xt7n5t3g1h92 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7n5t3g1h92/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640129  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 29, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 29, 1964 1964 2015 true xt7n5t3g1h92 section xt7n5t3g1h92 Jim iEHia
Vol. LV, No. 63

Med School Gets

IL

Public Health Service

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON,

KY., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29, lOfil

Eight Pages

Centennial Applications
Are Due Before Friday
Friday is the deadline for
for the Presi-- ,
pplications
dent's Student Centennial
Committee.
Any member of the Junior

class in all colleges of the University may apply. Applications
are available in the residence
halls, fraternity and sorority
houses, the offices of the dean
of men and the dean of women,
and at the Student Center Information desk.
Completed applications should
be returned to the offices of the
dean of men and the dean of
women or the Student Center
Information desk by 5 p.m. Friday.
The committee will work with
the Faculty committee headed by
Dr. J. W. Patterson to plan activities for the University's centennial celebration during the
1964-6- 5
school year.
At last night's Student ConPaul
gress meeting. President
Chellgren announced a
committee that will screen
committee applications and submit a list of 30 names to Dr.
Oswald. Prom that list, the President will select the 12 to 75
member committee.
The screening committee includes Keith Hagan, president
of Lances, Junior men's honorary; Sandy Brock, president of
Links, Junior women's honorary;
Ann Combs, president of AWS;
a representative from the Congress, and Chellgren. Richard
Sellers, assistant dean of men,
and Skip Harris, assistant dean
of women, will also serve on the
committee:
The committee will meet at 3

Theta Scholarship

Applications are now available for the Kappa Alpha Thrta
Mothers' Club scholarship to be
given to a sophomore woman
academic year.
for the 1964-6- 5
The forms may be picked up in
Room 4 of Frasre Hall and
must be returned to that office
by Feb. 7.

J

p.m. Monday to select the list
that will be submitted to the
President.
Dr. Oswald does not believe
the centennial is dwelling unnecessarily on the past. "The
centennial observance will provide the University with a chance
to signify its past achievements
while at the same time looking
to opportunities in the future,"
he said.
He further insisted that it was
Important that students played
a major role in the success of
the centennial. He said. "It is
mandatory that students be involved to great degree in this
Important event, for the University revolves around its student body."
He added to this statement, "I
view membership on the Student
Centennial Committee as one of
the fine opportunities a student
will have to serve the University."
"The Student Centennial Committee," he explained, "will have
a major responsibility
in the
planning and execution of student centennial activities and
in the coordination of student
participation in, other centennial .
events."
Chellgren said that he would
encourage every member of the
Junior class to take an active
interest in the centennial.
"It
is a tremendous
responsibility
for the class and a great opportunity for service to the University," Chellgren said.
The committee will be announced Feb. 22, Founder's Day,
at a luncheon and a reception.
The reception will be held at the
Alumni Center and will be for
all members of the Junior class.
Detailed planning for the centennial observance Is now in
progress.
The University will attempt to
attract national and regional
meetings to the campus during
1965. A subcommittee
for centennial professorships has been
established and the committee
will Invite three to five scholars
to the campus under the title
Centennial Professor.
A centennial
conference sub

Grant

Seven-Yea- r

committee will plan conferences
or symposia in the areas of
higher education, biological sciences, physical sciences, social
sciences, and humanities for the
centennial year.
The Board of Trustees has appropriated $130,000 to finance the
centennial... A centennial device
and centennial motto is being
prepared and will be announced
later this year.

Requirements Drop
For Chi Delta Phi
Literary Honorary
The University chapter of Chi
Delta Phi, national women's literary honorary. Invites all women
Interested In literature and creative writing to apply for membership.
In the past, membership has
required a 3.0 in the English department and a 2.8 overall. This
to Betty
semester,
according
Bruce Fugazzi, president, any
student in good standing with
the University may apply for
membership.

