xt7ns17sqv1p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ns17sqv1p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670407  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  7, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  7, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7ns17sqv1p section xt7ns17sqv1p Ti

K

EKNEL

MTOCICY
The South's Outstanding College Daily
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Friday Evening, April 7, 1967

Vol. LVIII, No. 130

Cook Narrow Victor Over Snyder
In SG Race; Vallebona Wins Easily
President

r

Vole Close
All Night

mm

At 8:30 p.m. Carson Porter
predicted that Sheryl Snyder and
Kendall Threlkeld would carry
the election by 200 votes. Three
hours later he congratulated
Steve Cook and Rafael Vallebona.

In the three hour interim and
the hour before over 20 paid
workers counted 4,784 votes
which resulted in Cook and Vallebona as winners in the SG
contest.
As far as the counting was
concerned, the race was close
all the way. By 9 p.m. Porter,
current president to SG, had
switched his prediction to Cook
"by 200 votes."
About an hour later, as a
strong endorsement for Snyder
was recorded from Donovan
Hall, Porter was again predicting Snyder.
Porter, moving about from
counting table to counting table,
was merely reflecting what the
records were saying.
Porter wasn't the only one
checking votes.
Observers for all the presidential and vice presidential candidates also were showing an
intent interest in the counters.

B

w

Only 176 Voles Decide
Tiglil Presidents Race
Steve Cook edged Sheryl Snyder for SG president Thursday and
his running mate Rafael Vallebona swept to an easy vice presidential victory in one of the heaviest turnouts in memory.
Cook nosed Snyder by 176 after the results were announced,
votes. He had a total of 1,734
shortly before midnight.
for Snyder's 1,558. William Mur-re"A great many people, now
ran a distant third with are
willing to take SDS as a
690 votes and David Holwerk,
serious organization," he said.
who ran as a joke and called
Murrell and Wheeler ran on
himself "the Caped Crusader," a ticket that was drawn
up and
got 556 votes.
supported by SDS.
Vallebona easily upset SnyWheeler said that he and Murder's running mate Kendall Threlrell would be willing to work
keld as he ran well ahead of with Cook in the future.
all candidates with 2,016 votes
Cook attributed his and
to Miss Threlkeld's 1,554. Martin
success to the people
Wheeler, Murrell's running mate, who
"really worked hard for us."
was third with 750.
He said that the election was
Since Holwerk did not have a won
"in the last three days"
vice presidential candidate, many when he relied on a lot of
"gimstudents who voted for him also micks."
voted for Vallebona, observers
Cook said that he has about
theorized last night.
$300 invested in the campaign.
students
A total of 4,784
Cook said that both Holwerk
voted, more than 201 over last and Murrell took votes away from
year's figure.
but conceded that they also
Of this total, 246 presidential him, have
may
brought out votes that
ballots were for write-i- n candiordinarily would not have voted.
dates or were left blank. There
would
The Kernel
were 464 vice presidential write-i- have meant aboutsupport votes,
400 more
or blank votes.
he said, but The Rogue, a ditW. Garrett Flickinger, an as- toed
paper put out in the Comsociate professor of law, received
plex, helped them with their supa significant but untabulated
he said.
number of these vice presidential port,
The Kernel supported Murvotes as he and Holwerk won rell and Wheeler.
heavily at the law school poll.
"Our main stress was on the
The board of elections yesComplex and the coed dorms,"
terday decided that the election
Continued on Page 2
could be won by a simple plurinstead of a majority.
ality,
Cook and Vallebona ran best
at the Student Center and Bla-zer Hall polls. Cook lea Sny- der by 224 and 132 respectively
there, while Vallebona led Miss
Threlkeld by 272 and 215 reThe Campus Committee on
spectively.
A total of 2,229 votes were
Human Rights will sponsor
cast at these two polls, while at Wednesday an open forum on
Donovan Hall where Snyder led social change and the Negro
Cook by 213 votes and Vallebona student at the University on the
led Miss Threlkeld by 148, 688 Student Center patio.
votes were cast.
In a prepared statement the
Other polling places and their committee said, "There are many
results are:
issues to be discussed, there are
Fine Arts Snyder and Valmany circumstances and situalebona; Commerce Cook and tions existing here that you don't
know about."
Vallebona; Dorm Complex
Cook and Vallebona; Agriculture
The statement said, "We chalScience Snyder and. Threlkeld; lenge you to attend if you feel:
Medical
Center Snyder and The Negro feels like a 'real'
Threlkeld.
student here. That there are never
Murrell and Wheeler did best any overt examples of racism
at the Student Center where they and discrimination and . . .That
earned 283 and 323 respectively. the athletic department tries
"We have contributed to the harder."
fact that a great number of people
The time for the forum has
turned out to vote," Wheeler said not been scheduled.
ll

