xt7nk9313n1p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7nk9313n1p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581003  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  3, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  3, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7nk9313n1p section xt7nk9313n1p OPEN HOUSES

Recommended Reading

All wcmen's residence halts

(The Ronltn launrhed their
first Sputnik satellite a year
a to today. Associated
Presw
writer Rem Price has written an
Interesting account of American
reaction In the Intervening yar
which we thought would Interest
our readers. The article Is
today's editorial page.
The
Editor).

Be yd,

Kcenelard, Patterson,
Jewell, Holme. Lydi

Brown
and Dillard House are having
open house Sunday from 3 to
5 p. in. All men student are
to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
in-vit-

ed

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Lexington, Ky., Triilay, Otlolcr

Volume L

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UK Expansion Plans Call
For Over. 20 New Units

A master plan for campus cx- pansion projecting 10 to 15 years
into the future and involving pos- sible construction of more than 20
new buildings
has been an- nounced by UK.
The plan was presented in the
fall issue of "Our University." a
quarterly publication for faculty
ana sian memoers ai UK.. A large
map illustrating
the proposed
changes was enclosed with the
newsletter, and a statement by UK
President Frank G. Dickey ex- plained the purpose of the plan.
Dickey
said the University
Hoard of Trustees approved the

plan after Hare and Hare, a Kan- C ity
ronultinz firm, had
studied the problem for 18 months.
The consultants were assisted by
a University planning committee
headed by Dr. Leo M. Chamber- lain, vice president of the I'nl- versity.
The president estimated the
lotai cost or the project at "about
20 to 25 million dollars." but he
emphasized that the amount of
money and the length of time it
would require could not be ac- curately determined this far in
advance. He said bond issues would
support a sizeable portion of the

Cot. particularly in d.r:niltry con
.struct ion.
"No hard and fa, t schedule ha
been developed for carrying out

sa

the plan becaie the availability
of funds Is a matter which Ls im- -

possible to predict." Dr. Dickey
said.
pus planner has left the plan at
flexible as possible." adding that
"such problems as how to meet

New Look

The map of the proposed
changes in the I'K campus published In "Our I niverslty- - will
be seen in a later Kernel.

Professors See Little
Change From 'Pro Rule

V

He pointed out that the
needs, how to place eating
facilities and how "best to provide parking areas are still under
cam-libra-

9

f

7
Still Unnamed

'

The Kernel, In an attempt to expedite distribution, has placed
several new distribution boxes at various points on the campus.
Miss Darlene Scheibel, a Louisville freshman, volunteered to help
boost this "new look" circulation campaign. Unfortunately, the
pretty Miss above does not come with your copy of the daily
Kernel. Alas

Beauty Show, Relays
Highlight Sig Derby
"UK's sororities will engage in the event to be canceled last
their first of several competitions year, according to the fraternity's
this year in the Sigma Chi Derby Derby committee,
tomorrow at 1 p. m. on the UK
Queen contestants announced by

The new University rule raising
probation standing to 2.0 will not
bring more lenient grading from
professors here, according to com- ments made by professors inter- viewed about the effect of the
rule.
Prof. Sam Hite of the Depart- ment of Chemical Engineering
said there has been much talk
about the new fctandards among
professors. "I'm not going to
change my grading system." he
said. "I believe this is the general
feeling of the Engineering De- -

partment."

"There are weak areas (in the
University) and the only way to
raise standards is in class with
the instructors not with rules
"The rule might make students
work harder," Prof. Hite concluded.
"I don't think the rule will last.
as I aon t tninK it s a working
plan " asserted Prof. M. C. Brown
of the Mathematics Department.
However, he felt that little resist- ance would come from teachers
here. He thought the strongest
feelings on the subject were held
by students.
"The general feeling In the

