xt7ngf0mw606 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ngf0mw606/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19611006  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  6, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  6, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7ngf0mw606 section xt7ngf0mw606 i

111

Wr'"
1

151IE3

IRPHE

University of Kentuc h y

Vol. LIU, No. 12

LEXINGTON,

KY.,

FRIDAY, OCT.

fi,

II

IT
Eight Page

5,000 Student Directories
Go On Sale Next Month
SC Sponsors

Publication
By BILL RIFENBl'RGII

Kernel Staff Writer

Five thousand student dischool
rectories for the 1961-6term will he on sale Nov. 20,
said Myra Tohin, chairman of
the committee preparing the
listings for the directory.
2

The Student Congress, which is
sponsoring the directory publication, has contracted with Marquam
Dressed in (he latest fashion and following her Scottish descent,
and Co., Lubbock, Texas, to proCharlene I)ai strikes a bonnie lassie pose in front of the Delta
duce the student directory this
Zeta sorority house. "Char," as her friends call her, is a sophomore
year.
elementary education major from Martin, Ky.
Marquam and Co. have solicited
advertising from local Lexington
businesses, publish the directory,
and then give it to the Student
Congress free of charge.
The congress would then have
the option of selling or giving the
directories to the student body.
"The directories will be sold to
Freshmen women will elect two senators today for Associated Women Student Congress. The elections will Ik? held the student body as a money-makin- g
project of the Student
in Jewell Hall lounge from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Congress. Miss Tobin said,
the Senate. Alice Ford and another
Because only 5,000 copies of the
Only freshman v. omen will be
allowed to vote in this election. senator, not yet announced, will directory will be circulated, the
advertising rate will be $48 for one
Each voter must present her ID represent Panhellenic.
Members of the House of Rep- square inch on a page.
card.
will be selected from
This means that it would cost a
The candidates for senators are resentatives
Continued on Page 2
firm $24 to put its name and
Nancy Jane Auer, Sandra Kay
Brock, I'am Glass, Karen Lavan,
Penny Price, Betty Beth Koper,
and Jane Tuilis. They were chosen
by freshmen advisers through the
women's applications.
'
S"m
Di,llas'
biPv of the lymph gland in
Aim Piper, preskl.nt of the sen- J
riBhJLBrT
ate. said the tenate will deal with eteran T.f
tf" Cm"
.
Demo- - pleted.
biopsy revealed a met- h,
,h Representatives and "Mr.
ujri
house of representatives, the secHos"This indicates that the most
ond basic element cf UK women's suffering from cancer, Baylor
olficiaLs revealed yesterday.
likely primary site of the malig- government, will deal primarily pital aide of the
Texas nacy Ls the pancreas. No further
An
with business in the living units,
Other members tf the Senate were congressman said the cancer is surgery is anticipated."
.,
.
A metastatic malignancy is one
"It may be Just a matter of a that has
These senators are Ann Piper, few
spread from its point
days." The aide said when of
origin into other parts of the
president; Irma Strache, vice pres asked how much time the doctors
Idrnt; Gypsy Barker, secretary; give Rayburn. A doctor later said body.
The speaker left Washington
Ann Combs, treasurer; Yvonne "this
thing could last for several late in
August before congress ad- Nichols and Janice Troop, senior
Journed- - He complained of a back
class senators; Kay Shropshire and
Surgery will not be resorted to
Gimmer Leonard, junior class sen- "because there is nothing they can
ators, and Mary Ware and Sue do. It is all over him," the aide
i: icn Grannis, sophomore class said.
senators.
The official bulletin issued by the
Ann Combs and Julia Webb will hospital after doctors had made
represent the residence hulls in tests for the past several days said

Straight From Scotland

Frosli Women Elect
AWS Senators Today

.

phone number In the directory.
However, Marquam and Co. told
Student Congress that all advertising space has been sold.
Although the directory will be
put out by Marquam and Co. this
year, the Lexington Chamber of
Commerce is planning to print a
directory next year.
The chamber of commerce is
planning on this to keep local
funds and business here in Lexington.
This directory would be organized and published by local firms
through the city chamber of commerce. The directory would then
be given to the students as a
friendly gesture from the City of
Lexington.
The directory would also contain, under separate sections, simi

lar listings for students at Transylvania and the College of the Bible.
Last year the chamber of com-mer- ce
printed programs for
"Sweet Sixteen Basketball Tournament."
Hogan Trammel), assistant secretary of the Lexington Chamber
of Commerce, said, "We ran a circulation of 12,000 copies and $48
would have bought an entire page.
We easily ran $4,000 worth of
which meant that
advertising,
Athletic Association
Kentucky's
after we paid for the
got $2,000
printing."
A chamber of commerce spokesman explained, "We could put the
directory out in the same time
period as Marquam and Co."

