xt7n5t3g1j2h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7n5t3g1j2h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660418  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 18, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 18, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7n5t3g1j2h section xt7n5t3g1j2h At UK: Who Gets Hurt?
Nepotism
By FRANK BROWNING

2. Two related faculty members cannot
Asst, Managing Editor
both be granted tenure.
A proposal strongly curtailling the
While both points closely limit faculty
University's so called teacher "nepotism relatives' promotional possibilities, they
rule" is in President John W. Oswald's weaken the current rule which
simply
hands as part of an overall recodification
of UK Coverning Rules.
News Analysis
The portion of the regulations dealing with the "nepotism" question will states no two relatives can be hired by
make faculty appointments "strictly on the University as an assistant professor
the basis of merit," President Oswald
or higher.
said.
The President said the revision discourages employment of related faculty
Two basic changes are inherent in
within the same department. Such emthe rules revision:
ployment "must be approved by the
1. There cannot be superior or "line"
President and should be avoided where
authority of one faculty member over practicable to do so," the new rule
a blood relation.
reads.

Carried over from the old rules is
statement prohibiting relatives of UK
Trustees or administrative officers from
appointment to faculty positions.
"Relatives" are defined as including
blood, marriage, and step relations as
a

well as family
However, all stipulations may be lifted
either permanently or on a temporary
basis by Board of Trustees action.
A major consideration
in revamping
Dr.
the
regulation,
Oswald explained, is to allow the University the chance to hire first quality
people who may be related but are in
separate academic areas at the University.
As the situation stands now, a number
of exceptions have been made to allow'
"in-laws- ."

"anti-nepotis-

Wqvji Mrii
Vol. LVII, No.

University of Kentucky
1966
APRIL

LEXINGTON,

121

K.Y.,

MONDAY,

18,

faculty with unrelated interests to be
hired. "Certainly there have been more
(exceptions) than there will be if the
revised rule gains trustee approval."
After presidential consideration, the
complete revision will be presented a
Committee studyjoint Faculty-Truste- e
ing University regulations.
"Where there have obviously been
no relationships anywhere but in unrelated departments, exceptions have been
made," the president declared.
Although many faculty readily admit
there has been little hesitancy in lifting
the present rule, some feel it is antiquated
and potentially too restrictive.
Continued on Paf e

tTWIRitj

3

jjM-

-

Eight Pages

LKD Controversy Settled;

Pikes Are Named Winners
By

JOHN ZEH

Kernel News Editor
Questions over ineligibility
were settled today as Pi Kappa
Alpha fraternity was awarded
the first place trophy for their
winning finish in Saturday's
Little Kentucky Derby bicycle
race.
The Pikes were disqualified,
however, for intramural points
in the race, and Phi Gamma

first place honors. The judges
told no one of their decision,
Smith admitted.
Written LKD rules allow ineligible teams to participate, and
win, but not receive intramural
points.
The "man" Smith referred
to is Miles Kincade, Pike whose
student status was questioned.
Kincade is not carrying the
required 12 hours to be classie
fied as
student, but
was when the intramural season
full-tim-

More LKD stories and pictures,
throughout today's Kernel.

Delta fraternity

was awarded

, the first place marks.
LKD Saturday

chairman

Steve Smith ruled the Pikes'
victory legitimate because "you
can't prosecute a man on an

unwritten law."

The "law" was a rule passed
orally by judges just before the
first heat, declaring that an ineligible team could not receive

started.
Written Intramural Council
rules say any "regularly enrolled" student is eligible for
participation. The council apparently interpreted "regularly"
Their Monday
to mean
noon session was closed to involved parties and the press.
The question over Kincade's
status was not raised until after
the Pikes had beaten the Fijis
in the final race by a half a
full-tim-

e.

v

lap, even though one judge knew
of the status.
Smith refused to identify that
judge, saying the name might
have been withheld because of
"strategy."

Smith at first was going to
have the registrar's office decide
Kincade's status, but then he and
his committee declared the decision should be the intramural

council's.
The body tossed the ball back
to LKD, saying it was their responsibility only to decide
whether Pikes were eligible for
intramural points.
Smith made the final decision
himself because of possibly
biased members of his committee.
Alpha Tau Omega took third
place, but was awarded second
place intramural points.
Sigma Chi won fourth place,
and received third place points.
One Fiji, and several Sigma
Chi's were judges and timers.
Fiji president Rich Robbins
said the decision was "alright
with me," and then shook Smith's
hand after he announced his decision outside the intramural office.

