xt7np55dch3g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7np55dch3g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1986 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, 1986, no. 2 text images Kentucky Alumnus, 1986, no. 2 1986 2012 true xt7np55dch3g section xt7np55dch3g » A   ;-¢- \L“’i?+¢i -·->a¢ -V*=i52$    VV:»v~»-—·V··.W..   ~1v-¤ VA A V · - 1
·V *V.AV;   VA;} {VV; .,... A       VVj,;,t§V§;,»1·"E~""‘*».;V:»_·A -J·*“-·*~·;·,.        2
A   A.;  `   leg       L A       aq              Aw
‘ "< TV ° ·*~:* EA Mw.'"' . _` Q; A-Y€’~]-Ez * ¥1—     'ifé     -5 'AV · YT ’· V -9    \ .   V
V V   .·?=;·V—·\ Vw-§~ ¢!=`{ ·E ‘·—V `~’. VV   V~¢~+»§ ·»>.`T.;V ·.V V··.:V‘i: :V ¤,VV“‘¥V~¤  Aw   •
»· §VV{,·V;*¥-··;_i.-;»."   V5": ’~¢*rf:gA_.V V· jr *·¤·y ?{_ V.] f Am Fg! Y2   ;§ 5*;%% * "., = ‘   -
V      —:_ V AAA {--éV=§""~V:Ax     V     ii:     A   Ag- =
V V?     »·y-. V L v - Q XV: — \·hA”=·'2*·.¤ x   V .*-93% • ~#:.V.¤ ' `s§~>V *5-+  ’
V ‘ :.=    ..f<;V>~\ iI;jZ¥».‘V`- ~» L-?   V ViVi<>¢.a  4V} ‘     ,A ;;\ * -  2VV  ‘- A
V V   §i’¤‘¥€f.V==\   H gig " *3€V=¢-`iA§ zféséé *       "'°  *¥?<,§AiA%;#¢\ °’  i
A 5 _       »=·>  L           V             Y
.   ""“**-*—~*=-J-~———*’ ·‘»· 8 rb    <.§s>J;2»e»   AN     ‘s-#.1%  ¤?;V?V  
V V L.,-‘¥V.,4V~~V ..V—~.w»·— · V.#VV¤~ ,» .V.»’   Va   V     · {yew} 4
S  VV»..»...,. ' `W   " t2?:V,__A,GVA_V»  ,V    V   \
    .»··   AA'    ““” '“’“Q A "       VV  · -
A -   V   -.·;   T;   Y
  .—gV:VVV;A·m;--.¤: »».·.   -.A ·   ·V-f· Vt.? ,...  ·i={V      ··»:  ?*¥?*?V»=F"-%¤’-·*°‘   —·V~V-5- ’
V -*--*4- “*- ··‘- ~=»· 7 ’V’    5,* ··V5~.-V-;V`V’,V;¤.AV   f;_Q A; QV VV ;V;_V;__ _   »* A{-:.4.; ;:,‘.—VV·V;_V_ An; AV;‘V=‘5   V:. A_ _,V,V_',~;, =_J_. A. A :*1 uy;-'A 3 1:5-;;;   _:A=¢_ .;-AV   C, ·A .   AAA,__A_,__A A_ .
V V A I 5 V V V V V .~ V V-~·*··¤- y VN.: .... V, ~Vg;¢V¥;;Vx{AV5{$EjV3_y\&_V.Af V;~.%.V;;A§;iijV;A¢ I  Ag;;;$;$g;4;j ·      
-   "`V   V—s$§::·V=¤V· ·V;z»:~m¤`VV·;¤52¢éV2.:V1  —»¤¢··VVA·VA2~.·»VV· ·  VM?  Ig A
_ ·· .A . . V-·¤.¤¤.-.»h.,; VV   .VV.,VV·. ¤yV V; ._.,,·.§!;i¤V;s>V VAN   gi  `QLV
. A . V VY VA I _ . -*·-·*-·*—····—¤·~ V · V  V. V ;· .V· V    i
V 2';¥;V_,_,_V»w L Q ‘ _ _V` . .‘ I
V V \   V A V -— V V .  —-¢ -V if V V
V ‘ 1 ¥ V ’· -=- xA A V A   V V * ’- A - V 1
V   *~   ‘ ` ’ VQ   " 4 ‘ - · - A A V-q
- V»V Q A gh V ¥?.$\. V V ` V? O .
§   `r ' ~ * V" y ·'" I
- A · — - V · yl _ V ,V V V · V V
Q ‘ °` A   FQ! V Y/L? _’·V > A I ` ' "` 6 xi , .`   * '      
· · :, . ‘V   VA ` ' ‘ ‘ ¤ *§§. > A V `
I A   A Vi A. V   V   V V E., I • V ·V4·. V "! 5 ' _¥V_ _ { , .V V.  
V. ; V   A V_ V V il : VV` _ m ·"§_ . AV V V - V  
V · A .   ~ sv V V V A 3 V · .
Au `-    i · k {A · U [ ~ V`} ! "  
`   `~     A A'°' — , ‘  . — -= ~ it · V
1   V 4V 0 V A " J A .lk_ V Q V
‘ >   ·; · V A · ` * * »*Y·" ·-‘ ‘ V Y ¢ g V A ‘ ~ · ‘  
. I-  |°·“~"*»'°‘ - V=·.   ·*   —A V \\* g¤··V A
V """"‘ A "`“* A A V "#¤· VV; » 3* "· V .•     1
: . V AV! . rfa V . . V S * · A
 VV V g` g   ` l -Vg¤£‘ ' A *f° ` V
. V _ . _ V A. AV 'V · I f
. VV a A   V A ,»· ¢ , V
' .__ V A  MV! . ‘ A `   V j- _ 3 ··'- W ·  
VV? - ’ I   ·€¢""‘ vp';
P z {   ' —   “ VV V I .m‘·j Q1
` I ‘“ - ' AAA ~· A' · ' · · JV _
_  V — \ l , /‘» · · · A . _ G ; » V V ·· {V 1 ·  
" " :‘ ` P ‘ · ‘ ‘: ‘ ’ . A · •V
> ‘   ,I ( 1 ` V '” "A V ' V" · · é ' V _ A •·. ·
,,}*5;* 4   p .w{ V . V _ A _V   V { V; X V
  VII , i, d *_* V V V A __, e ’_ v r V J   V
V s* ·e· 1 QV ‘ V V ` . ( lk ` ° ` ' [ OV ’ ‘ *
Q .$.   ¤
; ‘\’ -: ‘•. · · ) V *·V - JW V- ' · V Ark ( I
A A— "! A "· L A wd: _ A A A 4* •· _ A `· ·· VRA, ..   ·. "· * AA g
 A V" (· I ‘A y A A. ' V rf V•’ V   ./I _ { A;`i···VF '*¤¢, •·_,,»¤ :_·‘ Q` W"  