consideration."
Math Department is that since the
"As far as buildings are con- University is growing, a student cerned." the president said, "tho
who doesn't do well shouldn't re- -i first major structure which wo
jhope to see underway Is the
main," he said.
y
Dr. Ralph Pickett, Commerce
building on Hxa
College, said. "We won't change Street." According to the map,
our grading system." He thoughtjthat building will occupy an area
there would be no tendency to now covered by tennis courts, be- save students from flunking out tween the president's home and
because the professor, as a rule, the men's dormitory quadrangle,
doesn't know a student's standing.; "We hope to start work on that
"It's hard to say if the rule w ill phase of the project as soon as
benefit the University. This rule is funds are available from the state,"
of secondary importance. First are he added, saying that architects
the standards the teacher sets in are nearing completion of plans
the course." he said.
for the building.
"I don't like to see matters that
Other construction high on the
effect individuals handled so me-- 1 priority Nt includes a new eom- chanieally. All the factors involved merce building, a library extension,
shoculd be considered," he added, a new building for the College of
Prof. M. A. Hatch, head of Engineering, and extensions to the
freshman English, thought stu- - College of Law, the College of
dents would take dally work more Education and several agriculture
conscientiously, and "take better buildings, Dickey said,
advantage of their opportunities to
There are 4,891 parking spaces
8et what they're paying for an ; indicated on the map. compared
to a present total of 1.333. With
education."
.,f
lot near
Dr. Hatch added. "We've never the exception of a 336-c- the medical center, most of the
yet lost a student due to overwork. If the instructor makes clear spaces will be in small lots scatwhat it takes to pass, most stu- - tered across the campus.
Also on the map are three men's
dents will work towards that
and two women's residence halls,
goal."
an addition to the Student Union
Building. 'a food technology build-- v
ing. an animal scienceDUiuing,
a plant sciences building, an addition to the football stadium and a
large classroom building.
Bids will be asked in November
Continued on Page 3
physics-chemLstr-

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baseball field.
press time were Katie Maddux
This year's field day for sorority and Judy Tabor, Chi Omega;
pledges will differ from past
Continued on Page 8
Derbies in several events.' The
chief change will be seen in the
x .n i.wfB.y.'
,4rv mim r
beauty contest. Girls will not step
Into the form" of the ideal girl
this year and will wear sweaters
and skirts instead of sweaters and
shorts.
,
skM
v.Vi
1
Another change Is that a relay
race replaces the obstacle race
seen In past years. This novelty
,t
event will require contestnts, in
iJ
v.
their turn, to roll hula hoops,
A!
balance apples on their heads, run
in potato sacks, run with peanuts
in spoons, drive nails in boards
CV
i
rt
oil cans
and race with
on their feet. The last contestants
will blow up two balloons and
carry all property used in pre-i
V'
V K.
V"
vious stages to the finish line.
s
I
V
.'
An endurance contest with hula
i
f im
r
hoops is a new event. ALo added
is a Tace requiring two pledges
from each - sorority to run with
an orange balanced between their
foreheads.
One event held over from previous years is a whipped-creaflag chase, in which Sigma Chis
will try to drive a'way pledges
determined to capture flags tied
to the boys' belts. Ammunition will
be sprayed whipped cream.
Sophomore Realities
The oldest event back again Is
the tomato toss. Girls will each
Some of the candidates for the title of "Most
Durall, AC I); Naneye Faareat. DDD, and Sue
throw three tomatoes at a target,
Hudson, PSK. Couples attending the Keys
Beautiful Sophomore Woman" are, front row,
center of which is a Sigma Chi
L to r
Nina Warren, representing PDT; Sue
Dance. 8 to 12 tomorrow night at the SUB bail-roopledge's head.
will vote on the girls and e the winner
Buchanan,DTD; Peggy Olmstead, PKT; Marty
Keffer, DZ; Brenda Napier, ZTA; back row,
crowned. The Gin Bottle Fire Plus Two has
Derby was
This ninth annual
Sue Schuler, LXA; Carol Yates, SPE; Diane
been contracted by the sophomore honorary to
scheduled earlier in the fall this
Bittitow, XO; Nancy Barnett. KD; YUUu
play at the dance. Admission, which cau be
year to avoid weather and reTouer, KAT; Barbara Bronstoa, KS; Eleaaor
obtained at the door, is $2.50 per couple.
caused
scheduling problems which

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Panlit'llcnic IVcstMiN
New I'lt'tlnes Tonight

t

v-.Y-

five-qua-

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!

The annual Pledge Presentation, sjxmsored by Panhellenio
Council, the female Greek gov- erning body, will be Ik Id at 7:30
p.m. tonight in Memorial Hall.
new
Two hundred ninety-si- x
s6rority pledges will be introduced and" 'formally preente'd'
by their respective pledge trainers.
Jan Oover. president of
said a special invitation
is extended to families and friends
of the pledges.
"

"

Pan-hellen-

m

11

m,

Last Week
The contest to name the card
picture of the week is still la
progrc
but it will ead nett
Tharsday. The Kernel is spoa-Mrithe contest and a priie
will be given the winner.
Entries are Judged on the
basis of cleverness and originality. Send them to Kernel Office, JourualUm Building.
ng

ic.