r

Val-lebon-

Kernel Photos by Shelby Jett
faces of the candidates tell the story of yesterday's election.
The
Sheryl Snyder, left, is sullen as President Carson Porter announces
e
defeat. By contrast, Steve Cook, the victor, is congrathis
ulated by his campaign manager.
176-vot-

Parsons To Lose
Its Accreditation
New York Time

News Service

CHICAGO Controversial Parsons College in Fairfield, Iowa,
lost its accreditation Thursday.
500 member
The action was taken by the senting the agency's
colleges, was unanimous.
ColNorth Central Association of
Dr. Norman Burns, executive
leges and Secondary Schools at
secretary of the association and
the final session of its annual
professor of education at the
meeting here.
Continued on rage 2
The vote by delegates repre- - University of Chicago, said the
accrediting body had voted to
drop Parsons from membership,
effective June 30, because of its
"persistent failure" to correct
"serious weaknesses."
Parsons President Millard G.
Roberts and all other executives
of the college were unavailable
Dr. Stanley J. Zyzniewski, associate professor of history, died for comment.
of a heart attack Thursday at Central Baptist Hospital.
The agency had placed ParDr. Zyzniewski, 42, came to
sons on probation in 1963, rethe University in 1960 from the
moving it in 1965 with the stiUniversity of Virginia and has
pulation that the school be resince received many honors, the
examined within three years to
most recent being the Alice Hal-ladetermine whether the association's standards for quality of
Award, given by the department for the best article written
education were being met.
In 1964 the Presbyterian
by a member of the faculty.
His death makes a total of
Church cut off support for the
five University professors to die
liberal arts school, breaking a
this past week. Four other staff
relationship that had prevailed
members were killed Monday in
since the college was founded
a plane crash at Blue Crass
in 1875. William A. Morrison,
Field.
general secretary of the church's
Board of Christian Education,
Dr. Zyzniewski was schedcited "noncooperation" with the
uled to speak Saturday at the
church. College spokesman inafternoon session of the third
dicated they no longer wanted to
regional conference of Phi Alpha
be restricted by church ties in
national history honorary.
Theta,
DR. STANLEY ZYZNIEWSKI
operating the college.
A specialist in modern EuropContinued On Page 8
ean and Russian history, Dr. Zyzniewski, before coming to UK,
was research associate of the
Soviet Bloc Economic Relations
By JOHN ZEH
"I support higher education but also
Project and instructor and adminKernel Associate Editor
istrative assistant to the director
the constitution," he said answering a quesA little more than a hundred years ago
of the United States Air Force
tion about how he conceives the relationHannibal Hamlin was vice president of the ship between the University and the GovRussian Program at Syracuse UniUnited States. Now a "direct descendant" ernor's Mansion.
versity.
He said the governor as chief executive
Receiving his masters and doc- of Hannibal is seeking the COP gubernatorial nomination because he feels "it's about of the state has to administer laws and
tor degrees from Harvard Unitime for another Hamlin in public office."
funds but otherwise should use little inversity, he was a Fulbright Research Scholar in Finland during
fluence over higher education, delegating
He is Thurman J. Hamlin, 42, a London
1904-6and visited the Soviet used car lot owner and storekeeper. Mr. responsibility to college presidents and
Union and Poland in the summer
boards of trustees and regents.
of 1965.
Should students be given seats on those
Primary Profiles
boards? "Since a student is in training
There will be no services here
Hamlin preaches "return to constitutional (at college), it won't hurt fiom a training
as the body is being sent to Dr.
government" with economy, efficiency, and aspect, but when it comes down to actual
Zyzniewski's home city, Rrocton,
authority," no.
Mass.
honesty.
four-da- y

