xt7n5t3g1p2q https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7n5t3g1p2q/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky. University of Kentucky 1950 1951 The University of Kentucky Gradute Schools course catalogs contain bound volumes dating from 1926 through 2005. After 2005, the course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs English University of Kentucky Copyright retained by the University of Kentucky. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Graduate School course catalogs University of Kentucky Graduate School Bulletin, 1950-1951 text University of Kentucky Graduate School Bulletin, 1950-1951 1950 1950 1951 2020 true xt7n5t3g1p2q section xt7n5t3g1p2q   
    
  
  
   

    

   

BULLETIN

University of Kentucky

 

Graduate 55/100]
19 5 0’5 1

July, 1950

 

 

Published by the University of Kentucky. Entered as Second-Class Matter
at the Post Oflice, Lexington, Kentucky, under
the Act of July 16, 1924.

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103,
Act of October S, 1917, Authorized June 30, 1920.

Vol. 42 No. 7

 

 

  

 

  

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION

 

HERMAN LEE DONOVAN, PH.D., LL.D., President

LEO M. CHAMBERLAIN, M.A., PH.D., Vice President

”MAURICE F. SEAY, M.A., PH.D., LL.D., Dean of the University

MARTIN MARSHALL WHITE, M.A., PII.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

THOMAS POE COOPER, B,S., D.Sc., LL.D., Dean, College of Agriculture and
Home Economics

LEVI IACKSON HORLACHER, M.S., Assistant Dean in Resident Teaching, College
of Agriculture and Home Economics

DANIEL VOIERs TERRELL, C.E., Dean, College of Engineering

ELVIS J. STAIIR, IR, M.A., AB. in Jun, B.C.L., Dean, College of Law
FRANK G. DICKEY, M.A., Ed.D., Dean, College of Education

CECIL C. CARPENTER, M.S., PI-I.D., Dean, College of Commerce

EARL PLATT SLONE, PH.C., B.S., Dean, College of Pharmacy

LOUIS ARTHUR PARDUE, A.B., M.S., PH.D., Dean, Graduate School
LOUIS CLIFTON, M.A., Director of University Extension

ALBERT DENNIS KmWAN, A.B., PH.D., Dean of Men, Dean of Students
SARAII BENNETT HOLMES, M.A., Dean of Women

LEE SPROWLES, M.A., Ed.D., Registrar

FRANK D. PETERSON, A.B., Comptroller

LAWRENCE S. THOMPSON, M.A., PH.D., Director of University Libraries

  

‘ Resigned, June 30, 1950.

     
   
   
   
 

BULLETIN

University of Kentucky

 

Graduate 55/100]
19 5 0/5 1

July, 1950

  

 

   

September 11—13
September 14-16
September 18
September 23
October 13-14
October 23
November 23—27

December 16
1951

Ianuary 2
January 22-26
January 26

February 3
February 5-6
February 7
February 13
March 2—3

March 12

March 23-27

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR THE YEAR 1950-1951

FIRST SEMESTER

Monday, 8:00 am. to Wednesday 5:00 p.m.— Classifica-
tion tests and physical examinations for all new students

Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to Saturday noon — Registration and
classification of all students, according to an alpha—
betical schedule

Monday —— Class work begins

Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class
for the first semester

Friday and Saturday—Period for filing application for
degree ,

Monday—Last date one may drop a course without a
grade

Thursday, 8:00 21.111. to Monday, 8:00 la.1n.— Thanksgiv-
ing holidays

Saturday noon — Christmas holidays begin

Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.— Christmas holidays end
Monday through Friday — Final examinations
Friday, 6:00 p.m.— End of first semester

SECOND SEMESTER

Saturday, 7:45 a.m.— Classification tests and physical ex-
aminations of all new students

Monday, 8:00 a.m. to Tuesday, 4:20 p.m.— Registration
and classification of all students, aCcording to an al—
phabetical schedule

\Vednesday — Class Work begins

Tuesday—Last date one many enter an organized class
for the second semester

Friday and Saturday—Period for filing application for
degree

Monday—Last date one may drop a course without a
grade .