* U--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Fri.ljy, Oct. X

TIIE

IO'iH

New Units

Enrollment Record Set
More thnn 9,730 persons

Continued from Tate

Biggest Increases In this year's
grand-tota- l
are in evening classes
on the campus and extension
classes over the state. The evening program has almost 200 more
students than last fall, while the
extension program shows an Increase of approximately 400.
The Ashland Center has 393
students this year, 50 less than
last fall. At Covington, the figure
decreased from 594 In 1957 to 516
this year.
Dr. Elton said one significant
total
fact about the
was the Increase In the number of
new students (freshmen and transfers). This year's total. 2,478, is
322 more than last fall.
In addition to these figures, the
University has some 3.100 persons
taking correspondence courses and
another 200 or more taking courses
without credit. In all. more than
13,000 persons are receiving educational Instruction from the

a

record .total have enrolled for
credit courses at UK.
The fiRiire, reported yesterday
by Dr. Charles F. Elton, dean of
admissions and registrar, includes
all persons registered for credit
on the Lexington campus, those
enrolled at the University's centers at Covington and Ashland,
those In the evening program at
Lexington and those in organized
extension classes throughout the
.state.

Last year, when the previous
record was set. 9.136 persons, or
about 615 less than this year, took
organized courses for credit.
A breakdown
of the figures
.shows that campus enrollment,
which was 7.297 last year, increased by 145 persons to 7.442.
This total is still approximately
350 below the 1947 figure, when
7.800 persons, many of them service veterans, enrolled on the
campus.

1

for one of the men's dormitories,
to be located on the practice football field between Donovan Hall
and Fraternity Row.
Shown on the map but expected
to be further in the future are
additional agriculture classroom
buildings, more dormitories and
general classroom buildings, a
gymnasium for physical education and a new administration
building.
Several existing buildings will be
razed before the project Is completed. Included among these are
the College of Commerce Building,
the Psychology Building, the Agriculture Administration Building,
the Physics and Chemistry Buildings, the Geology Building, the
Health Center, and a number of
annexes an dtemporary structures.
The project will benefit from a
series of street changes near the
University- which are being
planned by Lexington City officials. Extensions of Cooper Drive,
south of the campus, and Euclid
Avenue, on the north, are included
in these plans.
Dickey said the flexibility of the
plan would offer several possible
directions for future campus expansion. "We want to leave the
heart of the campus w here it is
now," he said, "so that we can
delay as long as possible perhaps
forever the day when 'shuttle
buses' are needed to take students
from one part of the campus to
another."
The president predicted that
alumni returning to the campus
10 or 12 years from now will "rub
their eyes in disbelief" at the
changes that have taken place.
"But. among all the changes, the
one which we hope will capture
their imagination most will be the
improvement in the quality of edu- cational opportunity provided by f
the building program which stems
from this campus plan," Dickey
said.

on-camp- us

-

VARSITY VILLAGE
(Your Home Away From Home)

HAVING A PARTY??
WILL SUPPLY

HAVE CIDER

U. OF K. HORTICULTURE CLUB

Call Univ. Ext 2437 For Parry Rates

'Before You Buy'
THAT

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TELEVISION

STERO
RADIO

OR

APPLIANCES

KITCHEN

at the Music Dept., Fine
Arts Bldg. or at Jay Dee TV, 890
E. High in Chevy Chase in the
afternoons or evenings. "I can lave
months to' pay."
you money and give you up to 24
See me

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College of Arts & Sciences

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PLATE
LUNCHES

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Try Our Delicious

DIXIE BURGER 50c
Pound of Fresh Ground Beef, Cheese
Lettuce, and Tomato)

(One-thir- d

Breakfast-

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Dinner

Lunch

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SUNDAY 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

OPEN DAILY 7 a.m. to

500 Rose Street

11

Phone

2-90-

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Colorado's state flower is the
white and lavender Columbine. It
makes very poor biscuits.

34

STYLE MAJOR CREATES
NEW STYLE MASTERPIECES IN

THE

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SPORT COATS OF
IMPORTED HARRIS TWEED

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YOUR
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by Scottish

handweavers
in Varsity Town's
own deap, rich
tones and
distinctive
stripes.
Trim, new

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models which
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character of
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British cloth.

