xt7n5t3fzc3t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7n5t3fzc3t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19180222  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 22, 1918 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 22, 1918 1918 2012 true xt7n5t3fzc3t section xt7n5t3fzc3t 1

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON,

VOL, X

KENTUCKY, FEBRUARY

No. 18

22, 1918

"PUT MONEY IN THY PURSE"
GRADUATE ENROLLED FIRST APPEARANCE OF
IN SIGNAL COURSE

STATE CHAMPIONSHIP

IS DECIDED TONIGHT

Centre and U. K. Meet For
Second Game in
The Gym.

BATTALION IN PUBLIC

O. M. Kirby, '07, formerly of Butler,
Ky., has returned to the University,

and entered the branch of the Signal
Service Course established here.
Mr. Kirby was president of his sen
ior class, editor of the 1907 Kentuck
ian and a member of Alpha Tau Ome-p-

Colors Will Be Presented
to Battalion By

President

a

ROOTERS ARE NEEDED
Tennessee was humbled and now it
is Centre's time.
Tonight the Wildcats will meet Centre on the home floor. The visitors are
sure of the state championship and
the Wildcats are sure of their ability
to head it this way. Already the Danville boys have dope on the Kentuck-lans- ,
but the U. K. team insists this
dope will be worthless if Centre is
stopped with enough force Thursday
night. Centre has defeated Georgetown and Transylvania this season
and has one victory over the Wildcats
to her credit.
The duty of every student is plain.
There is space for almost the whole
student body in the gym, and where
room is lacking some crowding will
be permitted
The members of the
team declare that no victory will come
to Kentucky unless they are well supPsychological effect is the
ported.
"argument presented by Coach Boles
for a
crowd. Centre
has had opportunity to crow over U.
K. twice in the last season, and three
times is, in the words of the prophet,
"to dern much b'gosh." This time
Centre must meet defeat.
Lately the Wildcats have been gorecord-breakin-

ing fine.

g

They have won every game

but one this season. Their goal

shoot-

ing is excellent and ranks second only
to their perfect teamwork. Individual

stars there are

five of them account
for many of the successes of the team.
Practice for the next game, has been

steady

and serious

The Blue and

White neds Danville blood to complete

the color scheme for this patriotic

sea-

son.
If the game tonight is won by the
Wildcats they will be tie with Danville, for the state championship and a
third game will be necessary to decide

the honor.

In spite of the setbacks

U. K. bus had to endure thru the loss

of valuable players, the team has developed splendidly and fans may expect the best gume of the season.

fraternity.
After graduation,

he went to the
Philippines on government work, and
later became treasurer of one of the
Philippine provinces.
At present Mr. Kirby is in the employ of the Standard Oil Company, and
is home on a furlough from China,
where he was stationed when war
trouble necessitated his leaving.

GOVERNMENT WILL PAY

S21 TOWARD UNIFORMS
R. O. T. C. Uniforms to Be

Left Here During
Summer

SHOES WILL BE KEPT
The Quartermaster Department of
the United States Army has given Captain Royden the information that it
has decided to pay finally $21 towards
the cost of uniforming the members
of the Reserve Officers' Training
Corps of the University, the military
department retaining, however, all uni
forms until the beginning of the next
semester.
General McCann, of the Quartermaster Department at Washington, in
writing regarding this matter, states
that all uniforms, except shoes, furnished under these conditions to members will not become the property of
the institution or the student, but
must be available for issue in the following year. The shoes may be
by the student.
Captain Royden, in discussing this
matter with one of the Kernel reporters, said that this means In the final
result the student will pay only for
his uniform. The shoes cost $5, of
course, but they become the property
of the Individual student. The method
of settlement adopted by the Quarter-iiiiibto- r
Department will be to pay $14

Miss Mary E. Sweeney, head of the
Department
deliver two
March

2

and

of Homo

Economics, will

lectures
3,

in

Louisville

under the uuspices of

the Woman's Committee of the
cil of National Defense.

