xt7n5t3g1j33 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7n5t3g1j33/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19631106  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  6, 1963 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  6, 1963 1963 2015 true xt7n5t3g1j33 section xt7n5t3g1j33 SeKktttimJk

A&S Senior Class

ISIEIEM1EIL

Vol. LV, No.

3G

University of Kentucky
NOV.

LEXINGTON,

KY., WEDNESDAY,

6, 19G3

To Elect Officers

Eight Pages
mssstczstssixsmmsai

Nominations To Be Told
In Class Meeting Today
Arts and Sciences seniors will elect class officers at Arts
and Sciences Senior Convocation at 10 a.m. today.
John PfeifTer, Arts and Scia talk on "Graduate School Opences senior, will announce the
portunities." Next, Mrs.
candidates after a brief welcomKemper, diiector of the
ing address by President John W.
Kath-erir-

I

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Oswald.
Roger May, Jerry Truitt, and
Ben Wright are the candidates
for the office of president. Carl
Modeckl. Jim Pitts, and Marline
II. Noojin are the vice presidency
candidates.
Candidates for secretary are
Dee Hall, Martha Greenwood, and
Linda Woodall. Richard Capps,
Sharon Perkins, and Susan Scott
are the candidates for treasurer.
The floor will be open for
nominations.
Voting will take
place after Dr. Oswald's opening
address, and the winners will be
announced at the conclusion of
the convocation program.
Following the election of officers. Dr. M. M. White, dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences,
will speak to the convocation on
"What Your Degree Means."
Inga Riley Carmack, Arts and
Sciences senior, will follow with

LC

Air Force Sponsor Candidates

Candidates for the 11 positions in the Air Forre
Sponsor Corps were introduced to AFROTC radets
during a jam session held in their honor Friday.
8hey are, from the left, first row, Nancy Spare,
Cheryl Defcro, Linda Carter, Tarn Robinson, Judy
Gooch, and Maggie Anderson; second row, Carl

Enis, Charmane Marlowe, Kelly Kirby, Judy Car-wel- l,
Sally Harris, Wendy Tanner, and Mary Veal;
back row, Fat Downey, Shirley Meador, Marty Carpenter, Jackie Jones, Sharon Teague, Vickl Ambrose, Bonnie Lindner, and Pat Mudd. Brenda Pat-to- n
was absent.
sssassa

Delta Gammas Plan Big Move
To New House Next Semester
By GARY IIAWKSWORTH
Kernel Staff Writer

The Delta Gamma sorority
will move into its new house
next semester, said Stacia
Yadon, DG president.
"Our clothes will be put in the

new house the week before finals,"
said Stacia, "and we will be moving in the first day of the spring
semester."
The new sorority house is
located on the corner of Columbia and Pennsylvania Ave. The
house is designed with a sub-lev- el
basement (half underground
and half above ground level) and
two floors.
The kitchen, dining room, a
recreation room, and laundry and
storage facilities will be located
in the basement," said Stacia.

Links Sale
Nets $476
On Corsages
Links sold 12,076 mum corsages during the homecoming
weekend to net a profit of
$476 to go toward an academic scholarship. '
Sue Perry, chairman of the

sale, said about 200 more corsages
were sold this year than last.
The mums were provided by the
University Horticulture Club. This
froup also made the corsages.
The scholarship will be awarded to a girl in the junior class
who might not be able to complete her education without financial aid.
The award will be given at the
Stars in the Night program la the
spring.
Links is a Junior women's honorary whose members are chosen
for their scholastic achievement
and participation in extracurricular activities.

The first floor will have a room
for the housemother, a guest
room, and four girls rooms.
"The second floor will contain
only living quarters," Stacia explained. "There will be eight
rooms on the second floor."
"We have seen the plans for a
new house on paper for two years
now," Stacia said. "We didn't
think we would ever get the new
house, but now we really do
have it."
Stacia explained that there
.would be four girls to a room.
This means 16 girls will live on
the first floor and 32 on the second floor. "It's wonderful," she
said. "We will have rooms for
all of the chapter members.".
"We are being kept in suspense
about most of the details of decoration," Stacia explained, "but
we do know that most of the interior will be white with gold accents."
Stacia said that they have
turned over to Mrs. Thomas
Moore, a Delta Gamma Alumna.
Hubbuch In Kentucky is the