Awards UK $784,805
The U.S. Public Health Service grained $78 1,803 to the
University Medical Center for the establishment of a general
cjinital research center at the hospital.

The sum allotted Is for Initial
support of the grant, which is to
last for seven years.
All Medical Center departments
will use and operate the center
under the advice of a committee
of
composed of representatives
the departments.
The center will enable physicians to make controlled studies of
a patient over long periods of
time. He can have the patient
admitted, have necessary laboratory work completed and note
periodic changes in the patient's
condition all in one place and
with a minium of inconvenience
to the patient.
agree that such
Physicians
conditions permit closer studies
of disease processes than can be
obtained when the patient Is not
Immediately available.
As a result, the Clinical Research Center will have as its
primary goal the study of diseases and disorders under carefully controlled conditions.
The research work will be done
In a specially designed,
wing in the Hospital. The facility
will Include a recreation area,
diet kitchen, seminar room, office
and laboratory.
The center will become part of
the clinical teaching program.
Interns and residents, and some
UK medical students will be assigned to the unit and will there
d
by gain
experience
with the aims, methods and standards of clinical research.

Officials believe Initial studies
the research center will Include
work done on bone diseases, the
effect of diet control on Internal
secretion glands, the effect of
drugs on patients with heart disease, the study of cancer, the
control of particular blood diseases, surgical techniques and
psychiatric disturbances.
Of the total amount granted,
$201,919 Is for renovation of the
existing hospital facilities and for
the purchase of equipment. It is
anticipated that the Clinical Research Center will be located in
the ambulant wing of the University Hospital.
Receipt of the grant was announced by Dr. R. Williard. UK
vice president for the Medical
Center, and secretary of the Fund
of the Advancement of Research
in the UK Medical Center.
the grant was
Technically,
made to the fund from the Na
tlonal Institutes of Health.
Members of the center's advisory committee and their special
fields are Dr. Rene Menguy, surgery; Dr. C. Charlton Mabry,
pediatrics; Dr. John W. Oreena
Dr. Daniel L.
Jr., obstetrics;
Dr. Robert
Weiss, pathology;
Greenlaw, radiology; Dr. Marion,
Carnes, anesthesiology; Dr. David
C. White, biochemistry; Dr. Michael J. McNamara,
community
medicine, and Dr. Abraham Wlk-le- r,
psychiatry.
In

Eight Months Careful Planning
Preceded Health Service Grant
9

By MELINDA MANNING
Kernel Staff Writer

Over eight months of careful planning and preparation
by mem!ei's of the Medical
Center staff preceded the announcement that the U.S.
Public Health Service had
granted $781,805 for the establishment of a clinical research center here.
Many more months of hard
work will be necessary before the
clinic becomes operational.
Target date for completion of the
facilities Is October, 1964.

"

"!

X.J
Ctvens Entertain Freshmen
Owens members Sallie I.lst, far left, and Kathy Ker- - freshmen Cwen candidates,
far right, serve punch and cookies to three lug tea Monday.

guests at the

The installation, to be located
in the Center's ambulant wing,
will be used to conduct long-ranresearch on patients under controlled conditions.
"The National
Institutes of
Health saw a need for similar
Institutions
about four years
ago," assistant hospital administrator Richard Warren said.
He explained that about 80 institutions of this kind, many
located at medical schools, have
received grants from the Institute.
The Institute does much of its
major research in its headquarters at Bethesda, Maryland, and
these clinics are an extension
of their work designed to utilize
the facilities
and talents of
health centers across the country.
"We felt that the Medical
Center had reached the stage In
its development when we were
ready to undertake a project of
this kind," Mr. Warren said.
He added that much of the research done in the clinic would
be an extension of some projects
already being carried out by
members of the medical staff,
but the clinic would provide the
control conditions unavailable In
the University Hospital.
Some of the project proposed
for initial research Include studies
on diet controls, cancer development, surgical techniques, and
bone diseases.
People under study in the clinic
may fall In one of three categories:
1. Physically normal people or
those with a health problem not
directly related to the research
who would permit observation tif
their reactions to drugs, diet-trchanges, or other controls under
study.
I. Those with a particular disease syndrome. This might include studies of similar to the
research being done on crash
dieting programs being conducted at other clinics.