Coun-

GUARD

COLOR

Preceding the Washington birthday
celebration in chapel Friday morning,
the battalion will hold its first public ceremony, the "escort of the colors," one of the most beautiful ceremonies in the drill regulations.
Promptly at 9:30, the color company,
especially designated as such by the
commandant, will march to a point
opposite the front of the Main Building and receive the colors from Presi
dent McVey for the first time this
year. The entire battalion, composed
of five companies with the band and
signal corp, will be formed In line in
accordance with the regulations.
Captain Royden has designated
Misses Frieda Lemon and Elizabeth C.
Loughrjdge as color guard, prior to its
presentation by Doctor McVey to the
escort. These young ladies are enrolled in the radio engineering school
of the University.
Captain Royden announces that if
the weather is fine, arms will be
stacked and a color guard posted dur
ing the chapel exercises following the
escort.

CERTAIN STUDENTS
TO BE RESTRICTED

Following is an excerpt from the
faculty minutes regarding delinquent
students. It should be noted that any
student who is delinquent in one third
of his work can not engage in any of
tho University's intercollegiate athletic contests, or in any debates or entertainments connected with the Uni
versity.
"Any student whose standing Is
found delinquent at the end of the
of his work, is
semester In
placed on probation for the whole of
the next semester. His parents are Informed of the fact, and during tho
period of probation, ho is under tho
week to week supervision of his dean.
If at the end of this semester of probaf
of his
tion lie is delinquent in
towards the cost of the uniform In work, ho is dropped."
the present school year and $7 at the
.eniug of the full term of the next ILLITERACY FUND PROGRESSES.
one-thir- d

one-hal-

semester.
MISS SWEENEY IN LOUISVILLE.

CO-E- D

An Important fact to bo re-

TIGERT LECTURES
CAMPAIGN IS
ON POPULAR SUBJECT
"Woman's Opportunity in Regard to
the War" will be the subject of Dr.
J. J. Tigert's talk tonight at Patterson
Hall at 6:45 o'clock. All women of
the University are urged to be present.
This is the second of six lectures to
be given by Doctor Tigert at Patterson Hall. Every Thursday evening
he will discuss such questions as the
following ones:
The program follows:
February i21. "Woman's Opportun
ity."
February 28. "Her Obligation."
March 7. "Her Ability."
March 14. "Her Training."
March 21. "Her Reward."

MOST POPULAR
--

CO-E-

DS

ELECTED BY STUDENTS

Each Will Occupy One Page
In This Year's
Annual
TWO

1917

FAVORITES

In the most heated contest yet held
at the University for the election of
the student
the most popular
body in chapel Friday morning selected Misses Dorothy Middleton, Ann
Molloy, Helen Taylor, Isabelle Dickey,
Mary Heron, Dorothy Walker, and
Nancy Buckner as the special favorites of 1917-1The election, an annual affair to
select young women to adorn the
pages of the University year book,
the Kentuckian, was intensely interesting this time, on account of the
abundant supply of popular girls, and
Sam Morton,
the scarcity of boys.
f
of the Kentuckian, presided over the election Friday morning. Prior to the voting Mr Morton
said the nominees should not only be
popular but attractive, or better,
"wonderfully beautiful." As a result,
the seven young women were chosen.
A representative
from each class
was selected to total the votes received. These men said tho number of
nominees was astounding and it seem
ed that every girl in tho University
was considered by one person at least
us "wonderfully beautiful."
It was the original intention of the
Kentuckian staff to select only six
young women, but the unexpected
happened and two young women tied
for sixtli pluco, so that both will bo included and tho Beauty Section will
have seven pages instead of six.
Departing from tho usual custom of
having but one picture of each girl
editor-ln-chle-