Reds Take Yankees
In Second Game,
6-- 2

NEW YORK (AP) Cincinnati's towering Joey Jay stopped
r
New York with a
and his teammates took advantage
of miscues to beat the Yankees
and tie the World Series at
today.
inning. The third game is set for
singles by Elio Saturday at Cincinnati.
Chacon and Eddie Kasko and
The run came in after Cincincatcher Elston - Howard s passed
four-hitte-

6-- 2

1

Back-to-ba-

ball manufactured what proved to nati's Gordon Coleman and New
be the winning run In the fifth York's Yogi Berra each clouted
two-ru- n
homers in the fourth inning to break a scoreless pitching
duel between Joey Jay of the Reds
and Ralph Terry of the Yankees.
The Yanks threatened in their
ache and said it was due to Lum- half of the fifth with men on first
bago.
and second and one out. The towFor a month, Rayburn rested at ering Jay, working cautiously, put
his home at Bonham in North out the blaze by fanning Tony
Texas, receiving friends and tak Kubek and Roger Maris, the home
ing occasional automobile rides. run king.
He reassured those about him that
With one out in the toD of the
he would regain his strength and fourth, Frank Robinson reached
would be back in Washington be- - first 0n an error by Clete Boyer.
fre Congress reconvenes Jan. 10. fielding star of the Yanks' open- But he continued to lose weight ing victory yesterday. Coleman
and his physician, not satisfied then belted the ball about 400
with his progress, sent him to the feet into the
Dallas hospital Monday for ex- - bleachers to produce the first runs
haustive tests.
of the series for the Reds.

Fatal Cancer Grips Rayburn
Rab;

SC To Name President

Al First Meeting Monday
will elect a
Student
and his cabinet

Congress
president
Monday night in l.allerty Hall at the first official meeting of
the body.
for each atives of the College of Arts and
Three nominations

cabinet position will be presented
by the nomination committee to
the Congress, said Miss Jo Hern,
chairman of the committee.
Nominations will also be accepted from the floor. Miss Hern, who
will preside at the meeting, added.
The chairman said the members
of the nomination committee ure
composed of the representative
fiom each college who received the
largest amount uf votes.
Members of the nomination committee are Jerry Westerfield, Arts
and Sciences; Jean Harris, Agriculture; Judy romp ton, Home Economics; Jim Brockman, Pharmacy;
Chic Kice, law; Maine Kiviniemi,
Nursing; John Williams, Commerce; Helen Wilson, Education;
Troy Burchett, Medicine; and Ron
Porter, Engineering.
Results from ttie tabulation of
tlia votes cast for the 42 represent

were completed
late
Sciences
Wednesday night.
The students who will fill the
seats in Congress are Carroll Baldwin, Margaret Brown, Kathy Cannon, Paul Cheilgren, Thomas Cherry, Ann Combs, Mary Coons, Dee
Ellis, Ann Evans, Robert Fields,
Douglas Frazier, Ouida Gadberry,
Reuben Garnett, Sue Ellen Gran-no- s,
Becky Groger, Monte Gross,
Marvin Henderson, Jo Hern, and
Mary Hill.
Ann Jeffries. Barbara Johnson.
Fdith Justice. Chuck Kirk. Carol
Koenig, Raleigh Lane, Janet Lloyd,
Diane Murek, Betsy McKinivan,
Marilyn Meredith, James Moss.
Linda Mount, Mary Newcomb, Ron
Nickell, Martine Noojin, Robert
Roach, Jerry Sanders, Waneti
Scoville, Vivian Shipley, Anne
Swartz. Allan Todd. Marie Van-- I
loose, and Jerry Westerfield.

