xt7ns17snp57 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ns17snp57/data/mets.xml  McDaniel, J. M. 1900 v. : ill. ; 23-25 cm.  Volume numbering changed during 1899 from Volume 8 to Volume 2.  Description based on Vol. 8, no. 2 (Nov. 1989) journals  English Lexington, Ky., [s.n., 189?-] Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine University of Kentucky. Kentucky University. Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky. University of Kentucky--Students--Periodicals. State University, Lexington. State College, Lexington. The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 3, no. 2, 1900 text The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 3, no. 2, 1900 1900 2012 true xt7ns17snp57 section xt7ns17snp57 ;*•‘ -·c—•ii /·~-»»» -· ` i' VV V `  V - .
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, ;“ _ ROBERT McDOW’}]LL ALLEN, i 
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  .-lvl erolu/fun I/ict! sirwclis fum rz. g1·uinI:·r day,  
"   B When man enters the world's first traditions, he enters conditions. The . ·
·` frost was cold and the rain chilled him, and his hunger demanded food.  
is There was a snarl from the sunless forest, and his brother, like himself, Q
, was>waring and barbarious. Every day, every sun, c`very mountain caused  
-him to wonder. The night came on and every star wasa mystery, Q  
l ‘Man met th1·ee problems—three problems which he must face if he would ly j
f exist-three problems which he must solve if he would be civilized. To lr é
', ¤ protect himself, to beat off the frost and rain and feed his hunger, to know ; E
’ Q more of the mystery. · ,_,; 
To beat off the frost and rain and feed his hunger, he built his bark-  
, thatched hut and went forth with his bow into the trackless forest in search
of food; ‘T[‘0-day tbe problem points in its .solution to the industries which
* build the palace and heat and light the cottage, which produce and distrib-
ute at lns will every necessity and luxury man`s abilities and needs can
_ desire.
To protect himself, and he gathered his tribe into a village and surround»
- ed it with a wall and practiced the crude elements of government with a
chief to direct and a warrior to guard-later, a king and a soldier. To-day
the problem points in itsrsolution to the republic with its judge and lawyer,
d with its great organization of society and government, with their constitu-
tions and codes, with their many laws and mighty principles.
To know more of the mystery, and his astroliger taught him to read the
futureof histtribe in the setting of the star. To-day he is melting the
sands and through the telescope is reading the harmony of. the universe in
the track of the planet; and out of his desire to learn more of the mystery .
” . around him, he points to the teacher and preacher, the phylosopher and
. scientist, with their literature and art in education, and above all, areligion
~-which worships only a being of love and truth.
"Man was barbaric, but bravely he met his conditions. Slowly while
` ~ years became pyramids and castles, at the sacrifice of kingdoms and creeds
and giving his life upon the block and battlefield for the triumph of right ,;,
he has been solving the problems, and knows the elements of a glorious in
. civilization. ‘ I  
, The centre of thought to.day is the industrial question, never before    
has it been greater, more complex or more seemingly unsolved. Mans . "  
wants have multiplied, and the systems to produce and distribute them   ' 
. have correspondingly grown to be many and great ones. Une by one he r l
has utilized the energies of nature to turn the wheels of thc factory and of ij  
.» . A!
fi
._ _____ 7 _ g .’

 ,_ histrairel, he has lifted the burden of the industry from his shoulder to l
—   _-_his.·»mii1d; and the problem has become complex; while the iittiest to snr-
` ` ` ’. .—vive, the law in this age of evolutLon—-the same law which bids the tallest V
;_ Qtree steal the first sunbeam and drink the purest rain-drop while the dwarf-
_  ed sapling struggles beneath-the law which lavishes to tl1e intellectually I
’ `"strong and refuses to pity the ignorant weak never before was felt as it is '
in this time of conquering mind} . ‘
Oui civilization hasbruught new conditions. Un one hand the industri· , _
al king, whose power consists not in the elangor of arms, but in the silence l
of wealth. Un the other hand, as labor becomes more enlightened it grows ,
more discontent with its lot, and is feeling more keenly the injustice from _
greed. - w-
‘ · What once was the strength of two barbarians joined to drag the veuion
from the forest, what was once two shoulders to lift the log to its placeosn
the hut, to-day is the mighty corporation, formed by the combination of
wealth with industry and inventive genius, which manufactures with great
economy of product and energy, which transports with marvelous rapidity
the building stone and steel and plank, tl1e heating coal, the light-giving
- oil, the nourishing bread and beef, and the countless necessities and lux- i
uries of life, which gives labor better opportunities to improve its condi-
4 tions, a cottage instead of a hut, an electric globe instead of a tallow c ip,
but which accumulate on the one hand wealth in piles and power beyond
the dreams of Lydia’s richest king, which abused cities and filled them
with toiling men and children, subjected and succumbing to vice, and these
· are the evils which we would eliminate or at least would control.