LAUNCHED

BY UNIV. MINUTE MEN

Thrift Stamps Are Advertised in All
Quarters
BABY

BOND

PRIZES

The Thrift Stamp Campaign on the
campus is launched. Four minute
speakers appear at every meeting-Thrift Stamp posters confront the
student at every turn, Thrift Stamp
contests are the popular things of
the moment, and Thrift Stamps form
the basis of all conversation.
Professor E. F. Farquhar, Doctor J.
E. Tuthill and Doctor R. N. Maxon
were appointed by President McVey
to direct the work of the campaign.
Under them are two teams of student
minute men, under the leadership of
Miss Mildred Graham and C. E.
Planck.
The "minute girls" visit the men's
meetings, while the boys advertise
gatherings.
Thrift Stamps at
The gilrs' team and schedule for this
week follows: Marie Collins, Boys'
Glee Club; Louise Unee, History Club;
Adele Slade, Agricultural
Society;
Louise Mayer, Basket Ball game;
Eliza Plggott, Union Literary Society;
Eliza Spurrier, Patterson Literary So
ciety; Frieda Lemon, Boys' Mess Hall,
Kathleen Brand, Y. M. C. A.; Bertha
Society; Ruth
Miller,
Mathews, Henry Clay Law Society,
The rules regarding the essay contest announced In last week's Kernel
have been formulated. The essay Is
to be on the subject, "Why we should
buy war Saving Stamps," and must be
not more than 300 nor less than 200
words in length. The essays must be
given to Dr. J. E. Tuthill, not later
than March 15.
As prizes two baby bonds worth ?5
each will be awarded In the Collego
of Arts and Science, one In tho Law
Department, one in tho Collego of
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
and one in tho College of Agriculture.
The Thrift Stamp campaign will be
presented tomorrow In chapel by one
,

co-e-

representative
ute teams.

from each of tho minMarch 8, tho entire chapel

hour will bo devoted to the Interests
of the campaign.
The stamps aro on sale in tho Busi
ness
About

(Jilico

and nt Patterson Hull.
sinco tho

300 havo ben sold

Prof. T. T. Jones, chairman of tho
campaign started.
illiteracy campaign on tho campus,
rect with the Quartermaster and bo
committeo of students, has
REGULAR MEETING OF TRUSTEES
sure of a credit account on tho $7 at thru his
succeeded in selling tho illiteracy buti ho beginning of tho next Homester.
Tho Board of Trustees held its regu
ton emblem of war on mental darkAll uniforms must bo left at tho col
ness, to moro than f00 persons. Tho and placing two or threo on a page lar meeting In tho President's oftlco
lege Miring tho summer term for
Only routine mat-tor- s
go to raise tho staff hus decided to devote a pago at noon Tuesday.
cleaning and repairing, so that tho Income from tho sales will
were brought up for discussion.
(Continued on Page Five)
illiteracy campaign fund.
tho State's
(Continued on Pago Five.)
membered is to keep the records

cor-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

wo.

fife

STRAND

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P. M.

EXTENSION MEASURE
SUPPORTED BY McVEY TABBIES LOSE
NEW

GRADING

SYSTEM

Points, as Well as Credits, to
Count Towards
Graduation
GRADES A, B, C, D, and E.
The faculty of the University has
adopted a now system of grading and
grouping of students with special re
quirements for graduation and special
commencement honors.
The University Is one of the fifty
colleges and
eight out of sixty-fou- r
universities, approved by the Carnegie
Foundation, which has adopted the
system consisting of but few grades
or groups. This system favors the plan
of having only five grades, A, B, C
D, E, the first four grades above the
passing mark. This means that the
troublesome "D," which heretofore
has meant a condition, now means a
poor pass. The new system gives
credit hours whose value in points are
as follows: A, three points; B, two
points; C, one point; D, hours credit,
hut no points; while the lowest grade,
E, will yield neither points nor credit.
An equal number of hours and points,
120, will be required for graduation.
A student with 120 credit hours but
no point credits will not be allowed to
graduate.
Following is the system adopted,
which will go into effect after June,
1918, and the results will be recorded
in the Registrar's office:
A Exceptionally high quality, valued at three points.
B Good, valued at two points' credit.
C Fair, valued at one point credit.
D Poor, but passing, valued at no
points' credit.
E Failure, valued
credit.

