xt7ns17sqv4f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ns17sqv4f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650907  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September  7, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, September  7, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7ns17sqv4f section xt7ns17sqv4f Inside Todays Kernel
featured

A

Vol. LVII, No. 4

I

1

University of Kentucky
19G5

LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY, SEPT. 7,
::

v

J

UK's first Negro professor discusses
living conditions ond sociology work:
Poge Two.
Students for a Democratic Society
(SOS) to hold meeting on campus:
Two.

-

K ;T!r

.r.

v

r

x vPV-

y

'
V'. '.,11
'.,, American Entertainment
-

-

-

-

-

...

Foreign student advisor Ben Averitt helped demonstrate American musical entertainment to foreign
students at the University and Community Inter- national Orientation and Homecoming Sunday on

-

Eight Pages

tt,

ffT

t

I

ion

,

J

:I..--

the lawn of William Kelly, of the Rotary Club,
Dr. John Oswald and Dean Kenneth Harper gave
addresses to the assembly of about 500 students
and members of the Rotary Club.

ni

The Associated Press
NEW DELHI, India-Ind- ian
and Pakistani bombers struck at
large cities in both countries today, spreading the conflict 1,000
miles across the subcontinent to
East Pakistan and eastern India.
Hit in Pakistan were the
capital, Rawalpindi, the chief
port of Karachi, and Dacca, cap-itof East Pakistan. A Pak- al

Additional world news
pears on page seven.

ap-

istani spokesman declared Indian
planes "indiscriminately bombed
civilian areas;; and warned the
attacks will be met in kind.
This implied an air raid on New
Delhi.
Pakistani
India reported
planes hit "civilian areas" in
Amritsar, largest city in Punjab
State, adjacent to Kashmirwhere
fighting was raging on the
ground.

Formal Rush
Pledges 393
To Sororities

Also hit was Ferozepore, 50
miles southwest of Amritsar.
Six persons were reported killed.
The Indians said Pakistani
planes bombed Kalaikunda Air
Base at Calcutta, far from the
front in eastern India, and
Kharagpur, about 70 miles southwest of Calcutta.
These reports showed the air
war had spread 1,000 miles eastward from Kashmir and border
areas of India and Pakistan to
East Pakistan and eastern India.
A Pakistani spokesman
aid
six persons were killed and 15
wounded in the Indian air raid
on Rawalpindi.
The Pakistani
air force
claimed destruction of 46 Indian
planes, including 24 today in an
air battle over Sargodha, in
Pakistan 250 miles south of Rawalpindi, and in raids on India
bases.
India conceded the loss of
eight planes but said its air force
decisively defeated the Pakistanis
in aerial combat, destroying IS
U.S. made B57 bombers, F104
supersonic Jet fighters and F86
Sabres.
A report gave no breakdown,
but earlier accounts had said at
least two supersonic F104s and a
B57 bomber were shot down.
Official sources in Rawalpindi
said the Indian air force attacked
a number of other targets in East
Pakistan, including Chittagong,
Kurmi, Kurmitola, Jessare and
--

"They are forcing us to react,

forcing us to take further action
to stop this madness in which
they are indulging. These attacks
are going to be met."
For military reasons, the
declined
to say
spokesman
whether the Pakistani Air Force
would bomb New Delhi. He could
give no details of the air raid
on Karachi.
In the ground fighting, New
Delhi radio claimed Indian troops
were "maintaining steady pressure" on Pakistani troops and
were riaking progress on the
Lahore front. But other accounts
indicated the drive was stalled.
Lahore is 15 miles inside Pakistan and about 110 miles south
of the fighting front near Ohhamb
in Kashmir.
Pakistani spokesmen declared
the Indian troops had penetrated
into Pakistan near Lahore but
had been pressed back to near
the frontier.

Steel agreement reached; contract
signed: Poge Seven.
Marines may hove to resort to the
droit: Poge Seven.