Friday, 8:00 a.m. to Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.— Easter holidays

 

 

  

    

)—I

June

[0

June

9”
._.
0

June

i ‘ June 18
June 19
June 20
June 23
June 28
June 29-30

July 4
‘ August 10
ii , August 11

 

May 29—June 2

September 10

     

Sunday — Baccalaureate Services
Tuesday through Saturday — Final examinations
Friday — Eighty-third Annual Commencement
Saturday, 6:00 p.m.— End of second semester
Tuesday through Saturday — 4-H Club Week ‘

SUMMER SESSION 1951

Monday, 7:45 a.m.— Classification tests and physical ex—
aminations for all new students .

Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:80 p.m.— Registration and classi—
fication of all students, according to an alphabetical
schedule

Wednesday — Class work begins

Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class
for the summer session

Thursday— Last date one may drop a course without a
grade

Friday and Saturday—Period for filing application for
degree

Tuesday — Independence Day holiday
Friday — Summer Session Commencement

Saturday noon — End of summer session

FIRST SEMESTER 1951—1952

Monday — Opening of first semester

 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
  
  
    
  
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 

     

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for

    

GRADUATE FACULTY

HERMAN LEE DONOVAN, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.
President of the University

LOUIS ARTHUR PARDUE, A.B., M.S., PhD.
Dean of the Graduate School

 
   
   
 
   
    
   
  
 
     
  

 

 

  
   
 
    
 
  
 
   
   
  
 
 
    
  
   
 
 
 
   
  

MARGARET HOTCHKISS, Ph.D.
Secretary, Graduate Faculty
RICHARD SWEETNAM ALLEN, M.S. .................................. Anatomy and Physiology
CHARLES BARKENBUS, B.S., PHD. ................................... Chemistry
HOWARD W. BEERS, B.S., M.S., PHD. .. ......................... Rural Sociology
ADOLPH E. BIGGE, M.A., PHD. ........................................ ....German
GEORGE K. BRADY, A.B., M.A., PHD. ..... English
ALFRED BRAUER, M.A., PHD. ........................................... Zoology
AUBREY J. BROWN, M.S., PHD. ...Markets and Rural Finance
jAMEs CALVIN, PHD. ...................................................... Psychology
CECIL C. CARPENTER, M.S., PHD. ................................... Economics
LUCIAN HUGH CARTER, M.A., PH.D., ....... ...Commerce
LEO MARTIN CHAMBERLAIN, M.A., PHD ............................ Education
JOHN SHARP CHAMBERS, M.S., M.D. ................. Hygiene and Public Health
THOMAS D. CLARK, A.B., A.M., PH.D., LI'I'I‘.D. ........................................ History
ARTHUR L. COOKE, M.A., PHD. .................................................... ..English
“CLYDE B. CRAWLEY, M.S., PHD. . ............ Physics
CHARLES STEVENS CROUSE, E.M. .Engineering
LYLE R. DAWSON, PHD. ................ ....Chemistry
FRANK G. DICKEY, M.A., ED.D. ............................... ....Educafion
GRAHAM B. DIMMICK, PHD. ............................................................. Psychology
HAROLD HARDESTY DOWNING, B.C.E., M.S., PHD. .. Mathematics
W. CLEMENT EATON, PHD. ............................................................ History
STATIE ESTELLE ERIKSON, PHD. ......... ..Home Economics
EDWARD FRANKLIN FARQUHAR, M.A. .. ....................................... English
ERNEST NEWTON FERGUs, PHD. ........................................... Agronomy
WESLEY PATTERSON GARRIGUS, PHD. . ...Animal Husbandry
'CARSIE HAMMONDS, M.S., PHD. .......................... Education
ELLIS FORD HARTFORD, M.A., ED.D. .. ....Education
MARGARET HOTCHKISS, PHD. ....... . ............................... Bacteriology
HERBERT H. HUMPHREYS, PHD. ................................. Psychology
PERRY ELMER KARRAKER, M.A. ....Agronomy
GRANT COCHRAN KNIGHT, M.A. ................... English
OTTO TOWNSEND KOPPIUS, B.S., PHD. ......... Physics
JOHN KUIPER, M.A. ..................................... ...Philosophy
SHELBY T. McCLOY, PH.D. .................................................. History
ARTHUR CRANE MCFARLAN, A.B., PH.D. ....Geology
FRANK T. MCFARLAND, PHD. .................................. Botany

‘ Died October 26, 1949.