at no points'

A credit represents one hour of "recitation or two hours of laboratory a
week for one semester. Drawing, shop-wor-

gymnasium, military, science
and other courses requiring no outside
work are reckoned at three hours for
one credit. The standing of a stu
dent Is defined as the ratio of his total
number of points to his total number
of credits. An advanced credit will
be regarded as a grade of C. A grade
of E means that the work must be
taken over in class to be credited.
Concerning the requirements
for
graduation, the faculty has decided
that the student must have gained the
specified number of credits, plus an
equal number of points. This require
ment of points shall apply only to
work taken after June, 1918. At least
one year of the course must have been
in residence.

In regard to the securing of passage
of the Extension BUI, known ns House
Bill 294, Senate Bill 96, now beforo
tho Legislature, Doctor McVey said:
"Heretofore tho Stato of Kentucky has
appropriated only $18,000 for tho carrying of agricultural extension work
thruout tho Stato, when tho Federal
government requires tho providing of
$00,000 annually by the Stato to meet
r
Bill,
tho conditions In tho
and the difference, about $38,000, has
been taken from experiment station
funds which in reality were needed
in other places; for instance, in croc
lion of farm buildings and enlarge
ment of experiment work along agri
cultural lines, which is hampering
both divisions of work.
"The request for the direct appro
priation of $62,000 has been made to
take care of the work properly, and
as a result of this appropriation, the
State will receive $180,000 annually
from Federal funds under the Smith-Leve- r
bill passed by Congress In 1914,
but if the appropriation is not made
by the Legislature we will not get the
$180,000, which Is wholly for agricultural extension work. The extension
work places a burden on the University in addition to what it now carries
and the passage of the Extension Bill
will relieve the situation and continue
the good work of the extension division."
Smith-Love-

CLASS VISITS FARM
The class studying stock breeding
at the college of Agriculture will soon
begin to spend Saturdays visiting various, large stock farms of the State
for the purpose of studying representative types of pure bred stock.
The stock at the Experiment Station is inadequate for the extensive
study required to give boys experience
in judging. The class Is composed of
40 men. During the remainder of the
semester they wil study sheep, beef
cattle and swine with regard to their
characteristics, origin, tye and adaptability.

15

U. K. FELLOWSHIPS

In the University of Kentucky Index, published February 5, appears the
following regarding graduate fellowships:
"Fifteen graduate fellowships are
open to students who desire to pursue
graduate work. Tho student applying
must have completed his undergraduate courses.
The fellowships are
$350 in amount. The fellows appointed
are expected to teach a limited number of hours, not more than ten a
week. Application should be made to
Mie chairman of the Graduate Committee, University of Kentucky,
Kentucky."
Lex-'ngto-

frollowlng are the commencement
honors to bo granted graduates who
do certain accredited work:
lege career will receive the first honor
1. Students are graduated
"With
If his average is B, ho will receive the
tiign uisiincuon," wno attain a
second honor. A student in tho Unistanding for the course of 2
points.
versity prior to Juno, 1018, to bo eligi2. Students
graduated "With ble for honors must have met tho forare
Distinction" who attain a standing of mer requirements for honors for that
2
points.
part of his course taken before tho
3. Students
are graduated with new ruling.
"Special Mention" who attain a standIt is the intention of the University
ing of two polntB and are recommendto make public announcement each
ed by the department concerned for year of all undergraduate
students
especially good work.
who have so far In their courses at-- (
This means that a student making talned a standing of two points or
an annual average of A thru his col- - more.
8

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

Prices 5 Cents and 10 Cents.
Afternoon and Evening.