firm who is handling the interior
decoration.
"I don't know exactly what the
house will look like when it is
completed," Stacia added, "but I
do know that we will have more
than adequate closet space well
at least enough closet space."
The new house is being financed with loans from the University and from Delta Gamma
national headquarters.
"It really is terrific," Stacia
exclaimed, "to see plans which
you have looked forward to for
such a long time actually turn
into a real brick and stone construction."
"The new house will be finished during the vacation between semesters and will be ready
to be occupied as soon as we
return," Stacia commented.
The new Delta Gamma house
located on the corner of Columbia and Pennsylvania Ave. is Just
behind the Columbia Terrace address of sorority row.

President
Will Visit
UK Ctvens
Jl ie national president of
Cwens, national sophomore
women's honorary, will visit
the University chapter of the
organization next week.
Mrs. Carlton J. Sweeney of
Chittenango, N.Y., will arrive in
Lexington Sunday night and will
be met by members of the Theta
chapter.
Her Lexington visit is part of
a tour in which she will visit all
Cwens chapters across the country.
The organization holds a national convention every two years.
In the intervening year a national officer visits each chapter.
While at the University Mrs.
Sweeney will meet with officers
and advisers of the local chapter. She will stay in a guest room
at Holmes Hall.
Mrs. Sweeney Is a former member of the Epsilon chapter of
Cwens at Alleghany College in
Alleghany, Pa.
The organization was established to promote leadership
among freshman and sophomore
college women. Members are
selected for their participation in
campus activities and scholastic
averages.
The Theta chapter at UK was
established in 1931.

.e

University Placement Service, will
spenk to the seniors on the services of her agency.
Dr. White last week notified departments in the College of Arts
and Sciences that seniors would
be excused to attend the convocation. Royer May, program
chairman for the convocation,
s.nd he expected approximately
half of the Arts and Sciences
seniors to be present.

Zela Beta Tan

Tournament
Set Saturday
Greek letter
organizations are entered in
the Zeta Beta Tau Creek
bridge tournament set for
Twenty-tw-

o

Saturday.
Eleven sororities and eleven
fraternities are each sending two
member teams to the competition.
Winners in each division will receive trophies.
The play will begin at 1 p.m.
in Room 206 in the Student Center. An official of the American
Contract Bridge League will serve
as the tournament diiector and
will regulate scoring.
The sororities which have entered teams are Alpha Gamma
Delta. Alpha Xi Delta, Chi
Omega, Delta Delta Delta, and
Delta Gamma.
Delta Zeta, Kappa Alpha Theta,
Delta, Kappa
Kappa
Kappa
Gamma, Pi Eeta Phi, and Ze:a
Tau Alpha.
Fraternities entered are Alpha
Tau Omega, Delta Tau Delta,
Kappa Sigma. Phi Delta Theta,
and Phi Gamma Delta.
Phi Sigma Kappa, Pi Kappa
Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Kappa,
Epsilon, and Triangle.

Philosophy Club

"The Nature of Philosphy"
will be the topic of the discussion at the Philosphy Club
meeting at 4 p.m. Thursday iti
Room 109 in the Student Cen-

ter.

There will also be a discussion on the possibilities of graduate work in philosphy.

Student Congress Figures Now Final
The figures from the Student Congress election are
now official.
Gene Sayre, chairman of the
elections committee, said that a
recount of the Arts and Sciences
representatives showed no change
In the outcome of any of the
races.
The A&S totals had been contested by John Cole and Bert
King who ran on the COUP ticket for representative. They had
claimed that
had
not been taken into account in
the voles originally.
tabulating
They felt that some of the voters
may have voted for more than
18 allowed on the A&S ballot.
Gilbert Adams who operated
the IBM machine counting the

votes, said that over balloting
had occurred on 15 ballots. He
said that on recount they found
that four ballots had not been
counted. However, none of these
factors changed the outcome of
the election in Arts and Sciences.
A total of 2,450 votes were cast
in the election. Some 26 of these
were thrown out on election
night because they had been
voted improperly. A total of 72
voters polled their ballots without signing in at the polls. The
elections committee said this accounted for the discrepency be-tnumber of signed voters.