Prove fo Yourself thai You CAN Loam Nov to Fly!
If you can drive a car, you can learn

how to fly! To prove it to yourself,
make your appointment now for your

FREE DEMONSTRATION

FLY-

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really is. Many students solo after
only eight houri,.cfJying time.

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Young end old

men and women
thousands each year are making their
dreams of flying come true. It takes
no special talent. Our airplanes are
modern
our instructing techniques

Related-ton- e

Varsity Town Slacks

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lOHMES ''FLYING SERVICE
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BLUE GRASS FIELD

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PHONE

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Cardigan

Trim in contrast color
gives the newest look
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ALL COLORS

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YOURSELF

Open' 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily
Phone
877'i E. High

Time, Time, Who 's Got It

SWEATER RIOT!!

.

Time Marches On, to get pro- these clocks will not be installed
ve rblal.
campus-wid- e
due to the
The clock which rests in the
effort it would be to add
n ain Hall of the Administration an extra hand to the hundreds of
Fuilding is the only one of its clocks here.
'
kind on campus. However, across
He said that the clock, made
the street in the.M&O Building, by IBM in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., '
such clocks have been used since is ideal for places with a time
eoily summer.
'problem like Lexington.
This time - telling device is
A bill which passed the State
unique in that it .has two hour' Legislature last February to the
hands, a black one designating! effect that no institution or muni- Ctntral Standard Time and a red! cipal building in the Common-- 1
one for Central Daylight ' Time. wealth can operate on fast time
For the wary, there are instruc is the source of the problem.
tions taped to the face.
Until the state government de- cides on just what time it would'
Clyde Lilly, chief clerk of Main-- !
tt nance and Operations, says that like us to run, we must continue
to play the guessing game Time,
Timer Who's Got the Time? , Unless, of course, you own a watch.
time-consumi-

"LO-HOLE-

10 min., 10c

Time
-

CREW-NEC-

ng

THE UNUSUAL

FOR

IN

Just

South On U.S. 27

.

WELCOME!
Glad You are Here
Come Out and Enjoy the
MOVIES With Us
To Aid in Your FUN We Serve
Delicious Snacks and Drinks
TRIPLE FEATURE
FRIDAY & SATURDAY

October

3--

4

Mm Mi

Randolph

SCOTT

BULKY-KNI- T

Any Size

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COSTUME JEWELRY
ht

PMUip

Louisa Spagnoli

SWEATERS
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from Italy

Luscious

Fall Colors

OPEN FRIDAY
NIGHTS TIL 9 P.M.

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Values to $12.95

COMPLETE FORMAL RENTAL SERVICE

Siam and Mexico
Set in
sterling
hand-wroug-

Any Color

$4.95 to $7.95

imports - Grns

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American publications are
achieving wide distribution in Indonesia under a U. S. Informa-- 1
tion Agency guarantee that the
exporters will be paid in U. S.
currency. The guarantee for books
and periodicals sold in Indonesia
is authorized at $1,250,000 annually.

LAMBS WOOL

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GIFTS TRY:

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A Short Drive

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The Fabulous

COIN OPERATED v
WASHERS
DRYERS

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SPECIAL
PURCHASE!

troit are UK's Victor It. IVtt- niann. nsMt.uit professor of Jour-- ,
n;tllsm. and I.rxincton Henry Cl.iy
HiRh School's Alex Campbell.
The Ford Motor Co.. I)tubtn.
Mich., initiated the (inference
last year to which nev.-p.ir associations send teenagers to compute for college scholarships. Another highlight will be the showing of the 1959 Ford.

Y

,

;

vVj.;--

Attending the foul Tun
rnws Conference tod.iy in

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Porlniaiin
In Detroit
For Meet

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Phone

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CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE

26

117 S. UPPER
PHONE:

2-06-

52

DAVE FRYMAN

I

WORSHIP DAILY AT NOON
with the

SEE

ALSO

CHRISTIAN STUDENT FELLOWSHIP
YMCA CHAPEL

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S.U.B.

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PLUS

Din Daily in

Dick Carpenter

"UnderWater

Phone:

Warrior"

SUNDAY

&

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WORSHIP SUNDAYS

Taylor London
iohm Cassavetes

at these CHRISTIAN CHURCHES

amo METROCOlOR

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AND
BURT

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CURTIS

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Roger Roby

Athens
Phone:
Berea

C. Russell Bowers

Phone:

Ploy "BANKO" on Tues.
TUES.-WE& THURS.