3. People with ccute disturb
ances, especially rare disorders.
Physicians would be able to obtain invaluable Information from
close observation of such patients.
They will submit to observa-tlo- n
in exchange for free medical care.
"Our first problem here," Mr.
Warren said, "is preparation of
the physical facilities for the
project."
The facility will Include one-arooms, a recreation area, specially equipped diet
kitchen, seminar room, offices,
and laboratories.
"Patients are often closely
confined for as long as a month
for these projects," the administrator commented," and their
surroundings will be designed to
be as cheerful and comfortable
as possible."
He added that at some clinics,
patients are allowed to decorato
their own rooms and even paint
the walls. Patients here will be
permitted quite a bit of freedom
in making their quarters pleasant, he commented, but ha
doubted if they would go that far.
In acknowledging the grant,
John W.
University President
Oswald said 'this award means
that we will be able to carry on
Important but difficult research,
at the Medical Center and that
we will be able to Improve our
teaching program through tha
appropriate Involvement of medical students, Interns, and residents in caring for the patients
housed in the "research center."
Information received from research at the clinic will be circulated nationally
by doctors
participating in the projects and
the National Health Institute.
In addition, there will be much
cooperative research between
at the Center and detailed study of side effects such
as psychological problems caused
by coiiiinemcnt will be possible.

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan.

29, 19f4

Spindle top Hall In Third Year;
Has New President, Calendar Plan
Spindletop Hall, University
club, begins its third year of operation this month with a new
president, a new operating
calendar, and a new set of
standing committees.
fac

Dr. R. D. Johnson, executive
dean of Extended Programs, has
succeeded Dr. Prank D. Peterson
as president of the organization.
Dean Johnson was a charter
member of Spindletop Hall's forerunner, Carnahan House, which
was established In 1957.
The Board of Directors on
Nov. 29 approved a change In
the club's operation from fiscal
year to calendar year basis to
obtain greater operating efficiency and more satisfactory continuity In the work of committees. The change became effective Jan. 1.
In recent artion, the directors
also:
Renewed the contract of Mr.
and Mrs. Warren O. Dorsey,
for one year; apmanagers,
proved resurfacing for the south
(terrace and surfacing of the
bathhouse with quarry tile, at a
cost of $6,240; authorized painting of the bathhouse; and approved the purchase of eight additional card tables with chairs
and 12 additional lamps for the
library.
During the past few months
experts have been at work restoring the pipe organ in the
music room to playing condition,
and the project has now been
completed. The major project
planned for this year will be air
of parts of the
conditioning
clubhouse. Remodeling of the old
horse barn for use as a teen-ag- e
recreation center is expected to
be completed next spring.
Several Scotch pine trees have
been planted adjacent to the new
tennis courts in the picnic area
and others are to be added. The
lawn of the mansion has been
s.
fertilized and seeded with

Current membership In the club
totals 1,376 families and single
persons. Membership is closed
for new faculty-sta- ff
except
members, new graduates of the
University, and alumni who move
area from
into the
which members are accepted.
Persons in these categories have
ninety days from date of appointment, graduation, or move
in which to join without payment of the club entrance fee.
Those who do j not apply for

membership within the ninety-da- y
period are placed on the
club's waiting list for acceptance
as vacancies occur.
Faculty and staff members of
the University may obtain membership information from the UK.
Public Relations Office. Alumni
should contact the Alumni Association Office.
Dr. Johnson has appointed the
committees
following standing
for 1964:
Membership Committee R. W.
Wild, chairman, Doris Seward,
Ada Refbord.
Rules
House and Orounds
Committee
Charles Landrum,
chairman, W. L. Matthews Jr.,
J. Frank Grimes, Mrs. Carl Wie-se- l,
Mrs. Margaret McMillan.