:_ , {ng, gr . pz 4 -   —V» -V , A p rA__ · A.A
V - A A - Qi"- A A ‘· V! x A A ..1 V   - ¢V , ‘ r A
V _ . *3* V _ J L ,`_ y . _ { VA V V VV _ . V A
` Ax . _ V. F AQ A ' `· ¤ *· • A, `
A V jp   A V · AV , ; _ V ._,__/   * VV J
 A ·~ V V ~ * sv?   "V ·= A ___ ·V · •
·   V ·¥ M V VV V *-‘   -· ";!kV ‘···*’·-·-·--·' ` »  ·
. A V if ' é’· .. ¤V V V ‘ ‘ ' •   ,
V_ · V A A ...$ • ,,. V A · I `
'R '**·   sV· V IV ji. V» V. g T I A { . .
r *.A L 7* ..·· V F `- · I ‘
,{ A- A. Aa Z ·¤ -   A A
V = » ‘ V ‘ V Ax 2* .
A V; , 5 · VA ¤·•' V ` A . AA  
. ’ ·»A A` 4) ~· ·' 4 i V - A A ~ A V. . · _ A A VA. > ‘   ‘   __ VIVA-
3 *6 "‘W .   A V V. V ·» _A. 1* Z  \ · ‘J_V  Q "Vj_‘—A "?.?r—V· `· ` R)
' V I 1   ` · _· r` VV ·‘ " ' _ V A -- - Y ` A -   _rA·A,. V Af EV_ . VAA.;kgi~·Vf·¤"— ` ` A ,,. .~ —  - I VA
> `.   V *2 V Z · A ~V · V. '   " V. V A- ~. . V A _ V   ' ‘ A. ` I A V    L2   ` "   ‘ U Q V N _ ` ...‘_  V’ I     ;`_;¥A ,V»=_Vx`gTVV"·fAFE'_.·:
` ’ A V' ..V. V ; I ` A ‘ ’ V V   ‘ ·’ ·   V A J       V     ’· -” ` “‘ ' AAAA VSV V "   *5`*’V"VV;.·  M-- Ve ’‘~A—.V V- 
1 V AV VA VZ AA 5:-;   .   ‘ - i ’ V V . A V · j :iV   JV   vV·`gVi;i .AA”· :JV VYi>;-¥*E ¥>’*‘-"  " A ·V     ‘--   ’-’V“-      
. _ _ ° VA ·. ‘-V~~° A   - ·· ·A V V _ j     V. V;. A     `V   I’,—.V@j`j·__   ·Q»   '·   . V V   M V     FTX V- i·= ‘‘VV‘ 5ViZ V-_·· f" '?',g~·:..§=VVR,.3*;5$*£:1’J·1¥';53**%?*·'{'@5»:·Vi1;V=51**3;-"—-·r;»‘?.-LY AVZ¥,
A A A A -  A AV V V A A _ A   , A. A . A   ·VA_.~;__ ·»V . _ A _ _,_.   »v,__A¥A     J; r V, .V...V» g; A»V·-,· VV »V ·,,..VV., ·V VAA_..A_ VAVV,., ._{4...,.·,A._$VnvA
V I         ` V   -   V` V-; ‘·'` 1  ~?VV¥?.i"I  ' ` ` `   A ·xV».V;g,*,§:   ··**‘ A <§Vi?Z*“ AW ‘ " 
` · ‘ V ’V¥   " ’ —°  ·. V   V‘   . ; V .—§*—..Q7V‘VAi‘.-U‘iV*5"V '``’’ ' " ` V V A   V .—"  V,       ~V~·   §"I'  ‘ .·‘ *°  ‘ ' ` ` V -¥’§§kl>i‘;VV     -V VfVVP**;;.A ’¤i¢;‘”.i¢*V¤
' V V A. A   ‘   V.AA.‘   V; jQ>Aj;A*A;2:`VA_:.*;z§>’V-V -`·"    ` AW 4 V.V~wV»¤‘¤i "  V·c ¤* -A’A» # F?   "  V ’ izgt `£' YZ{¥T{?   ~ °" `''·’`     `-
A V   A;   V;A· AJ; VV.VVVi_;g·g·VV;AVA;_‘ __;   ~· - V _ V _;;A_V;_VV —  .,».   ..   _V,_...,A_iVA__V.   _ V_ A .,    A VVA A   _ _V·Q_;,_     -·».:;_.,V>_.V‘Ag_;;;·_ _ · · :V; , V V. A. V · - A
V  _f__V¤  "  ` ` — V       "  Y       MJ"  V V {    T`?   `
V   V V  · -- "% A ·¤    q.I·:;=q.i;V:· AM; »·)a.  
 V A '   ’  VV;  ·‘   ,..·••··~ ` ·. .. -· · V
V VV > .V V : [T-   f'*%i‘!Y  " ’Y ' Fs ` ’ Y
A ·‘ - ·— V   ~·... . A . - V — VV   V V. ;'L-Q-£‘1‘&3%*g*·C>*l°:YY7~*f¤‘T?.§°{?{`~ V ·
_ V, _ - V _ .`i‘_ VA A   _ __ VM _ ‘ "' ` ' ;·   _   V_AVV IQ W · . V._ L .·    }J L?}   ·_ .i_ ;:V "* / A I I J
. Q A 7`._Z¢?Z`§23"i3F:‘“f‘§*·2 ·** _{i"V%:é$$e»·A_V.j¢' V CV  ", A;*·:—··-*  -    A A. -  A .A A AA   > " -“ ’ °‘  ··»~.·¤ cir} ·~ · V A  ..A ‘ ’· . •»·- ` A _
-i-?‘=¢2V   *;A~·r  AAVA -   -V V A. A. _ ‘ t A g  A  · - V . -· _ A 1,,   V V
V*       ·‘·€..-’.;,.V~;se·¤¤é¥6‘~?r*~   ·‘ ·   -‘V` ‘»  I   ~·-V---¤ ~ V     .--‘   ·‘ A· · - ··· • · V· ···-: . ·
A V .   -`~·.,VVQVVV··;—.;VV-‘·;·.—   ‘V VV   . .A·A u       - f · -- » --V =·  .,   V V·.~ . ···V
  Ah .:` {   VVj'VV-"· ‘· Z'- ,.:T'·   ’?`¥·V'·   ,·     AV VA   _ _AA   Vi 'V V · A ‘_` ‘- ' I AV ‘ A A ` ·· -··-··»·4VV•-·“,,. A
    1/u;`V ;.i%·T·"i` "Y`*:·`· A -— ·— `J   -` ..: VQ*» ~*A -2 Z ·-’*` ` `· ‘ · V ': V VV · _ ' V- Vw '·¤*‘ '   A.
A V . ;,..2V"-‘Q` E  `   f V V . ;V   ·  V `V ` " A A V " . . ` · ' ·
V A V=VV  &*·- 9 1
A V A f»V . V?§‘V='=’ ??*:i. .  _A ·
· .` V. _: Q. V   V};. 
T   `   u p V
‘ — "“"""‘ ‘···~ -— V -V   A —- Y     Q ·r " .V V -·
' V _ · ' V-.%.:1 1 A; g N L_ ‘. A V '   i   rx`
· ' " - V VW ,7, .AA_ V<   . AAA,]/"
' ""‘ ·—--···f'* V?. ...-..·*;(;- 7-  

