 18, 3:30 p. m. Commencement `
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 _ SUMMICIL SESSION (‘Alil·]XDAR
l\Ionday June 12 Registration for Hrst term.
Tuesday June 13 Classes begin.
Friday June 17 Last date for making changes in regis-
tration o1· in schedule without payment _
of fee.
Monday June 19 Last date upon which a student may reg-
. ister for credit for the first term’s
work.
Monday Juno 19 Last date upon which a student may bc
dropped without a grade.
Saturday July 1 Last date upon which a student may
withdraw and receive a refund on
matriculation fee for the first term.
Saturday July 15 Examinations for tl1e Hrst term.
Monday July 17 Registration for second term.
'1`uesday July 18 Classes begin.
Friday July 21 Last date of making changes in regis-
p tration or in schedule without payment
of fee.
Monday July 24 Last date on which a student may reg-
# ister for credit for the second term’s
{ work.
{ Monday July 24 Last date upo11 which a. student may be
dropped without a grade.
 · Saturday August 5 Last date upon which a student may
{ withdraw and receive a refund on
  matriculation fee for the second term.
Friday August 18 (`ommeucement
Saturday August 19 Examinations for second term.
l
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{ 7
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l .
 ] OFFICERS OF THE SUMMER SESSION
  ‘ FRANK LEROND l\‘[CVEY, Ph. D., LL. D., President.
E; JESSE E. ADAMS, Ph. D., Director of the Summer Session
f BILLY YV1iITLO\\', A. B., Secretary of the Summer Session.
Q, OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
E FRANK LEROND MOVEY, Ph. D., LL. D., President
‘ PAUL PRENTICE BOYD, Ph. D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences.
L. TIIOMAS POE COOPER, B. S. in Agr., Dean, College of Agriculture
  FHEDEllICI{ PAUL ANIJEIQSON, M. E., Dean, College of Engineering.
I ALVIN E. EVANS, Ph. D., J. D., Dean, College of Law.
  IYVILLIAII S. TAYLOR, Ph. D., Dean, College of Education.
  EDWARD `VIEST, Ph. D., Dean, College of Commerce.
  TIIEODORE TOLMAN JONES, Ph. D., Acting Dean, Graduate School.
Q LOUIS CLIFTON, M. A., Acting Director of University Extension. ~
lf COLUMBUS RUDOI.Pll lWIiLCIlEIl, A. M., Dean of Men.
E SAEAII G. BLANDING, A. M., Dean of Women.
  Mas. P. K. HOLMES, A. B., Dean of Women in the Summer Session. /1
l EznA L GILLIS, A. B., Registrar.  
ii DAVID HO\\'J\l(D PEAK, A. M., Business Agent.  
j. MARGARET ISADORE KINO, A. B., Librarian. {
I M. J. Ci
 I

 Ftzezl/ry
6`\\9
Amxrs, .I1~;ssE E., Ph. D.
E Professor of Philosophy of Education; Director of the Summer
Session
, A1.1.i:x, RIC1l.\IlD S., M. S.
Associate Professor of Anatomy and Physiology; Head of the
Department
ALLEN, \V1r.L1.ur RAY, Ph. D.
Professor of Zoology A
Ax1n-msox, Gimeic, A. B.
Critic Teacher in English
Axmmsox, `VAI.’I`Iili SEWELL, M. A.
Professor of Genetics
:\l{l(l.l·1, Tiwxms MeKEE »
Insiruetor in. Wood Shop
Asmziz, Eswox Jscxcsox, M. A.
Assistant Professor in Psychology
Z`.\'l·ZRl·1'l"1`, Lmrn B., M. A.
Instructor in Economics
B.x1:1;1·;Nm;s, Cl[.\I{I.lCS, Ph. D.
Professor of Clzcniistry
I3.u:1<1.1·;Y, M.xmE Roincs, M. A.
Instructor in Home Economies
_ B.u1NE*1"1‘, B1:rxm,EY, B. M. E.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
Q Bl*).\UMON'1‘, H1·;xnY, Ph. D. .
‘ Assistani Professor of Psychology
j BEe1E<>1m, 1\iA’l"1`IIE\\’ HUME, Ph. D.
  Professor of Chemistry
_ B1·:s*1‘, H.x1uI£S'l`\', Ph. D. `
i Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy Q
2 8 Q2
  » .:9
  4 37
  t
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   DUNCAN, Mics. MAY K., M. A.