L

Vi)Tlirt't'-Wa- y

Although most democratic elections are conducted
by secret ballot, it took three Arts and Sciences
students to mark one ballot in the Student t on- -

Deal

-

gress election Wednesday. These women huddle
over a ballot trying to decide which candidate
would be the best man.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

Oct. 6,

KERNEL, Tri.Uy,

1I
KERNEL Ads Bring Results

CAMPUS

SPECIAL!
Shampoo and Set
by

Mr. Lewis
Any Evening After Six Except
Monday and Saturday

$2.00

Downtowner Beauty Salon
345

Phone

E. Moni

Leadership Conference Committee

which will begin tomorrow. The conference,
potential leaders. Members of the committee are,
seated, Vanda Marcum, standing left to right,
Patty Pringle, June Bohanan, Linda Mount.
Dave Stewart, Anne Shaver, and Kitty Hundley.

The starring com ml I tec for the Leadership Conference, gponsored by Links, Mortar Board, Lanres,
and Omirron Delta Kappa, are putting on the
finishing touches for the Leadership weekend
which will begin tomorrow. The conference,

ODK President Resigns;

Called To Active Duly

NOW SHOWING!
STARTS
AT 7:00
ADM. 75c

Rifle Club
Begins Here

Dave Stewart, ODK president, will resign his office and
A Rifle and Pistol Club has refake a temporary leave of absence from the University to go cently been organized for students
and faculty members.
into the active reserves Oct. lfi.
He is also a member of Student
vice chancellor of Lamp
mid Cross, and vice chairman of
region four of the Association of
College Unions.
When asked how his absence
would affect his offices in these
organizations, he said, '"the next
officers in line will assume my
duties until L can return second
semester. However, there is a pos- ;
ibility that I will be gone a year."
His orders stated that he could
!;erve a year or less.
Stewart said he had planned to
run for Student Union Board
president of region four, but will
be unable to do so now.
He is scheduled to leave Oct.

Staff Now Parks
In General Areas

s,
The purpose of the organization
for Ft. Lee, Va.,' near
burg. He needs two more semesters is to encourage rifle and pistol
of graduate work to obtain his shooting, safe handling and proper
care of firearms, and proficiency
master's degree.
in marksmanship. A charter was
awarded the club by the National
,
j-Rifle Association in August.
V VOSIl
OlllVll
A meeting will be held at 7 p.m.
October 10, in Barker Hall. All intt)JS
terested students and faculty memContinued from Page 1
eacn livi,,S unit. lima Strache. bers are Invited to attend.
vlce P'esident of the Senate, will
preside over this body.
OPEN daily 1 30 P M
The third part of AWS is the
Judicial branch of Advisory Board,
Emmie O Conner has been selected
Euclid Anu
Chy CniM
10 represent this segment of the
TODAY AND SATURDAY!
"PLEASURE OF HIS COMPANY"
Congress in the Senate.
Fred Attair
Debbie Reynold!
AWS
will
meet twice each
"WORLD OF JULES VERNE"
month. Dean Doris M. Seward and
Erni
Lou Tock
Njvjrj
Assistant to the Dean of Women,
Miss Pat Patterson, are advisers.

12,

JUMBO SAYS:
Fresh

Donuts

WORLD'S

"We Make

Mat.

til 5

THEATRE

SLi';

,i

III A

Sun.

05,

SATURDAY

Plow BANKO Fr daw

NO. 2

Thur., Fri., Sot., Sunday

COFFEE SHOP

NEWMAN
LEAS ON

x

15

rf

MARTIN

lost

Mjrit

.

Hw

'A

REYNOLDS

JFFTBFY

Mini

A

STflNF

IN SCOPE
Grant Williams
Carole Mathews
In

"13 Fighting Men"
mmammimmmmmammAmm
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
Cwiitd

THE

LoiioDngida

JjrWYU

20

SandraBobby
Dee

ANDRA

HCHNICOIOH

NO. 3

s3cTbamt
WILLIAM

Hudson

f.tTrwssENS

SUNRISE AT

CAMPOMILO

ry

DnrL- -

TOO

GREER GARSON

!1

Phone

D. R. AND "FALLA"

RALPH BELLAMY

TWI-NITTWIN BILL
Over 10:55
Begins 7 p.m.
It's the World Series of
Movie Mirth!
WHAT PITCHERS!

mm

Adm. 75c

jockpot $150.00 (at press

F.