Centennial
Opens Series
In Hninanities

Six noted scholars and artists will participate in a Centennial
Humanities Seminar beginning here today.
Running through the fall semester, special lecturers will be
Eudora Welty, Louis Zukofsky, R. Buckminster Fuller, Hugh
Kenner, Eugene Ionesko and Robert Palmer. Each person will
seminar and present one public lecture
participate in a three-da- y
in College of Commerce Room 322.
Eudora Welty, a novelist,
painter, and photographer, opens
the series today by lecturing to
12 specially selected University
upperclassmen participating in
the seminar. She will present her
public lecture at 4 p.m. Thursday.
Among Miss Welty's most
noted literary works are "A Curtain of Creen," "The Robber
A
"The Bride of of new chapter in the history
Bridegroom,"
the
Panhellenic
Innisfallen," and "The Wide starts University's Chi
today as Alpha
Omega
Net."
sorority begins its colonization at
Zukofsky begins his two-da- y
the University.
stay on campus Sept. 28, and will
Colonization is the process by
present his public lecture on Sept. which a
sorority establishes itself
30. He is the author of "Bottom:
on a college campus. A group
On Shakespeare," a
of girls who will form the nucleus
study of the famous English
of the new chapter are pledged,
writer, and is recently retired from and their number
grows with the
the faculty of the Polytechnic
strength of the chapter.
Institute of Brooklyn.
Camma Phi Beta, the other
Fuller, a mathematician, enginew sorority at the University,
neer, philosopher, writer and inbegan its colony late last spring,
ventor, will lead the seminar The
Alpha Chi's, however, electOct.
Professor of architeced to come on campus and rush
ture at Southern Illinois Univerthis fall after formal sorority rush.
sity, he is the inventor of the geoTheir first rush parties will be
desic dome. His space frames and
this Sunday at the Alumni House.
enclosures are held by many
These first Open House Teas
authorities to be some of the
on Sunday will be primarily for
greatest architectual advancewomen who are interested in
ments since the arch.
becoming part of an Alpha Chi
Kenner, head of the English
department at the University of colony here, according to Joanne
California,; Santa Barbara, and a Classon, graduate counselor for
the sorority. Three national ofprodigious writer of literary critificers will be present to explain
is set for an October semicism,
nar, the specific date yet to be just how the sorority intends to
These
determined.
go about colonization.
officers will remain at the UniDates for the lecture appearances of Ionesko, a composer and versity during the entire Alpha
professor of music at Cornell Chi rush.
University, and Palmer, acclaimEighteen collegiates from Ined as Europe's most avant garde
diana University and Butler Uniplaywright, have not been set.
versity also will be here for SunStudents selected by their deday's parties. In addition to
partment chairmen and invited
these, members of the dean of
by UK President John W. Oswald
women's staff and the presidents:
to participate in the Centennial
and rush chairmen of the various
sororities will attend.
Continued on Pace 7
two-volu-

12-1- 4.

Hopkinsville To Hold Dedication

UK's newest Community College will celebrate its official
opening at a Centennial Convocation Dedication Program on
Thirteen UK sororities pledged
Thursday.
393 girls during the formal fall
The Hopkinsville Community
rush which ended Monday.
College is the newest of nine UK
There were approximately 700
Community Colleges. It opened
its facilities this semester.
girls out for rush this year, as
The new community college
compared with the 612 who parLalmunirhat.
has an enrollment of 332 students
ticipated last fall. The sororities
A spokesman said the Pakisand a faculty of 19.
pledged a total of five less than
e
tani raids in eastern India were
last year's
In honor of the occasion, the
high.
Chi Omega sorority pledged in retaliation for Indian air force UK Centennial Central will have
the largest class, adding 40 new attacks on Fait Pakistan. One its offices at the community colSabre Jet was downed but the lege for the two days of the dedipledges to their rolls.
The total role of new members pilot bailed out over East Pakiscation.
for the 11 other sororities was as tan.
The program is the fourth of
Newsmen in Rawalpindi visitfollows: Alpha Delta PI, 30; Alnine University of Kentucky Cenpha Canuua Delta, 26; Alpha Xi ed a residential suburb where tennial Community College ConDelta, 25; Delta Delta Delta, 32; bombs demolished one home, vocations.
Delta Cainina, 30; Delta Zeta, killing a woman, child and two
Cov. Ed ward T. Breathitt, re34; Camma Phi Beta, 33; Kappa men, and damaged surrounding
cipient of UK's Distinguished
Centennial Alumni Award and a
Alpha Theta, 27; Kappa Delta, dwellings.
The Pakistani
spokesman, Hopkinsville native, will deliver
32; Kappa Kappa Camma, 35;
the dedication address at 3 p.m.
and Pi lk-tPhi, 34; Zeta Tau pointing to the raids on Rawalpindi and Karachi, declared: Thursday.
Alpha, 15.
all-tim-