    ;—¤’_._. .`
. ly ¢·`\\`4 4* _
[ JK ‘ I 'RAV E ERS F "    ll  =     
  V   "'*T_ xl
.*.·7 `.··,Q*'\.; ’}
`¤     .-/>
1987 PROGRAM   ·»**"‘”*# % .
" Wi ` =
     
4 ( Q .`
' msg ‘
‘ Date Destination Estimated Price I
February Virgin Islands cruise aboard the $1,495 to p
l5—22 Nantucket Clipper. Flight to and 1,745 plus
from St. Thomas. Visit St. Croix. airfare.
St. John. etc.
April Two—week tour of Tahiti, Australia $3,489 from
3-18 and New Zealand. Deluxe hotels and Lexington-
most meals. Six nights in Australia, Louisville.
six in New Zealand and two in Tahiti. $3,199 from
Los Angeles
July Canadian Rockies Adventure with local $1,699 plus
7-17 flight to Edmonton. Visit Jasper, domestic
Lake Louise, Banff and Calgary with airfare.
return from Vancouver.
July 29- Two—week deluxe visit to Scandinavia. $3,149 from i
Aug. 12 Three nights in Copenhagen, five in Lexington.
Oslo—Bergen and fiords, three nights Option to “
in Stockholm and two cruising to and Leningrad
(Aug. 15) from Helsinki. Three—night optional plus $449.
to Leningrad.
3
I
Q
\ ' -* .
"_ !.’ ·‘ . ` (7/)) _
"ée; ··—‘   · ’{®?__J,r; gi
XY v. .w » k"“;~¤a; Y T
*   M »=/{ W7 » lj  {
»   ‘ i   A   “ `
..TT?n••|||| ¤ lll!  ‘ 7-A   rk V gif ra- { — `
  **? i   '”'' "`"ZL"  _.._   V "-” " €— ¢" ,,4 [ i
* ~ *‘7.~.`r`ZE5'!’!£ ;,,_. ·_ "'§ f r_ A " ' `  /’/Q J
‘ Y »~». `J .YF7
MB r.~·¤sm.s-    .