  

 

  

JAMES W. MARTIN, M.A. ........................................................................ Economics
WILLIAM DURRETT NICHOLLS, M.S., PHD. .. .Farm Economics

 
  
    
   
  

  
 

 

 

 

 

   
   
   
  
  
 
 
 
  
 

FRANK A. PATTIE, M.A., PHD. .............................. Psychology
SALLIE E. PENCE, M.A., PHD. ......................... Mathematics
HUGH BRUCE PRICE, PHD. ....................... ...Markets and Rural Finance
EDWARD WARDER RANNELLS, B.A., M.A. .. ............... . ....Art
HERBERT PARKS RILEY, M.A., PHD. ........................... Botany
HARRY ALEX ROMANOWITZ, E.E., M.S., PHD. .................................. Engineering
L. HOBART RYLAND, A.B., M.A., DocteuI de l’Universite ....RonIance Languages
IRWIN T. SANDERS, PHD. .......................................................................... Sociology
MORRIS SCHERAGO, B.S., D.V.M. .............................. ..Bacteriology
]. R. SCHWENDEMAN, PHD. ...................... Geography
DON CASH SEATON, M.A., PHD. ............. Physical Education
MAURICE F. SEAY, M.A., PHD., LL.D. .................................................. Education
' ALBERTA WILSON SERVER, M.A., Docteur de l’Universite ...,Romance Languages
JASPER BERRY SHANNON, PHD. .................................................... Political Science
JONAH W. D. SKILES, M.A., PHD. . Ancient Languages
HERBERT SORENSON, M.A., PHD. ............................................................ Education
DUDLEY EUGENE SOUTH, M.A., PHD. ................................................ MathematiCS
HERMAN EVERETT SPIVEY, M.A., PHD. ................... English
ELVIS ]. STAHR, IR, M.A., AB. in JU‘R., B.C.L. ......... Law
OLUS JESSE STEWART, A.B., M.S., PHD. ..................... ' ........................... Chemistry
RODMAN SULLIVAN, A.B., A.M., PHD. .................................................... Economics
“WILLIAM SEPTIMUS TAYLOR, M.S., PH.D., LL.D. ...... Education
DANIEL VOIERS TERRELL, CE. ............................................ Engineering
LAWRENCE SIDNEY THOMPSON, M.A., PHD. . ........... Director, Libraries
LEE HILL TOWNSEND, PHD. ....Agricultural Entomology
AMRY VANDENBOSCH, PHD. ............................. Political Science
WILLIAM SMITH WARD, M.A., PHD. .. ................ En lish
RALPH HOLDER WEAVER, M.S., PHD. . ..Bacterio ogy
WILLIAM SNYDER WEBB, M.S., SCD. .......... Physics
HAROLD E. WETZEL, B.Sc. in SA, M.A. ..Social Work
MARTIN MARSHALL WHITE, M.A., PHD. .............................................. Psychology

‘ Died August 26, 1949.

 

 

   

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TH E GRADUATE SCHOOL

LOUIS ARTHUR PARDUE, A.B., M.S., PH.D., DEAN

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

Graduate work is offered in all colleges in the University. Approximately
a thousand courses are listed in the catalogue, under the various departments,
which are accepted for graduate credit.

The following advanced degrees are conferred by the University:

Master of Arts

Master of Science

Master of Science in Public Health

Master of Science in Agriculture

Master of Science in Home Economics
Master ofScience in Civil Engineering
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Master of Science in Metallurgical Engineering
Master of Science in Mining Engineering
Civil Engineer (C.E.)