The 2,450 votes cast constitute
a record for any Student Congress election. The largest vote
prior to this years was 1,800 cast

in the fall of 1962 in a representatives' race.
In that 1962 campaign, the first
party slate was run since the
election frauds of 1959. In that
race, the Progressive Party placed
98 percent of its representatives
in the congress.
This year, three different slates
were run. The Student Party, led
by Chellgren, placed 77 percent
of its candidates in the congress.
COUP won nine representative
places and a ticket led by Jim
Pitts placed eight representatives
in the congress. Only one independent of the 119 candidates was
elected.
The new congress under its
four new officers will begin its
program for the year with a

meeting Nov. 12.

President-elePaul Chellgren
said the meeting will be held at
7 p.m. in the Student Center
Theatre. All of those elected as
conmembers of the
gress at the Oct. 24 election are
to be present.
The Student Party holds the
majority in the congress. Aside
from the four officers, SP has 28
of the congress members.
amendUnder constitutional
ments approved Oct. 17, the congress only has 50 voting members
members.
and five non-votiThe amendments are scheduled
to be presented to the Faculty
for its decision at the November
Faculty meeting which is scheduled for Monday.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

2

G,

19f.1

Speed Bumps Installed
In Sim wnce town Drive

4

5

New speed bumps, siinili r to those on the drive between
Keeucland ;uk! PalU'ison HallIs, have been installed in Shaw-saineetown.
'1
"were

"They were Installed (o control
tlie speeding. " Robert Dlakenian,
director of men's housing, said.
"We had several complaints from
people living in the project about
cars speeding along the main
drive."
Signs along the drive post the
speed limit at 15 miles per hour,
but drivers seemed to ignore
them. "The speeders," Blakeman

Educator
To Begin

Field Study

Dr. Paul Street, director of
lie Hurean of School Service
iii the UK College of Education, is among 92 American
educators and school board
members who on Nov. 10 will
field study of
begin a
educational
reform in the
Scandinavian countries and
Russia.
y

The study is sponsored by Phi
Delta Kappa, professional education fraternity; the Comparative
Education Society, and the National School Boards Association.
Participants comprise one of the
largest education groups from the
West to visit the USSR in recent years.
An authority on Russian education, Dr. Gerald Read, Kent
State University, will head the
group. Assisting will be Dr. Donald W. Robinson, associate editor
of Phi Delta Kappa publications.
The group will visit schools
and private homes, and will attend seminars for three or four
days in each of the Scandinavian-countriesEight days will be spent
in Russia, with the time divided
between Moscow and Leningrad.
A total of .53 men and 29 women, representing 24 states, will
make the tour.

)r. Oswald

Dr. John Oswald will meet
with students again this week.
The conference will be from
5
p.m. today in Room 206 ii)
the Student Center.

CLASSIFIED
FOR

mainly people living
in the project."
Ho said that the bumps were
installed mainly for the protection of the children of those living in the project.
K. It. Farris, chief engineer of
MAO, said the bumps, (made of
asphalt), are about the same size
as those by Keeneland.
Richard Stevenson, senior journalism major and Shawneetown
resident, said the three new
bumps added recently are much
taller than the old ones or the
one by Keeneland. "They may be
for the protection of children, but
they are too high and are a traffic hazard."

A?

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DR. MILTON ELKIN

To LcctlUC
Here Friday
Dr. Milton Elkin, chairman of
of Radiology at
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Philadelphia, will be a guest
lecturer Friday at the University Medical Center.
Elkin will lecture at 8 a.m. on
"Effects of drugs on the appearance of renal vessels" and at noon
on "Radiologic evaluation of head
trauma with emphasis on the use
of cerebral angiography." Elkin's
appearance here is being sponof
sored by the Department
in the University
Radiology
Medical Center.
Elkin who earned his M.D. degree at Harvard in 1941, has recently returned to this country
from sababtical leave in Europe.

the Department

.Homo Kc Council.
Dean Seay of the agriculture
college will speak at a party
sponsored by the Agriculture-Hom- e
Economics Student
Council at 6:30 p.m. Thursday,
at the Stock Judging Pavilion.
All freshmen agriculture-hom- e
economics students are invited
to attend. Freshmen Home Economics Club girls will receive
points for attending the party.
vcit!msmstmiemsmssmssi8ssiissm