SOUTH AFRICAN ON
WAY TO UNIVERSITY

WHEN

TIE IS PLAYED

OFF

Weslcyan Triumphs in
Closely Matched
Contest
GAME IS INTERESTING
Once more the ladles of Weslcyan
have used tho Tabbies shamefully by
defeating them 9 to 7.
The coincidence of the tied score
wns again before tho notice of tho
Winchester fans. Like the boys' game
tho week before when the tie was not
discovered until too late to play It off,
tho score at the end of the last third
was 7 to 7. According to the rules
for a girls' game, the first team to
make a score after the resumption of
playing wins the game. The Winchester girls made the first field goal
a few seconds after the play began
again.
The game was interesting thruout
with the scores always close together.
At the end of the first third the score
was 1 to 1. Weslayan led the visitors
by 5 to 1 at the end of the second
third.
The line-uand summary follows:
Wesleyan.
Kentucky.
F.
B. Spencer
Crane (1)
K. Spencer
F.
Cromwell (1)
C.
Ellwanger (2)
Cregor (1)
G.
Dean
Porter (2)
G.
Coward
Walker
p

Cregor, one foul out of five trials;
Spencer one foul out of seven trials.
Robertson, of Wesleyan, referee.

COMMERCIAL COURSE

PLAN FOR NEXT YEAR
President McVey has announced,
that beginning next September, there
will be introduced into the curricu
lum of the University, a commercial
course in collaboration
with the
course in Political Economy now offered.

This does not mean that a business
school will be instituted here, running
in opposition to the business schools
of the city, but that an extension in
the work of economics, possibly employing two or three more instructors,
will be made. This course will teach
Insurance, commerce, advertising, and
the finer courses not to be obtained
elsewhere.
Similar courses are now included in
the curriculum of Harvard, Yale and
Columbia, and have proved unusually
nopular.
Only graduates of High
Schools will be enrolled, and a pre-- ,
ious course in shorthand and stenography will probably be required also.

Schorffius, Pretoria, South
Africa, graduato of tho University,
from tho Collego of Agriculture, has
been, for a number of years, employed
by tho Tobacco and Cotton Division of
tho Union of South Africa to carry out
experiments in tho raising of these
commodities. A letter has Just been
received from Mr. Schorffius, announcing that H. S. Lo Roux, Pretoria, South
Africa, Is on his way to Amorlca to
nnter tho Collego of Mcchnnlcal and
Electrical Engineering.
Until tho declaration of war between
Germany and America, there was another student from South Africa,
studying mechanical engineering at
tho University, R. C. A. Mapstone, who
Joined tho Royal Flying Corps of the
Canadian forces and at present is
in the aviation service of the British
government.
W.

KENTUCKIAN NOTES

H.

MRS. WIGGS WILL BE
S
PRESENTED BY
CO-ED-

The Life and Writings of Mrs. Alice
Hegan Rice, author of "Mrs. WIggs and
the Cabbage Patch," "Lovey Mary,"
Hill," etc.,
"Romance of Bllyl-Gowas the subject for discussion at the
regular weekly meeting of the Philo
sophian Literary Society Wednesday
evening, Feb. 13. Ruth Duckwall, for
mer president of the society, was in
charge of the meeting.
Miss Duckwall is a resident of Lou
isville, where the Cabbage Patch and
t
Hill are situated. This, and
the fact that she is personally ac
quainted with the author made her
talk unusually interesting.
The members of the society are
making preparations for the presentation of "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage
Patch," in spring. The committee in
charge of the selection of the play
was: Elizabeth McGowan, chairman;
Alma Bolser, and Elizabeth Kraft.
Billy-Goa-

NEW COURSE IS UNDER
SMITH-HUGHE- S
BILL

All copy for tho societies must bo
In by not later than Monday, Feb-

ruary 24. This Includes tho written
matter on tho page, and It must bo
as It Is to bo printed. This copy
must bo turned in to tho Kentucklan
office or deposited In tho Kentucklan
box at tho north entrance of tho Main
Building.
All accounts for space In tho Annual
will be due March 1. All payments
and checks should bo made payable to
Eugeno Wilson, business manager of
tho Kentucklan. Immediate arrangements with Mr. Wilson In this regard
must be made.