Aristotle said that if some power other than man’s own could be learned j
i to Love the shuttle. that the problem ol. slavery would ne solved; but man
knows the power of Niagara, he has read the law cf the lightning, and bids
them ruaand rule his machine, but never before were the inequalities
. greater, or the utilization of common interests for private ends more marked
Our statutes are llllcd with laws to regulate these evils, the party platforms
are making the trusts an issue for a coming campaign, the pages of the
press are fill d with articles from the brain and thought of the land; that
something is wrong all are determined; that something all are endeavoring
to eliminate.
When in the last century the political inequalities became too great,
‘ when kings asserted tothe Saxon their ·=divine right" to rule, and when . .
. they built their thrones out ot the tears and blood of a tolling serf, with
redder blood and brinier tears than built them they were swept away, and
the scrf became, however humble, a citizen. But the thorns or greed and
‘— the industrial inequalities have not been created by birthright are armies, . , .
- nor can strikes or armies iliminate them.
. e Socialism is pl reed as the gold of human endeavor and honest men are
advocating it for the solutionof our economic conditions. In its broad
theory 1t is beautiful, grand, ultimate. No special development of a class
at the subjection and sacrilicc of another class; no society formed out of
warring individuals, but an organic whole, in a word, self supplanted by
altruism, a dream too far in the l`uLure to bc realized in our present condi-
· tions. For, if we understand the plan by which they would accomplish it ,
can a government make cipialities? .()an any code of laws determine who

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7 `F `A_`r \;
‘ ` is to discove1· the element, invent the machine, write the poem or sing the
melody? lf it were possible to equalize the wealth of the land, would tlns
e equalize the desires for the luxury and power which wealth brings, and the
spirit to obtain them? If it were po sible to mingle the classes. would not
he spirit of cast still remain? As long as there are differences in men’s
·‘ tnvironment, there will be classes. As long as there are both the strong _
end the weak, one class will develop at the subjection anu sacrifice of the
V other class. You cannot eliminate from the industrial world the law of ·
”· , u supply and demand. You cannot unteach men’s minds that in unity there
V is more strength and greater possibilities for good or for evil. The law of l
l the fittest to survive is as fixed as the law of gravitation; and all legisla-  
_ ° ,_ tion, all thought, all endeavors to solve the problem must recognize these i
laws. -
There is nothing the matter with the systems themselves. If any change ll
give us at factory with cheaper prices, better products, more utilization of  
inan's genius. The wrong is that they are being operated for individual I
interests, The problem is to have them operated for the highest develop- p 
meuis of each, and for the good of all. The problem needs moreof human ,g
_ , kindness to soften the harsh law of the iittiest to survive. It needs more   -
of the wasting strength of organization turned to feed and freehumanity.  
lt needs. in a word, less of self and more of love for fellow-man. ,  
As long as there is ignorance, as long as greed operates the industries
as long as we license vice, as long as we place men in our legislative halls
who will p1·ice their souls and and sell the people they represent to bethe
victims of greed, so long will the industrial inequalities be hard to V sore
. and there will remain misery and want in lands of plenty, and the dark
‘ clouds of ignorance still will hang around the horizon of learning sky in
the very presence of sunlight and truth. _ ' V p
This, as we recall with pleasure the victories of the past and realizewith
delight the marvelous progress of our civilization, is the question to. istudy
forit concerns the destiny of our glorious republic. I repeat that war can ~
not solve it, for its solution must eliminate from the heart of man all anger
and strife. It is the thought for the philosopher, it is the theme for the
pen; it is the question for the deliberation of patriotic statesmen, and the
work for the pulpit and the school-room. It concerns the destiny oljour
republic as does no other problem. The pesimist tells us that it threatens
to destroy it. But when we see before us our grand achievements, and
` " realize the unparalleled progress of the age's thought: when we see
all around us the uplifting elements of our Christian civilazation; uni-
versal education, making knowledge the birthright of the people; the
l _ press and voice teaching and telling the established truths of religion
` ‘ and science to all; society claiming moral culture for its standard; and ’;
above all, the political equality of the people; when we recognize that -,  ·
our censtitution has been written from experiences of the past; that i `
the principles of our government have been shaped and purged by `
sword and flame, we believe that the grand old republic is a success, will , '
stand, will dedicate its industries to liberty, and triumph iu its mission , -
of freedom. ·'  j
The curtain ig soon to close on a glorious scene in the drama of time, ·.  
‘ and the century of beginnus soon will be history. History, not only to be ,_  
'F. )
,4;  
[
k '  

 ...- . SM i°"
_ read on ledge and leaf, not solely legand for totteriug age, but history, told -
- in the roll of every driving wheel; told by the conquered parting crest of
“ the ocean foam, painted sublime by the harmony of natures laws, and .
heralded immortal by the never-dying melodies its pen and string have
sung. For iis monument, political liberty triumphant, a republic with a »
constitutional government, and a religious ideal whose God inspires to sac.
endness of duty and worship of truth, love and the desire for right. Time
is moving on toward eternity, while truths structure grows stronger and , A
greater, as one by one the jewels of discovery are added to the sacred walls
and as one by one the great problems relating to human life are solved.