College women ore conservative with
style: Poge Three.
Student Congress revamping discussed
in editorial: Poge Four.

AXOColony
Established
On Campus

War
Spreads Over Continent

Indian-Pakista-

Freshmon Camp
in pictures:
Poge Five.
Coach Bradshow tolks obout Rodger
Bird: Poge Sii.
Defensive tackle position considered:
Poge Sii.

About 50 UK administrator's,
faculty, and students from the
Lexington campus will join the
Hopkinsville Community College
faculty, staff, students, and
friends in the dedication ceremonies.
Dr. Louis Cordon, UK visiting
Centennial professor in the physical sciences, is expected to be
among the guests at the Hopkinsville convocation-dedicatioAlso participating in the ceremony program will be Dr. Thomas L. Riley, director of the Hopkinsville Community College; Dr.
Ellis Hartford, dean of the UK
Community College System; and
Dr. John W. Oswald, UK president, who will introduce Cov.
Breathitt.
The 101st Airborne Division
Band, Ft. Campbell; will perform
the program music at the convocation.
Dr. Oswald will also be the
speaker at a noon luncheon open
n.

ing the day's activities at the
Hopkinsville Coif and Country
Club.
UK Centennial CraduateSam
Burke, freshman in the College
of Law and a Christian County
native, will deliver a student
greeting at the luncheon. It will
be answered by Katherine A.
Duco, Hopkinsville Community
College student.

Also participating on the
luncheon program will be Dr.
Riley, F. Frnest Lackey, Hopkinsville mayor, and . Jeff Hammond, president of the Hopkinsville Chamber of Commerce.
The convocation marks the
opening of the community college
convocations for the second half
of the Centennial Year.
Other convocations scheduled

fortius semester are at Somerset,
Cumbeiland,
Elizabethtown,
Prestonsburg and Ft. Knox.

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Tuoda. Sqx.

7.

Ii3

UK's First Negro Professor
Has Joined Sociology Staff
"Had

By FRANK BROWNING

Attittant Manajin? Editor
Dr. Joseph Scott didn't thir.k
that his corr.ir.5 to it L'nrver-it- -

rrT

ata
story.
Dr. Scott, the first Nero
here.joined the sociology
department at an assistant professor this surr.rr.cT.
He explained his stand at
sirrpjy beirvj; another nrvr professor at UK who hat yet to
accomplish anslhir,? of newsworthy value and whose main
concern is not who he it, but
what he may accomplish.
The mere fact that he would
be the University" first
e
Negro professor was of little consequence to the sociologist.
And "things have been beautiful" for theScotti tincethey have
been here, he explained.
foil-tim-

Wilson Fills

Development
Directorship
Leonard L. Wilson, former
sic president of dev elopment at
Hanover College, has accepted
the new Iy created post of Director of Development for the Office
of the Vice President for University Relations.
In this position Wilson will
encourag- - voluntary financial
support for the University programs and projects. This support
will come from gifts by organi-

zations, foundations,
tions and alumnae.

corpora-

previously served
as assistant to the president at
Illinois College and director of
admissions at Hastings College.
A graduate of Hastings College,
he did graduate work at Boston
University.
He later completed studies at
the Development Officer's Institute of the American College
Public Relations Association.
Wilson,

39,.