Electrical Engineer (E.E.)

Mechanical Engineer (M.E.)

Metallurgical Engineer (Met.E.)

Mining Engineer (E.M.)

Master of Arts in Education

Master of Science in Education

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered with major work in the
following fields: Agricultural Economics, Bacteriology, Chemistry, Education,
Economics, English, History, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, Political Sci-
ence, Romance Languages, and in the combined fields of Sociology and Rural
Sociology. Minor work may be carried in any department offering graduate
courses.

ADMISSION

A student who is a graduate of a fully accredited institution of higher
learning may be admitted to the Graduate School b the Registrar of the Uni-
versity by submitting an oflicial transcript of un ergraduate courses and a
written application. Blanks for the latter may be obtained from the Registrar
or from the oflice of the Graduate School.

It should be clearly understood that a graduate student may not be able
to begin immediately a full graduate program leading to the degree he desires.

  

   

 

UNIVERSITY or KENTUCKY

It may be necessary for him to satisfy certain prerequisites which he omitted
in his undergraduate curriculum. These will be determined by the department
in which the major work is to be done. In brief it may be stated that a grad—
uate student may begin a full program in- the fields in which he has the
equivalent of an undergraduate major; in some cases the equivalent of an
undergraduate minor is adequate.

If the record submitted to the Registrar entitles the applicant to admission,
he should confer with the Dean of the Graduate School about general require—
ments and with his major professor concerning detailed requirements that he
may have to satisfy.

Members of the faculty of the University of Kentucky having a rank higher
than that of instructor may not be considered as candidates for advanced de—
grees from this institution.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL ADVANCED DEGREES

Courses

All courses listed in the regular University catalogue which_have numbers
above 100 may be counted as credit toward a graduate degree; however,
courses numbered from 100 to 199 may be counted only with the approval of
the student’s graduate committee. A course completed with a grade of D will
not be given graduate credit.

Residence

A load for full-time residence comprises a minimum of 9 semester hours
of graduate course work. In the summer seSsion the corresponding load is 6
semester hours. Part-time residence during any semester is computed on the
basis of one and one—half weeks of residence for each semester hour earned,
but the amount of residence for part-time work is limited, except for graduate
assistants and part-time instructors, to not more than six Weeks .in any one
semester. These receive one and one-half Weeks of residence per semester hour.
Part—time students in the summer session receive one and one-half Weeks per
semester hour except for short courses of less than eight Weeks in which case
residence shall not exceed the actual number of Weeks involved.

Fees

Registration fees per semester are the same as for undergraduate students
in the college in which the major work is done, that is, $60.00 for residents of
Kentucky; $90.00 for non-residents who registered before September 1, 1947;
$120.00 for those who registered after September 1, 1947. Part—time graduate
students who are legal residents of the state pay $6.75 per semester hour; non-
residents who registered before September 1, 1947 pay $10.25 per semester
hour; non-residents who registered after September 1, 1947 pay $13.50 per
semester hour. Students carrying full loads in the summer session pay one-half
the regular semester fee. Those taking less than full loads pay the regular
semester credit hour fee.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
  
  
 
 
 
 
  
    

   

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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MASTERS' DEGREES
Transfer of Credits

No transferred credits are accepted toward any master’s degree in course;
however, a student is not asked to repeat a course which he has satisfactorily
completed at another institution. °

Extension

Under certain conditions, up to one—third of the credits and residence
required for any master’s degree in course may be satisfied by extension courses
given in person by University of Kentucky instructors. No graduate credit is
given for courses taken by correspondence.

M.A. or M.S. Degree

Whether a candidate selects a Master of Arts or a Master of Science
degree is left to the option of the candidate and his major department. In gen-
eral it may be said that a candidate with major work in the natural sciences
should take the MS. degree; others, the M.A.