,

.Si

"

Bernard M. (Skeeter)Johnson,

intramural director and LKD

ad-

viser, called his council into
session with Pikes and Fijis to
discuss the situation.

?

(

'

aW

Kernel Photos by Rick Bell

Premature announcement that Pikes had been disqualified caused
this expression of jubilation by Phi Gamma Delta riders and fans.

Pikes said they had no intention of cheating in the race, but
had assumed Kincade was eligible because of previous loose
interpretation of the eligibility
rule.

The trophy in the foreground of the top photo is the physical
element of dispute in Saturday's LKD bicycle race held at the
Sports Center. Below, members of Pi Kappa Alpha's team celebrate
their first place finish before being told the race was contested.
The Pikes are, Louis Rives, left, Miles Kincade, and Bruce Lunsford.
Whether Kincade is a fulltime student, and the interpretation of
intramural rules, are subject of the dispute.

Dr. Jokl Named Top Professor
Dr. Ernst Jokl, director of the University
physical education laboratory and founder of sports
medicine in the United States, Friday night was
named Distinguished Professor of the Year in the
College of Arts and Sciences.
He was elected by fellow faculty members of the
college. As holder of the title, he will be released
from regular duties for one semester to do research
and writing at full salary. He will deliver the 1967
Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor lecture
next April.
The physical education professor is the 23rd
winner of the award, which was established in 1944
as a means of recognizing outstanding academic
achievement. Dr. Wendell C. DeMarcus, professor
of physics, was last year's winner.
Dr. Jokl was born and educated in Germany,
where he earned a medical degree. During World

War II he served as a medical consultant to allied
armed forces. He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and a member of the International Council of Sport and Physical Education,
an agency of the United Nations.
He currently is engaged in research on the effect
of altitude on physical performance. He conducts
the first graduate course on sports medicine in the
United States, and also supervises doctoral dissertations in sports medicine.
Among las scientific publications are reports on
the effects of sustained physical activity on aging,
physiological and psychological adjustments to prolonged and intensive physical training, and the
problem of sudden death of athletes. He has conducted research surveys at the last four International Olympic Games at Helsinki, Melbourne,
Rome and Tokyo.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

18,

16

Songs From Past
Offered In Show
By JOHN ZEH

the show started, most of the 3,500 in Memorial Coliseum
Saturday nifcht probably expected little more than the Magnificent
Seven in concert. But the big name attractions at the LKD concert
scored heavily with most, but provided little more than refreshing,
As

music.
nearly nostaligic, relief from today's Beatle-typ- e
From Chuck Berty s School
Along Fight It," "Midnight Hour,"
Days" to the Coasters
Came Jones," collegians present and "Satisfaction," the Mag
were no doubt reminded of their Seven yielded to Chuck Berry,
own earlier school days when who squeezed that unique sound
out of his magical guitar throughthose tunes were popular.
The audience reception of the out his old hits. Playing an instruShirelles' "Soldier Boy," prob- mental lead-i- n for "Memphis,"
ably the prettiest song in the he danced and cavorted into
show, was colored by the girls' nearly every position possible, exhumorous, and unappreciated, cept wrapping himself and his
dedication to all the
guitar into a Centennial device.
Most vigorous applause came
fellows in the crowd.
The Magnificent Seven, cer- during a bawdy version of
tainly not unknown to the jam "Reelin And Rockin'," a big
session set, opened the show with seller on 45 rpm, without the suggestive humor. Move over Hot
Nuts.
A Review
The Shirelles, shaking like
Wilson Pickett and Otis Redding lime Jello on Meade Brown's
rhythm and blues soultunes in a drum heads, entertained with
more old rock, sock, and roll
style that lived up to the adjective
in the group's name.
favorites, including "This Is
"Mama Said"
The expert showmanship of Dedicated,"
Larry Orr, a UK English major, "Tonight's The Night," and
coupled with the Mag Seven in- "Baby It's You." Their version
strumental sound made some of "Satisfaction" would make the
listeners remark, "The rest of the Stones roll over in their graves.
show will have to be pretty good The girls are good, but their's is
to top this." The guys didn't not the Motown Sound and show
close the show with "Stubborn of the Supremes.
Kinda Fella," but if they had,
Enter the Coasters, and
the lead "Here's the one you've more humor.
They started out
been waitin' for all night long"
typically, performing (if that's
would have been appropriate. the
Yak,"
word)
"Don't "Searchin'," "Yakety "Charlie
After "Respect,"
and
Brown," but the finale sent
the audience home discussing
11wA
semantics. Crude, gross, and obscene were the words in question.
The concert could have head3rd BIG WEEK!
lined the Righteous Brothers or
the Kings men. Bill and Bob, who
now have the top song in the
as MATT HELM
country according to Billboard
Magazine cancelled because of
MEACAiY CLAJOE reduction
TV committments.
The LKD
COLUMBIACOLOR
., ...
committee got cold feet about
the Kingsmen, fearing they
wouldn't draw a sufficient
The Kentucky Kernel They were probably wrong.crowd.
The Kentucky Kernel, University
No matter how you feel about
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. the quality of Saturday's show, it
Published five times weekly during was a loser in at least one
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during respect financially.
The loss
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the was about $2,000. The three
University of Kentucky by the Board groups took home $5,500. The
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Linda Gassaway, Mag Seven got $400, and should
secretary.
have been paid more and allowed
Begun as the Cadet in ia4. became the Record in 1900, and the Idea to do more.
This group is too
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.
good, to professional to deserve
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
the status and frustration of a
Yearly, by mail $7.00
back-u- p
Per copy, from files $ .10
band.