Exclusive! First Run!
Kow tha rcmn blaze
with the stay based on
r!
tha blistering

e had any trcutCe
housirj; I wcili complain, bet we haven't."
"I oeser I:ed in a segregated
fin-ir.-

To
neighborhood.
segregate
would be the charge. r:t
Dr. Scct said previous- -

h.

Last sumrer Dr. Scct ard his
wife, who is from Puerto Rko.
moved into a brick borre in the
Cardinal Valley subdisision here,
previously an
neighborhood.
Not only does Dr. Scott anticipate no problems, but he explained that in one cf his courses
Last summer, he and the sociology
class be was teaching were able
to discuss racr relations openly
and
reservation.
Dr. Scott said that while he
was doing military- - service, the
Army recognized his training
without regard to race and put it
to use by placing him in a human
research unit. He spent most of
his time in the Army at Ft.
Benning, Ca.
The
professor played football and was an intercollegiate debater at Central
Michigan .University. He still
continues daily basketball work-

In addition he ruhmsittd two
research articles for publication
this summer. "Social Change in
Cocrr.ur.;ty Family, znd Fertility in Puerto Rico" and "Social
Class Factors Underlying the
Civil Rights Movements in a
Small Town in Indiana."
Currently he is working on a
project dealirrg with the reactions
of new-- soldiers to complex military organizations.

all-whi- te

outs.

Dr. Scott took his doctorate
from Indiana University and
taught at the extension center
of American University while at
Ft. Benning.
This fall he will teach two
courses, Introductory Sociology
and The Community.

Med School
Enrolls 75
As Freshmen

Women are down. But men
will be up in the
graduating class at the UK College
of Medicine.
Dr. Roy K. Jarecky, Associate
Dean of Admissions at the
Medical Center, released those
statistics about this year's Medical School freshman compared to
those of last year.
There are four women in the
new class of 75 students. Twenty-fiv- e
of the class are married,
12 of them with children.
Last year, in an enteringclass
of 75, 14 women and IS married
students w ere included. There are
61 Kentuckians in the new class,
the same number as last year.
Ages range from 20 to 33.
There are 50 new dental students, the same as last year,
although all are men this time.

10

Campus Chapter Of SDS
To Meet, Show Film
On Organization Sept. 9
"Hie Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), a controversial
national organization with a chapter on campus, will hold a
meeting to explain the SDS Thursday night.
The meeting will feature a
short film dealing with various
Tickets at this summer's meetaspects of the SDS. A representing carried a number of different
ative from the national office w ill placards, examples of which read
present a short talk and will "U.S. Can't lie A Paper Tiger,"
open the floor to a question and "They Fight Now For Vour Safety
answer period.
Tomorrow," "Peace Creeps Co
The meeting is scheduled for Home," "Support U.S. Policy,"
"7:30 p.m. Sept. 9 in Room 200
and "Contain Chinese Now Or
Dunces
in Funkhouscr Building.
Some
Later
Say
The campus chapter of SDS Never."
was the target this summer of
The SDS, which is reportedly
pickets protesting the national
the student branch of the League
organization's stand on U.S. IN! for Industrial Democracy, an
organization's stand on U.S.
ion oriented tow ard the Socin South Vietnam and
ialist Party, has recently been acton other issues.
ive in civil rights work in the
The pickets disrupted a schedSouth and in welfare work in the
uled meeting of the SDS by firing slums in the North.
questions to the meeting's moderator.
The purpose of the meeting
was to have been to discuss plans
A
h
for a teach-i- n Vietnam, similarto
SHOWS CONT.
NOW!
the leach-ithe
MOM 12:00
sponsored by
national organization in WashOTOPWOnilYING!
ington, D.C. in May.
That teach-i- n attracted a host
of eminent academicians, including Hans Morganthau, Arthur
I
M. Schlesinger Jr., Max Lerncr,
ON THE WAY I
and Clinton Rossiter.
TCcioHiiUrmof
State
of
Undersecretary
McCeorge Bundy was scheduled
to speak at that gathering, but
Coming
Sept. 10
cancelled his appearance at the
R'm Harhon
Audrey Hepburn
last moment, presumably to fly
My Fair Lady"
to the Dominican Republic.
org-niz- at