Assistant Professor of Elementary Education
, EAST, M;\I{(}.\I{l£'l‘ L., R. N.
State Board of Health
i Em', Fouuyeic, M. S.
` Professor of Animal Husbandry
Exams, :XI.\’1N E., Ph. D., J. D.
Dean, College of Lazo
I<`.s1:o1:11.x1:, Eiiwsim F1:.xN1<1.1N, M. A.
I Professor of English
i 1<`1·;iu;us, Eiixiasir N1cw1·oN, Pl1. D.
Associate Professor of Farm Crops; Assistant Agrononiist
FLYNN, C1..uc1;Nc1-1
Laboratory Assistant
Fos*1·1·;i:, Ftossiic M., B. S.
Visiting Instructor in Library Science
1<`ow1.1·;u, Fiisxic C., M. A.
Assistant Professor of English
Fi:1·:1·:A1.xN, XV. A., M. D.
Professor of Health Administration at Johns Hopkins University
I·`1:1·;m1.xN, _\V1I.I.1.\Al Ei>w1N, E. E.
Assistant Dean of the College of Engineering; Head of the
i ltepartnient of Electrical Engineering
i G.u.1..xw.xY, \V1I.l.1.\AL 1·`i:.xNc1s, Ph. D.
{ Assistant Professor of English
i G1i.i.1s, Eziu L., A. B.
Jtegistrar; Professor of Educational Administration
Gnscc, Lucy, A. B., B. S.
i Librarian in the University Training School
G1{I·1II.\N, Exoeu B.xcoN, A. B.
, Professor of Journalisrm; Head of the Department
ri G1:uNm11·;11sn, Eo11·1r, M. S.
,i Assistant Professor of Home Economics .
i TIAIXES, Mics. Ruhr, M. A.
{ Instructor of Elementary Education
} I·I.xr.L, E1.Lr;1u· L., M. A. ,
_ Assistant Professor of History '
i 1'I.\MI\IONDS, Cixnsm, Ph. D.
Professor of Agricultural Education
Hxm., HENRY Hi\RRING'1‘ON, Ph. D.
, Lecturer in Atlrninistration.; Superintendent of City Schools,
  Lexington, Kentucky
I‘I()LLO\VAY, J. B., M. A. _ i
Professor of Administration
g Irlonmxcs, HENRY Bmw, M. A.
  Assistant Professor of Romance Languages
i Houma, J011N Sxrmmss, M. E.
  Associate Professor of Drawing
A 9

 .;‘  .
l·l '
— ' I
_ QV; I{0R.LACHER, LEv1 JACKSON, M. S.
{ii Professor of Animal Husbandry; Assistant to the Dean.
  HORSETELD, MARGARET BENNETT, M. A.
  Assistant Professor of Romance Languages
i, JENNINGS, WTXLTER WTLs0N, P11. D.
  Professor of Economics
  JETT, CARTER COLEMAN, M. E.
in Professor of' Machine Design
  JOHNSON, JAMES R1c11ARn, B. M. E.
  " Professor of Applied Mechanics {
  JONES, J. CATRON, Ph. D. `
i. Professor of Political Science; Head of the Department
  JONES, T11E0¤0RE TOLMAN, Ph. D.
  Professor of Ancient Languages; Head of the Dcpartnicnt; Acting
  Dean of the Graduate School
E I{ARRAKER, PERRY ELNTER, M. A.
Q Associate Professor of Soils
, I{EMI’ER, DURRTN C., B. S.
  Critic Teacher in Science
{ · IKENNARD, CHARLES D.
  Instructor in Foundry
QQ, I{I£'l"l‘ENACKER, JouN RALDTT
  Instructor in Pattern Making i
‘i I{NIGIIT, GRANT C., M. A. `
  Associate Professor of English
ig I{OPI’IUS, 0TTo TowNsENr>, Ph. D.
E` Professor of Physics
  KU11-ER, Jo11N, M. A.
12 Professor of Philosophy; Head of the Department
1 LAMPERT, CARL, B. M. ‘
E Professor of Music; Head of the Department ,.
  LATTMER, CLA1Ro1:NE GREEN, Ph. D.  
1. Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy _ ’
  LEE, ATA, M. A.
ii; State Supervisor of Home Economics Education i
  `LEONARD, MA1z.10R1E, A. B. |
  Fourth Grade Teacher in the University Training School {
  LESTOURGEON, FLo1iA EI,IZ.\lZPI'1`II, Ph. D. 4
  Associate Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy l
V LEWIS, MTLDREU, B. S. in Music Education
{ Instructor in Music _
¤ , L1coN, M. E., M. A.  
t Professor of Secondary Education  
t LOCKMEYER, ELSIE, A. B.  