 I 986-2 C O N T E N T S
R KENTUCKY
  E   ‘iE_;f*3· >¢:·‘
 *3 ¢·€·i .     e
·:e_ ge ·• A L U M N U S
t ° I l
I COVER
l Alumnus Donny
I Sullivon wins ot Indy
I986 OFFICERS
  • •
PRESIDENT Celebrat1or1 of the Automob1le 5
G. D `d R tt '58
I Gltgestsrleoglc A Trivio Quiz; Speed & Sport; Donny Sullivon `
PRESIDENT-ELECT
Jélhpbmos Tucker
e yvill ’56 • •
TREASURER V1olat1o11 by Burglary
Mrs. Joe F. Morris ’38 RVR R , d ,R   Rh _ R R ,,,h_ \
Lexington OS OGOID G ON FSC] IZC 9 |ITIpOC O IS
SECRETARY crime on its victims. ‘
Joy Brumlield 'AB
Lexington
ASSOCIATION STAFF; , ,
DIRECTOR A Grow111g L1brary
Joy Brumlield '48
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR King Librory plons to celebrote ocquisition ot its
B°b CR\R;YR“R;°,:€' '58 Iwo millionth volume. `
Liz Hovvord Demoron
'68
MEMBERSHIP
O O ORD, N A, OR Sav1ng Marrmges  
ACIO DO$:;b,Q'd [B9 Four out ol tive morried couples in the U.S. ‘
BRORROO BOO seriously consider divorce ot some time.
, Julio Brothers
Lindo Brumlield
Mg;$§,E;;Rbt For the Common Good
I CAm8ll° GB"? The l\/lortin School ot Public Administrotion
orolyn Griltith d { h , h d
Ruby H¤,d,,, e ucotes moncigers or government, eot on ‘
Ennis Johnson GOUCOTIONOI INSTITUTIONS.
Betty W. Nelson '52
ART DIRECTION
5 Eloine Weber •
  Designs Putt1ng a Degree to Work ' 2 A
  ISN 0732-6297 Bob Wisemon '76, ’84 tockles city services. l
   
The Kentucky Alumnus is
published quonerly by the
University ol Kentucky Alumni
i in,4OOR seSr t, _ •
R   KY .OEs..O.‘.z?  UK Beat u.....,.,IEy Atctiw ‘ 2
I i u - i m mb r , R
  gpIIn;5nsli;kp?gss;dineTTie R ., . _ , I-   L|b|·a|·y - rlbfth
  ` Kentucky Alumnus ore not
I FF*€”°’Il’¤lh€”i°l£hZ Ohh llgwenny oi Kentucky 7
NI\/ETSI GNU y Y 9
I I?;$lE2l2II`E5§“§SLZ’i`é?Ig, md Class Notes Ilqlqton, Kmwdw 40506 2
R oddress correction requested. ‘
R Send to The Kentucky Alumnus,
I UK Alumni Association,
R Lexington, KY 40506.

 l
U Q l
li
|:
\4
{I
l
V.
l
l
il
Ford Fellowships Record Giving Agoin   _
Lisa Green and Keith Clark, two grad- literature. Green also intends to earn a The generosity of UK alumni, friends, i X
uate students in the English department doctorate in linguistics. corporations and foundations and other ,, t
at the University of Kentucky, have She is a member of Beta Gamma organizations toward the University has   f
been awarded Ford Foundation Doctor- Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha once more yielded a record-breaking f l
al Fellowships for Minorities providing and former secretary of the UK Black year in private support for the insti- t E
up to $16,000 per student each year for Graduate and Professional Student As- tution. [ t
three years. sociation. Her hobbies are acting and The grand total for 1985 was . t
The grants include a student stipend writing poetry. $23,821,620.84. l t
of $10,000 per year with an additional Clark is from Norfolk, Va., and com- Gifts from alumni in 1985 totaled
$6,000 for each student’s annual ex- pleted his undergraduate work in Eng- $4,()69,665_ Friends eontributed anoth- 1 `
penses going directly to the university. lish at the College of William and Mary gr $7,140,820, organizations, $692,844, E
The fellowships are renewable for two in Williamsburg, Va. corporations and foundations, 1 I
more years. His UK graduate work centers on $11,444,603, and trusts, $473,648. S
Approximately 900 graduate students Afro-American and American litera- The largest gift was the anonymous l  
applied for the Ford Fellowships. Green ture. He wants to earn a doctorate and donation of $5 million for the Equine °
and Clark are among 50 who were cho- then teach at a university. Research Foundation. Alumnus Erv l  
sen as the first recipients. Clark is newly elected treasurer ofthe Nu[[€r gavo $1 million as Sood monoy l ‘
"This clearly indicates the quality of UK Black Graduate and Professional for a football training complex.  
graduate students which the UK Eng- StUCl€l1[ Association. Hl$ hobbies l¥1· Gifts designated to the National   i
lish department is recruiting," says clude tennis, music and writing. Alumni Association tallied $64,573. 1
Daniel Reedy, associate dean for aca- The funds made it possible for the Asso-
demic affairs at UK. ciation to continue designated scholar- l
William Parker, vice chancellor for   if "~t”i#”"     ships, assist in funding a new student l
minority affairs at UK, notes, "lt is not V V if f #   .. entertainment group and conduct the  
only an achievement by two outstand-   H   . , ,3, ‘    Y UK Rallies.  
ing individuals, but also reflects UK’s .. T V Y fl ` `*   One of the UK National Alumni As- l
strengthened effort to bring in many , *`·     » V Af 4 sociation constituent groups, the Col- l
more scholarships from sources outside H {     , ” ·I~»Z lege of Engineering, was number one in i
the university." r » , alumni support among all UK colleges.
Green is from Lake Arthur, La., and   »   
came to UK after earning her under- ` \ l
graduate degree in English education l , vg ll  , [
at Grambling State University in   i`*""’*‘  ./ ,,6;;]  
Grambling, La. W ·,    
Her graduate studies are in English 2   __,,     V  
    L  
i     lutr   ~ t
Keith Clork, Liso Green .
l
i
l
2 UK  