IlllHllI

n

lira
is

THE BEATLES

SALES LADIES WANTED

Will Dunn Drug

Call Mrs. Hensley for

Corner of S. Lime and Maxwell

appointment
Telephone
254-21- 24

The College Store
Cosmetics:

Max

Factor,

Rcvlon,
DuBarry, Marcclle, Coty

FOUNTAIN

Toft '"fed

FREE

DRUGS
DELIVERY SERVICE

best-selle-

y
LECTURES in
SOUTHSIDE
CHURCH OF CHRIST

J0SEPHLLEV1NE

1533 NICHOLASVILLE PIKE

CARROLL BAKER

"HAMV
FLUS

U4

Saturday, Sept.

rMS40NM

(1) SPEAKERS . . .
MfTBOCOiM

Kentucky Kernel. Uruvernty
SULon, Viuvtrmy of Kentucky,
iO. becofxl
Kentuiny,
t
Ujti. Kentucky.
po.ufc
t'uDiire3 lour Ut.
rekijr during
Lr
kiuioi er except lura. houd)
CKm period.
keesiy duu.
tne uiiri-cmeUrr.
t'ub.iAM-lur m tludcnU of tn
University c Kentucky by Ln iVd
ol btuurnt rut.cUor.A. rrol. Wiu
OtMrrl. ciuimun nd biepnen fa.xi.cr.

ALLEN PHY, Minister,
Bereo Church of Christ
GEORGE

Minister
Paris Church of Christ

n.

r

Ul

Cdet

in

lm.

necofd in lw, d tn lie
Ln
in
fiiUmitd conLiuovuiy
Kernet inc 11J.
Utc

SUUSCKIPTION RAT t3
Vcny, ty riuiii 7m.10
Per copy, lurn liae
K IK.S IX TlXiPHONtS
tU.Ujr. ttcibUv Ixi.UM. MniA
Z121
LA.U
Lm-- ,
N
bporU, Women's fcdtor.

Wua
AdcrUu..

13

Uuuie,

.

OF...

THINK

1:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

HIT!

The Kentucky Kernel
TK

mitury.
tWn

...

OF

11, 1965

The Whole Armor of God
m

WHEN YOU
THINK

CircuUUoo

2jil

ROGERS,

JOHN BAILEY, Minister,
Upper Spencer Church of Christ
and Sophomore Dental Student

C

f
f

V

I

SPECIAL
Cih
Ui4ra

yMf

tUrff arc

riv coup
tkirt UMft4ra . .
Ym

I

!
ytur
at Creppr's!

for vry
. Mv4 100
4 RICCIVE ONI NtW
WHITI DRESS SHIRT . . . f Rtt!
1

cM

FREE

PICK-U-

P

ni A
Ykf

'

, f'V

X

jVN.
'

T"'

--

1

0S

AND DELIVERY

(2) SONG SERVICE
(3) RECREATION

LAUNDRY

k

Ont-Ho-

Cleaning
S rvl

(4) DINNER

FREE!

DRY CLEANING
PROFISSIONAl

606

S. Broodwoy

254-445- 4

SHIRT SIRVICI

S. Ashland

at Euclid

* TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TuoMlay, Sept. 7,

Conservative College Women Find
Their Style Choices Unchanged
Fashions for the college
bound, or firmly entrenched woman student have not changed
much in the last five years.
This is startling in view of the
drastic overhauling the world's
couturiers have attempted each
season. Hut it also speaks well
for the practicality and longsightedness of campus women.
The fads of the fashion designer
she reserves for the special, onetime night of the year.
While Courregcs, Ungaro,
and the rest hassel over hem
heights, college women content
e
with the
length turn
to Villager, Lady Bug, John Meyer, Carland, and Pendleton for
classwear and general date attire. For the dressed occasion,
Lanz and Jonathan Logan join
with the above mentioned favo
mid-kne-

rites to determine what the ladies
will wear.
The emerging favorite for
wear is what Coco
Chanel termed the "liltle suit."
The Jacket, styled on the order
of a man's suit, and the basic
of the skirt manage to retain feminity through the use of
carefully chosen textures, colors
and accessories.
Suits, naturally, demand the
suit blouse. These blouses, available in several styles, have one
thing in common: they are collar-lesCoordinate these with accessory favorites a single strand
of pearls or a monogrammed
solid circle pin and you have
an outfit that will go anywhere
or almost.
For an occasional variation
a silk ascot, held at the throat
s.