J

23

10th BIG WEEK!
Jack
Tony

draft-conscio-

mm

Lcxnxncn Curtis
Natalie VTbod
BLAKE EDWARDS'

Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

The Magnificent Seven's Larry Orr sways to the soul music of
Wilson Pickett's "In The Midnight Hour," in the Lexington group's
part in the LKD show, held in Memorial Coliseum.
THE KERNEL

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You can tell right away if a child is mentally retarded just by
the way he looks.
Sure you can?
Then, how many of the children shown here are retarded?
Two? Possibly three? Certainly not all of them!
That's where you're wrong. All these children are retarded.
isn't it?
that they look so much like norSurprising
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Maybe you think that these children could get along all
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Chuck Berry rides his electric
guitar across the stage while
playing "Memphis" at Saturday's concert.

They need special teachers who understand the problems
of the retarded. They need special recreational programs to
help them develop physically and socially. And, later on, they
will need special training for jobs
or else they will become
burdens to their families and the community.
You can bring new hope to the retarded. You can be a
part of one of the most satisfying programs ever planned for
man to serve his fellow man
a program aimed at preventing mental retardation and helping the six million Americans
already afflicted.
t
A free booklet will tell you what you can do.
Address The Iresident't Committee on Mental
Retardation. Washington, D C.

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* J

.THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

18, 1900- -3

'Nepotism Rule' Under Study

IJSl
Continued From Paf e

"It is administratively

1

con-

"One kind of inconvenience
the hiring of a husband and
wife in the same department.
I have some doubt as to going
even that far, but it doesn't
horrify me to hire a husband
and wife in the same department if they are both very good
or if the department would have
hired them separately," Mr.
is

venient not to have to decide
sticky cases," Paul Oberst, professor of law, commented about
the present rule.
"It is administratively convenient not to have to decide
sticky cases," Paul Oberst, professor of law, commented about
the present rule.

Oberst said.