Dr. Zyzniewski, Historian,
Dies Oj A Hearl Attack

c

m

LJ$Z

n

CCHR Plans

Open Forum
On Changes

Hamlin In Race Because It's 'His Time'

5

-

Mr. Hamlin, a former school teacher and
coach, favors "spreading out" graduate education among the universities, as long as there
is no

"duplication."

Education's greatest need in Kentucky
is more and better teachers, he said, ami
"buildings in some areas."
Asked again why he is qualified to be
governor, Mr. Hamlin replied "I sort of
think it's time for another Hamlin." He said
he feels he has inherited Hannibal's good
qualities and has developed others himself,
but did not give examples.
And, oh yes, Hannibal Hamlin was vice
piesident, the history Uoks show, un! r
.
Abraham Lincoln,
1S61-G5-

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, April

I7

7,

Vallebona Win
In Heavy SG Turnout
Coofc,
Continued From

raje

Dob Abrams, Cook's and

1
Vallc-l)ona- 's

campaign captain said.
"We aLso tried to appeal to the
independent through our parades
and jam session."
"We didn't concentrate on the
fraternities or the sororities as
hard because we thought the independents were the most important, he said.
The process of manually
counting the votes started at
7:30 last evening and continued
until after 10:30. The results were
made known to a shouting crowd
of about 75 students at the Student Center one hour later.
All of the candidates except
Vallebona and Murrell were present when the. results were announced by Student Covemment
President Carson Porter. The
crowd was clearly for Cook.
A chant, to the tune of a
a
commercial, with the
words: "Things go better with
was taken up
by the crowd soon after the final
Coca-Col-

Cook-Vallebon-

word.

did not want to make any comment when questioned about the
results. Both she and Snyder left
immediately after the announcement, and could not be located
afterwards.
Holwerk, conceding the election before the official announcement, said that he took a few
votes from Cook, but "aside from

the total vote,
effect."

I

didn't have any

Holwerk felt that he contributed to the large turnout. He
has been running on a campaign
of "inspecting toilet seats and
kissing babies," and has appeared in a caped outfit under
the name of Brand X.
He said earlier this week that
he would retire his cape until
there is further need of his services on campus.
Clyde Kirtley, chairman of the
board of elections, said that he
had received no official reports
of violations of the rules set up
for the election, but that he had
a few

received

"scuttlebutts."

One of the rules that has
caused sone trouble in the past
is that forbidding the distribution of campaign literature on the
same floor of the building as the
polls.
Kirtley said that this was not
a problem this year.

The

platform

Cook-Vallebo-

calls for a "structural reorganization of the representation system" based on a Student Government of 59 members.
All of the candidates except
Holwerk ran on a platform advocating a reform of some sort
in the system of representation.
Murrell and Wheeler called for a
lottery to solve the problem, but
the other two proposals called for
a revamping of the present system.
Other proposals of the Cook

CANTERBURY HOUSE

University
Methodist Chapel
151

E. MAXWELL.

Sunday, April 9
Sermon by:
Rev. Fornash

Episcopal Church

MORNING

WORSHIP

ROSE ST.

SERVICES

SUNDAY

8:00 a.m. and

10:30 a.m.

CHURCH
East High at Clay Avenue
DR. J. T. HARMON,
Pastor
Dr. W. P. Fryman, minister, visitation
9:45 a.m. Church School
PARK

METHODIST

"Hands"
7 p.m. Young Adult Class
Taught by Dr. Frank Bean
11

11:00

All

a.m.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

RUSSELL R. PATTON, Minister
9:35 a.m. College Class
"Steadfast Hearts in a Day of Trouble"
10:50 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
Fellowship Night
4
4
or
Transportation provided for students Call

WEST HIGH

at

UPPER ST.