Examinations

A final oral examination is given all candidates for masters’ degrees in
course, not later than fifteen days before the close of the semester. The Dean
of the Graduate School appoints examining committees of at least three mem—
bers each for the purpose, selecting the members from the major and minor
professors under whom the work was done. The Dean is ex officio a member
of all such examining committees. The candidate is asked to defend his thesis,
if one has been written, and is examined on any Subject matter related to

his field.

Fees

Before any master’s degree is conferred, a commencement fee of $20.00
must be paid at the Comptroller’s Office of the University.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE

Credits

The candidate shall complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of graduate
course work with a standing of 2.0 or better. Additional courses may be as-
signed by the candidate’s adviser.

Courses

The candidate shall have a major field which shall comprise at least two-
thirds of the course Work; the other one-third may be taken in that field or in
fields which have graduate relationship with it. In education and agriculture
only one—half of the work must be in the major field.

 

  

    
   
   
 
   
  
   
 
 
   
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
 
   

 

  

10 UNIVERSITY or KENTUCKY

Residence

The minimum residence required is one academic year of 86 Weeks. This
residence may be fulfilled by any combination of semesters or summer sessions
which totals the required number of weeks.

This does not mean that the work prescribed for each individual can
always be completed in the minimum length of time. Inadequate preparation
or assistance in departments very frequently makes a longer period necessary.

Thesis

A thesis is required of every candidate. Two type-written copies of the
thesis, approved by the professor in charge and in a form acceptable to the
Graduate School, must be presented not later than three Weeks before the last
day upon which grades may be reported to the Registrar’s Office. The final oral
examination may not be taken before the thesis has been accepted by the Crad-
uate School Office. Information about this thesis deadline date may be obtained
from the Graduate School Office.

Language Requirements

A reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language is required.
This language should be pertinent to the program of the student and approved
by his adviser. The language requirement must be satisfied by an examination
given by the foreign language department of the University offering instruction
in the language concerned. The passing of this examination may satisfy one
of the two language requirements for the doctorate if approved by the student’s
special committee.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
See Education, page 120. ‘

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF SCIENCE
IN AGRICULTURE AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
HOME ECONOMICS

Students holding a bachelor’s degree from a standard agricultural college
may obtain the degree of Master of Science in Agriculture or Master of Science
in Home Economics by satisfying the following requirements:

1. The completion of 24 semester hours of graduate Work with an average
standing of 2.0 or better, 36 weeks in residence, and a thesis, or the
completion of 36 semester hours of graduate work with a standing of
2.0 or better, 45 weeks in residence, and no thesis requirement.

2. Under either plan no grade below C may be counted.

3. One-half of the work must be in one department, the remainder in
any other department or departments approved by the major professor.

4. There is no language requirement for either of these professional

degrees.

 

  

   

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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 11
,

In either case a final oral examination is given the candidate not later
than 15 days before the close of the semester in which the degree is to be
secured. The candidate is expected to show a comprehensive knowledge of
the subject matter related to the field of his major work and in case a thesis
has been prepared to defend same.

Graduate students in the College of Agriculture fall into four groups:

Group I.— Those who have presented the degree Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture or Home Economics and plan to prepare a thesis under the direction
of a major professor in their graduate work.

Group II.-— Those who do not have the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture or Home Economics and plan to prepare a thesis. Such students
may not have had certain essential undergraduate work. In such cases the
major professor will recommend to the graduate committee a plan to strengthen
the student in such weaknesses. When approved by the committee this plan
will become the basis of the student’s graduate program.

Group III.— Those students who have the degree Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture or Home Economics and request the option to omit the thesis and
present 36 semester hours in graduate courses and 45 weeks of residence. Such
students will be assigned a graduate adviser who will aid them in preparing
a program for graduate work. The program will be submitted to the Graduate
Committee for approval early in the student’s residence period.