Broadway

Ard Hoven

Phone:

D.

October

k

7-8- -9

JAMES CRAIG

LITA MILAN

AND

twCEASTcf
i::uc7 r.:cu:iui:j
. HWOI

First

Charles P. Herndon
Phone:
'
Northern "Heights
Churches in UK area

E. Ray Jcnes
Gardenside
Phcne:
High Street
Wm. Ransford
Phone: 2 0909
Bill Cooper
Macedonia
Phone:
Southland
Waye B. Smith
Phone:
Jack Conder Phone:

J

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CUV KADI10

28

6

bu"".'i

'Tlw-' ts

7-44-

MONDAY

October
--

Minister to Christian Church Students

KM

Call any of these churches for transportation
to and from services
The CHRISTIAN STUDENT FELLOWSHIP ministers to students
cn the UK campus frcm CHRISTIAN CHURCHES and CHURCHES
OF CHRIST.

COMING

Premiere Showing

Night Heaven Fell

MlFL

* A Year After

The Kentucky Kernel

1057, Russia

Univfrsity of Kentucky

Eotrrtd

iwconH flaw mttrr limlrf fnf Act of Mrch 3, 1870.
t Ltiingtnn. Kentucky
four timet a wrrk during the regular m hool year rtcrpt holidays and Clam.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

t Kr Pout Office

fblrkrd

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

t.

ef

Newt Editor
Larrt Van Hoosk, ChUf Sports Editor
Ant Roberts, Society Editor
Bvsi next hi onager
Norman McMullim, Advertising Manager
John MrrcitiLL, Staff Photographer
Marilyn Lyver and Judy Fennebaker, Proofreaders
CfcfV

Fairr Mmrr,

--

-

Editor:

The New Campus
campus eyesores.
President Dickey has estimated
that an outlay of $20 to $25 million
will be required by the time the
projected buildings and facilities are
completed. Some of this money for
dormitories, for instance will be ob-

tained through bond issues. Classroom buildings, however, produce no
rent income as do dormitories, and
are therefore dependent upon fluids
from the legislature for construction.
Since these funds vary from year to
year, it is not possible to say exactly
when all the new classrooms will be
completed.
The master plan calls for no overnight transformation of the campus
into a beehive of construction activity, and those of us who are students now will not see the plan completed before we graduate. But thanks
to the farsightedness of the board of
trustees, we'll be able to return in a
few years and find ourselves having
to ask directions to a now
building.
It's a comforting thought.
npn-ex-iste-

nt

f

Registration Headache
The registration day battle of 'student against student and professor
against student will continue for at
least another year. Although everyone associated with the University,
has been well aware for years of the
existing system's drawbacks,
the
usual moans will be heard from the
Coliseum
again prior to next
semester.

The forging of advisors' signatures,
evading guards to get on the Coli- scum floor, standing in line sometimes for hours and fighting for
classes that are needed will be prevalent again and again until some
changes, however few, are made.
Until then, utter confusion and chaos
will continue to reign at registration.
At present, fortunately, a new system of
has at least
advanced from an idea to the planning stage although nothing is definite.
If the new system were to be put
into effect next faff; ' then at some
predetermined time in the spring
.
r
i
.1
i
me stmient, -eitner iby aipnauetjcal.
order or standing, would first go to
his dean's office where he would be
given an IBM schedule card. This
card is taken by the student to his
advisor where he is counselled and
his schedule is made out for the
next semester. From here the 'student
will take his signed schedule card to
the registrar's olfice, where he will
sign up for his classes.
In general, the new s)stem would
require a much closer relationship
between the student, the advisor, the
pre-registrati-

e
placed the first
moon in orbit around the earth.
In the alarmed United States Sput
nik 1 touched off a spate of self
reproach, a flood of proposals for
overtaking the Russian lead in spatial
technology. In the year that has
passed, what has the United States
actually done?)
man-mad-