There were never brighter hopes for the future. There was never more
work for all, work of expanding the uplifting elements of a Christian civ- _ a
ilizaion that have already done so much for man. There are empires of
prejudice and passion which know not of the peaceful rule of justice, and
the guiding power of reason. There are hearts of greed into which never
beamed the sunshine of love for the world. Science has its vast accnmu·
lation ot fact and law, and its present attainments are but the material-out
of which the palace is yet to be builded. And there is avast expanse upon V
the sea of intellect long lonesom for a sail. There are countless heights
surrounded by a cloud of mystery still unchmbed. Ambitious eagle
needs but attempt and courage, there is room in learning’s sky for every
' wing to spread and soar to the basking sunlight of knowledge.
The victories of the past have been fought with hoe and sword upon the ‘
dusty field of toil and strife. The problems of the future are to be solved
upon the loftier plain of the mind. Have you a smile, then make the sor.
row less. Have you a prayer, then lend Lispiration to the work. Have
yon a ballot, then the judge cannot be too just or the law.n;a.ker too con- ,
soious of the sacredness of his duty. "But you say the smile is weak, the .
prayer is faint and the ballot but one. `
On a hillside in Minnesota a little brooklet leaves its home, singing as it A
yields its course to the stone, singing until its murmers are hushed upon _
the bosom of a lake, to the sea; and so another brooklet, and many others I
until a lake, lingering long enough to echo back to lts prarie home itslong
farewell, joins its song with the song of other lakes to swell one chorus to ‘
sea. Formed by the melting snowflakes in Montana’s hills another stream ·
is started, singing as it goes upon its long winding journey, singing as it
rounds Dakota’s wheat fields, singing as it mocks Kansas‘s dusty plains ,
singing until its song is swelled by creek and river into a rolling chorus or l .
the sea, until it meets the chorus of the lakes to form the mighty Mis-
sissippi, whose onward course no mountain stone can turn, upon whose bos- `
som lioats the commerce of its valley, whose rich alluvial waters fertllize , _ _
· the broad areas of the South, whose springs and rivers form the mighty ,
waterway of the mightiest valley of a mighty earth.
` Bring more oo-operation and more purpose into work. And from where
the cotton stalk bends beneath its snowwhitc emblem of purity, where every _
breath is sweet with the song of the nightingale, and every zephyr faint »
with the ordorous breath of the maguolia and the rose; from the golden
gate, whose every mountain tissue yields in countless measuresithe yellow
shrine of the million, whose vine such fruit as did the ;Jewish scout never
lind in the beautiful land across the Jordon, from where the tool spark-

 ling waters of the Oregon roll their splashing music as they dash their way
‘ sound the base of skypiercing peaks; from where the wheat fields hold _
aloft their yellow grain, whose golden blades are fanned by western zephyrs
· into mimic waves of a mighty sea; from where the smokestack wreathing
its brow with blackened smoke and the click of machinery points to the
busy hum of man’s industry and progress, there isa land of ~faith and pa-
` triotism, a land of thought and religion, a land of ballots.
New developments, new work, new growth. new responsibilities. The
t ¤ lightening has wired light into the palace, it remains to burst the monop-
olized discoveries of genius and make bright the hearts and homes of the i
people. The world has been conquered by the sword, and before the Saxon
a glorious opportunity, and in his hands a Christian civilization, mighty to
. — teach and uplift. New conditions, new duties, an evolution that sweeps
. into a grander gay. » l
‘ ECONOMY. *
l Happy the man so well educated that his finances add wings to his sueecss. .
_ Genius without ability to live within means actually possessed or respensib- l
ly expected, is synonymous with misery. The true blessedness of life-  
_ whatever sphere of activity a student enters-depends largely upon his i
ability to keop out-go less than income. Many an ordinary mind has un-
ceasingly advanced to influence, as well as has constantly held happiness,
simply because it knew how to manage its money account. Of two students
equally bright going out into the world from graduation day, one capable in
W money affairs and the other incapable, the chances-—no the certainties-of a
` successful career are with the former rather than the latter. `
I A studeut’s use of the money that comes into his control is therefore of
most signilicent importance. His sense of its worth, his appreciation of the
· source from which he received it, his metheds of expenditure, his power to `
_ obtain the best and largest results from it are elements of his character that
, he cannot afford to underestimate. Even if it comes to him freely as a lev-
ish gift of wealthy parents, all the more should he be on guard lest misuse ·
_ of it unfit him for the thoughtfulness that, sooner or later, his own personal
` _ Z responsibilities will demand. Here is where the poor boy, struggling to
obtain an education, and necessarily counting every cent he himself ean_earn
` or can secure from self-denying friends, i