 l
ll
i
ll
pl
n Singing to the Computer Duol Enrollment Professor Singletary
l Voice students at the University prac- Some Kentucky high school seniors are The Ashland Oil Chair in the Humani-
l tice "pitch matching" with their com- graduating with a UK transcript and 13 ties is waiting for President Otis Single-
é puters. The machines, using a program college credits already in the bag tary when he retires next summer.
i written by two music professors, gener- through the Dual Enrollment Program Singletary will be the first person to
ate a tone for the students to match with of University Extension. occupy the Ashland Oil chair, which
`, their voices. The computer uses a graph With this program, seniors in partici- was established in 1986 by a gift from
to show the students how close they are pating school districts can take UK the Kentucky-based oil company.
Il to the correct pitch. courses at their high school and receive The board of trustees also has be-
ll "In testing the system, we found that both high school and college credits, ex- stowed the title of president emeritus
l we were not nearly so accurate in our plains Betty Langley, program director. upon Singletary who will be a professor
, singing as we thought we were, and we Of the 13 school districts in the UK in the history department.
Q made considerable improvements our- service area, Marion, Spencer, _]essa- Both honors become effective imme-
l selves when we had help from the mine and Fayette counties are partici- diately upon his official retirement
, computer," says Charles H. Lord, an pating in the program that began last from the UK presidency.
l associate professor of music, who wrote fall. . . . l , N,
l the program with Allen W. Goodwin, Offerings include English, computer     l ·,-lp, if
i an assistant professor. science and math. Foreign languages _ .l   i`   if
  Computers are also used by the mu- and other disciplines are currently being   g ·   _
  sic department to generate marching considered. *7*.*- ,,_ ,$      `  
  band half—time formations. High school instructors act as volun-   ° il _V__i I  i;   .7
,* teer faculty for UK, after being ap- _    
l proved by UK faculty in their specialty.   -~—  A f V
l Most of the participating high school if
l. O {/_=駀EE;= teachers have graduate degrees in their
  2  :%¥? E °" subject area and three years’ teaching
l. ¤ ___==¢?=;g€~5..?’; experience, says Langley.
1 (Z;   -52;: In return for their volunteer efforts, · A ,
l L;   participating high school teachers can  
2 receive graduate courses at UK or trav- *4-_ ’
i. Z   Cl ?Xl’°‘IS€S to mend °O“f€“’“°"S ‘“ Ashland on vp Robert McCowon eongrumletes
ll 2, b egeeeaeii fg l lhelr S'~‘bJ€C[ ar€a· President Singletory who will be the first to hold
¤ 7*"°" __= =_ The students must meet the same se- the Company-sponsored choir in the humonities
  E   lective admissions criteria as students ¤iUl<·
<>  ,___, ___,EEE;géeéE on the main cam us. The also a
  ii  ET;-ga in ` ___= regular, in-state tuifion for cgllege cgedij
l lg   its and are registered as off-campus stu- I
i CS fig s! ’ dents. Next fall participating students
l O will have part-time ID cards.
Participating students visit the Lex-
l ington campus to take advantage of
` UK’s facilities. This year some students
p` toured the computing center and others
  attended a play at Guignol Theatre.
il The schools benefit by being able to
{ offer advanced courses which they
  couldn’t without the program.
l
  UK 3 `
 