The United States has t (Highly.
--

Scorrn ilM.- ipcrts

After poring over the map of the
proposed expansion of the University
campus during the next 10 to 15
years, we are pressed for adjectives
descriptive of our pleasure with the
plan.
Jt is, very simply, wonderful.
The master plan of the campus was
of
approved by
Trustees after a detailed study by a
city planning firffi, and the result
indicates that thedecisions for locations of new buildings as well as
choice of which buildings should
come f irst were made with an eye
toward both beauty and expediency.
In the former instance, the plan
calls lor the construction of several
buildings within the main campus'
present boundaries; this not only will
utilize present space more efficiently,
but will keep the campus from losing
its beauty through too much expansion.
In the latter case, the plan provides for jiew buildings to replace
those already obsolescent orlike the
ctiemistry and engineering, annexes
ad the school sciences building

sians had to use a toe ket engine with
a million pounds of thiust to put
jheir ton and a half satellite in place.
The United States tested its first
500,000 pound thrust engine Aug. 26.
, Once again the question comes
back one year after Sputnik: where
stands the United States?
Sgviet Russia has an estimated 500,
submarines, .the United States about

4,

By BEM TRICE

FRIDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Box Mammons, Editor

I

NOTE -- On Oct.

( EDITOR'S

respective

clean's offices and the
registrar's office.
As simple as it may seem, the
problems related to this system are
numerous but should easily be eliminated. All advisors would be re
quired to maintain an accurate record
of courses taken, courses neededMind
present overall standing of each of
their advisees. The added work for
the registrar's office would call for
more clerks and alloca
unds
The method of handling new

t)noli

WASHINGTON- - r :For
t:
year the Unired States has lived witrr
the knowledge that it is only 30
minutes by missile from Moscow to

.

New York.
One year ago today, Russia launched its
Sputnik I and ushered in the age of space and the
181-poun-

(ICBM).

Jupiter.
The United States has yet to test

d

intercontinental

ballistic

.

successfully a
range ICBM
over the full distance although it has
test fired two ICBMs about 3,000
miles. Russia announced an operational ICBM on Aug. 27, 1957.
The United States armed forces
have 29,000 operational aircraft of
all types. The Russian air force con
tains 20,000. In the Pentagon it is
believed that the Russians have more
combat planes. China's air strength is
5,000-mil- e

missile

,

The initial reaction in the United
States comlortable, prosperous and
convinced of its technological superioritywas stunned disbelief.
This was followed swiltly by alarm,
concern, hysteria, panic. If the vocal
reaction of politicians, scientists and
military men is any indication, the
United States was beset by a feeling
of chagrin and even a touch of in-

unknown.

(D-Te-

x)

international blackmail . . . "
There was talk immediately after
Sputnik 1 about complacency in high
places, about the lack of a sense of
urgency.

The Army declared that if it
hadn't been for Pentagon politics
and penny pinching, it could have
put up a satellite way back in 1955.
Well, a year has now passed since
Sputnik I. If there is a grim determination to overtake the Russians,
regardless of cost, in the missile and
satellite field, or in producing scientists and engineers for the future, the
record doesn't show it.
Meantime, the Russians have put
two more huge satellites into orbit,
one weighing 2,919 pounds. The
United States has boosted four into
space, the largest of which weighs 38
pounds.
U. S. scientists estimate the Rus

Soviet Russia has completely
its ground forces since
World War II. China's army is
equipped chiefly with World War
II Russian weapons.
The U. S. Army and Maiine Corps
is equipped with weapons designed
prior to World War II, some dating
back before World War CTheUrmy
fwas
announced early in September-iplacing orders, for 70,000 bfit&
design which :can
Rigles, a

ed

feriority.
These emotions now seem to have
disappeared. Gone, too, is the sense
of anguish over the obvious Russian
possession of an ICBM which prompted Sen. Lyndon Johnson
to cry, "we have entered a period of

men in its jpound. Torces.
Soviet. Russia has an" army tti 20Q,-- .
000; Red Chinam an army of 2,600,000.'
The United States is in production
range missiles, the
on two 1,500-mil- e
Air Force's Thor and the Army's
--

the?-pas-

.

t

M-I- 4

operate either as a
weaxn or as a machine gun.
Maj. Gen. J. H. Hinrichs, Army
chief of 'ordnance, said in an irjter-vie15 U. S. divithat to
sions with the latest weapons how
developed would take about three
semi-automati-

c

r

w

re-equi-

p

years even on a crash basis.
This is the United States one year

after Sputnik.

j

Kernels:
"Why don't you settle the case out
of court?" said an Irish judge to the
litigants before him.
"Sure, that's what we were doin',
my lord, when the police came and
i n t er f ered . "The Readers Pi'gesf

stu-den- ts

and transfer students wil prob-abl- y
present the worst problem of all.
Regardless of what the new system
may be, it is imperative that a change
take place soon and that all the
faults of the existing system be corrected. The attitude of complete indifference by many of the people
concerned must be changed. The
problem is there, and it must be
solved. This University, is for the student and under present registration
conditions the student is sulfering.
Who has the answer?