277-669-

252-034-

platform were an "alternation in
the executive department of Student Government," the formation
of a Student Activity Central Information Service and a Student
Activities Coordinating Committee, the investigation of parking
and food facilities on campus,
and other programs.
Doth Cook and Vallebona are
presently representatives in the
Student Government assembly
Cook is a senior political science major from California (Ky.)
and Vallebona is a junior in international economics from South

ALDERSGATE METHODIST CHURCH
ORIN M. SIMMIRMAN, JR., Minister

9:50 a.m. Church School; College Class: Sara Davis, Teacher
SUNDAY SERVICES
11:00 a.m. and 720 p.m.

few

Dnsl4 W. Dsrhmm, Minister
8. Lla
(Next U Hospital)
J. B. Weed, Pastoral Minister
Sanders, AsteeUte Minister
Ssmoel Morris, Yooth M Mister
(Parking In Bear ( Church)
9:50 a.m. Sunday School
"I Will Pray for My Church,' Dr. Durham
9 a.m. and 11 a.m.
"The Result of the Resurrection"
7:30 p.m.
(Parking In Bear ef Chnreh)
Narsery for ill Services

1U

Dwty

Continued From Page

305 votes from Blazer,
to Snyder's 173.

1

"What's the matter, don't you
trust me," one counter questioned as an observer leaned
over her shoulder. The observer smiled weakly and moved
to another table.
As counters drank coffee,
others droned the names of candidates tabbed by the ballots.
Each table had at least one
counter and one recorder.
As the time wore on, observers gathered in little cliques,
quietly discussing the results.
They gathered around Porter as
he collected results and made
their own mental tabulations.
It looked good and bad for
both Steve Cook and Sheryl Snyder at varying times. The first
poll tabulated, the Medical Center, showed a 14 vote plurality

i.
T

inspecting toilet

and

As the Donovan Hall vote
was tabulated, the predictions
clung to Snyder. Snyder polled
389 votes at Donovan, compared
to Cook's 176.
However, as the Blazer Hall
vote came in, predictors began
again favoring Cook, who drew

Neysa Jo Routt, a junior Spanish-hmajor, was omitted
Wednesday from a list of the
five iinalists in the Miss Lexington contest.
Miss Routt sang "Rock A Bye
Baby With A Dixie Melody" in

ing, supposedly by
class. Mr. Flickinger was teamed
with David Holwerk, "Thei
Caped Crusader," who also car-- i
ried the law school by a wide
margin.
"The Caped Crusader," who
ran on a platform of inspecting
toilet seats and kissing babies,
drew 126 votes, wliich was 77
votes ahead of Ids nearest competitor, William Murrell.
From available reports, the
draft of Holwerk and Flickinger
started when a mass of law students burst out of a classroom
yelling "Vote for Holwerk and

Fountain

HALE'S PHARMACY

RICHARD T. HARBISON. MinUter
College Class. Mr. Jack Matthews, Leader

Phone

Leiington,

255-774- 9

CRESTWOOI) CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1832 BELLEFONTC
Sunday

Worship

DRIVE
-- 1

REV.

JAMES A. LOUIS, Minister

0:30 a.m.

Sunday College Seminar
For Transportation Call
277-378- 9

9:30 a.m.

Flickinger."

IS S. LIMIJTONI

MILL ST.

9:45 a.m.

Sundries

277-402- 9

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
174 NORTH

.

Acton front

UK

Medical Center

Ky.

1

one-ye-

istory

Drugs

results as they left, but they
weren't positive.
Porter and five others moved
down to the Student Center
Board's Office with a tabulator
for the final results.
An hour later, at 11:30 p.m.,
the result was obvious. A slight
majority for Cook, and an even
wider majority for Vallebona.
Ironically, the first vote officially tabulated was for Cook.
After announcing the results
to a yelling crowd standing outside the Student Center, Porter
congratulated Cook and Vallebona for a good campaign. He
said it was clean and honest.