UK Press Publishes
A collec tion of 14 essays by American and British scholars

concerning the work of the English author, Graham Greene,
has just been published by tlie University Press.
Edited by Dr. Robert O. Evans,
associate proafessor of English,
the book is entitled "Graham
Greene Some Critical Considerations."
The essays, many of which
have never before been published, vary from a discussion
of Gi een as a writer of Christian tragedy to an assessment
of "The Power and the Glory,"
one of Greene's
works.
A number of the essayists focus
to
upon Greene's commitment
the Roman Catholic faith and
the definition it has given to his
work. Rounding out the presentation of the author's accomplishments are discussions of his
work in the drama, the short
story, and as a motion picture
critic.
The collection also contains the
most comprehensive
published
bibliography of Greene's works
and criticisms of them. The bibliography was compiled by Neil
Brennan of Villanova University.
Dr. Evans has written an essay, "The Eatanist Fallacy of
Brighton Rock," for the book and
Dr. Jacob H. Adler, associate professor of English, comments on
Greene's plays.
Other essays in the volume are
by Harvey Curtis Webster, University of Louisville; Francis L.
Kunkel, St. John's University;
Dominick J. Consolo, Denison
Univeisity; David H. Hesla, Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa.
A. A. DeVitts, Purdue Univer- -

SALE

FOR SALE ImpUla, 19M. 6 cylinder, automathUike new. 39,000
mUes; power starring, brakes,
radio and heater. Quick sale,
28J4t
$1,200. Call
FORSaLE laafKlodiV "A" loi d
Coupe. Runs good. Call
)
29J4t
after 5 p.m.
VOH SALEj-Ponti- uc
'58, 4 door,
heater, radio, seat covers, new
Phone

atjfer

5

p.m.
28J2t

WANTIO

WANTED an experienced sax
player (or Combo. Call Ken Pos-to1)1 about wages, hours,
t
audit ions,Lnd arrangements.
to carry
routes in
section. Weekly earnings
$30. Also University area, weekly earnings $20. Apply 150 Wal28J4t
nut.

WANTED

Two

LOST One gold St. Cltfistopher
niedul. Lost in vicinity fit Taylor
Education Bldg. if ffcund call
Re- Chaiieen Davis,
SJ
28J3t
ward.

at Alpha
LOST Coat niitf-uGam formal. Seel;ing beige cash- mere coat. IV
pockets sewed
up. Have otheiyi mt. Chris Zar- 29JU
ger,
MISCELLANEOUS

Herbert R. Haber, Wayne
John Atkins,
Higher Teachers' Training Institute, Omdurman, Sudan; Miriam
Allott, Liverpool University; Carolyn D. Scott, Washington University, St. Louis; Nathan A.
Scott Jr., University of Chicago
Divinity School, and Kal
Helsinki, Finland, editor.
sity;

State University;

Horizons '64

Dr. Paul Oberst will speak on
"Race Relations:
Kentucky's
Next Step" in today's "Horizons '64"
The
lecture, at 4 p.m. in Room 206
of the Student Center, is the
second in the series sponsored
committee.
by the

University Stiulents
Attend Conference
At Ohio University

atstudents
Six University
tended a week-lon- g
Ecumenical
Student Conference on the
Christian World Mission at the
University of Ohio in Athens.
UK delegates included Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Harber, graduate
students in history; Robert Roberts, engineering senior; Ralph
Gelbach, engineering senior;
Richard Marsh, arts and sciences
sophomore; and Maxine Coldiron,
pharmacy senior.
The meeting was the 19th conference of the National Student
Christian Federation.
Delegates from 79 countries
discussed the conference theme,
"For the Life of the World."

'

1

Stuffing's Bock 'In'

m.

Gets New Members

The Patterson Literary Society accepted 10 candidates
for membership at a meeting in the Student Center last week.