AIM

Darin winme:,!

Door

'; TOWH.

Int
TRUTH
IT
CALLED
INDECENT!

She lived on the edseol violence

I

JCFF'fV

11:00 p.m.

V-.-

Cincinnati's Cinderfcllj
Jerry (Lynch) Lewis

"CINDERFCLLA",
ay ije rzTiSL--

.

ae

Color!
gyrarr as ia

fwrilil
IlETunu

2a
TO

PEYTON PLACE

At 9:20

AND

1

&

DIAL

17 7641

DAVID

75c

TONIGHT

Open 11:45 a.m.
Starts
Feature at 1 2
1:50
TODATI 3:505:50 7:50 9:50

vY'j

s

LARGEST SCHUNI

Open 7:00 a.m.

500 Rose St.

I

Minutes

Order It To Go

THE SAVAGE REALITIES OF THE HUSTLcR
LIFE AND LOVE W.TH . . JACKIE
G

Kentucky

Lnnfc?

TOP STORT OF AMERICA'S
Ik.

I

Aim. 75c

Plus "THE YOUNG PHILADELPHIANS" Paul Newman

Grind
Our Own"

Starts Tomorrow

I NEW

Cooper-Ker- r

"W

fRancisbfassisi
IWITOW

NOW!

Starts 7:30

to 12:00 p.m.

k

Starts 7:00

Fresh Coffee

BEN ALI

1,

1

A S.y v

"THE HORSE SOLDIERS"

Also

Our Own"

Shines

STRAND

'

Take So. Broadwa
Past Springs Motel

n

uwi n mmm

TECHNICOLOR

lleCl Sdt(t

General campus parking permits
have been Issued to faculty and
staff members.
These permits have been issued
because of the continuous shift in
parking areas due to the construction of new buildings and because many faculty members have
responsibilities on different parts
of the campus, Dr. Leslie L. Mar- tin, dean of men announced.
Faculty and staff permit holders
will "be admitted to the parking
lots on Rose Street, College View,
Scott Street and the new lot at the
ca.t end of Stoll Field because of
the reduction In the number of
parking spaces, particularly in the
area of McVty Hall, Dean Martin
said.
The area signs will remain on
campus for use in issuing citations
to violators.

si

un

Crv
fj,

lrr

n

l
uunw oepwmuer

tr

fct

ma coton
I

I'MVrADP-rdOTt2- -

by

dc Luxe

ffiAiUN YIRA MILES
GEORGE SANDERS

* THE KENTUCKY.. KERNEL,

rridjy,

(

J

ieireais, naynaes, nouse writes i o p.r Majors To Hold Fun Nighc
Highlight Social Whirl This Weekend
By ANNE SWARTZ
This seems to be the weekend
for parties, since the football game
is away. But, while the Cats are
away the mice will play, and the
Fig Eps are starting the weekend
with a party at the Congress Inn.
The members of Triangle are
going on a hay ride to High Bridge.
Back on the campus, Joe Mills

Social Activites
Meetings
Canterbury Fellowship
The Canterbury Fellowship will
meet for dinner at 5:30 Sunday.- Angus McDonald will be the
tpeaker.

Desserts
Sigma Nu fraternity and the
Kappa Alpha fraternity entertained Kappa Alpha Theta sorority at
a dessert last night at the Sigma
Nu house.

Is

at

from
Movie

It again with a dance party this weekend because there are
to midnight at Boyd Hall. more hay-typ- e
parties than you
passes and records will be can Imagine. The Sigma Chi's are