Tho retouching and printing of tho
individual photographs are practically
finished, and they may be secured
from the photographers by the numerous organizations and fraternities, and
the design work and mounting must
be rushed to completion.
We recommend the use of No. 1
for mounting purwhite
may be obtained at Wren
poses, which
& King's, corner Main and Mill streets.
The printing page of the Annual will
be seven inches long and five inches
wide, therefore all mounts for whole
pages designs must be In the proportion of seven to five.
mat-boar- d

f

CATS DEFEAT TIGERS
ON THEIR OWN FLOOR
The Georgetown Tigers were defeated by the Wildcats for the second time
last Thursday night at Georgetown by
a score of 25 to 16.
The Kentucky players were up to
and
their usual style In
team work and did not give their hosts
Thomas for the Wildcats
a "look-in.shot more field goals than all the opposing team and played his customary
star game. Shanklin also deserves
mention.
and summary follows:
The line-uGeorgetown
Kentucky.
C.
Campbell
Henderson
Adams
F.
Shanklin
C.
Black
Thomas
G.
Siler
Dishman
G.
Dean
Glickman
Referee, Roberston of Wesleyan.
Zerfoss for Campbell,
Substitutions
Bastin for Glickman; Moss for Dean.
g

"

p

Professor McNeil James, a graduate
of the University of Illinois and a Master of Science from the same university, has been employed by the University to instruct students enrolled
in Agricultural Education in the radio
buzzer work.
s
Under the provisions of the
bill, known as the Vocational
Educational Act, this course in Agricultural Education is to be instituted. WANTED
Professor James has recently been
Roomers for three
professor of Agricultural Education in furnished rooms in the beautiful old
the State Normal School of Valley Gordon home Lexington avenue and
City, North Dakota, and has been a Maxwell street. Phone 3530-X- .
county agent for the past two years.
His coming will add a new typo of
BUY A THRIFT STAMP
work in tho University.
Smith-Hughe-

OLD DORM. CHALLENGE
Residents of tho Third Division of
tho Old Dormitory have challenged
uny equal number of students living
on tho campus to buy more Thrift
Stamps than they will. Their apparent intention is to change the Inscription that figuratively hangs over their
door from "Tho Home of tho Bearcats
und Land of tho Brave," to "Tho Homo
of the

Patriotic and

Land

of

tho

Bravo."

MRS. J. TANDY HUGHES
Member of A. N; A, M. of D.
106 N. UPPER ST.
Classes Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday evenings.
It is the aim of this school to teach dancing as it
should be, advocating at all times proper
positions and decorations.

MusicPiano, Saxophone, Violin, Trap Drum
BUY A THRIFT STAMP

A

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
PROGRAM ANNOUNCED PERSONNEL FOR "MICE
FOR MILITARY BALL
Following is the program or the
dances for tho Military Ball. Thero
will bo twenty dances and eight no
breaks.
1. One Step, "Over There."
2. One Step, "SonB of America."
3. Waltz. No break, "Old Fanhion
Wife."
4. One Stop, "We Are Going Over."
5. Fox Trot, "Some Sweet Day."
No Break,
6. Waltz.
"Till tho
Clouds Roll By."
7. One Step, "Dlrle Valentino."
8. Fox Trot. No Break. "Lilly of
tho Valley."
9. One Step, "In Sanda Mingo."
10. Waltz. No Break. "Tho Sunshine
of Your Smile."
Intermission.
11. Waltz. No
Break, "All tho
World Will Be Jealous of Me."
12. .One Step, "Glorious."
13. Fox Trot, "Long Boy."
14. Waltz, No Break. "There's a
Egypt in Your Dreamy Eyes."
15.
One Step, "Some Sunday Morning."
16. Fox Trot, "Just a Baby's Prayer
at Twilight.
17. Waltz. No Break. "Moonlight
r
Blues."
18. Fox Trot, "Some One Else May
He There."
19. One Step, "Homeward Bound."
20. Waltz, No Break, "My Little
Rambling Rose."
j

TIGERT GIVES FIRST
OF SIX WAR LECTURES
Dr. J. J. Tigert delivered the first
of his series of six lectures to be given before the Y. W. C. A., Thursday
evening, at Patterson Hall. Doctor Tigert spoke on "War and Woman,"
which gave a survey of the lectures
which are to follow and showed woman's great opportunity in this war for
service and how she is taking advantage of It.
How the attitude of the people has
changed since the declaration that
made it every one's war and not one
so far removed that it did not affect
this country was touched on. "The
spirit of giving has become one of
love," said Doctor Tigert, "as well as
sacrifice, and woman offered her greatest sacrifice when she sent her sons."