Each applicant was required to
speak before the group on a
The
topic of timely interest.
Patterson
Society, the oldest
continuing organization on campus, meets regularly to discuss
current affairs and to permit
members to improve their speaking skill.

The Society will sponsor an
Speaking conExtemporaneous
test in the Spring in memory of
George Crum, a distinguished
alumnus of the University.
New members accepted by the
Society Include Robert Bennett,
a sophomore in Commerce, who
spoke on "Selling Yourself";
liam Keith Brown, Engineering
"A Blind
Spot";
sophomore,
David Sullivan, a freshman Education major, who discussed
"Survival;"
Jim Hawkins, a Sophomore in
Engineering, who discussed "The
Tobacco Industry in AdvertisAfcS
Richard
Pollitte,
ing";

Junior, "Overpopulation: Its Ef- -'
feet on Underdeveloped Coun- tries"; Richard Hite, Commerce
De1i
Sophomore, "Juvenile
Howell Brady, A&S Sophomore, "As Superior as the Living over the Dead"; Alfred Oakland,
Engineering
Sophomore,
"The Problem of Presidential
Succession"; Curtis Q u n d r y,
Commerce Junior, "The Registration System"; and Michael
Staed, AfcS Sophomore, "The
History of the University."

ELECTRIC

HEATERS

Starts 7:30

Admission 75c

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NOW li

1:30 p.m.
Show
1:45
ABOUT
IS TALKING
ALL AMERICA
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FRIDAY

STARTS

Charade'
. STANLEY

JEAN
SIMMONS

1

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Hepbun

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musical sitasterpiaca
by Walt Disney

wiesoiDMEra

"FANTASIA"
IN

lECHNICOlCMr

COLOR

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Cent, from 12:00

Marias,

16JU

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CINEMA

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TECHNICOLOR
viiAOrjrra mono
PLUS

VAKlIEFlJ'J

PHONE

510,301113

T

ADMISSION

Courier-Journ-

MISCELLANEOUS

SHARE EXPENSES
Regular
commuting to Bloomingtou, Indiana, or area, with own cur.
Room 143, Fine Arts Bids.
23J4t

NOW'.

'THE SECRET
PASSION

$1.00
.

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STUDENTS (WITH I D.)
FORMAL OPENING
WEEK,

75 e

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Freud

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MOM
ACATHA CHRISTIE'S

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CLIFT
Shows

ilT!ft"i

i.lSC&rUriiM

With
MONTGOMERY

JAMES

II

MARGARET RUTHERFORD IS THE
FUNNIEST WOMAN AUVEI"

SAT.

WED.

i

Although the stuffing craze on college campuses went out several
years ago. University students are back at it. This time it' not
foreign cars or phone booths but closet compartments. Two Haggin
Hall residents climbed into a storage compartment that measures
28 inches deep, 36 inches wide, and 13 inches tall. The boys are,
from the left, David Curry, a 6 feet 2 lncher from Cynthiana, and
Tom Tollivei, 6 feet 1 inch from Ewing. Both are freshmen.

BEN

Kentucky
V

ALTERATIONS of dresses, skirts
and coats for women. Mildred
Cohen, 215 E. Maxwelu Phone

I

Patterson Society

Essay Collection

CLASSIFIED
FOR

Mrs. Joe
House Committee
Morris, chairman, Robert G. Figg,
Alvin MorNorman t'hrisman,
ris, Mrs. H. B. Ingalls.
House Activities Committee
Martha Shindelbower, chairman,
Mr. and Mrs. Emette Hart, Mr.
and Mrs. Glenn Tutt, Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Rushing, Mr. and
Mrs. Ben Barron.
Richard
Grounds Committee
F. Allison, chairman, J. G. RodMrs. Ray
E. B. Fan-is,
riguez,
Hopper, Robert HiUenmeyer.
Outdoor Activities Committee
Bernard Johnson, chairman, Paul
Nagel, Mrs. Frank Henry, Wallace Briggs, Earl Kauffman.
Swimming Pool Committee
James
A. M. Reece, chairman,
Coyle.

at 7:15 and 9:15

Sunday, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15

mmm

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan.