Vote Scries

Completed
The last In a three-voluwork, "Kentucky Votes," compiled and edited by Dr. Malcolm
E. Jewell, associate professor of
political science, has been published by the UK Press.
This volume contains the results of Kentucky primaries and
general elections for the U.S.
House of Representatives
from
1920 to 1900.
Previous volumes dealt with
the state's vote in presidential
elections, primaries and general
elections, primaries, and general
for the governorship.
Before the series was published,
interested researchers and students could obtain the information only in the office of the
Kentucky Secretary of State.
Statistics in each of the three
volumes are listed by county.
Compiling of the statistics was
facilitated by extensive use of
the UK Computing Center.
Each of the three volumes is
obtainable from the IK Press.
Jewell, acting head of the
Political Science Department here
last year, is now on sabbatical
leave. He is scheduled to re'iirn
to the University the fall semester of 1964.

Eclou Awarded
Missouri Grant
William W. Ecton, associate
professor of accounting in the
College of Commerce, has been
awarded a $1,000 grant for graduate study at the University of
Missouri.
He Is on leave at Missouri
where he is completing requirements for his Ph.D. degree.
The grant was presented by the
Haskins and Sells Foundation.
Prof. Ecton received the master of business administration degree from UK in 1JV30. He is a
certifier) public accountant and
was on a Ford Fellowship in 1961
for advanced study in business
and public administration.
Kin

na

LOST

Pressor

Plans Study Of
Water Pollution
Water pollution troubles created by increased use of toxic
materials,
especially pesticides,
will be studied for the next two
years by Dr. Robert A. Lauderdale, professor of sanitary engineering.
The U.S. Public Health Service has provided $24,130 to support the project for the first year
and is to supply $23,640 for the
second year. The funds are administered by the Kentucky Research Foundation.
Interested in both natural and
artificial means of freeing water
from pesticide contamination. Dr.
Lauderdale intends to determine
the extent to which concentration
of poisonous compounds can be
reduced.
A native of Tennessee,
Dr.
Lauderdale formerly was associate health physicist at the Oak
Ridge National Laboratory and
was a member of the faculty of
the Massachusetts
Institute of
Technology before joining the UK
faculty in 1958. .

W

OO N

JK

I

H1

Alumnus

The University Department of
Civil Engineering named James
Alexander Caywood '44, Baltimore, as Alumnus of the Month.
Mr. Caywood Is the deputy general manager of the Baltimore
& Ohio and the the Chesapeake
& Ohio Railroads. He is responsible for coordinating the planning and Implementation of programs for construction and maintenance of rights-of-wand for
of
and allocation
acquisition
maintenance equipment.
Is a registered
Mr. Caywood
professional engineer in Maryland and Kentucky. He Is an active member in several engineering and railroad associations and
Is listed in "Who's Who in Kentucky" and "Who's Who in

KENTUCKY
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ENDS TONIGHT

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BotWhatAWojiderfcl
J

sary for survival because it contains the combined sets of stiic-tur- es
from its two parental an.
cestors.
Dr. Rao and Dr. Stokes crossed
a diploid tobacco plant with 48
chromosomes and a haplold tobacco plant with 24 chromosomes
and found that tobacco germ
cells that have as many as five
chromosomes missing can function nevertheless.
- The study indicates that some
chromosomes from sets serve the
same function and that the
plants can function normally
without some of these duplicates.

STARTS TOMORROW

f!0

FOR SALE Curwite, I960, red,
automatic, 230 hp., fine condi5N4t
Call
tion,

Two University
professors'
study in tobacco chromosomes
in the October issue of
Genetics, official publication of
the Genetics Society of America.
Dr. P. N. Rao, Department of
Physiology and Biophysics, and
Dr. G. W. Stokes, professor of
plant pathology wrote the study
on reduction of chromosomes in
tobacco plants.
The researchers pointed out
that normal tobacco possesses
chromosomes that are unneces- -

A'Jmitod Alone

SALE

Corvette, 1901, tan,
lip.., excellent con5N4t
$2,893. Call
dition,

Finish Tobacco Study

Radiologist

FOR SALE
--

J

Tivo UK Professors

1

Shows Cont. from 12:00

LOST Brown leather wallet. Reward! Please contact Geore
after 6 p.m. 5N4t
Black,
LOST A set of car keys in front
of Baptist Student Union, Friday night. If found please contact Tom Stephens.
5N4t

ENALI
PHONE

TODAY!
Shovi Cont. from

1:00

IT

cgsaiisits!S.