FOUR THRIFT STAMPS
FOR BEST LIMERICK
"Uncle Jimmie" Lyons in the Busi
ness Office, has announced that he
will give four Thrift Stamps for the
best limerick handed in before March
15, on any subject dealing with Thrift
Stamps.
The announcement of this limerick
contest has already produced some
brilliant efforts, and brought to light
heretofore unrecognized talent. Following is a contribution from a former

student:
"There was a young Kaiser named
Billy,
Who got on his ear like
But we gave him the cramps,
With War Saving Stamps,
look
And made 'Hock der Kaiser
silly."
Sam-Hill-

JUNIORS NOTICE!
Class dues are 3 and are payable
now. The $3 Includes the expenses
of the Junior Prom. A dues receipt Is
necessary before the Junior Prom ticket can be obtained. Tho following were
appointed by class president Hall, to
assist in collecting dues in their re
spectlve departments.
Misses Mildred Collins and Lillian

AND

KAPPA ALPHA GIVES
LONG SERVICE LIST

J. D. PURCELL CO.
LEXINGTON,

KY.

NEWEST FALL MODES

MEN" ANNOUNCED

IN

Thcta Chapter of Knppa Alpha fraSUITS, DRESSES, COATS,
ternity lias thlrty-Ilvmen in nctivo
SKIRTS and WAISTS.
sorvico now, fourteen of whom wore
Pleasingly Priced.
Final Selections of Certain connected with the chapter Inst year,
Not Yet Made,
according to a report given tho regis
However
trar this week.
The University service list continues
GRATEFUL to grow, and tho
MANAGER
of tho
$1.00 Per Year
students is asked In making it comThe management of "Mice and Men"
5c Per Copy
plete. The fraternities and other orofficially announces a part of tho cast
ganizations are especially urged to
for the forthcoming Stroller play as
make out lists of their members In
follows:
to you
Embury's ward. sorvico.
Molloy
Peggy
Ann
25c
Hair Cut
Gus Gay Mark Embury, a scholar
Ceo. T. Martin Barber Shop
DR. TANIMURA VISITS
ami scientist.
139 EAST MAIN STREET
naoement Opp. fhnenlx Hotel
Milton Rovoll Captain Lovoll, his EXPERIMENT STATION
PLAIN, SIIOWEU AND
nophow.
TURKISH BATHS
Rent of Service
FOUR CHAIRS
Dr. Issa Tanlmura, Commissioner of
Grover Creech Roger Goodlake,
Animal Husbandry in Japan, who is
Embury's friend.
Harry touring the country looking for sheep
Augsburg Sir
Frederick
DENTIST
lyi js sultnble for the climato and conTrlmblestone, English nobloman.
For any kind of dental service call on
prevailing in his country, visitFrederick Jackson Peter Embury's ditions
DR. J. T. SLATON
ed the Experiment Station last week.
servant.
127 CHEAP3IDE
Charles Planck Kit Baringer, a He spoke in high terms of the Hatnp-shire- s
seat Walnut Hall farm, and
fiddler and professor of deportment.
Oflce hour, 8 . m. to 6 p. m. Phone 884-Elizabeth Murphey or Eliza Spurrier lected one of the animals to send back
to Japan for foundation stock.
Joanna, wife of Goodlake.
Dr. Tanlmura came to this country
Edna Berkeley Mrs. Deborah, Emseveral years ago as an Immigrant,
bury's housekeeper.
Ruth Cassidy Matron, foundling seeking an education. After completing a course at Yale, he took graduate
PROGRESSIVE SHOE
hospital.
REPAIRING SHOP
Robert Ralble Beadle, foundling work at Pennsylvania and Cornell.
My Work and Prices Always
hospital.
Keep Me iuay.
Molly A Kitchen Maid (not yet se- WEATHERFORD SPEAK
140 South Limestone.
lected).
ON NEGRO PROBLEMS
TenOrphan Girls (Not yet select
ed).
On Tuesday evening, Dr. W. D. Patronize Our Advertisers
In the selection of this cast, much Weatherford, Nashville, spoke on "Nedifficulty has been experienced, owing gro Life in the South." The subject
to the fact that the talent from which was illustrated by slides representing TUG O' WAR PICTURES