KERNEL WOMEN'S PAGE
The Counter Spy:
An Undercover Clerk
NEW YORK (AP)-I'- or
all you know tlie pleasant sales
clerk who helped you select the exactly light shade of gloves
to match your .suit is a counter spy. Some of the clerks are.

one is not watching
you.
xnougn. Trie department
store
detectives are probably doing

that.

She may be adding up evidence
against a slippery fingered coworker with whom she lunches
daily In the employe cafeteria.
Or she may squeal soon on the
handsome buyer in infants-wewith whom she flirts outrageously.
For she, with the fake name
and the phony background, is one
of dozens of undercover operators provided by a shortage controls company here.
Chic, personable and knowledgeable about nearly all as
pects of retailing, these lady
agents specialize in ferreting out
personnel who In one way or another pocket the store's profits.
The length of time on a Job
Varies from a few day to sev-- eral months. The cases coer
everything from the petty pilfering of a part-tim- e
employe to the
grand larceny of the president's
grandson.
crowd
Although the teen-ag- e
works cheaper, says tall, shapely
blonde Miss X, their fingers are
stickier than their seasoned Ood-an- d
detective - fearing
seniors.
Their thefts are minor at first
but they quickly grow into alarm
ing and expensive propoitions.
Nor are these charming counter spies particularly dazzled by
success. To the contrary, the clerk
with unswerving customer loyalty
may very well be the object of
their suspicions. Very often, says
Miss X, the sales lady owes her
popularity to huge, unauthorized
discounts.
Their collusion with the customers is easily accomplished by
remarking or switching sales tags.
The clerk profits by her commls- -

CosntopolUan Club
This Friday at 7:30 p.m. the
Cosmopolitan Club will sponsor
lecture and discussion in
Room 206 of the Student Center. Dr. James YV. Gladden of
the Sociology Department, will
speak on "The Role of Man in
American Society." Following
his talk there will be a chance
for questions. The evening will
social hour.
end with

slon and the stores lose plenty.
Unfortunately, Miss X and the
others in her unique occupation
become extremely fond of some of
the people they are paid to spy
upon. Indeed, ratting on the buyer boyfriend has wrecked some
potentially beautiful romance.
"That's the really heart breaking part of this Job," says Miss
X, heaving a sigh. "But our
loyalty belongs to the store."

Pin-Mat-

Betsy Britt, a sophomore at
Murrary State College, to Howell
maBrady, a sophomore pre-lajor from Mayfleld and a member
of Delta Tau Delta.

Help Wanted
Unusual sales opportunity for
college man. No sjes experi-encnecessary. National advertising company nueds and aggressive man with car for part
time sales work In local area.
on live sales will
Commission
earn $100 for njan selected.
Send me a, brier resume, and
phone number, so that I can
arrange for aWrsonjI interview.
Saleimister
Company
204 Woodland Drive
Vine Grove, Ksnrucky

H.

1

B

Edalen

NEW YORK CAP)
You may
be knee-dee- p
In boots, choked up
in turtlenecks, swathed in fake
fur and shivering with goose
bumps nt the moment, but there
is a new feminine you Just around
a sunny spring corner.
Soon you're due to peel off your
cocoon of sportive tweeds and
look" in
pack your "mannish
camphor.
Although
designers
have diverse Ideas of how you
should accomplish this, they have
unanimously endorsed your fash-Io- n
right this spring to emerge
as a women once again.
The many ways of being womanly, as interpreted by America's trendsetting couturiers, was
scheduled to be a subject of study

NEW YORK (A I') A lot of women manage to live quite
happily without groping for a cigarette. the. first thing every
morning.
once in a while' Just to wreak
in the form of smelly
retribution
clouds of smoke aimed' at eyes
and sinuses on all the human
engines who plague her the rest
of the time.