The Readers' Forum

1

Kernels:
The professional military mind is by
necessity an inferior and unimaginative mind; no man of high intellectual
quality would willingly imprison his
gifts in such a calling. -- Herbert
George Wells.

The woman called to the stand was
handsome but no longer young. The
judge gallently instructed, "Let the
witness state her age, after which she
may be sworn." The Reader's Digest

-

To The Editor:

tioual maturity and tolerance.

At the risk of olfending a small
minority of students on campus, I feel
it a part of my duty as a student at the
University and as a citien to bring to
light an incident that happened the lirst

think the majority ot students on
campus are quite tolerant toward the
presence of Negroes in our .classes. The
past several years (with integration)
haven't brought forth any outward incidents or hostile leelings, to my knowledge. I'm sure wcaie all glad that it has
not been necessary to have military or
(ore cd integration at Kentucky.
police-eYes, the University has broached die
ilv.ingtf voj- - well. Hmnftr, the incident related above points to the lac t
that there is a line to be drawn, il we
are to continue to be Iriendly neighbors
in the University community.
1 think
the Negroes should also take
a mature viewpoint to their campus relationship. ' Very few, if any, are here
"to prove anything," as has been the
case at several other Southern universities. Any attempts on their part to abuse
the privilege, of a college education at
Kentucky could lead to iiiodeuts which
none of us white or Negro want to

day of classes.

liiend and

were eating lunch at
one of the University eating establishments about noon. We were quite taken
aback when two .voting Negro girls
brought their hisicrw over and sardoxiv
at the same table Wth us. Admittedly,
"
the "."place" was somewhat crowded, but
there WERE several vacant tables. My
Iriend and 1 got up and kit the building, ami our exit did not go unnoticed
by many ol those present.
My companion made the remark once
we were outside that "at least they gave
us the privilege of getting up and leaving."
While I do "riot intend to bring any
hint of controversy over segregation to
the campus, there is a 'oint to be made
by this little incident. I am personally in
lavor ol integration at the college level.
Alter all, there is quite a distinction
between inborn stubbornness and eiuu- A

I

I

n

happen.
Then, loo, wc can always "get up and
leave."
(Name Withheld)

* t
THE Kr.NTl'C.KY KERN I.!.,

Keys Dance Highlights Big
The recipe U a combination of
yoghurt, tea, egg?, beer, vinegar
and lemon Juice. The yoghurt Js
you noticed all those bright used to wash your face. Then seprggs. brat up the yolks
? miles and shiny new pledge pins arate four
for . a shampoo, and apply the
thlsireck? Congratulations Oreeks
for fretting such good pJ edges nd whites,, qne at a time, to your
congratulations also to all you face. When the egg white dries,
off with cold water. It
. . rinse , it
mrw pledges.
act as ah astringent. Egg in the
Rush Is orer
now and every- hair softens tresses. Rinse with two
one is trying to tablespoons white vinegar to one
water to leave hair
settle down cup waxm lemon Juice (two tableshiny and
into a some
cups of
to
what stCfifllW spoons to twohair. Then water)your
set
toonne flZltieEryour
Ychool.V I'm nair in Deer, ine iea7xwo Dags,
afraid it's go- Just damp, are placed ori tired or
ing to be hard puffy eyes. Works wonders x they
after glancing say.
Key's dance tomorrow night
at my social
promises to be a real swinging
calendar, though.
event. The band is none other
ic
The big event tonight , is
le
Five Plus
pledge presentation
in than - the
Memorial Hall. All the new sorority Two. Sounds wild doesn't it. The
gals will be on hand to be pre- dance will be held in the Stusented to the campus population, dent Union Ballroom, and the Most
so if you want to get a good look Beautiful Sophomore Woman will
at some of the future campus be chosen. The title is quite an
queens and campus leaders, you'd honor as there are many beautiful girls competing for it. (See
bitter get over there.
By the way. if you girls want to picture).
try something a little different in Please don't forget to turn in
the way of a facial so you will your announcements of pinnings,
look your best tonight," try this.
I can't personally reco