xt7ngf0mwc8n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ngf0mwc8n/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Press Association Kentucky Press Service University of Kentucky. School of Journalism 1962 Call Number: PN4700.K37 Issues not published 1935 Aug - 1937 Oct, 1937 Jul - 1937 Aug, 1939 Oct - Dec, 1940 Jan - Mar, 1951 Aug - 1956 Sep. Includes Supplementary Material:  2005/2006, Kentucky High School Journalism Association contest 2004-2005, Advertising excellence in Kentucky newspapers 2003-2005, Excellence in Kentucky newspapers newsletters  English Lexington, KY.: School of Journalism, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Press Press -- Kentucky -- Periodicals The Kentucky Press, March 1962 Vol.28 No.6 text The Kentucky Press, March 1962 Vol.28 No.6 1962 2019 true xt7ngf0mwc8n section xt7ngf0mwc8n ,r~< » _ .7 ._ . ’ .. ,‘ .. 5 . ‘. ' u;_u.£ ~”.:-*j;".\‘.;1 1
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1 ' . . A .. 1. .. 1. '. 1 1 .1. 111111111
eased 1 “cut on until 10.10 a.rn. All but onc of'thc sonally, a statement tiom N. B. Musselman, Referring to newspapers in general, and ' 11111 1111 ‘ 1 2%? ‘
nuch a scheduled wrtnesses made the early hearing. Editor of the Shawnee (Okla) News-Star particularly gunner comrnunitv publications 1 1111 111111 1 W511 1
14 era R. E. Fisher. of MoO‘ fi ll \V. Va. 12:: — a ' ‘1 1 ' ' ‘ “ ‘ ‘— '1 1 “1 ’ ' 1 1 17 ’1 111 1 11 1 1111:

p ‘ t b t 1 .. 1 . :6 6&1: “'18 11) md Presldent (it-“the Oldjhomd 131955 A5 Cooper said: I dont think we should ever 1 1111111 1 ‘11 1 * ‘
sen 11 us statemcnt \\ as entercd in the socration comprising 231 weeklies and forget thev are educational and help form ‘ 111 1‘1 ‘
.— record as it read. dailies was placed in the record bv Sen ' '11'1 1 1 1 ‘ 11‘1111‘ 111 1 1
1 ‘ . s 1 -, _ .. . ' . ~ public opinion. If we ever lose that kind of 1 1 111;; 1 1 1 ‘1 ‘
Notpble tool was lthe Senatorial attend- A. 5. Mike Monroney (D., Okla). service to the conllnunitv it would be 11 . 1111111111 1 1
ance (:1 'ts 1'1 -. - 41 .1 1 ,.~ . ‘~~ ,, 1 11"‘1111
mt“) .prl ctttie err )bhoui Seven of the Mr: Esters, :peakin-g-on behalf ot 13,1300 great blow to our democratic system. 1 111 1111 1 1 1.1
veg” 5115101: Li's/1113111111106; inprn Ieis 12116113811C11110111h weeklres and 13/0 dailies in all 130 states Henry contended the proposed surcharge 11 1111 1 1i . 1

1‘ ' 1 ‘“ " "' ' " 7‘ "”-~~— ~_ . 11 . :1.

. 1 .1 pic 1n. a1 1 u son. affiliated “Ith the (I )Ldl old REA, re would spell the end of inanv small weeklres 1111 1 11 1 116.1
01 81111111101111'5’ 1111(1 F1111g1' 1” uddlf‘Oh’ Senator ported that 11 survey showed the average and dailies saving the provisions of the bill 11 1111 ‘1 ‘1 1 1111"
1 1 , ' . .g t t .1.” 11 . 1 ‘1111' .
180-per-1Lausche was present to introduce an Ohio postal cost increase tor NEA members 1111- would triple the morithlv postage costs ()1- 11 11111 1111 111' ,