Preregistration Heavy;
Priority Still Unsettled
By RON IIERRON
Kernel Staff Writer
With approximately 90 percent of UK's students through preregistration, the Office of Admissions staff will meet next Monday
to determine what priority system to use in assigning them classes
for the fall semester.
system shouid be used at all.
Dr. Elbert Ockerman.Deanof Rpaiictraiiv. thoutrh. he added.
Admissions, said today that a one is needed, and the problem
decision would have to be made becomes to decide which system
at that meeting; later would be is fairest.
too late.
Student opinion has been sugDr. Ockerman said he per- gested as a guideline, and Dr.
sonally could see no advantage Ockerman said he would like to
to using last semester's grades meet with the registration cominstead of this semester's in de- mittee of the Student Congress
termining priority. The question this week, but he will be out of
had arisen in last week's Faculty town most of the time.
Senate meeting.
Use of cumulative standings
There is even some doubt, Dr. is considered by some to be the
Ockerman said, that any priority fairest means of assigning priority, since it provides a more
overall picture of the student's
performance than one semester's
grades.
Dr. Ockerman said he had not
The Junior IFC will hold
thought too much about that
their last meeting of the year
possibility yet.
at 6:30 p.m. tonight in the Student
He emphasized that whatever
Center
system is used, a special effort
The UK Music Department will be made this time to see that
has announced that the recital of everyone gets into the classes he
needs.
Gary Ferguson scheduled for
Preregistration has "improved
has been changed from
Tuesday,
the Lab Theater to the Guignol considerably" this semester, he
said. About 8,000 students have
Theatre.
been cleared, or about 90 percent
of those eligible to preregister.
Sigma Delta Chi, national
journalism society, will hold its
initiation and election of officers
at 5 p.m. Tuesday in thejournal-isBuilding.

Bulletin Board

One familiar claim is that,
should closely related teachers
be hired to a department, they
might set up a power block or
a rudimentary "conflict of interest" if one member were to
gain a supervisory position.
Mr. Oberst, who is chairman
of the Faculty-Truste- e
Committee working on Rules revision,
felt that such a problem depends
upon individual cases and on
the size of the department.
He went on to say the department should thoroughly investigate that possibility before
the faculty are hired. "If we do
not have information on that
point, we better not hire them."
"I think the nepotism rule is
outdated, largely
and does not fit in with today's
situation," Dr. Lee Coleman,
chairman of the Department of
Sociology, declared.
"With the shortage of personnel, why give the wife's services to another institution when
we may need her ourselves?"
the department chairman asked.
His view that the present rule
is a holdover from the "spread
the work" system of depression
days is a common one with
those faculty interviewed.
As a result of the present
rule the Sociology Department
finds itself in a unique situation,
Mr. Coleman explains.
He and members of the Sociology Department often go to
surrounding colleges and to the
state government to find positions for spouses of faculty members about to be employed.
"We have done that on many
occasions. We know we will not
get one without helping the other
find work.
Dr. Coleman spoke of another

department whose chairman is
being brought to the University
next year. The future chairman's

Dr. Coleman dismissed the
fear of "power blocks" by saying that "as large as departments
are gettingnow, two people could
hardly constitute a power block."
A minor, yet accademically
important point that resulted
from the present rule is prohibior brother-siste- r
tion of husband-wif- e
research teams who may
compound their efforts.

wife is active in the same academic area as her husband, but
due to the rule, she could not
be hired in the same department
at UK.
According to Dr. Coleman,
the University tried to find an
opening for her but none were
available except at a nearby state
university where inquirers were
told the school did not want

r

infrequent, such

Though

teams occur more often in the
social sciences than elsewhere.
But perhaps the key element
is that raised by both professors
Oberst and Coleman: the loss
of potentially superior academic
teachers and researchers who are
and will probably remain unable
for University employment.

"anymore UK wifes."

The result: she will return to
New York next year to teach
while her husband is at UK.
Cases like the above are likely
to remain unchanged. Most
would regard it as "unfortunate"
yet inavoidable.
The proposed revision in fact
is designed to avoid hiring relatives with one major of the unit
acting in a supervisory capacity.
Reasons put forth by both
Dr. Oswald and most faculty
interviewed are not that one
member would necessarily show
favoritism toward the other member. Rather the fear is that he
might not be able to make judgments wholly on merit, and, in
fact, could over compensate
negatively.

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I

* Time For
Congressman Charles L. Welt-ne- r
has introduced into
Congress a constitutional amendment which would set IS as the
legal voting age in all of the 50
states. This issue has remained
dormant and moot too long to be
now ignored.
All but four states now require
voters to be at least 21 years old.
At one time this may have been a
reasonable requirement, but most
voting laws now are outdated and
impose an unreasonable denial of
the rights of a large percentage of
the population.
This is a young nation, becoming
younger every day. Statisticians are
predicting that soon over half of our
population will be under 25 years
old. Many of the burdens of maturity are placed on this surging generation, yet they are denied this all
important right of birth, the right to
vote. It's time this privilege was
extended.
With understanding attitudes of
patience, young Americans are
serving as Peace Corps volunteers;
with grim feelings of determination,
young Americans are waging a war
in Southeast Asia. Both are man-siz- e
tasks with adult responsibil- (D-Ca- .)