Edited hy
Nancy Loughritlge

during the week Fashion Press
Werk (Jan.
by visiting reporters.
This year more than 75 designers were to be represented
in a marathon of style shows
presented simultaneously by both
The American Designers Group
coordinated by Eleanor Lambert
and the New York Couture Group
headed by Kitty Campbell.
A preview of these styles indicate that you will have two
choices in figuring this spring
either subtly or snugly. If you
favor
curves and or
a cinched in waistline, you will
seek the designers advocating
the fitted look.
If you prefer to suggest your
shape rather than shout it, you'll
crepes
drape yourself in bais-cand silks and loosely cut suits
created by the unfitted camp.
But don't think you can guess
by past performances which designer is following true to form.
They are all mavericks.
Your hemlines will stay put but
your waistlines will dance up and
with many
down like a yo-yef them settling around the hip
bone, and sashed or belted for
emphasis. Sleeves on the new
spring styles are capped, or long,

full and gauzy. Or dresses are
to be covered
with capelets or brief jackets
when the air conditioning demands It.
You'll be a white collar girl
again this spring too, wearing, a
frothy meringue to perk up your
gray-pi- n
soften your
stripes,
blacks, and sharpen your navies.
And maybe you'll complete the
icing with fake white cuffs, and
slick 'white patent leather belts.
You will surely emerge from
your winter cocoon a social butterfly, with gossamer things for
going places that flutter and
blouse and drape weightlessly
across your framework. These w ill
be imprinted with zingy splashes
of dots and dashes, or delicate
smashes of pastel posies, or gaudy
giant horticultural fantasies.
Such will be yours in crepes
and silks and chiffons that haft
at the knees or float to the floor.
Perhaps much more of you will
emerge than you modestly might
have thought possible last spring.
The designers who are going all-ofor this womanly woman in
fashion era are dropping decol-leteto hitherto unknown
depths.

Hairdo's

Two Coeds Represent UK
On Mademoiselles Board
This year's representatives are
Vivian Shipley, a Senior and
Ethel Marie Dolson, a rophomore.
The annual College Board
Competition is designed for women students with talent in art,
writing, frshion, merchandising,
promotion, or advertising. Board
members were selected on tlie
basis of entries that showed the
ability of each In one of these
fields.
As College Board
members,
they will report news from their
colleges t o MADEMOISELLE.
They are eligible to compete for
the twenty Guest Editorships that
will be awarded by the magazine
In May. To win one of the top
twenty prizes, they must submit
a second entry to show their
specific aptitudes for magazine
work.
The twenty
College Board
members who win Guest Editorships will be brought to New York
City for the month of June to

Campus Calendar
Jan.
Jan.

3

Spring Styles Return To Femininity

The Big Protector: Cigarettes
Often as not. scruples of morality and health have nothing to
do with it. These women simply
don't like to smoke.
But fastidious, clean-livin- g
girls
though they are, once In a while
they. get a twinge of wistfulness
because they've run into a situation where a cigarette would
help things immeasurably.
Random research among some
feminine
have turned up these points:
A cigarette is great for keepmale at
ing an
bay. It's the modern equivalent
of grandma's hatpin. He can't
reach around a glowing cigarette to get cozy and you can
e
for hours. Having
to keep lighting "em up for you
may distract, finally discourage
him altogether.
Holding a cigarette keeps your
hands from dangling at your
sides, gives you something to do
while you're waiting.
When you smoke you often eat
less, say women who use it as an
appetite depressant. It could be,
of course, that your taste buds
curl up in disgust and refuse to
be tempted by goodies.
You drink less at a party If
you're smoking, some girls insist.
Toying with a cigarette keeps
you from biting your nails, cona nervous type. She
tributes
doesn't say whether it's because
it releases tension or keeps her
hands busy.
A
should light up