I

 I
  I
I
{I
 ;
II
I
Foreign Lobbying Medicol Geogropher Elderly Breothing l
UK Political Science Professor Chung While most research related to Alzhei- A UK psychology professor, Dr. David l
In Moon felt there was no clear, schol- mer’s Disease takes place in medical T. Berry, and a UK medical specialist,
arly research, within an analytical laboratories, UK geography professor Dr. Barbara Phillips, are studying l
framework, on the lobbying efforts of Gary Shannon is also looking into the sleep-disordered breathing in the elderly
foreign countries in the U.S. capital. crippling disease of the elderly. Shan- in an effort to find out just how often it t
Now, having completed his research on non, a medical geographer, says Alz- occurs and how harmful it may be. ,
South Korea’s lobbying, Dr. Moon is heimer’s victims often lose their sense of The UK researchers are studying sub- {
at work on a study of the comparative time and place, which can cause confu- jects who are 60 years of age or older  
lobbying strategies of three foreign gov- sion and seemingly aimless wandering. and looking at three phenomena associ- l
ernments: South Korea, Taiwan and Victims often are no longer able to find ated with sleep-disordered breathing——  
japan. He’s found four distinct types of their way to a once-familiar store. Simi- cardiopulmonary disturbances, hyper- '
lobbying by a foreign country: 1) hiring larly, such people sometimes are unable somnolence (excessive sleepiness) and  
"power peddlers"—persons with power to adjust to new surroundings, ie. a intellectual variables (changes in mental t
and influence—to represent the coun- nursing hOIT1€, and will lose grasp ofthe acuity). They want to find out if these l
try; 2) hiring American technical and concept of "home." Where do geogra- conditions, in the cldgrlyl point to a  
legal experts because American foreign- phers come in? Shannon says there’s a pathological elisturbanee and result in
policy issues are increasingly more tech- need to design or modify the home and exaeerbation of rnental and physical tle- `
nically and legally complex; 3) forming hospital €l'1VlI‘OI1I1'l€1‘li to 8.CCOHlITlOd21t€ terioration, Sleep-disordered breath- l
political coalitions with domestic actors the I1€€ClS of victims and keep them in- ing, Dr. Berry says, occurs in perhaps l
through functional networking of mutu- dependent as long as possible-such as one-thirel gf persons over 50 and is ele- °
al interests; 4) mobilizing grassroots designing hallways and rooms to have a {ined as the prgsencc of three events- l
support among U.S. residents with distinct appearance and function to apnea or absolute pause in breathing l
ideological or ethnic ties to the foreign minimize confusion. On a broader Wlnen lasts for at least lt) seeOnds’ deep X
(;()u¤try_ scale, Ih€ 3.CU.12il lOC?:IflO1'1S of IlL1I`Sll'lg iri amplitude of breathing, arid drop in
homes and other support facilities need arterial oxygen saturation_ l
to be planned to adequately serve vic- l
tims and their families without being
too far away. I
Shannon is working with Dr. Gra- `
ham Rowles of the Multidisciplinary t
Center of Gerontology, also a geogra-
pher, to determine future research in
the "geography" of Alzheimer’s
Disease.  
I
*   1
i   a t " · 1 I
t  it A I \ l
Medicol geogropher Gory Shonnon
I
I
A ui<  
I

 ?)    )
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
l
i i  
, » ` g'  ' _· _·; _"- _, ·_ '_,;   ···  »·`.·‘_¤ -_ ‘ ~. _\, ;_ *`Q.f'  ` -" • - ~ )_ . __  `xi
1 J ..  " ,   P ,‘,·¤ »* ¢*`   ` »;"··“   ~*  *Q     ·i:` ·
· J Z- t L   I   ~   ¤I - `·       *5*7* `   ‘·  ·.»?’.»  
‘ i ELP   'P ’Y?~ f   he . · ~-   "•'  .  i*·•":*`  ··‘?·}-.£* Y
i 4   "'··‘·· "`  Q   '°_.*Q 'i_ `K ._ ‘_ `$' ‘· * ·__.` ,- ·` _ ' _ ‘- -» t .t`i·_`_ *• ‘ .
i Q  rf"     ·   r ;'—* {if i   P   — L_ ,5; ` ` *"
_ _,_··.,{,tU ..¢,:) '.~_:_,_ .. _1,_ ig V QN, \ _t`·g¤*·
_ 5   ·' V  . .   ` ,  A   ‘.• . fl"
i l Piiéfi *~=·* _ '  ` »  . ·  ”" - ` ·?· ‘ " ’
1 l   ‘ .`  E . r 5
Z   hl ;,;_ " xqmliq  ¢Y
1 .     i A » ’ I
i i brys   V . ·
_ l Q/._`·i:···   _'
S  3  ·_ _\. ?   P     y     ‘  `     _ y y  *   Pt l
. 2  "    Puf f "      »— V =-., ..J· *5     ‘ ‘Z "‘ . (‘
  ·     ewgsztm ¤ ·i·“  t . ·¢f‘·~“"»¤ ··   *"('· ·
{ ’ '   I     fsf;  ' ‘ ,-*-;;;.12 P ·`> ~'   *7 ·”'·$l  i
)   D Y V ` ig'    :;*7;   ? •·'v ‘· P {L
t [ ·- ,r V P   \   __ ~w ·_ -· t._.l
l   —. ·   _ g 7; .7_`:—! ` ' ·, •\ Y
y _ ¢· ~   =     ~ “'t _
x , 4   ° 1 _ p \_ ‘   - \ •__`
i   ' "1"/I .K b ~•   / ,.f| i f "
’ i _ /  '— » - 41;. if `I __
{  H  4% `—`} _ n E   hg N_ U py
>   'U W,  ,   ¤ Q: · V   ._;,`··~ I Q. all ,,; •
y \ . __  A,  J » _-/  ;- '_’~· _ ~ _. • ,_ ~ n.
’ #~ r¢·i.·•f» if//’ ,4   W"'     ‘ ·‘ ' °'t" ""\°
-`*‘ ` ..,;. i J **4   ——l” .' " 
 , 5 , V A EQ., " Ik   ,7 ‘r   ' 1   L")? *
__ \ ,. 4   .- _ . ¤~-~r . ·.~,._ _  _ ¢ I "
y   ./ _ . .,_. y, gv  1 ./| I
` , ` *¢· ` /1 A" P -‘ ·"  ‘_ a , A  .` gsi
_, ,; I , ~· vv L. ·   /  ·.‘-  __ - *€ lg: E
fx, I      f _A 2 - · ` ‘   I [ _-”-{/Q • `  ` i \"t;·'Q' ' — g
é M"  - 4~ “`{1  h, ` ¢r_f__t'¢ é gw '··` 35% I- Ir"};. - L-;   -` _. L" j ,1 ·— ‘- { gz
;,’*-{ ,1: ‘ ,,,,` ' Q *4, '*' O» .;; {_ ;,- ··•• · A_ - _;_ ·LL" pv __;·· _ , O
" Y .--l` ·_ P   g__;*.tf·‘,`.2P7 _i’?__;j if- Y* L _   ‘..r · é
0 celebrate the centennial anniversary of the automobile is to sing praise
i and to ex ress dis st. On the o en road the fleet-movin automobile
y . P . PP . P . g
  provides a special form of liberation; in late afternoon traffic, the
  OV€I`l'1€3'[l1’1g €1'1gl1'1€ 2lI`OLlS€S 3.l'1g€I`.
y No one can deny the significance of the pervasive automobile, the one technological
l device that has changed human patterns of existence as have only the wheel and the
E printing press before it.
1
 
l
w
E
 
 
 