,.1/.1 ‘1‘ ' t . . .( .. _1 .1
9‘63 ortfiitncss 1wlrospoke. tor a Hungarian loreign der the surcharge would be 114 percent. his paper. 11 11111 11 111 1.}1 '
tormafit anguage paper), and Senator Cooper also He also predicted the Post Office would not The figure 1.1% vear was $307 ()3 .1 month 111 111111 11 1 1 1’21 1
ch 1111 11111111111110 prcsent the Kentucky Press As— realize expected added revenue because he said, and “1.0111(1 soar to 8921.21 if the 111111 1' 1 - 3-1 _
it o souatron spokesman. mail subscriptions would decline due to bill wins final 13.1%.th as it shut]; 1'1111‘1‘ 1 11‘ 1 ~

Ahandornnent 01 11186—111'C111111ty—bllt 119' higher P1111095 caused by the rate increase, He said publication of news about the 11111111111111 11 11
131211-11 1:111e1t111011 and extension of in-county pound because of the death of newspapers which government in privately owned newspapers 1111111111111 1111 ‘1 1
:0 on 1111 es—was stronglv urged bv Senator Mon- could not absorb the increase and because 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 111111" ‘ 1 1 11111

. . . 1 . . . .1 s . s 1. . ‘- > ‘ “ ' saves the government the cost of getting 111111 1 ‘ 1
:he 88111101161111} atter suggestions to that end were of diversion of papers from the mails where this information to the public. “This is 1111 111111 1 1 1111/11 '
1 air hOIlthe. )y the Oklahoma and Wisconsin Press possible to substitute other delivery metli- serious matter ” he added “because if ”$1111 1111 1 1 1 111113 f1
tutorvs1ASSOc111t10ns. Ch‘til-HT 1 1 . . 1 ‘ . t , I. , 1 t 1 I 1 t : .11 11 1‘; i1 1

. 1 . & an JO mston appearec ods. rates legislate weekly and small dailies out 111111 11 11 11
1'15-p1211151111)11511:(111)11the sentiment from those states He also predicted that any extra income of business how much expense will be .1 11111111 11111 11:1
1115],“)th as ec tor a survey f 1 ' -' 1 '- 1 ' . 1 ‘- 1 1 _ 1 1" 1 A 11111 1111 i 1‘1

. "ton th -. f 1‘ ‘ , 0 weekly publishers to the Post Office that did result from a sec added to the government operation to get 111111 1 1 11 _ f1 ,1
.rtives1 fell 'ee ings about dropping tree post— ond class mail increase “would be such a this information disseminated?” 111111111 11 11 11
;e 1egnage or arr—county mailings where there is small fraction of the gap between Post Of- H) . t ld t1 3 . 'tt 1 K k 11111111111111 1‘
two-5191110 carrier delivery, NEA’s Ted Serrill fice income and expense that no appreciable P (1:11 0. t' 1L commi ee he $111111? '11 1111111 11 11 ’ 111’1

. ‘ , . 1 '2 SJ; 7 ' .‘ 3'; 1 111‘ :11 -1.
septerlgieed .tO seek the information from state (lent would be made in the Post Oflice de- 11161111 ssocrr 1.01:1 fopposes‘ “1'1 51111119112110” 1 11111 ' 1 1' 1 ,:1 '
fthefoptssolcrations and supply it later for the ficit, while at the same time causing great 1: 111 cflmtcreasles 01 neustpapcis 111111 1011- 1.111111 .11 5‘1 1'

1 a 1‘ 1 1 1 _ tress 1's ma 'es sure 0 ie' an d.‘ 2'), :1 1 1‘1 ° ,

$100 1 rrc nice of the committee. and Widespread harm throughout the pub- fhirlv assessed and that the 113081581?“ 131111111111 1 1 1 1 _ #111 ;.-
‘ "1 1111.11836111111g that the proposed penny-per— 115111111; 111(111311111'” iartinent effects the S300 rnilli ' (L 9' 1111111 11 11 1

new surcharge on second class mail w ll \IEA ') ' l l tl ' t ' I "t 1 - 11- - 1 O11 .111 “(1110- 1111111 1 '1 1 .11.}

A11' 1 . 1 ‘ 01” 1 ”(011“th e( 1“ ‘1“) 1“ e 1" rnies which postal officrals have said can be 1 1‘11 1‘1 1 1 1 '