lOftl

2!),

Spindletop Hall closed.
Bacteriology Society 7 p.m.. Room 124 Funkhouser.
Fryor Premed Society 7:45 p.m., Koom 211 Journalism
Building.
Trooper 8:30 p.m.. Room 107 Alumni Gym.
Troupers Kenturkian picture, 7:30 p.m. Journalism Bldg.
Home Ec, 6:30 p.m.. Room 203 Erk'kson Hall.
Art Tour meeting, 7 p m.. Roam 208 Fne Arts Bldj.
29 Fencing Club, 7 p.m., Room 107 Alumni Gym.
Jan.
Horizons '64, 4 p.m., Room 206 Student Center.
Pitkin Club, noon, Presbyterian Center.'
Army ROTC Sponsors, 4 p.m. Buell Armory.
Jan. 29 Swimming Meet, Kentucky-AlabamColiseum, 4 p.m.
Series, Coliseum,
Eddy Gilmore, Lecturer, Concert-Lectur- e
8:15 p.m.
Jan. 30 Links reception for prospective members, 8:30-- 5 p.m.
Jan. 30 Dutch Lunch, noon. Student Center Peace Corps representative will speak.
Jan. 31 TGI F.
Jan.31-Fe2
Sorority Initiation.

Instant hairdos are not here

help write, illustrate, and edit
MADEMOISELLE'S 1964 August
college issue. They will share offices with the magazine's editors,
advise the staff on campus trends,
Interview
artists and
writers, and represent the magaon visits to publishing houses,
zine
stores, and advertising agencies.
They will also be photographed
for the college issue, and will be
considered for future staff positions with MADEMOISELLE and
other Conde Nast publications.

yet, but they are getting closer.
Another step was taken recently by the makers of professional beauty supplies. They are
now marketing a
portable dryer for home use that
dries short hair in 10 to 15
minutes and long hair in 20 to 30
minutes.

'

mm

SPENGLER

STUDIO
NEW LOCATION

222

S. LIME
I $MHS

Phone:

252-667-

M

2

Complete

28

Automotive
Phone

y
"24-Ho-

252-712-

Service

7

Emergency Rood Service"

TAYLOR TIRE CO.
400

E. VINE ST.

LEXINGTON,

KY.

Will Dunn Drug
Corner of S. Lime and Maxwell

7

KENTUCKY
TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
Olivetti Fartabia Typewriters
Carbons f Ribbons
and Olltte Supplies
SALES

SERVICE

AND RENTALS
Phone

387 Rots St.

WATCH BANDS

WATCHES
DIAMONDS

JEWELRY

DODSON
WATCH SHOP
I

V
Fine Watch Repairing
110 N. UPPER ST.
Phone 254-126- 6

THE COLLEGE STORE
Fountain
Cosmetics

Delivery

Service

Drugs

r

* LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

A Mature Look
At UK Athletics
In withdrawing from the Southeastern Conference, Georgia Tech has
tossed down the gauntlet of intellectual honesty before the 11 remaining
members.
Tech is a peculiar institution. It
refuses to offer athletic scholarships
to young men and later force these
tame students to forsake the grants
because they did not "make the
grade."
For several years Tech has toyed
with the idea of athletics
Its withdrawal from the SEC eliminates regulation by an athletics rule-booApparently, Tech is planning
to put education up front, and athletic events in their proper
What is our record in this field?
As for treatment of athletes themselves, we need only remember the
great purge of 19G2 which marked
the opening of Coach Charlie Brad-shawregime. We justified the departure of some 30 athletes with the
Word "quitters."
As for the educational role, we
reed only consider the value system
we are developing in our students.
Our present god is Cotton Nash; we
worship the scoreboard; we cheer the
"bone-crushintackle."
We are fair neither to the athletes
themselves nor to our own role as an
educational institution. Why do we
continue? What are the benefits?
First there is prestige. Think of
the publicity that accrues to the University when we have a winning teaml
Yet, it is doubtful that academic rep-- n
tat ion