A little after midnight today VV. Garrett Flickinger graciously
conceded the Student Government vice president's election.
.
i
i
u iuiiuMun s,peecn, ae- SDOnded that Flick (as he 1S
II
one reporter Dy telenvtieu iu
caiieu oy nis students; took a
and two Siamese cats
phone
greater interest in the student
whining in his apartment, Mr. body than the rest of the candiFlickinger "wished my oppodates.
nents a successful and energetic
Mr. Flickinger was chairman
year.
of the Senate Committee which
With little remorseful emotion
drafted and fought for the adoptevident in his voice, Prof. Flickion of the Student Rights Code,
inger admitted that he didn't run now
being reviewed by Board
much of a campaign. In fact, even of Trustees committee. a
close observers of the SG race
Mr. Flickinger, who has a
were not aware of his candidacy.
leave of absence, efHowever, the associate profective at the end of this semesfessor of law took the majority
was reported by one law
of votes for the vice presidency ter,
student to have taken the leave
at the law school poll.
to serve as vice president of the
Mr. Flickinger, who drew 90
Student Government. Prof. Flickvotes at the law school, ran
inger denied the rumor.
47 votes ahead of his nearest
Mr. Flickinger said he recompetitor, Martin Wheeler, who garded his most formidable opdrew 43 votes.
ponent as the "more attractive
The move to draft Prof. Flickcandidate," obviously referring
inger as a write-i-n candidate beto Kendall Threlkeld who drew
gan some time Thursday morn1,554 votes for the vice presithe freshmen

er

babies

compared

Flick Concedes, Says
He Wishes Everyone Well

for Snyder.
Cook and Snyder were considered from the very start of
the race the leading contenders. Observers seemed certain
slate was
the Murrell-Wheelhurt by its affiliation with Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS).
Some said that David Holwerk, the Caped Crusader, was
thought funny, but never considered a serious candidate. Holwerk ran on a ticket of kissing

DONALD R. HERREN, Minister
2356 HARRODSBURG RD.
10:50 a.m. Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. College Class
10:50 a.m. "The Eagerness of Doubt"
Vesper Worship, Mr. Herron
or
PROVIDED FOR STUDENTS
Coll
TRANSPORTATION
277-617- 6

A''1"

:

--

The clincher was the Student
Center vote, supposedly the voting place of the independents.
The Student Center vote, the
largest and last to be counted,
was 625 for Cook and 401 for
Snyder. The 176 margin final
vote count difference between
the two candidates thus perhaps
was, in part, recorded at the
Student Center.
As counters finished tabulating the Student Center vote,
Porter ordered all counters out
of the room.
Some thought they knew the

the talent competition.

SOUTHERN HILLS METHODIST CHURCH

STj

x

Those Counting The Votes Knew
It Was Tight Race All The Way

Name Omitted
CENTENARY METHODIST CHURCH

PJk if

Students vote at the Student Center in yesterday's Student Government election. Votes cast there may well have been decisive
as Steve Cook carried the poll by slightly more than his final
176 margin.

America.
Results from the representatives races will be tabulated this
weekend.

seats.

1881 EASTLAND PARKWAY

-- .,r

.

A sign was posted behind
the voting polls proclaiming,
"You can put your trusts in
Mr.
Flickinger"
Flickinger
teaclies a law course in trusts.

Asked why Prof. Flickinger
was drafted for the vice presidency, one law student re- -

1

1

.1

1

ar

dency.

On a closing note, Mr. Flicksaid he was "delighted
with the interest displayed by
the law students in the election

inger

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
.station, University of Kentucky. Lexington. Kentucky 40508. Second class
postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4988.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
as the Kernel
published
since 1915. continuously
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
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jjjj

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday, April

7,

l7 -

:i

Nurse Returns From Africa Understanding Needs
was Naleriagu, in the northern

By MARYJEAN WALL

Kentucky nurse who spent

-

Classified advertisements, S cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy Is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113, Journalism Bids.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not Include,
as a qualifying consideraUon In deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.