,1 N1: b11116 athdisastrous effect on the hometown crease be “across—the-board” applving accomplished 1 1:11 11 1 1 ~11 ‘

.ess, ~ . . . . . 1 . . 1 1111 1 1 1 . 1 , {1. a,

de 1t ebuge Ht 6 bpokesrnen pornted out that post- equally to those entitled to the second class He 1150 s rid the rssoci rtio “k t f 1111 1 1 1 11 E‘

'1‘ 1.. . .. 1 . . '2 2 ’z).'." 1 .~1~.

mu :1. . . 95 011 newspapers have already been marl privrlege, tollowrng the historic prece- . . 1 11 U 8 10111“ ' 11 . 1 11 1 '

sseI-v6111‘zlrsed six times in th . 1 . . . issue With the statement of Postmaster Cen- . 1:1 1 1 .‘ ‘ "1 1 '1

“ [total f 8‘ ‘ e past decade to a dent of percentage increases in zone pound )H] 1 Edward Dav th't at] . 1 111 j ‘1111 1 .13

the M3 )ostalo ‘3 ‘_pel‘cent. One witness testified rates, spread over a period of years to per- :\_(1)u](‘11 not 1); (“1611", buiidensdtii “e“ 11161111 11111 1 1 11 "11 1"
costs for his small daily would be 687 mit gradual adjustment of subscription .. .. ,1 ' 1 1 L 011 311111 1.11.1 i 11

“—2 )elclent hlgher in 1963 than in 1951 if the prices " 116111111)111)e111' 1 1 1 1111

108110111! ' 1 J. 1 " . '1111 1 1 1 1 '