...

Women Can Wear Almost Anyt
ling:
If They Have Sound Clothes Sense

Serving University of Kentucky
Students For 50 Years
We Now Feature

AT NO EXTRA COST!
In by 9 . . . Out by 5:00

LAUNDRY

DRY CLEANING CO.

Corner of South Limestone and Euclid

"chicness."

Classic cardigans and
retain their appeal as fashion
toppers, but the coed this season
button-les- s,
will wear
boldly patterned and brightly hued sweaters to add interest
to neutral fall colors brown
tones and navies.

...

ONE DAY SERVICE

box-plea- ts

The big fall colors will be
burgundy, bottle green, and indigo, while the fashion word is
COORDINATE!
Separates, the old reliables
of the wardrobe, have become
more important since manufacturers added jumpers, slacks and
blazers to their lines of skirt and
sweater coordinates.
will tax the artistic ability
of all fashion minded coeds this
season.

-3

COMPLETE LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING SERVICE

by a jeweled stickpin adds a
daring, sophisticated, high fashion flare to the simplicity of
the suit.
gored and
continue to reign as campus
skirt queens. Tweeds, herringbones, houndstooth checks and
textured wools are the hands-dow- n
favorites for skirt and
jumper material because of their
universality,
wearability and
e,

19(i-

IT'S NEW!
LEXINGTON'S MOST
UNUSUAL SHOP

Finest quality

...

Fashion right I

HANDBAGS

over-the-hea- d,

By CAY CISH
When a woman wears her clothes, contrary to popular opinion,
she is not dressing for herself and other women alone. Most women
have men or some special man in mind every time they choose
an article of clothing . . . because the garment is usually bought
for an occasion t" w hich a gentleman is taking her.
How, then, should a woman dress? I would say in the most
flattering and becoming fashions she can find.
The adage that "it's not what you wear but how you wear it"
may be old and considered very trite to many, but to the discerning
dresser, it is the one sure rule for dressing well.
Because everyone is wearing madras cumberbunds, you having
a drawer full is not going to matter if they give you a choppy,
look. Cumberbunds are not for you. And if
you have a tall and elegant figure, fashion models can, but you
usually can't, get away with dressing like a twelve-year-ol(As a point of information, models rarely wear the same type of
clothing which you see on magazine pages beyond the photographer's studio. In fact, models dress as conservatively as college
women.)
Another realm where women often falter and fail involves color
and the mixing and matching of colors and prints. In the last
year it has become camp to break at least two fashion rules you
have always abided by. This is fine if you and your figure can
afford it. One suggestion: go ahead and break a few rules just
make sure as you break them you make a few more to replace them.
And if you must wear your orange sweater with a pink blouse or
d
stockings with Black Watch be careful . . . and
don't advocate the same for everyone!
Most women in college wear only the simple fads because of
price tags and the tendency to be "just one of the crowd." This
is not entirely what I have in mind. A woman should dress, simply,
to be the full woman that she is. The object of dressing well is
to make every one else know, too.
cinched-in-the-midd-

le

d.

Huge selection of famous

brands and at

The conservative look for
that is what college women
across the nation have advocated
need not be drab. Accessories,
like ascots, cumberbunds, silk
scarves, scatter pins, perk up
any outfit. And certain
achieve a unique
and pert effect . . . blues and
greens, oranges and pinks, reds
and browns, ad infinitum.

...

DISCOUNT PRICES

ns

Fads and fancies leave their
impact on the fashion world of
the coed, but the tried and proven favorites are irreplaceable.