Furnished apartment-livi- ng
room and bedroom combined
large kitchen, private bath with
shower, off street parking, first floor,
private entrance. All bills paid.
RENT:

FOR

$85.00.

Call

5A4t

5.

Woodland at Euclid,
furnished house. Students.

FOR RENT:

374

5A5t

1.

WANTED

Bus drivers. Must have
valid Ky. driver's license. Must be
over 21, have mornings or afternoons free. Apply Wallace's Book
Store.
7Ftf

WANTED

FOR SALE

SKYLARK. automatic.V 6
deluxe trimmings, very nice.
JEEP UNIVERSAL,
drive. Phone
days,
4A4t
nights.
'61 Auster Healey 3000.
FOR SALE:
Good condition, two tops. Call
4A4t
or
DUICK

1964

-

CLASSIFIED

1954

885-52-

278-54-

254-80-

BOOK
STORE
needs
your used textbooks. Bring them In
We pay top prices. We buy
anytime.
all used textbooks.
9Ftf

WALLACE'S

with thatched roofs which
with cow dung.
Electricity and running water
are unheard of in the huts, and
can be used in the hospital and
missionaries' homes only at certain hours of the day. The native
women must fetch their own
water from a community reservoir, and carry it back to their
families in huge goards which
they balance on their heads.
The native women, Miss Ward
explained, are not considered of
much importance by the African
men. Their purpose is merely to
work and to have children, and
a woman
is not considered
of much value when she can
no longer bear children. It is
not uncommon to walk through
an African village and see the
men sitting together and talking, while the women are hard
at work.
Miss Ward's alarm would
awake her each day at 5:45 a.m.
Shortly after this she would leave
her home and walk to the stone
hospital, and prepare for a working "day" that would last into
the night. A clinic was held
five days a week, and although
it didn't open until 9 a.m., people

topiK--

part of that country.
What she found was not ena month in Ghana has returned
with the impression that "the couraging.
"Two physicians and two
need for Americans to work in
Africa is overwhelming."
nurses administer to 15,000 people
Patricia Ward, a native of in one area," she said. "They
Shelbyville, and a graduate of work 15 hours a day, seven days
Kentucky Baptist Hospital in a week."
The people of Naleriagu are
Louisville, flew to Ghana last
April in response to a plea from undernourished and live in una missionary doctor there, who sanitary conditions, she also
needed relief. Her destination found. Their homes are mud huts
A

are plastered

would begin to arrive and line
The
up several hours
largest numlxr of persons ever
treated in a five-hoperiod was
356, which averages out to approximately one minute per person.
"Tliese people can't get what
we'd call excellent medical care,"
she said, "but any small amount
we can give them, they consider

something special."
There were 60 beds in the
Naleriagu hospital, but, mused
Miss Ward, "nobody ever stayed
in bed." Many patients would
sit outside during the day, and
sleep on the floor at night. "They
weren't used to sleeping in beds,
because they don't have furniture," she pointed out. "A bed
would have seemed as hard and
uncomfortable to them as the
floor would seem to us."
Miss Ward quickly discovered
that being a nurse at the
Naleriagu hospital also meant
being a mechanic, an engineer, a
repairman, and a carpenter, too.
"Sometimes the nurses even had
to make crutclies," she laughed,
"if the carpenter decided to take
a holiday and didn't show up."

"It was a challenge to work
with thce people," she continued, "lccausc we couldn't
communicate with them. We always had to work through an interpreter, and since there were so
many different dialects, sometimes the interpreter couldn't
help."
"The people were friendly,
though, and appreciative of anything and everything we did for
them."
"Most Americans arc willing
to give up some of their money to
help missionaries," she pointed
out, "but they arc unwilling to
give up themselves. Not only arc
doctors and nurses needed, but
agriculturalists and teachers, too.
Tlic people in Africa must be
taught to help themselves; how
to make the most out of their
resources."
"And if you are thinking of
Africa in a missionary sense,"
she concluded, "the giving of
yourself, 16 hours a day, six
days a week, says much more
to these people than the
pulpits ever will."

beat-'ngo- n

READ THE KERNEL
CLASSIFIED COLUMN DAILY

4.