8

given as prizes for the dance contests.
On sorority row, the Thetas are
vacating tonight for a retreat at
the home of their president, Mary
Bartlett, in Owensboro.
The ADPls are having a slumber
party for their pledges at the
house tonight.
Tomorrow campus leaders will go
to the annual Leadership Conference at Camp Daniel Boone
Before we get too engrossed in
tomorrow's activities, let's return
to Friday. Tommy Gentry Is throwing a party at 8 p.m. at Jay-lan- d
park.
The
Now, back to Saturday.
Alpha Xis are leaving for a retreat to Sunset Lodge.
The Delts are having a blanket
party. The PIKAs are moving to
Lake for a Cabin
Herrington
party.
There must be a surplus of hay

having a barn party.
The Phi Delts are going to Ben
Crane'a farm tomorrow night.
Back at fraternity row, the
Lambda Chi's are having a play
In the Hay party with the house
converted Into a barn, Including
hay and fodder.
. Music
will be provided by the
Rejects.
The Kappa Sigs are swinging as
usual, but this time with a Yard
of Cloth party. Little Orbit and
the Pacesetters will provide the
music.
The SAEs are having a more
sophisticated house party with the
Temptations providing the sounds
for dancing.
Also, the Tekes are having an
open house.
The Sigma Chis are carrying
their partying over to Sunday
afternoon with a party at Joyland.

Women physical education majors are Invited to participate lit
Fun Night being held In the Women's Gymnasium, 1:Slr p.m.
Monday.
Games will be the feature event of the evening so dres
should be in the regular major's uniform and tennis shoes.
Further Information concerning membership in the club
and future programs will be explained at this meeting.

ADAM PEPIOT STUDIOS
'Your Portrait Deserves

The Best"

Wellington Arms

Phone

Home of the College Folks

683

ADAMS

S. Broadway

Phone

Private Rooms for Parties
Reasonable Prices
Music for Your Dining Pleasure-"High Fidelity
MR. AND MRS. JOHN IN WIS,

ProriM

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
The Cosmopolitan Club will hold
a folk dance at 7:30 p.m. tonight
in the Women's Gym.
Everyone is Invited to attend.
KAPPA DELTA TEA
Kappa Delta sorority will hold
a tea from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday in
honor of its new house mother,
Mrs. Leila Black.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
The Wesley Foundation will hold
a Sadie Hawkins costume party at
8 p.m. tonight in the recreation
hall ol the Wesley Foundation.
There will be no charge for admission and the women are to ak
the men.
" FRESHMAN

J" j

v'

T"

The Freshman "Y" picnic will be
held this Sunday at Bluegrass
Fark. Bues will leave from behind the Student Union Building
nt 4 p m.

1

t.

STARUIE

Get with

if

V

3T'

t

I1

it! You belong

in Traditional

DRIVE-I- N
2401 Nicholcsvillc Rood
At Stone Rood

SANDWICHES
SEA FOOD

FOUNTAIN SERVICE
Dining Room
Curb Service

if

Take-Hom-

Smoothest pair of slacks that ever
hit a campus! Trim, tapered Post-Grahave the authentic natural
look other slacks can only try to
'imitate! Belt loops and cuffs are
'standard equipment. Pleatless? Of
'course! Pick out a few pair today
from a terrific group of new fabrics,
and colors!
.

?

9

$5.95

or

5,

DOWNTOWN

.

Service

e

Dial

it1

Jk

TYU CENTER

-

135

VLT

WWN

IN
PLAYEOY

AS SEEN

Open
1

Until 1:00 a.m.

19 South Limestone

ESQUIRE

&

K,
'

r

7

l

* The Kentucky Kernel
Umvkbsity ok Kenucky

Enlirrd at Ihr pot office nt I.i titiKtnn, krntii.ky in si toikI
mattiT iiikIi t the Ai t of M.in h 1, 1S79.
rtiblivht'd four times a
ik ilnrtim thr renlar hnol wat r rpt during holults nd isann.
MX DOI.LAHS

Managing Editor

Krnny

A

SCHOOL

YEAR

Ed Van Hook, Editor

Wayne Ghkcohy, Campus Editor
Jean Sciiwahtz, Sotivty Editor
Hick McReynolps, Curtooni.t
FRIDAY NEWS STAFF
Kyha IIackley, Associate
Bill Mahtin, Sports

Bin Fit.patbk k. Sports Editor
Dick Wallace, Advertising Manager
Mike Feahing, Kctis Editor

Prepared For The 'Flood'