Group IV.— Those students who do not have the degree Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture or Home Economics and who request the option to omit
the thesis and present 36 semester hours in graduate courses and 45 Weeks of
residence. Students in this group will be assigned a graduate adviser who Will
aid them in preparing a statement of the candidate’s program for the master’s
degree. Approval of this program by the Committee must be obtained early
in the student’s residence period. Candidates in Crou IV should take one
or more courses, preferably advanced courses, in each epartment of the Col—
lege of Agriculture in which there is a required course for the Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture or Home Economics.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE
IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Students holding a bachelor’s degree from a fully accredited institution or
the MD. degree from a recognized Medical School may obtain the degree of
Master of Science in Public Health by satisfying the following requirements:

1. Twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses with an average stand—
ing of 2.0 or better.

No grade below C may be counted.
Thirty-six weeks in residence.

An acceptable thesis.

2.
3.
4.
5.

There is no language requirement for this degree.

 

  

   

 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES IN ENGINEERING

Two classes of advanced degrees are oifered in the College of Engineering,
the masters’ degrees and the professional degrees.

THE MASTEns’ DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. The masters’ degrees in engi-
neering may be obtained by satisfying the following requirements:

1. Twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses with an average stand—
ing of 2.0 or better.

No grade below C may be counted:

Thirty—six weeks in residence.

An acceptable thesis.

Two-thirds of the work must be in the major subject.

There is no language requirement for these degrees.

99‘2“?!“

The candidate must hold the corresponding Bachelor of Science degree in
engineering or the equivalent from this institution or from another engineering
school of recognized standing. The degrees offered are Master of Science in
Civil Engineering, Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, Master of Sci-
ence in Mechanical Engineering, Master of Science in Metallurgical Engineer—
ing, Master of Science in Mining Engineering.

THE PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. The professional degrees
of Civil Engineer (C.E.), Electrical Engineer (E.E.), Mechanical Engineer
(M.E.), Metallurgical Engineer (Met.E.), or Mining Engineer (E.M.) will be
granted only to graduates of the University of Kentucky, College of Engineer-
ing, who present satisfactory evidence of professional work of creditable
quality in the engineering fields of their choice, extending over a period of five
years, and who submit satisfactory theses as further evidence of their pro-
fessional attainments. '

A candidate holding a master’s degree in engineering shall be considered
to have fulfilled two years of the five-year requirement for the corresponding
professional degree.

An application for a professional degree must be made to the Dean of
the Graduate School and have the approval of the Graduate Committee of the
College of Engineering not less than one academic year before the degree may
be granted.

The Graduate Committee will pass on the qualifications of each applicant.
It may, at its discretion, require an oral examination. The applicant is expected
to submit a record of his engineering experience, which should include a com—
plete list of his professional engagements, showing in each case the length of
time employed and the position held. He should give for references the names
of at least three persons who are familiar \m‘th his engineering work. Preferably
these persons should be connected with the organizations by whom he has
been employed.

A thesis is required of each candidate. It may be in the field of research,
design, invention or engineering processes and methods. It must contain some
original thought and be the product of the individual submitting it. Quotations
and references with proper credit may be used. In general, the thesis should
be of such a nature that it will be of value to the engineering profession.

 
 
   
 
  
 
  
 
 
 
 
    
 
  
 
  
  
   
 
 
   
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    

   

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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 13 ,

A candidate holding a bachelor’s. degree in one field of engineering may
apply for a professional degree in another field of engineering if he has at-
tained unusual prominence and success in that field. .

Fees

The fees for a professional degree in engineering are $15.00 for registration
and $20.00 for graduation.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred upon a candidate who,
afte completing not less than three years of graduate work devoted to the
stud y of a special field of knowledge, presents a satisfactory dissertation and
passes a comprehensive examination, thus, qualifying for recognition as a
scholar of high attainments in his chosen province.

The doctor’s degree is intended to represent not a specified amount of
work covering a specified time, but the attainment, through long study, of
independent and comprehensive scholarship in a special field. Such scholarship
should be shown by a thorough acquaintance with present knowledge in a
particular field of learning and a marked capacity for research.