SALE: 1963 Chevrolet Impala.
Owned by Cotton Nash. Excellent condition. New tires. Call
4A4t
or

FOR
327.

1,

7.

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than April 14.

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* The Kentucky

Iernel

The South's Outstanding College Daily

Univkhsity of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

1894

FRIDAY, APRIL

7. 1967

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walter
Stkve

1Uk:c:o,

M.

Chant,

Editorial Vagc Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

William Knapp,

Business Manager

Perhaps A New Era

Sincere congratulations must be
offered to Mr. Steve Cook and Mr.
Raphael Vallebona for their upset
victory in Thursday's Student Government election. Although The
Kernel endorsed William Murrell
and Martin Wheeler for the respective offices of president and vice
president, we nevertheless think
that Cook and Vallebona will be
competent administrators in Student Government.
This election was significant for
several reasons. First, there were
4,784 votes cast, by far a record
number in such an election. The
student body is to be commended
for its interest in its representative body. Hopefully, the turnout
is a good indication that apathy
is not always with us.
We also think Cook's victory
symbolizes the end of almost complete domination of Student Government by a few people. Since at

least 1962, Student Government has
been controlled by the same cliche-ridde- n
group of campus politicians,
and the UK student thus has been
far from a significant force in campus affairs. We hope students can
now regain control of their Student
Government and play a significant
role in the decision-makin- g
process.
All of this means that Cook and
Vallebona will have a great responsibility on their shoulders next year,
for they are truly representatives
of all students and must protect
the interests of each of them.

1

Finally, the SDS candidates,
Murrell and Wheeler, and David
Holwerk, the Caped Crusader, must
be commended for the spice which
they added to the campaign, spice
which undoubtedly helped to create
the interest in this election.

Hclpei

Perhaps a new era is just over
the horizon.

Letters To The Editor

Readers Disagree With Endorsement Editorials
Editor's 'Note: The following
two letters were received too late
to allow publication prior to the
Student Government election.
To the Editor of The Kernel:
We find it interesting that The
Kernel has chosen to endorse the

ticket for Student
Government office. Certainly The
Kernel is entitled to express its own
views on its editorial page. What
is disturbing is the fact that Sheryl
Snyder has been rejected not because of his platform or his ideas,
but because The Kernel associated
him with a Machine.
If, as The Kernel chooses to
believe, the Student Government
is run by a Machine, why is Mr.
Snyder working so hard explaining
his platform, and winning votes
honestly, instead of standing aside
and letting Machine votes pour in?
The Kernel also chooses to speak
for the faculty and the entire campus on the Student Government
question with statements such as,
"Neither the Administration northe
students respect the current leadership . . ." From our point of view,
it appears The Kernel's editorial
staff, with its intimate and overwhelming knowledge of campus affairs, should have placed itself in
the running for Presidency of the
Student Government.
And, when we speak of Machines, we should note the monopoly The Kernel has in voicing its
own opinions, while being supported involuntarily by the students.
Murrell-Wheel-

er

Jerry O'Brien
Freshman

A& S

Thank Tor Assistance

Americans do not commit war
crimes. We only make occasional
We appreciate your informative
editorial on William Murrell and errors of judgment. This is best
Martin Wheeler. At the time, there illustrated by our bombing of a
were some doubts in our minds Vietnamese village several weeks
as to whom we should support ago. We killed nearly a hundred
in the election. However, after women and children by mistake.
reading carefully your endorsement The mistake, of course, was not
that we bombed civilians, but that
of these two excellent (?) candidates, it leaves us no other course we bombed the wrong civilians.
Personally, I believe the entire
of action to follow except to seek
Vietnam war is a monstrous crime
responsible student leaders elseagainst humanity. However