! Second Grade Teacher in the University Training School  
LUNDE, R011ERT GERTTAE, M. A.  
Assistant Professor of History  
10 ?
A °;
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 if A

 i\·IUBl·]E, JAMES (}1uax;>t
Instructor in Forge Shop
MUFARLAN, Am‘11U1i. CRANE, Ph. D.
Professor of Geology; Head of the Department
M(¢F4\I{I,.\ND, F1c.xN1< T., Ph. D.
Professor of Botany; Head of the Department
1\IcIN1·12m<, B1·;1:*1·11Us B., Ph. D.
Assistant Professor of Botany
, l\'ICL.\UGIILIN, M.x1:<;t71c1:1‘1‘1c, A. B.
` Assistant Professor of Journalism. ¤
MeVr·:v, F1:.xNi< Li·;RoN1>, Ph. D., LL. D. ,
President of the University
M.xNN1Nr:, J<>11N \V., Ph. D. >
Associate Professor of Political Science  
1\I1·:.xcu.ur, Rmx: P111r.11·, M. S.
Assistant Professor of Geology `
Mur.e111c1<, Conumnus RU|)OI.1’I1', M. A. `
Dean of Men; Professor of German Language and Literature;
Head of the Department  
Mrxicu, J.xNu·:S Bum`, Ph. D.
Professor of Psychology; Head of the Department j
iV[l’l`(?1II·]|.l.,`JOIIN R1<·1r.xRo, A. B. ,
l Assistant Professor of Oheniistry ; 
]\Il’l`(’III<2I.L, Jo11N S’1‘.u·1·, M. A.
Critic Teacher, Mathematics  
M()N’1'(L()hI1·lIt\', Enwsno XV., M. A. §
Assistant Professor of Sociology .
]\'I()RIil.;\XD, Rox', J. D.
Professor of Law V
1 MUn1:.\Y, F1:.xNi<, S. J. D. i
  Professor of Laio {
`; N1<:1m1.r.s, \V1r.r.r.xNr DU1{l·l'l"l‘, Ph. D. {
I Professor of Parm. Management; Head of the Department  
, Non, J.xm·:s Tuoxus Co*1"r0N, M. A., Litt. D.  
  Professor of History of Erlncation `
  P.~.m11c1c, Enum: Z., Ph. D. ,
  Associate Professor of Economics i
  P.~.1mu1c, Louis Aiitruun, Ph. D.
j Assistant Professor of Physics -
? P.xm<1s1i, Emmr. Leu, M. A.
  Professor of Home Economies Education _
v_ Pecic, ANNA B., M. A. A
  Critic Teacher in the Social Sciences ,
Px·;c1c, Josmru  
Assistant, Johnston Solar Laboratory 1
2 Poivrxm, RICIIBIOND CLAY, B. S. in M. E. 2
  Research Assistant in Heating and Ventilation _
11
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[W Poicmrimx, V1C'l`0I{ R., A. B.
  Assistant Professor in Journalism
  Po·r·1·1cn, IVIICRVIN E1.w0m·:Us ,
  Instructor in Forge Shop ’
Iii Sc11¤;1:.x<;0, Momcis, B. S., D. V. M. _
  Professor of Bacteriology; Head of the Department `
  S1·:A111oNs, M11.1>1:1z1m, B. S. `
  Assistant Professor of Library Science; Acting Head of the 2
te " Department
  Sl·]II.\'EI€, A1.1:1c1:*1·A W11.s0N, M. A.
  Assistant Professor of Romance Languages `
  SiIIiit.\\'00D, T. C., M. A. ii
  Assistant Professor of Anatoniy and Physiology i
  SINGER, DAVID NOl(T(\N ‘
  Instructor in Automotive Engineering  
  S1>1e1c.s1m, R()NIiI.I..\, M. S. E
  Associate Professor of Home Economics Education '
  S’1·1·:wA1:T, Ours J1:ss1·:, Ph. D. 4
  Assistant Professor of Oheniistry
  S'l`UllGEON, Nmwi1*0N R. _
  Instructor in Foundry g
  SU1.1.1v.sN, Rommx, M. A. I
; Assistant Professor of Economics
  $01.21211, E1.111;1; G1z1F1=1*1*11, A. B. Q
  Instructor in Music; Director of Publicity Bureau  
iii S11*1·111z1z1..sN1>, \\’11.1.1A1x1 R., A. B. `
  Assistant Professor of English  
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 T.xy1.oi:, A. P., A. B.