MISCELLANEOUS

ALTERATIONS of dresses, skirts
and coats for women. Mildred
Cohen, 215 E. Maxwell Phone
lOStf
with each
FREE HAIR-CU- T
shampoo and set. Special on
$10 permanent for $7.50. Offer
runs November 1 through NolN5t
vember 9.

share

Two male students to

apartment. Everything
furnished. Inquire
after
5

p.m.

fGflACC

KEJV

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U114-CI-

in ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S

f hcho mot

iS tMt V't lOV'HH
tucouNien fivi mums
UVOMO
Tut UHLIM WU

TO CATCH A
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JRMLS

-V

KIM

SIEftlTT KOlflH

WANTED

WANTED

CAW

GffflOT

in

ALFRFO HITCHCOCK'S

K0N(

Lilia Skala

OflHf

ft

kirMhJiMES

Ml Mm

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m.m

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l,Ilt

Stanley Adams

JERKV C0LCoU;:h

out

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

KERNEL WOMEN'S PAGE

i

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.4

.

.2 ...

-

3

Edited hy
Nancy Loii;Iirilge
Engagement

Pin-Mal-

7

(i, 1 90.1

Sharelvn P.nrton, a freshman
commerce major from Lexington,
to Jim Current, a sophomore
chemical engineering major from
Lexington and a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Lynn Wagner, a sophomore
nursing major from Cincinnati,
O. and a member of Kappa Alpha
Theta, to Alan Mi rriil, a '.sophomore accounting
major from
Lockpoit, N.Y. arid a member of
Lambda Chi Alpha.
Saundra riayforth, a senior art
major from Lancaster and a
member of Alpha Delta Pi, to
IJradlcy Cox, a graduate student
at Duke University from Lancaster and a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

Sue I.ndirott,
a senior Journalism major from Toledo, O., to
Del Xapirr, a former UK student
from Lamont, now serving with
the U.S. Army at Ft. Bragg,
North Carolina.

kmmmm

pump

FLOWERS
The Delt Pajama paHy Saturday night
out all manner of sleepy time characters.
course no pajama party would be complete
the presence of the ever popular stuffed

For Any

Puppy Love?
brought
And of
without
animal.

In this case Mary Sackfield's sleepy puppy seems to

Occasion

be telling Neil Hennessey's animal a big secret,
Could be about the good time she's having?

CALL

Miss Lexington Pageant Applications
Available At Women's Housing Units
Again this year. The Metropolitan Woman's Club will spon-

sor the Miss Lexington Pageant.
Paula Choate, a member of Kappa Alpha Theta Is the reigning
y.
Miss Lexington. Miss Debbie
Kappa Delta, was Miss
last year.
Lexington,
This year's Pageant will be
held in March and applications
are now available. The winners
will receive scholarships
and
prizes. The first place winner of
the Miss Lexington Pageant Is
eligible to enter the Miss Kentucky Pageant. The winner cf
this contest can go on to the Miss
America Pp.eear.t.
To be elegible for competetion,
you must meet the following basic
requirements:
a. Entrant must be single and
never have been married, divorced or had marriage annulled;
b. Entrant must be high school
graduate by Labor Day in year
of competition;
c. Entrants must be of good
character and possess poise, personality, intelligence, charm, and
beauty of face and figure.
d. Entrant's age on Labor Day
Jn year of competition shall not
be less than 18 or more than 28
years;
e. Entrant must possess and
display talent in a routine not to
exceed three minutes. Talent may
be singing, dancing, playing a
musical instrument,
dramatics,
art display, dress designing, creative poetry, writing etc., or entrant may give a three minute
talk on the profession she wishes
to pursue, including teaching,
nursing, law, medicine, business,
etc;
t. Entrant must be resident of
Lexington or Fayette County for
6 months prior to pageant. This
rule is waived only for contestants whose residence is out of
Fayette County, but who are college or university 6tudents in
Fayette County;
g. Entrant may be either professional or amateur.
Woman's
The
Metropolitan
Club has charm and talent adand girls interested in envisors
tering the Pageant are urged to
apply early, so the advisors will
have time to give them as much
help as they need. Applicants will

AWS Meeting

The Associated Women

to and from events pertaining to
the Pageant, by members of The
Metropolitan Woman's Club.