Admission

Admission to the Graduate School and acceptance of advanced credits
from other institutions must first be approved by the Registrar who will de-
termine at the time of admission the amount of residence to which the ap—
plicant is entitled toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. No Work is
credited which has not been done in a college or university of recognized
standing.

In order to be accepted as an applicant for the degree of Doctor of
Philosophy, a student must present to the Registrar evidence that he has com—
pleted an undergraduate curriculum and has received his baccalaureate degree
from a fully accredited institution.

Classification

A student wishing to become an applicant for the doctor’s degree must
first regularly register in the Graduate School of the University of Kentucky
and must then classify with the Dean of the Graduate School. The student
is expected to select his major professor as early as is practicable. He should
then apply to the Dean of the Graduate School to have a special committee ap—
pointed. The special committee, the chairman of which shall be his major
professor, will consist of members of the departments in which the applicant
elects to do his major and minor work and this committee will supervise his

work throughout his period of study.

Not every applicant for the doctor’s degree is a candidate. A student is
not a candidate for the degree until he has satisfied the language requirements,
has passed the qualifying examinations at the University of Kentucky and has
been formally admitted by the Graduate School.

   

  

   
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
  
 
 
 
    
   
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
  
 
  

 

 

4

14 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

 

Courses of Study

Every applicant for the degree must select one major and at least one and
not more than two minor subjects.

The major subject should be one in which he intends to concentrate his
efforts; the minor subjects should be closely allied to the major field or be sub-
jects which will be of value in the major work and should be approved by the
major department.

The applicant’s principal work must be in the major subject. Although
no absolute regulations are laid down in respect to the time to be devoted to
the major and minor subjects, it may be stated in general that the major sub-
ject should represent two-thirds of the student’s entire time.

Any regular graduate course may be assigned as part of the applicant’s
work by his special committee. Only courses numbered above 100 in the
University Catalogue are considered as of graduate status. The number and
extent of such courses is determined by the special committee.

Residence

A minimum of three collegiate years of resident graduate work, of which
at least the last year must be spent at the University of Kentucky, is required
for the doctorate. The full time of each of these years must be spent in study.
Part-time students and those holding assistantships or en aging in other outside
activities will of course be required to take proportionate y longer time.

While it is expected that a well-prepared student of good ability may
secure the degree upon the completion of three years of study, it should be
understood that this time requirement is a minimum and is w olly secondary
to the matter of scholarship. Time spent in study, however long; the accumula-
tion of facts, however great in amount; and the completion of advanced courses,
however numerous cannot be substituted for independent thinking and original
research.

Language Requirements

The applicant must give evidence of having a good reading knowledge of,
and of being able to translate at sight, at least two modern foreign languages.
This proficiency is determined by examinations conducted by the respective
language departments at the University of Kentucky. While ordinarily French
and German are acceptable the final choice should be made under the guidance
of the student’s special committee which will recommend what languages are to
count. The language requirements must be satisfied before the applicant can
be admitted to the qualifying examination.

Qualifying Examinations

An applicant for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is required to pass a
qualifying examination. This examination should be taken during the second
semester of the second year of residence but in no case before the special com-
mittee has recommended that the applicant is ready for the examination. The
examination shall be both oral and written and shall cover both major and
minor subjects. It shall be administered to the applicant by his special com:

  

  

   

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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 15

mittee and shall be evaluated by that committee. No applicant may proceed
to his final examination until one year of work has been completed in residence
after he has passed the qualifying examination. If the applicant fails to pass the
qualifying examination, no re-examination shall be allowed except upon the
recommendation of the special committee and the approval of the Graduate
Dean.

Dissertation

Each candidate must present a dissertation covering his thesis work. This
dissertation must give evidence of the candidate’s ability to carry on independ-
ent investigation and must be satisfactory in style and composition. It must
represent a definite contribution to the knowledge of his subject, must be the
result of independent work, must include original research, and must in some
way add to or otherwise modify what was previously known on the subject.
Two bound typewritten copies of the thesis and two copies of an abstract, the
original bound the first carbon unbound, of not less than 1,200 nor mo