 
 
 

 Urban patterns and literary
metaphors, the rite of passage which is ’
the learner’s permit and the servitude l
that is the bank automobile loan, the ,.· —
drive-in restaurant and the summer   .
cottage in the mountains—all of these    · . ~ ·""“° "’£` 1_
have been the cultural developments of `   7 i
that mechanical contrivance we if ,4;
summarily describe by the word   P ~   V V
‘ ‘wheels. ’ ’ _ l G    n F
First set running on the road 100      
YCHTS 3.gO   two GCYIHKH €IIglI\€€I`S  Y  Q.  ,j   
working separately on the project, ,     ,
Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz, the  ·4*?iliZ`·>§ ;, ’  I —
automobile was made democratic V °     A if .   `
. transportation by Henry Ford who  
rehned the assembly line technique of wants, among other things to be "taken {
production. Ford once remarked that to a cinema in the evening and driven  
he did not care what color his cars were afterwards along the beach in a closed  
so long as they were all black. By the Buick."  
time he made that remark, however, In the world today there are over l
automobiles of all colors and shapes 300,000,000 cars daily driven along the l
were roaming the world. As early as beaches, over the mountains, along the
1901, the French had 55 trucks highways, and downtown.
operating in the African Sudan, at a The Gaines Center of the  
time when there were only 304 motor Humanities, the Appalachian College  
cars in Great Britain. The novelist Alex Program, the Theatre Department and  
Waugh in his travel account, Hat Art Museum of the University of ,
Counhies, published in 1930, writes that Kentucky, in conjunction with Union {
he knows that the average Tahitian College, recently provided an occasion {
for the public to reflect on the  
automobile as a major element in [
contemporary public behavior and  
cultural form.  
i
, i * .\- Q \ `  
. `I- —\ `I . ` · $
. “‘~` ~ it
  l c·'L.11"| ll
-   tif` A · Il
\< ¤_¢tT\• . [yr .5. /./____I   
  s F ` “ 1 *`    » T
 — _ _ -., ·? l
~` T 1     1
.7; . .   e *‘  - 2
if ` vv .rA v_ ,,._j’     ' k`
*` is ' t' i..;>‘=° ';\‘/*· »   ?$*··A / l
`= " c‘»   t ‘ §VlJ"@& \ rl
~v*4" _ ... _ Q· ` ' ¥` i { 1 ` ‘  "     Q
if/@1%      
VI w       ~§*  »
** MLL
G tm §l

 I. MT , I if RI Q I 1} V i I é A
  I. Whot compony monutoctures the otticiol limousine ot the President ot the
  United Stotes?
H 2. Whot cor, monutoctured in Bowling Green, Kentucky, is the tostest produc-
l tion cor in the world?
I 3. Which moIor Americon outomobile line wos originoted by ci cor designer
  born in Switzerlond?
‘ 4. Which cor moke beors the nome ot o young lody?
I 5. Whot wos the octone roting ot gosoline in the United Stotes oround I920?
I 6. Which ot the tollowing tilm octors hos hod nothing to do with outomobile
  rocing?
I o. Poul Newmon d. Jomes Deon
l b. Jomes Gorner e. None ot the obove
c. Steve l\/lc®ueen
7. Which tour—cylinder engine hos held its own ogoinst lorger competition in the
  lndy 500 since the I 950s?
8. l·low mony torword geors did the stondord Americon cor hove in the I930s?
I 9. Who won the Indy 500 lost yeor?
I0. Whot is the nome ot the cor l·litler promised to moss produce tor the Germon
populotion? I
I I. Whot is the nome the heroes ot the Dukes ot Flozzord hove given their red
Dodge?
I I2. Which tomous Americon cor used steom os its motive power?
  I3. Which Americon cor is nomed otter on Americon President?
I I4. Which Americon cor is nomed otter o Romon god?
jI I5. Which short—livecl Arnericon cor wos given the tirst nome ot the compony
  tounder's son?
I I6. Nome two French cor monutocturers.
I, I7. Spell the Anglicized version ot the lost nome ol the president ot the Toyoto
Il outomobile compony.
  I8. Whot is the Chrysler engine colled which wos introduced in the eorly I950s I
ond is the dominont motive power tor top-tuel drogsters? ______ l
, I9. Who is the president ot the Chrysler Corporotion? _____;  
20. Whot does the term "Jeep" meon?
2I. Nome one cor model nomed otter cn jungle cot. ____;__
22. Nome one cor model nomed cutter o horse. ______
II 23. Nome one cor model nomed otter 0 city. _____;
I 24. List one cor nomed otter on explorer. _;T.T
  25. Whot color did l·lenry Ford soy oll cors should be pointed? _?_._.
I 26. Nome the mollusk whose shell the Shell Oil Compony uses os its logo? __;__..
I 27. Whot do the English coll o cor hood? ____L._
l 28. Whot is the nome ot the lorgest monutocturer ot tires in Fronce? __;__ I
I 29. Whot do the English coll o cor trunk? __.___T_
i 30. Which moke wos the outomobile "Christine" in the tilm ot thot nome? ______.i_
I 3I. Whot color ore the letters "RR" on the Rolls—Royce grill? ________.
32. Nome one mojor Americon cor monutocturer no longer in business. ___._._;
, 33. Nome the toreign outomobile monutocturer which dropped its troditionol
I emblem otter the figure become the internotionol sign tor the mole. _____;.
I 34. Whot compony is todoy the world's lorgest monutocturer ot cors? ____ 
  SJOIOW IUJOUOO   II l{SY`|U.Il{1
M0110 00 01iM 0i¤00 ‘01~i0A 129 SMHM 00 P¤1¤>i01%1 ‘10>i0{.10A MDN   01UId KBUUISDW   .lI2I"|H`B[".lUSI"|O:)   nsodxnd IHJSUDD   IZDODOIZI
39"[       EPOJIOLL   UOZLIIID JO ]O3STl9d IIIUEUOH   ISSPQ   AJUHJOW   UIODUI']   JZHUBZUS AOIUHIS   I}3'1 IITJOUBD  
UDSEMSXIOA   UEAIUHS AUUEG   OGJLLL   JSSUHQUQHO   'H   o/xi;-»(1u:>M_L   SOPODJSW   ISIOJAOLH)   {H10/\J():)   PJOLI    
iI I
I UK 7 I