The Door to Fashion
819 Euclid Ave.

dents will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, in the Student

FLORIST
Dial

255-658-

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417 East Maxwell

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A Hair Cut by
MR. PAUL
winner of more hair cutting trophies than any hairdresser in Kentucky)

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nitMOil IKl.bIl.UNAMtlNSOl.SU

* '

Washington Seminar

One of the most rewarding programs started by Student Congress in
leccnt years has been the Washington
Seminar. Applications are now being
accepted for next summer's seminar,
end we urge interested students to

epply.
The past summer's program was
described in the first two issues of the
Kernel The program ranged from attendance at one of President Kennedy's news conferences to a two-hodiscussion with the Second
of the Russian Embassy. Such
programs give students an opportunity to talk with people who make the
riews, to learn about our government,
end at the same time work in a gov- ur

Sec-teta- ry

ernmental agency. Thus you are earning while expanding your knowledge
of current and political affairs.
To insure that qualified persons
represent the University, each applicant is screened by a panel composed
of two professors and a student who
has participated in the program.
After approval by this panel, the
student's application is sent to several government agencies in an effort
to secure summer employment for
the student. This work is coordinated with the UK Alumni Club in the
Nation's Capital.
So if you would like to work in
Washington this summer and participate is a program such as the one
outlined above now is the time to
apply. Deadline for applications is

Friday.

I like trees because they seem more
resigned to the way they have to live
than other things do. Willa Catlier
Nothing that man created is outside his capacity to change, to remold,
to supplant or to destroy. His machines are no more sacred or substantial than the dreams in which they
originated. Lewis Mum ford.
Change does not necessarily assure
progress, but progress implacably requires change. . . . Education is essential to change, for education creates
both new wants and the ability to
satisfy them. Henry Steele Coin- -

It is a funny thing about life
if you refuse to accept anything but
the best you very often get it.
IT.
Somerset Maugham
The use of money is all the advantage there is in having money.
Benjamin Franklin

College Students
Ptliserable
A large number of American college students are so miserable that
they are counting the days until graduation. Instead of getting pleasure and
satisfaction from their college years,
they are confused, frustrated, and
failure conscious.
An article in the Oct. 12 issue of
The Saturday Evening Font gave statistics on and reasons for some of
the problems of college students.
At the University of Pennsylvania
20 percent of the students require
service
help from the mental-healtduring their stay at college.
At Harvard 25 percent consult a
psychiatrist. A recent poll of 600 college psychiatrists revealed tliat about
35 percent of the students in their institutions seek psychiatric help, while
GO
percent need help.
Symptoms of emotional distress
seen in college students are: excessive drinking, rioting, cheating on
exams, sexual promiscuity, and
A recent study shows suicide
to be second only to accidents in the
cause of student deaths at Yale.
Some people blame our society for
the misery of some of our students.
The idea that college is essential for
everyone and the importance placed
h

s.

University of Kentucky
The South' Outstanding College Daily

Entered at trip port offlc at LcxinRton, Kentucky M wcond class mattrr nncVr tfc Act of March S. 1873.
ic thr regular K hrxil vrar rjerm during oouaayi anu naiuii
Published four tunc a week il
A SCHOOL YEAR
SIX DOLLARS
IJavid 1IAWPE, Managing cauor
Sub Endicott. Editor

Daily Editors:

Elizabeth Ward, William Grant, Richard Stevenson, and Join Townsend

Modecki, Campus Editor
Tom Finnik, Circulation Manager
of Sports
John Pfeitter, Arts Editor
Phones: News, extensions 2285 and 2302; Advertising and Circulation. 2306