A

Of
Well, It's Always Wvvn Out

Change

ites. But apparently adult actions
don't merit adult privileges: the
stoic voting limitations stand. As
Congressman Weltner pointed out
before Congress, "They can sacrifice their time and energy in ministering to others. . . but they cannot vote. . . They can fight ami
die. . . but they cannot vote."
Two remarkably flimsy arguments are thrown up in defense of
maintaining 21 as the legal voting
requirement. One is that those
under 21 are technically still wards
of their parents and their actions
are controlled by them. A simple
refutation of this argument arises
from the responsibilites
young
Americans are accepting and the
independence that is necessary to
carry on these responsibilites.
The other argument holds those
under 21 have not achieved the
emotional and intellectual stability
to accept the responsibility to vote.
Reflecting on the great proportion
of young Americans leaving high
school for college or military service, this argument too is easily
laughed off.
Congressman Weltner's proposal is not new just continually
ignored. In a state of the Union
address, former President Eisenhower suggested extending voting
privileges to young men and
women. The late President John
F. Kennedy, the young people's
president, also advocated younger
voting requirements.
It is deplorable that only in
four states are young Americans
citizens in the full sense. It is in
the states where action to correct
the situation should be instigated.
But, regretfully, as in the civil
rights issue, it is with the federal
government where this question
must now be discussed. This is
another case where the federal government has had to step in because
the states are overlooking their own
responsibilites.
It is time for Congress to sweep
from the books this outmoded,
stilted requirement. It's time to
let young Americans be young
Americans in every sense of the
word.

Looking Back On LKD
Which rock and roll group LKD
brings to campus is not the University's biggest problem, but there
are two important aspects of the
situation.
LKD committees the last few
years have muffed chances of

having truly successful concerts
e
by letting
performers slip
their fingers. Many probthrough
lems are inherent in
but UK attempts seem to be
plagued by the lack of early planning and preparation when it
counts. Early LKD weekends
boasted really good, "dress-up- "
concerts. The argument that musical tastes have changed since then
is a good one. However, there's
,no excuse in not trying for the
very best in pop talent. There's
little excuse why a good contemporary music show can't
top-nam-

talent-bookin-

g,

f

.M I

Moreover, how good or how
popular the shows are helps determine the financial success of
LKD, specifically how much money
goes toward scholarships. Planners
should remember that LKD was
established to provide funds as
well as entertainment.
If the
music scene and LKD are
campus
to prosper, the Saturday night show
must go on, and it must be a
good one.

1

I

Letters To The Editor:

Young Republican Officers
Defend Patronage Charge

Editor of the Kernel:
This is in reply to the students
who requested more evidence regarding Herbert Deskin's employment status.
We checked Deskin's employment record at the State Personnel
in Frankfort last
Department
month. The latest document, dated
November 3, showed he was eme
basis. State
ployed on a
Personnel Commissioner Walter
Gattis commented that Deskins
must have quit school to work
To the

full-tim-

full-tim-

e.

Then after the controversy arose,
e
Gattis announced that the
for Deskins was a
designation
"clerical error" and would be
changed immediately.
However, pay vouchers show
that since November, Deskins has
worked an average of 25 hours a
week. If he had only part-tim- e
status, the state would not have
authorized payment for his working
past 20 hours a week.
We never said Deskins was paid
for work not performed. Rather, we
said that since his election as Young
Democrat president, the state has
given him full time employment
whenever he wanted it, which is a
better deal than other legal aides in
the same office recieve. It certainly
is more lucrative than most UK
students could ever get.
full-tim-

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

MONDAY. APRIL 18, 1963

1894

Walter Crant,

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

John Zeh,
Jcdy Ciusham, Associate Seus Editor
Carolyn Williams, Feature Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

Seta Editor

Terence Hunt,

Managing Editor

Henry Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Margaret Bailey, Arts Editor

Business Staff

William Knapp,

Advertising

Manager

Joint Anyway"

W

Marvin Huncate, Circulation Manager

If further proof is desired,
Deskin's record including pay
vouchers is on file in Frankfort.
STEVE YOUNG
President
TOM WOODALL
Vice President
Young Republican Club