 an l
»   ff  ‘ · ` `\
`J Q » '~· \
l __ A, l  I!  ` _ _  
. Ti` ~e   , ` 9 t,
i     I Y  il   i l
hgévf,  if l ` I \   Ty? F.- A g i i R
  7 ·~i~ *57   · e r a .  
  Y l\ e     1 -
V 1 1,   `~#· .L’5 »   ·‘·  ` ’%’  if   -  ». 17*** e
  T e e "     \; "   T?    ~  2 , T — 1
N —. -1; .... ° —  ian   l ’ i ii   . ·.
  i`/ éiliif ii l iiii e  ` in     i     l
  ` K- L,  I `_    ‘·t_; , 4- , tt, ‘ » K.   _        -` ,
Ile \ i . fw" ` 4 -‘   `   g V. . '-(Q.-h  I   L  , V        Il  
  ··,` ‘ ht?  ·¥L. '  H .   M;  ‘ T ·` ‘  7*   *=
¥   .,.   a . .    .   ._     ii" .
      ; g·,,j ;., .   , ""   ..V. i_ __‘‘ j’*» ¤ _ ,  `*·    es.- _.
 M *’‘‘  -‘   2 .     r Q · ”    #2*7   _
V   A , .  '    l i     in 7   `   Erzc C7/ZTZ·.S`tZ·d72.$`07L I
 *     me ummm Arzcruve l
erhaps 1986 is the centennial responsible for increased speeds, and its times the going was frustrating. l
of the automobile. Afterall, in remarkable popularity throughout a Mechanical failures were joined by Hat
1886 Germany’s Carl Benz broad spectrum of enthusiasts. tires, scarcity of fuel, and quagmires for l
did patent and demonstrate You might say the first auto race roads. During one 16-hour period they `
his fOur·Str0l<€ Otto €¤gin€‘P0W€!`€d took place in 1878. The winning Car in covered only 28 miles, and this is W
three wheeled "car," the engine that the 201-mile run from Green Bay to admittedly worse than Nicholasville
emerged as the Pe0Pl€’$ €h0i€€- Madison, Wis. was an Oshkosh Road in Lexington. They traversed the T
However, France, celebrated two years St€amer_ U.S. in 63 days, with 15 "pitstop"
ago for a patent issued in 1884, and the At the turn of the century days. The competition was left far
United States could have done S0 in estimates suggest that 40 percent of the behind-a Packard in Nebraska, and
1979, for in 1879 lawyer George B. cars were steam powered, 38 percent an Olds soniewhere in Wyoming,
Scldon patented but did not build a electrics, and only 22 percent internal In those early days of auto racing the
Brayton two-stroke powered four- combustion-powered. Yet, by World driver had to know how to repair, tune,
wheeled vehicle. And, really, the War I the steamer, like the electrics, and modify the ear, Today, most
world’s first petrol-driven, internal and the two-stroke Brayton motors drivers must take their prized
combustion, four-wheeled car is were falling victim to the growing possession to the computer engine
properly attributed to the efforts of dominance of the Otto four-Mcyclell analyzer in the car doetor’5 oflice, E,
Vienna’s Siegfried Marcus in 1875. ("stroke"), petrol engine in domestic Similarly, those week-long pit-stops  
This inventor, however, committed and racing cars. made by Dr. jackson would be
"obseuricide" by proclaiming that the Although it did not, racing in the shortened by the rigors of high-finance l
automobile was a ‘°SenSeleSS waste of U.S. might as well have begun with a races to less than a minute. The times l
timc.” very modest fifty dollar bet in the separating victors and losers in today’s l
Historians, and car enthusiasts, can spring of 1903. Dr. Horatio Nelson drag races, grand prixs, and stock car l
be just as picky in determining the Jackson of Burlington, Vermont, events are often recorded in fractions of l
beginning of racing. We do know that overheard a man poke fun at horseless seconds. A competition that once pitted j
in 1899, Frenchman Camille jenatzy carriages boasting that he would pay man and machine against hostile i—
ignored warnings of consequences fifty dollars to anyone who could drive terrain has beco