Carl

John Bum hard, Advertising Manager
Jerry Schureman and Walter Pagan,
Nancy Louchrtdce, Women's Page Editor

Campus Parable

In a world where materialistic capitalism and materialistic Communism
vie, can we help it if there is a materialistic motive in our life? Actually
it has probably been in man all along.
Yet it seems that it has the power
within modern society to make each
of us seem very impoverished in spite
of our position as a "campus have" or
"
a "campus
No one really blames us for desiring the nice things in life which money
can buy. Not even the preacher with
his sermon against materialism really
blames us. It is not our fault, if our
college education is motivated by vocational preparation with few .or no
hours left for what philosophical educators might call true education.
Yet there remains the feelings of
spiritual poverty. Can we blame it all
on our parents and the resulting complexes which bother us? Look carefully for His the sin of parents, of
and of ourselves you do not seek
to know yourself or to grow in understanding of your egocentric movement. The impoverished feeling may
result from too much seeking after
"silver" and entertainment and too
little seeking after selfhood.
have-not.-

Kernels

'

The Kentucky Kernel

For all of its failures on the domestic scene, including apparently, an
inability to marshal! support for its
civil rights approach, the Kennedy adhas made significant
ministration
moves toward modernizing the United
States' stagnant foreign policy.
with the recognition
is not immoral (and
may even be a sound foreign policy)
the President and his staff have moved
to open new possibilities in
relations, and to readjust
America's policies in the face of the
realities of 1963.
Beginning

There are 10 times as many colclinics now
leges with mental-healtas there were before World War H.
Colleges that offer such service have
found more and more students taking
advantage of them."
Until a separate
program was established, the University of Pennsylvania recorded a
23 percent increase each year in the
number of students seeking aid from
the mental-healtclinic.
From The College Ncus
h

g

"My son, if you receive my words
and treasure up my commandments with you, making
'
your ear attentive to wisdom
and inclining your heart to
understanding; yes, if you cry out
for insight and raise your voice
for understanding,
if you seek it like silver
and search for it as for hidden
treasures; then you will understand
the fear of the Lord
and find the knowledge of God.
For the Lord gives wisdom;
from his mouth come knowledge
and understanding."
-- Frovcrbs 2:1-6

Charles Garrison
Campus Minister
Christian Student Fellowship

The Policies Of Peace

that neutralism

on a degree from a "good" school have
helped to increase pressure.
Sometimes the frustration is partly the result of parental insistence on
a certain college, particular field of
study, or grades beyond the ability
of a son or daughter.
Students generate a lot of their
own tensions. The reason for tension
in many cases seems to be immaturity. Students with this problem are
unwilling to assume responsibilities
and don't care what anyone else thinks
about their actions.
Choosing a career, overcoming
loneliness at large schools, and trying to participate in too many activities are often sources of distress.

h

y,

King Solomon of the Old Testament was a man famous for successfully seeking riches, power, and the
intimate company of many women yet
also for feeling a great poverty of
spirit. His life experiences can be
valuable guides to our understanding
if we carefully ponder words such as
these which he wrote:

Soviet-Americ-

The highlight of the change in
our Russian attitude came last June
10, when, in a speech at American
University, Washington, D.C., Kenon
nedy called for serious
the whole subject of coexistence with
the Soviet Unoin. Despite ambivalences and contradictions in his outlooks (such as the inane fallout shelter
milprogram and the
itary budget), it is apparent that the
President is interested in a readjustment of our foreign policy in many
cases.
The nuclear test ban treaty and
pending wheat sale to Russia are examples of this willingness to achieve
limited solutions to complex problems, and of a willingness to cooperate with the Soviets in
areas.
Similarly, the Cold European policies of Truman, with troop and missile
bases throughout Europe and Asia,
may be coming in for review Operation "Rif Lift" is a clear indication
that the administration may be de- -

emphasizing foreign bases, a key area
of dispute in the Cold War.
The problem lies in the tendency
of American politicians to equate
negotiation with concession, and policy change with surrender. When the
President announced the close of Jupiter missile bases in Turkey and Italy,
he was immediately denounced for
"giving in" to Soviet demands, despite
the fact that such bases had been
made obsolete by the Polaris submarine.
Recently Republi