rout-’1 “11' Speiiblllfbewm“ law. Senator John Sherman Cooper asserted Lots of people play dumb. Untortunatelv 11‘1‘1 ‘ 1 1 1 1 ’1‘
(n - ,- .. .a . n. , , - ' 11111 1“
g or the National Editorial As- that he is wholly in accord wrth KPAs too many arentplaymg. 111-111 1“ 11 11 ‘ ., '1
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'1' PAGE TWO THE KENTUCKY PRESS MARCH, 1962 MARCH, 1
l
I‘ll II
‘ Wh' F' L‘ldo Ad " Lbl”
J as mgton ire eve e n vertismg, a e l j - ~a
ll Advertising is under fire on many phases construed as allowing the deduction of any and 1nedical-appliance advertising. 3 Q .
ll in Congress today according to the increas— amount p:1i:l or incurred (whether by way Should it be given authority to issiie i"
ii ing press report from \Vashington, including of contribution, gift, or otherwise) for par- prn'ary orders in its own name, they ‘ a»
‘l ‘ President Kennedy’s recent message to Con— ticipation in or intervention in any politi- also cover illegal price discrimination,
I ‘ gress calling for more protection to consum— cal campaign on behalf of, or in opposition medical advertising and mergers that I
l ers. Not only is advertising on the grill from to, any candidate for public office; or as al- competition. 2
the consumer-protection angles, but pro— lowing the deduction of any amount paid The bill has the strong support of
ii posed legislation, especially that giving the or incurred in connection with appeals to dent Kennedy, F.T.C. Chairman Paul
il FTC almost extraordinary powers over ad- the general public with respect to legisla- Dixon, Chairman \Vright Patman
l vertising and increasing power to the Food tive matters, elections, or referenda.” Tex.), of the House Small Business
l1 and Drug Administration over labeling, are A Fair Employment Practices Commission mittee, and some independent bu
just two of the proposed regulatory facets bill reported by the House Labor Commit- groups.
ii that is putting all advertising in a bad light tee would affect newspapers by imposing a The measure is just as vigorously 0p
jl in public opinion. ban on discriminatory employment ads. The by other business organizations, inclui .
ll The darkening picture starts with adverse bill, HR. 10,144, would be effective in all the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the, Kentuckians ati
ll actions 0" the Boggs advertising deducti- states which do not have a statute covering vertising Federation of America. In 'LeXIngton Wt
ll bility bill by the Ways and Means commit— fair employment practices. The bills fate at present is in thelll ficyzozecfutner"
ll tee. This group is on the verge of complet- The bill would make it illegal to publish of the House Commerce Committee, iii the grofipea‘frfhl
il ing action on 11 tax reform bill, and it had or cause to be published any notice or ad took testimony from Patman, Representz
ll been hoped the long-delayed Boggs bill relating to employment based on “race, re- Tom Steed (D., Okla), and other spar
ll (HR. 640) might be tacked on to the meas- ligion, color, national origin, ancestry, or of the legislation last August. Chali P bl R
ll ure. age, except that such notice or advertise— Oren Harris (1)., Ark.) has promisedlt U IC 6
it Now it looks as if the committe Will not ment may indicate a preference, limitation, er hearings this year. But thus far has Athletes 'lnd sci
lj only reject the Boggs proposal but instead specification, or discrimination based on re- set a date. to steal th‘e‘colle re
l;- adopt language which would endorse the ligion when religion is a bona fide occupa- Supporters of the bill say justice deli which he“ on :7”
ll Supreme Court decision which Rep. Hale tional qualification for employment, or based is justice denied. They say the F.T.Clu managing editor“
i Boggs (D., La.) has sought to reverse. This on age when the reasonable demands of the much work and takes so long to do ittl told a gatherin r 0
if ‘ decision came in the so-called “Cammarano position require such a preference. limita— businessman who is the victim of if personnel HeE s1
l 1 case’ decided in February, 1959. tion, specification, or discrimination.” competition may win his case only all? scientists lwere he
l , The court ruled that advertising expendi- As reported by Arnold B. Sawislak, UP has lost his business. This is partial “between these tw
i , tures for the promotion or defeat of legisla— special writer on March 17, a proposal to true, their argument holds, when a l the collegiate stoi
i tion are not deductible as a buSineSS GX- put a strong new enforcing tOOl into the business sets out to drive a small busint touched and unt'ol
_ ll ‘ pense. Internal Revenue Service followed hands of the Federal Trade Commission the wall. Reeves spoke t
i in 1.959 with the adoption of rules which could ignite the loudest Congressional dis— President Kennedy, in a letter to H'tions personnel for
l ‘ denied deductibility to ads which involve pute in years over Government regulation of last August 28, said “small businessmen from six southern
' i .7 lobbying activities. The Boggs bill would business. are so often the target of discriminatoryGeorgia, Tenness.
j l repeal the court decision and reverse IRS The controversy centers on a bill that monopolistic activities are often irrepm Kentuckv. The s