It is encouraging to know there
is some interest at UK to see that we
are not a part of a possible mass in-

cineration.
The establishment of a Campus
Safety and Emergency Committee,
under the terse leadership of Lloyd
Mahan, is truely the beginning for a
definite plan of action. It is honestly
hoped that the purposes for the establishment of this committee will remain as a steadfast image and not be
lost in the jungle of committee meetings and the high grass of other obligations.
The nine subgroups, appointed
by the main committee to study the
various phases of civil defense, must
act quickly and accurately. At present,
we still remain nakedly unprepared.
For if, and it must remain at that
level, the bomb the whole world fears

comes, the campus population will
have to know where to go and how to
fend for themselves. This needs direction, and it is up to the committee
to provide that leadership now.
There is an unusual and dramatic
bit of irony to our preparation for this
Twentieth Century situation, if we
believe history repeats itself. Without
gushing over the Bible in some blind
fashion, it is hard to read the story
of Noah and not consider its modern
ramifications. The people of Noah's
day thought the ark was folly until
the flood; then it was too late.
Will the campus population be so
complacent and apathetic as to wait
that long until it is too late? Let us
hope that if nuclear war and holocaust do come, we will not be a part
of the original cast, because we have
prepared.

full-tim-

lationsalas.
To the hard, materialistic coaches
who instructed their
to keep
their chin straps, the straps are merely
part of stock equipment, money in
n

.

vr ,

--

Secret Ballot?

a couple at the
of Arts and Sciences polls Yesterday as they ollalxrate- over a
College
ballot to choose 42 seats in the Student Congress.

Dkk Ware, Kernel staff photographer, chained upon

-

Glance Back To 1919

We Want A Chin Strap!

Aside from the familiar, "Doctor
7S63 call the exchange," an unusual
and disheartening statement of University policy was issued through the
voice of John Ileber to fans attending
last Saturday's Ole Miss game.
In effect, the University announcer said children were to stay
off the playing field after the game
and that the players had been instructed by their coaches not to give
away their chin straps. Oh, sigh!
Here we are in a University community that provides full scholarships
for men to come play football, pays
for tutors for some members of the
team, charges $1 for using University
parking lots, and charges 50 cents
for a roster of the two teams. A Unie
versity which maintains several
employees to handle public re-

Li

the bank. But to some aspiring
Throckmorton, a chinstrap is more
than a sweaty piece of leather. It
is a symbol of prestige, of respect,
and of gratitude to the football players and to the University. Some day,
little Throckmorton may want to
come to the University, to study and
learn to be a football player. Alas!
The University should not deny
these
aspiring youths. It
can help stamp out juvenile delinquency and build good public relations, if it would only give away
those sweaty pieces of leather.

Kernels
College teachers should be recruited in terms of realistic criteria
the ability to think, skill in imparting knowledge and stimulating
thought, and that ineffable quality of
enthusiasm without which the classroom becomes a mortuary.
Dacid
Boroff.

A small news dispatch from England reports that British scientists
gathered at Manchester University to
commemorate the birth in 1871 of
Lord Rutherford. The New Zealand-borphysicist was a man of genius
whose work would have placed him
in the front rank of the scientists of
our century whatever the course of
world history might have been. As
things have turned out, it is the
course of world history that gave the
Manchester ceremonies a special significance, for it was Ernest Rutherford who in 1919 made the discovery
that proved a key link in the chain
of investigations
ami experiments
leading to the production of the
atomic bomb and its successor weapons.
The nature of science is such that
there are no absolutely new beginnings in it and perhaps no single step
can be called decisive alove all others. But when Rutherford bombarded
nitrogen with what he had earlier
n

christened as the alpha rays of radium
and found that this induced atomic
changes in nitrogen there was a leap
forward into the future, although
none knew how far that leap was to
carry mankind.
Nearly two decades were to pass
before the idea of an atomic bomb
gained any currency even in the
scientific woild and Rutherford himself died in 1937 without ever believing in its development. Yet that
was, as science goes, an extremely
short time between a fundamental inquiry anil an application affecting all
mankind. Rare ly, if ever, has it Imtii
proved so swiftly, anil so massively
that an increase in pure knowledge
can be an access of terrifying power.
The Enmnp Sun, Baltimore.

Kernels
Who loves not women, wine, and
song remains a fool his whole life
loi:. Martin Luther.