Stndcnt Assistant in Zoology
'}`.w1.o1:, W1r.L1.uL S1sm·111Us, Ph. D.
Dean, College of Education
Tiimmtxx, Goimox Owmi
Assistant Superintendent of Shops; Instructor in Machine Shop 1
'I`mMi:m·:, Enmcsw G., Ph. D.
Instructor in Political Science `
'1`i7<·1<1-zu, '1`11cm.xs C. .
{ Instructor in U’oo¢l Shop :
TlZl'lIII.I., ]GI)\\'.\I{l), Ph. D.  
Professor of History; [lead of the Department i
\Y.\Nl>l·lNIl()S(fl[, AM1:Y, Pl1. D.  
Professor of Political Science i
\\'.xm·:, GliIi'1‘l{lTIIl·) El.lZ.\I2l·l'1'l[, M. A. '
Associate Professor of Home Economics I
\V.‘.l{I$ljl{'l'<)N, Fmao \V1X.|.I.\)\', Ph. D. j
Assistant Professor of Physics Q
\\*.x1:i>, XVILLIAAI S., M. A.  
Instructor in English  
\V.·\'l`l{IXS, Ismc G. i
Assistant, Engineering La.boratory  
\\vI·1.\\`l·ZIl, R..\I.PII I~Ioi.1>1;h. Ph. D.  
Associate Professor of Bacteriology  
I \\'1~:i:i:, \V1I,I,I.\1[ Sxwmiii, M. S.  
Professor of Physics; llcad of the Department; Professor of 5
Anthropology and Archaeology; Head of Department  
i \\’i-wi`. l\I.u:Y Lu;u.i·:, M. A. ·  
(fritic Teacher in Romance Languages i
\\'1i1‘r1~:, ]\I.\Ii’I'IN 1\‘I.\IiS1I.\l.Tl, Ph. D.
Associate Professor of Psychology i
‘ \\'l|·IS'i‘, EI)\\'.\l{I), Ph. D. E
Dean of Cotlcge of C'omnteroe; Professor of Econotn ics  
1 \VII.l·'()1lIl, Einwmm Jsmics, M. S. i
Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry ‘
  \\Y]I.](INS, JAMES E., B. S. in M. E.
i Instructor in Electrical Engineering  
_ \\'11.1.:+oN, Louisa, A. B. I
i Third Grade Teacher in the University Training School  
  Wooos, R.u.mr H., Ph. D.
f Assor·iate Professor of Agricultural Education.
E Xv.\’l`lCS, L.\\\`IU·IN(‘Ii, M. A.
Assistant Professor of English i
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  GENER-AL INFOIIMATION
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  THE SUl\1Il\·IER SESSION
1 ‘ Tl1e University of Kentucky held its first summer session in 1903.
‘! From 1903 to 1913 certain instructors 011 the campus offered summer .
  , session work to students who needed training other than that of the t
  regular year. This type of sumnier work however was often of an
5,, individual nature, largely (1€})€ll(l€11t upon agreements between the
V ` -student a11d his instructor. Beginning with the year 1913 the summer
l` school became a more integral phase of the regular University work
  a11d was characterized by a much broader program of offerings. This
  increment in offerings and the number of faculty members has con-
  tinued since that time.