l] rules based on it. would authorize the F.T.C. to issue tem— injured or destroyed long before the leli,Ke]mle;, public 1
l Recently Ways and Means decided tenta- porary “cease-and-desist” orders similar to process of adjudication has been complalmst for" the two ‘
ll ‘ tively to scrap the broad language of the preliminary injunctions issued by judges to Patman backed the argument witlny
j Boggs bill in favor of a narrow clause mak- “freeze” a situation while regular court pro- lustration of the problem. He said
’ l . ing deductible only those expenses incurred cedures are under way. F.T.C. started proceedings in July,lW0l'Cl1 Those ‘
. , , in connection with “legislative appearances.” Purpose of the bill would be to permit the against a big milling company which Better B V, ..
. it Now a substitute to that proposal has been Commission to stop a business practice it acquired two small competitors withinium, ad to :Illnejis
ll submitted by Rep. John C. Watts (D., Ky.), believes may be illegal and may cause irre- months. He said it was seven yearsllomer product' 5:1
l but it would exclude advertising costs com— parable harm before a final F.T.C. decision an F.T.C. examiner’s decision in the them “distres:" (If
" lj pletely. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is can be reached. was reached, another two years beiflllbe carefully gem:
l supporting the Watts substitute. The F.T.C. policies product-labeling, ad- full Commission ruled on the examud llSllallv st‘it» t
l: Full text of the \Vatts language: “Ex- vertising and some pricing practices by findings, and the decision now has Wand sacrifice :5-
l penses (including but not limited to dues business. It shares responsibility with the pealed to the fecleral COUI‘tS- ,BBB claims 1.81th
l‘ and other amounts paid to any organization) Justice Department for enforcing laws “\Ve must not stand by and permi‘such phrases £03]
paid or incurred by any person or organiza- against monopolistic mergers. little fellow to be annihilated,” Patmflllchise,» ““30; ‘ ‘, ‘k
, lf' tion in connection with and in preparation Supporters of the bill feel its impact Patman and Steed, appearing befort‘clmmed frei r131: .
. ii for (a) appearances before legislators or would be strongest in fighting price and dis— ris’ committee, said the proposed "ell-goods at “Uiibel‘ ‘
, l legislative bodies; (1)) communications with tribution offenses against small businesses. er for the F.T.C. could be surroundellcutegoW \V‘Itcle
' if I legislators or legislative bOdiCS; or (0) com- Opponents think it might bring on an all- safeguards against abuse. The)’ S”also some V‘l‘ll l1
munications between persons and their or- out drive against advertising and other busi- cease-and-desist order could be issuedag “Must sell n..( o
i: ganizations with respect to legislative mat- ness practices. the alleged violator had been given “last long at ihes
! ters of direct interest to such persons and The FTC. now may seek temporary in- ing before the F.T.C. on the Comililtt‘ a distress ii:-
t‘ organizations; provided, however, that the junctions from federal courts to stop fur After that, they said, the company COUthe “(ly'ertisuil C
1 II provisions of this paragraph shall not be and textile mislabeling and deceptive drug (Please Turn To Page '
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 1 11 :1 1
1 1 ‘ 1 13 1
1962 MARCH, 1962 THE KENTUCKY PRESS PAGE THREE 1. 1 1
1 1 1
W1 1111111 1
. 1 1 1 Community Maps Establish ‘l 1 1
[m1 _ 1 " 1 _ 1 Good Public Relations 111111 1
1 , ,_ {:;,,>or/;«{ , ,1 Cit Villa * ‘ townshi ' ' 1 1 ‘
1, {a 1 1 1 {fig/g; WM.“ y, gt, o1 even 1 p maps 111, 1 1111 1
g. 1 1 g .. 1 . I” 1%.éég1’ should have a decided place in the program 1 111‘ 1 1111
issue11 1 911.1,. ”é 1 '1 _ g . of a community newspaper publisher. First 1 11111 ‘11 1
hey 1 1 1:11 11 ‘, ; ’ '1 of course, there is the obvious consideration 1111‘ 1 11 1
lthn1 g ‘ xi?" that he may produce such a map—if he has 11 11 11
that 1 ’1. 11 ,1 %i 1%; the facilities. In many instances the city or 11111 1 111
‘1 ' ' ’ :1: ' 11 1 Village has a master map but doesn’t provide 1 11111 1 1111 1
~10f ti 1 11 ,5, . .’ copies for public sale or distribution. For 111‘1 1 1 11
Paul ' .‘ ' 7 1511/ 1. the publisher with offset facilities this is an 1111 1 1 1 11
man . I” 1 ’ -' j1 opportunity to provide a community service, 1 111 1
ness ’1 1' 1. 1 ”:- 1 and, perhaps, make a bit of profit. 1111 1 11
t bu ‘ 1 ‘ f1 ’ A former Publisher told us once that he111111 11 11
. 1 made good use of the village map. He ‘1 1 :1 1
‘IY 0P, 1 didn’t have offset facilities, but one of the 1111 1 1111
1111;111:1111: Kentuckians attending the American College Public Relations Association meeting localbpsmfeszesdrdimd 11111-111111m1111111ed1111]: ‘1 1
in Lexrngton were Ray Hornback, Morehead State College; Ben Reeves, managing dumps" t ”“50”“ "up5 t‘” hm He too 111. 1 1
editor, Courier-Journal; Robert Cochran, Western State College; Victor R. Portmann, these maps to ‘11 Chamber 0t COmmeI‘Ce 1 11.11 1 1 ‘1.
1116111 KPA secretary-manager; and R. W. Wild, University of Kentucky. Reeves spoke to meeting flhd 501d the 131151111655 men 011 the 1 1111111 1111