Reasons For The Surge In City Costs, Deficits
The average American city dweller
still rebels at
but seems strangely inclined to put up with

In an era when city property
taxes have grown systematically, then
begotten sales and gross receipts
taxes, too, urban voters still show a
marked reluctance to pay attention
to names at the bottom of the ballot.
Or to follow the budget work of
their city council appropriations committee. Or to care about competitive
bidding, assessment procedures, city
hall overstaffing, and a host of other
problems that gain the spotlight in a
Washington setting but are often
overlooked closer to home.
This is not to suggest that corruption is chiefly responsible for rising
city taxes. Far from it. Deferred maintenance and delayed replacement of
city plant are the chief cause. Tainted

patronage and contract favoritism are
but a small rider on the back of this
bonanza in public works and expanded public services.
Historically there is a good reason
for this surge in city costs and deficits.
The Great Depression and the
second Great War diverted so large
a percentage of public expenditures
away from the building and maintenance of cities to other social and
military purposes that city halls have
spent most of the postwar years
in red ink trying to recover
lost ground.
Analyzing Census Bureau statistics from 310 major American cities,
the Congressional Quarterly shows
that although deficits have dropped
slightly in the past year they have
done so only because more tax revenues have
collected. The'se
310 cities alone spent over $15,000,- wal-lowi-

lx-e-

half the cost
000,000 last year-ab- out
of running the federal government

(defense costs excepted).
Confirming the theory that much
of this is caused by deferred maintenance (slum clearance or urban renewal), the CQ analysis shows that
the greatest single increase in city
budgets last year was for housing and
redevelopment up 73.8 percent.
This spending is inherently useful,
not bad. On the average,
renewal dollars are stimulating private enterprise investment at a
ratio. And they are creating clean
livable new areas, sometimes (though
not often enough) aesthetically rewarding and socially improved. At
the same time such renewal is helping
to preserve for the American people
an investment in city plant estimated
to total about $S(K),(KK),(XK),(KK)- -a major national asset.
What is needed is simply a better

r
check on the process.
Local appropriations committee members ought to be watched carefully for
Pubsigns of mutual
lic works bidding procedures and the
criteria for awarding urban renewal
contracts ought to receive more than
cursory public attention.
In short those voters who complain about "big government" and
demand local rights should examine
their own performance to see whether
they are ready for what they ask.
They ought to know the caliber of
every local official found in the musty
bottom reaches of the ballot. And
they ought to mount a close watch on
performance alter these officials are
elected.
Otherwise, increased home rule
and local initiative may prove more
wasteful than that famous trip of
tax money to Washington and back.
The Chhisuan Scu nci: Mom ion.
citizen-taxpaye-

* THE KENTTC.KY KERNEL,

Off ThoKocord

Vvtivp

Bvubeck Concert Tonight
Brings Live Jazz To State

By RICK REYNOLDS
Central Kentucky's first live
concert by a name Jazz group is
Just around the corner.
The Dave Brubeck Quartet will
be at the Frankiia County High
School today at 8:15 to present
a ronrert under the auspices of
Kentucky State College.
Brubeck appeared at UK for the
Little Kentucky Derby concert in
the spring of I960. Although there
was some doubt as to the reception UK studenta would give the
progressive pianist, his concert was
certainly an enjoyable success,
even in the minds of the most
ardent progressive Jazz opponents.
Drummer Joe Morello and Oas-ri- st
Eugene Wright provide a solid
rhythmical backing that Is not
only musically correct but drives
and pushes so that the other musicians in the group really have
to work Just to stay on top of the
beat.
However their efforts are cer- lainly not wasted on the other two
mrmnrn 01 me quartet, uruoecK
and altoist Taol Desmond. Desmond, who looks like a Harvard
profesnor of economies, possesses
ample technique and an almost
flawless tone . that hi. playing I,

to choruses reminiscent of a Bach
invention, is now usin
bipper, fuller chords, devices such
a
locked chords (playing full
chords simultaneously with both
hands i, and generally more rhythmical solos.
As an added help the group has
been together for some little while
so that they all know what they
want to do and can help each
other in doing it. Put all this together and you have a definitely
solid and swinging group.
As for his records, Bruberk has
on was
rlrar chronology of his
playing and the changes his style
has undergone. As for the type
thing you might expert to hear at
his concert in Frankfort, try listening to three of his latest, although not his newest, albums:
"Southern
Scene (CL 1439);
"Gone With the Wind" rCL 1437);
and "Time Out" (CL 1397).
"Southern Scene" and "Gone