VhtyA

HANDBAG HO

f

WPtRWL PlAZA SHOPPING CENTER

'

A

argyle-patterne-

WwwWmwWwW
jCT

JQl

jOC

Fall

jOL

jCT

W-j- y

fOC

1

163 E. Main

NEW SHIPMENT JUST ARRIVED!

We have your size

in America's
No. one sports shoe
By

Weather Fashion

a

DARK
MAHOGANY
BROWN ONLY

4 to 10
AAA to C
S izes

The finest in
ladies' rainwear in
dacron and cotton

ft

j

f

$flfl98

...

fabrics. Colors of
Khaki, Navy,
Maixe.

MOC-NOTC-

O

YOUR MONOGRAM
FREE ON ALL
LADY GLEN COATS

H

THICK LEATHER

SLOT
SOLES

NEW ROUND TOE
HAND SEWN AND HAND LASTED

Hi

BOWLING GREEN
OHIO STATE
U.
MIAMI U.

PURDUE

U.

S. U.

OHIO U.
U. OF KENTUCKY

See our complete
shoe selection
the greatest in town.

sorr

.

163 E. Main

j

* "Nya! Nya! Nyn! So There, Too!"

Reorganization or Results?
Student Congress currently is
fighting to present a new image to
students at the University. While
the recent effectiveness of the organization is questionable, a turning point now may be at hand
with a new administration.
This year could very well further
diminish the effectiveness of Student Congress. On the other haiid,
the year could begin a reign of responsibility for student government
on the University campus.
And, with elections approaching, Student Congress easily could
get off to another bad start. The
body, as always, is saddled with
the handicap left by the annual
turnover of its membership, but
we already see signs of a more
serious threat to its existence that
of nearly annual attempts at reorganization.
We do not mean to indicate a

The March
That Fizzled
Thursday's Congress of Racial

Equality planned for downtown
Lexington march and rally demonstrated only one thing:
Lexington civil rights leaders
are troubled by internal problems
apparently more severe than the
segregation ones they claim exist
in the city school system.
Local CORE chairman Henry
Jones blamed the farcial failure
his back-b-y
on poor planning-behin- d
a dissident faction of the group.
No marchers showed up to be
led down Main Street by the
g
police.
No offical statement-whic- h
a
national CORE leader had promised newsmen-wa- s
read.
No sympathizers appeared ai:
the rally site.
No physical expression of discontent against the "deplorable
conditions" existing in Lexington
schools was made.
No "We Shall Overcome"
echoed in the air.
cycle-ridin-

more workable form of student government is not needed badly, but
we merely want to illustrate that
reorganizational
attempts may
reach a point of diminishing return.
Additionally, many tend to overlook the point that regardless of
the body's structure, it can only
function in terms of the leadership
strength and responsible support
or opposition of its members.
The Kernel supported Winston
Millei and John O'Brien in their
campaign to lead Student Congress
last spring. But we now feel their
day of reckoning is upon them.
They must show the Kernel, as
well as members of the student
body, they they did not support
them in vain.
Therefore, our interest is that
Student Congress not spend too
much time creating an organizational structure which a new administration may decide to change.
A flexible structure should be created to allow each new administration a way of introducing constructive programs in their own way.
As for now, Student Congress
will begin operation under last
year's new constitution. A new
structure probably will not go into
effect before next semester. It would
be easy for the whole semester to
be lost, and perhaps the whole
year. We hope circumstances will
cause no delay in the implementation of new programs for the students.
We urge President Miller to
waste little time in ironing out
this constitutional matter and get
on to areas of student government
needing immediate attention.
Miller already has worthwhile
programs in mind, and we now
urge him to begin these programs
immediately. We hope the fad
around campus to change the organizational structure of student
government every year will not
mean another year lost. This year
the promises of an active student
government must be fulfilled.