  The rapid growth of tl1e summer session 1nay be noted when one
  reflects that the en1·ollment in 1918 was 172; in 1925, 1,298; a11d in
  1931, 2,623. Due to the depression ftlld other economic factors there
  was a slight decrease in the enrollment for 1932. The increase in
,y, tl1e number of faculty members has kept pace with the increase in t
  enrollment. In 1918 the entire staff of the summer school consisted {
  of 27 instructors, while in 1925 tl1e1·e were 76, and i11 1932, 140. Many Q
  of these instructors taught in both terms of the summer session. `
ll ` One of the most interesting phases of the snmnier session at the `
ti University of Kentucky is the rapid growth in the graduate field. I11  
ih ' 1926 the Graduate School enrolled 177, while i11 1931 it enrolled 677. I
1. Throughout the history of the summer session new phases of the '
·` summer work have been added, and each year the program of offer- Y
gt ings has been widened. For example, in 1929 the first courses in the
tl; adininistration of higher learning and courses in library science were 1
i added. In 1932 a public health school for nurses and doctors com·
  prised one of the new features. I
tw? TIIE BEAUTIES OF THE BLUE GRASS
  The Blue Grass is a magic country full of scenic beauty, and rich ,
  in historical interest, romantic and traditional lore. Its ever-changing  
  ` ~ beauty of landscape and stately colonial mansions add to its charm. it
l' Many of the vast horse farms, some individual establishments con-  
l' taining more than a thousand acres, are open to visitors throughout  ‘
l I the year. These farms with their broad pastures, their sparkling V
t streams, their woodlands of gigantic forest trees and their paved
1 drives and 1·oads provide Fayette County with a system of parks which 1
4 is decidedly unique. In this enjoyable touring region 0119 finds vast V
I tobacco farms, meadowland, wooded foothills, and deep-running ‘ 
I streams and rivers, which, for beauty, are unsurpassed. Throughout  ;
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 the region one comes upon dignined old mansions, lovely gardens,  
groves of forest trees and mile after mile of stone walls which make {
the country-side both restful and refreshing. ;
In Lexington one will be impressed by the University of Ken-
tucky; "Ashland," the home of Henry Clay; Gen. John Hunt Morgan’s  
home; the home of Mary Todd, wife of Lincoln; the Lexington Ceme- 5
tery with its monument to Henry Clay, and tl1e resting places of many  
famous Kentuckians; the tobacco warehouses with their amazing size; V =
the Kentucky Association race track, the track of tl1e Kentucky Trot-  
ting Horse Breeders Association; tl1e Kentucky Agricultural Experi- i
ment Station; Transylvania College, and Hamilton a11d Sayre Colleges.  
"Idle Hour," "Elmendorf," "Walnut Hall," "Calumet," "Castleton,"  
"lIamburg place," (with its horse cemetery), "Dixiana," "Coldstream,"  
a11d "Faraway," (home of Man o’War), are among tl1e beautiful horse g
farms in Fayette County that are open to visitors. The new United i
States Veterans Hospital, the new Federal Narcotic Farm, the Agri- i
cultural Experiment Station Farm, the old colonial homes in which  
Lafayette was entertained, Grimes Mill, Clays Ferry hill, and Bryan  
Station add to the historical charm of this county.  
Visiting the Blue Grass, students will be impressed by the Ken-  
tucky River palisades. Boone Tunnel, High Bridge, Camp Nelson, Na-  
tional Cemetery, tl1e old \\’ernwag coyered bridge, Dix River Dam,  
V Ilorrington Lake, old Shakertown, Fort Harrod and Pioneer Cemetery  
at Ilarrodsburg, Centre College at Danville, and Berea Mountain School  
. at Berea. Within twenty-tive miles of Lexington one can visit the  
i state capitol, Frankfort, and see the new capitol building, the old  
Y capitol building, the Kentucky Historical Society museum, and the  
i state cemetery—burial place of Daniel Boone and a number of Ken-  
tucky soldiers a11d statesmen. I
 
` THE PHYSICAL PLANT OF THE UNIVERSITY  
  'l`he University's Physical Plant has steadily increased in size since  
‘ ISS0 from four to more than forty·six buildings. This growth has  
t come about in a conservative manner, at minimum expense to the J
I state, and well timed to meet the needs of a growing University. The g
i original campus area of 5l.ST acres has increased to a total of 106  
, acres. The College of Agriculture Experiment Station Farm has in- S
,` creased from a comparatively small place to a magniheent farm of  
600 acres. This farm is noted for its large number of experimental I
plots that have been under constant observation for the past forty  
`_ years. From the standpoint of time, they are just half as old as the ‘
1 oldest experimental plots in the world. The very nature of agricultural  
i science requires the passing of a great many decades, seasonal changes  
E and cycles before the foundation can be laid 011 which to build values  
_ of scientiac interest. In this respect the University of Kentucky is well j
1 on its way. A list of the most interesting buildings on the campus
2 is presented in tl1is catalog for summer session students.
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_lEjg The Administration Building, erected in 1882 to be used as a reci-
  tation building, has gradually been converted into an oilice building
  for the use of the Administrative Stalf, Publicity Bureau, Stenographic
M Bureau, Telephone Exchange, Alumni Office, and Museum of Geology.
  The Agricultrzrail Building, built in 190S, contains the ollices and
  classrooms of the College ot Agriculture and the Department of Home
  Economics.
  The Agricultural Engineering Building was constructed in 1931
  t