With the Wind" offer pood
nmples of the solid "tonethernoss"
type of sound that the Brubeck
quartet now has. The tunes on
these two albums are for the most
part tunes that are commonly associated with the South, particu- larly Stephen Foster songs. The
arrangements are fresh and happy,
but the true melodic scene of the
tunes is never lost.
"Time Out," on the other hand,
offers seven original tunes, all
based on different
rhythmical
structures. Rut here again, driv- ing rhythmical barking by
ello and Wright, plus good
solos by Bruberk
and Desmond give an overall
sound that is very pleasing without being overly excitable or dull.
But to really get the full enjoyment of the Brubeck sound try
to catch the Frankfort concert. It
will be well worth the
drive to get there.

UcbaiC

Curtis Woinscott

SPENGLER STUDIO

Ky.

N.E. CORNER MAIN

"frery Haircut a Specialty"

Phone

and Delivery Service

Pick-u- p

-

staff

"Musical Masterworks" the music of the masters
Debussy: Quartet in G Minor
German: Henry VIII
Berlioz: Requiem

O

SALES

O

PAR 3 GOLF CLUB

SERVICE
RENTALS

ROAD

MASON-HEADL-

18 Hole Miniature Course
Ar

15 Tee Driving Range

18 Hole Golf Course With 9 Holes Lighted
Monday

Ladies' Day

Ladies Play Fret When Accompanied by Data

Ploy Miniature Everyday, All Doy Till 3:00 p.m. for
Only 35c Each

Is this the only reason for
using Mennen Skin Bracer?

Skin Bracer's rugged, long lasting aroma is an obvious attribute. But is it everything?
Skin Bracer is the after shave
After all. Menthol-Icelotion that cools rather than burns. It helps heal
shaving nicks and scrapes. Helps prevent blemishes.
Conditions your skin.
Aren't these sound, scientific virtues more important
than the Durelv emotional effect Skin Bracer has on
women? In that case, buy a bottle. And -- have fun.

New and

jig

fj skin bracer,
pr 3 c c

o

KI.KI.I

,!

V.l.H.B

4'

ing Calculators.

One-ha-

Block

&

KENTUCKY TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
Phone

;V;:

fe.-j-

387 Rose St.

??t(

t

,

-

"'

j

O C C C:

Print-

From Campus"

for

Night Play

'

"Typewriter Service

LIME

ONE HOUR SERVICE

WBKY LOG

Used Portables, Carbon, Ribbons, and

&

PHONE

MONDAY THRU SATURDAY

"The Great Debates of 19W)? They were not 'great' and
,Wy wm, n()t '(U hates,"' says Dr. CifFord lily ton, nrofrssorl
.
r
i
i
speecn anu uernue coacn.
Association Con- Southern

Repair Service, Adding Machines,

I

Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service

On 'I960 Great Debates'

O

23

Your Portrait By

BARBER SHOP
Lexington,

2-2-

For The Personal Gift

116 W.Maxwell

pretty."
Speech
ht
The 1960 Kennedy-Nixo- n
vention In Miami, Fla.
Brubeck, who used to limit his
hand a good deal of the time - bates were analyzed at a recent
"The majority of debate coaches
feel that Kennedy won the first
two debates while Nixon won the
last two. The overall decision goes
to Kennedy," Dr. Blyton said, "because of his personal appeal and
A.M.
because he succeeded in getting
9:00 "Kaleidoscope" background music
Nixon on the defensive."
P.M.
"The debate coaches feel Nixon
4:00 "Humanities" required listening for Hum. 204
understood debate technique better
Schubert: Dlkoiiig, HeidenroMein, A Flat Impromptu,
than Kennedy did, but to a naMoment Maslcale
tional TV audience debate techSchumann: Die Beiden Grenadiere. Ich Grolle Nicht
nique doesn't mean too much,"
Chopin: E Major Etudes, Polonai.se in A Flat Major,
Dr. Blyton said.
Prelude in D Minor
"There is no question that the
5:00 "Kiddie Kornrr" btories for children of all ages
debates helped Kennedy win the
5:15