It was to be chosen was of such ex- conditions in practically every SouthFOR SALE.
ceptional quality, that it was indeed a ern state.
task to make proper distinctions and Doctor Weatherford spoke of the See Planck or Moosnick.
select those best fitted for the part in- home, economic, educational
and
volved.
church life of the negro and showed
With the usual spirit which has that given a reasonable chance the Patronize Our Advertisers
placed the Strollers among the first of negro will develop into a better and
organizations,
the useful citizen. The problem of the
all the student
nights present age is that of race relationmembers reported on "try-outand demonstrated their Intention to ships and he urged the students to
make the forthcoming play a success, make a thoro study of the negro as
CHIROPODIST
without regard to who should be lucky that is the problem nearest home to
Office Phoenix Hotel Barber
enough to be given parts in the com- us.
Houses by appointShop.
edy. Altho it was impossible for every
ment. Phone . 1988-- x
is hoped that
one to be successful, it
PATRIOTIC MEETING
that interest will never slacken, and
FOR ENGLISH MAJORS BUY A THRIFT STAMP
each member will consider himself a
ready to be called
committee of one,
A patriotic meeting of the English
upon at any time to aid in the producClub will be held tonight at Patterson
ing of this year's play and to do all In
Hall at 8 o'clock. Miss Roberta Thornhis power to make it a success. At
ton will speak on "Booth Tarkington"
the present time the stage manager is
and Miss Adele Slade on "Tagore."
in need of ten young women, members
Aftor the program a patriotic social
of the Strollers, to take the parts of
FRATERNITY
English
orphans and also to appear in a ball hour will follow, with the
major girls at Patterson Hall as hosroom scene. It will be very much apCLUB PINS
preciated by all if those desiring to tesses. Several features have been
planned and it Is hoped that all Eng
take these parts will place their
MEDALS
majors will be there.
names with either McClain or Planck, lish
at their earliest convenience.
Owing to the unusual talent dis- SERVICE FLAG TO BE
We Cater to the
played by Misses Elizabeth Murphey PRESENTED THURSDAY
University and College
and Eliza Spurrier in their interpretaPatrons.
H. V. McChesney, camp educational
tion of the part of Joanna, the stage
manager has decided to take a little director of tho Army Y. M. C. A. at
more time before making the final de- Camp Zachary Taylor, will speak tocision. This is a most difficult rola morrow morning at 10 o'clock, in the
and both these young women seem usual Washington birthday celebra
equally suited to handle it. For this tion. The University sorvico Hag,
reason this selection will be deferred which will contain 433 stars will be
Jeweler
formally presented at the same time.
for a few days.
Preceding the chapel exorcises the
Thru the Kernel, tho stuge manager
123 E. Main Street,
wishes to announce his sincere thanks battalion will give its first public cereOpp. the Phoenix,
und deepest appreciation to each and mony of tho year, tho "escort of tho
Lexington, Ky.
every member of tho organization for colors."- This will take place at 9:30.
Dr. Benjamin J. Bush will givo tho
his supreme loyalty and ready
to every call that has boon Invocation and Dr. T. C. Ectou, tho
benediction.
made.
The sorvico Hag is being mado by
Hayden, girls; Headloy Shouso, Ags; the young women of tho Home Econo
Ed Puryear, Law; More Smith, Civils; mica Department. It