The Illuminator
The sunlight inched its way
down upton the empty grave. For
a moment it seemed that its competing beams might overpower the
light which had for so long illuminated that little corner of Africa.
But it could not, for Albert
Schweitzer could not be extinguished by mere death. True, the
physically living man had ceased
to be, but that life, which he so
enjoyed, could never be turned off.
It seems senseless to try to eulogize
a man who is still so much alive,
still so vital.
How can we measure the life
of a man who gave humanity so
much and demanded so little from
it? The answer is simple: We
cannot. We cannot measure something when that something is the
standard for measurement.
Albert Schweitzer was more than
a great man. He relinquished his
opportunity to become a
doctor, a renowned theoa famed musician; and in
logian,
so doing this, he became all of
them and more. He became a truly
altruistic spirit, sharing that which
world-acclaim-

ed

r,:-

What Price Honor?
Speaking of Vietnam in a recent
press conference President Johnson
said: "Our national honor is at
stake. Our word is at stake." It
was not the first time that the
Administration has taken this position, but the emphasis and the
timing of Mr. Johnson's remark gave
it special importance.
The commitment involved in the
President's statement is so portentous that it deserves careful
examination. Obviously, if the
honor of the nation is at stake to
such a degree that American aims
must be achieved, then the struggle
is a war to the finish whatever
the cost. If the United States were
to lose its honor in Vietnam it
would lose its predominant place
in world affairs, while the Communist bloc would win a victory
of staggering proportions. This,
clearly, would be unacceptable.
But the question does arise
whether the honor of the United
States is at stake in such a drastic
and precise sense of the word. If
the United States were to give up,
pull out of Vietnam and leave the
country to its fate there would, of
course, be a loss of honor but very
few Americans would argue for such
a solution today. Between doing
that and forcing Hanoi to sue for
peace on American terms there is
a whole gamut of possible settle

ments that would not be at all
dishonorable to any except those
demanding a complete "victory"
over the Vietcong and North Vietnam.
A statement like the one Mr.
Johnson made arouses uneasiness
because of its categorical nature.
The stakes in Vietnamese conflict
are being raised steadily. The Vietnamese conflict and no one needs
to tell this to Washington holds
within it the possibility of a war
with Communist China and a world
war.
It is neither cynicism nor
appeasement to point out that the
word "honor" is not a scientific
but an emotionally charged term
of very high voltage. If President
Johnson means that Americans
would not accept a defeat so humiliating that it represents a loss of
national honor he is right. The risk
comes in determining when, if or
how honor would be lost. There
are even such things as honorable
defeats and dishonorable victories.
And in between are all kinds of
compromises that are neither one
thing nor another but sensibleand
realistic.
In international politics it is
wise to avoid extreme positions.
American honor must by all means
be preserved; it should, however,
be given a reasonable connotation.
TJic New York Times

DR. ALBERT SCHWEITZER

be had with those who needed him
most.
We will all miss the man, and
envy those who had the grand
fortune to know him because their
lives will find strength and meaning
from his presence.
We can only hope to stand on
the periphery and catch the rays
tliat filter to us. Other mortals cast
shadows, Albert Scheitzer is the
light.

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

The South' Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

1894

TUESDAY, SEPT.

Walter Crant,

Sally Stvll.

News Editor

Homcins, Managing

Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Kenneth Creen,

7. 19.55

Kenneth
Associate Editor

juuy Cmsham. Associate Sews Edito
Henry Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Cay Cish. Women's Page Editor
Margaret IUuey, Arts Editor
,,

Tom Finnie, Advertising Manager

Business Staff

Marvin IIuncate, CircuLtion Manager

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Sept. 7,

1903- -5

Freshmen Spend
Holiday Weekend
At Annual Camp

By JOHN ZEH
Kernel Staff Writer
Nearly 200 University freshmen spent the Labor Day weekend
Freshman Camp, held this year
at the 28th annual
at the new
grounds near Carlisle.
This year's camp differed from the one last year's freshmen
will rcmemljcr; It was coeducational, and no one got sick.
The purpose of the camp the
c
counselors, all
uc iuiu, was noi jusi r. sllIfipnl lrflflpr. aAvUuppersiuucm
,h
to answer questions.
freshmen:
"We want to raise more ques1. Cutting class is all right,
tions in your mind. We want to
but don't cut to go sit in the
make you