Demands Apology
In reference to a recent editorial
which discussed the "objective
merits of the county agent system,"
I would like to demand an apology
on behalf of the county agents of
Kentucky.
Anyone who has been associated
with the county agent system can
immediately see the many errors
which appeared in your editorial.
There are many students, for example, which have previously been
a
club member. Anyone of
these could have told you that a
county agent is more than a "crop
doctor." He is a coordinator for the
many
youth camps in Kenhe is a friend to the farmer
tucky;
the link between town and county.
And in the new system which
Dr. Oswald supported (last year)
the county agent is also concerned
with community planning, coordinator of all agriculture activities
and an industrial advisor (the only
advisor in many areas which desperately need industry)- The most
important thing, however, is that
through the county agent the
fanner, as well as the
sees a chance to live a better and
more productive life.
My interest in the subject stems
from the fact that my father is
a county agent. If you don't apologize, I will personally lead a protest inarch through the Journalism
4-- H

4-- H

-

non-farme-

r,

Huilding.
BARRY ARNETT
AUS Junior

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

18,

19GG-

-5

Universities Try Avoiding Legislative Battles

By LAURA CODOFSKY
The Collegiate Press Service
One of the most public arenas for
warfare has long been
the state legislature, where neighboring
institutions have bitterly and openly vied
for appropriations. Although the fighting
continues in some states today, a growing
number of state institutions have found
that it pays to keep their battles private.
Indiana's four public institutions, Ball
State University, Indiana State College,
Purdue University and Indiana University, have submitted one budget request
to the legislature since 1964.
The four schools have a joint committee which establishes yearly needs
according to a complicated formula based
primarily on enrollments. They no longer
compete for prestige facilities such as
law or medical schools which the state
neither needs nor can afford. In return,
the legislature is much less prone to
budget-cuttin- g
across the board in order
to balance excessive individual requests.
Purdue and Indiana Universities extended their cooperative efforts last month
when they established a joint board to
review policies and coordinate the academic programs of their rapidly growing
branch campus systems. Indiana has
seven branches throughout the state while
Purdue has four.
The coordinating board, which will
be composed of three regents and the
inter-universi-

"Inside Report"

president from each school, essentially
will be responsible for
seeing that there
is no unnecessary
duplication of programs
among the branches.
The University of Alabama and Auburn
University held nine joint dinner meetings
with legislators before a special session
of the Alabama legislature to "sell" a
united request for funds. Cov. Ceorge
Wallace later endorsed the request as
his own "breakthrough program in higher

however, Michigan State University, has
announced intentions to develop another
medical school. It is generally conceded
that MSU wants the prestige of its own
school, regardless of the cost to the state.
Public and private schools arc getting
together as well. Princeton University
President Robert Coheen is chairman of
a strong drive to bring more money to
New Jersey public higher education.
Iowa's three public institutions have
joined with the Iowa Association of Private Colleges and Universities to conduct
the broadest state study ever made of
education beyond the high school years.

education."

Florida's seven state universities and
30 public j unior colleges spent a
year

literally callingfor HELP throughout their
state. HELP-Hig- her
Education Legislative Program-w- as
a joint effort that
made college and university needs more
important to many state legislators.
By comparison, colleges in states such
as Michigan and Colorado remain the
victims of their own constant
before their legislatures. Each school has
its own lobbyists who seek funds at the
expense of the other state institutions.
Programs at the graduate and professional level are often developed without
consideration for statewide needs. In
Michigan, for example, a statewide committee of educators has recommended
that any future medical facilities be developed within existing schools at the
University of Michigan and Wayne State
University.
The state's third major institution,

e

Public-privat-

cooperation

probably

ultimate in Ohio where
"public institutions have higher fees than

reaches

its

...

in order to prevent
in many states
too great a difference in fee structure
from upsetting the balance between public and private schools," according to
John Millett, chancellor of the Ohio Board
of Regents.
Regional organizations have further
extended relationships between universities and colleges. The Committee on
Institutional Cooperation composed of
the Big Ten and the University of
Chicago has developed a "travelling
scholar" program which allows graduate
students to take courses at any of the
11 participating schools. The CIC is
generally aimed at getting schools to
pool their resources; it is also conduct

ing studies to help its members improve
their educational
and administrative
operations.
Fifteen states participate in the
Southern Regional Education Board; 13
st