xt7nvx05xw36 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7nvx05xw36/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19171004  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  4, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  4, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7nvx05xw36 section xt7nvx05xw36 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
VOL, X
ANNUAL

LEXINGTON,

VICTIM FALLS

STIRRING

BEFORE THE WILDCATS

BY

STORY TOLD

MISS BRECKINRIDGE

Butler Is Again Defeated Red Cross Worker Says
With a Score of
She Is Better Nurse
'
33 to 0
Than Speaker
BRITTAIN STARS AGAIN Y. M. C. A. IS WORTHY
Fears that the caliber of the 1917
Wildcat football team would be much
below that of last year have been cast
aside as a flight of fancy since the
very satisfactory
defeat of the
Butler boys,, who are annually given
one pill coated in anything but sugar
for every quarter they play the husky
Kentucks.
The result of Saturday's
game left little to be desired either
In the score, in the steady and reliable
work of the old men, or in fineness of
performance by the rookies from the
Freshman class and the scrubs of 16's
squad.
To tell the truth a
win was
more than what was expected by the
majority of the football fans. All
were confident that the Butler men
would bite the bluegrass of Barker
stadium but few thot they would take
away a winter's supply of hay for
their Hoosier horses. Previous scores
of games corresponding to that of
Saturday have been in the same class.
Rodes, Haydon, Grabfelder, Crutcher,
Klnne, Hick, Heick and Simpson are
gone, but in their places stand Walker,
Riddle, Shanklin, the Downings, Hem-doHedges, Bastin, DeBrovey, Adair,
Moore, iMahoney
and Thompson, a
brother of the famous "Fats."
Captain Brittain at fullback, played
where he hasn't played since his fresh-imadays. For brilliancy, however,
sure tackhis savage
ling, .breaking up of complicated formations, and ability as team leader
rank with the radiance of the summer
eun.
At 2:30 o'clock Gay kicked off.
the Butler fullback, received the
(Continued on Page Three.)
0

n

Ag-ne-

FORMER CAT STAR
HERE ON FURLOUGH
E. N. Mcllvain, of the United States
navy, sophomore last year in the College of Agriculture, is at his home in
Cynthiana on a short furlough and
was in Lexington Saturday to visit
friends and to attend the football
game Saturday afternoon. Mr. Mcllvain was the plunging fullback on the
Wildcat team last season and was expected to be one of the best members
of the squad this year. He enlisted
In the navy the past summer and has
just completed a course of training at
Newport, R. 'I. He has been promoted
from apprentice seaman to a second
class seaman and is assigned to the
hattle cruiser San Francisco. Mr. Mcllvain says that several of the bunch
of rookies who left Loxiugton for
Newport at the same time ho did early in July had already been assigned
to battleships and some had "gone
across." He will leave Monday to report for active service.

"Hoys," said Miss Breckenridge,
speaking in chapel Tuesday, "I want
you to know that if it is ever my sad
privilege to care for you on the battle
fronts of France I know I will be a
better nurse than I have been a
speaker here today."
This was the close of an address
which by its simple directness and absorbing interest stirred the University
to the very
of Kentucky students
depths. Miss 'Breckenridge has seen
active service at the front as a Red
Cross nurse for the past two years.
Her own personal experiences were
such as to confirm the worst fears .of
the outrageous atrocities which are
being perpetrated daily.
The Y. M. C. A 's are the only
means a soldier has of relaxing from
the terrific strain under which he is
constantly laboring. In the buildings
and tents all thru the warring zone
are magazines, fiction, hot coffee and
light refreshments,
and attendants,
both women and men, always at hand
ready to do their bit to brighten the
lives of the boys. Pianos, grapha-phonestereopticon
lectures, song
services, and other means of amusement are in constant usage. Besides
being a means of enjoyment, the Y.
M. C. A. work is a real protective
measure against all forms of temptation. In London and other cities
away from the firing line, Y. M. C. A.
buildings afford ample accommodation for soldiers in the city for a
short time, perhaps for the purpose
of attending a theatrical perfomranco
or some other form of amusement.
Lack of funds and embarassment over
the condition of their uniforms would
otherwise keep many a soldier from
enjoying a pleasant evening.
Ministers of the various churches
work in connection with the Y. M. C.
A. The chapels on the firing line are
divided into two parts, one used by
the Protestants and the other by the
Catholics.
Representatives of the Y. M. C. A.'s
meet all trains coming into Paris and
other cities, and secure safe rooms
for nurses and other war workers who
are strangers.
"Tho German people." said Miss
Breckenridge., "are Insane. They are
maddened with desire for power and
are blindly following what they think
Is a noble cause. In posterity they
will thank the people of tho United
States for saving them from themselves."
Miss Breckenrldgo Is a former student of tho University. According to
her statement, sho woro her first
"long" dross and mado her "first"
speech in chapel years ago at a meeting of the Philosophian Society.

KENTUCKY, OCTOBER 4,

No.

1917

FLORIDA TO FURNISH
THANKSGIVING MEAT T
The Wildcats will be fed Thanksgiving Day on meat procured from
Florida by the efforts of tho athletic
committee. Florida State University
will send its team to meet the fighting Kentuckians on that date.
When Tennessee called off all athletic activities for the year, the Wildcats were confronted with the task of
obtaining other opponents. The athletic committee wrote and wired In all
directions to find worthy adversaries
and finally received a favorable reply
from Florida State.
As a football team
the Florida
bunch has always been highly recognized. Last year, the team of the
University of Indiana won from the
Florida team by a very small score.
Indiana has often been compared with
Yale and Harvard, and the result was
an indication of the power of Kentucky's Thanksgiving opponents.
Daddy Doles Is pleased with the
new arrangement and thinks it will
prove a better game and a bigger
drawing card than one with Tennessee.

JUNIORS ELE

OT

HALL

PEAG

AMATEUR NIGHT TO BE
OE

FRESHMAN

CLASS

Vice-Preside-

McCLAIN

IS

nt

ORATOR

Following the lead of 'the Senior
class, the juniors held a quiet and
peaceful meeting in chapel Monday
afternoon, and elected Alexander D.
Hall, of Lexington, class president.
Hall is a junior in the College of
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, a member of Sigma Alpha Epsllon
man.
fraternity, and a good
Miss Mildred Collins, of North
a junior In the Home Economics Department, was elected vice
president. Miss Betrle Lucas, of Lexington, was made secretary, and
David R. Dudley, of Earllngton, treasurer.
Lee MeClaln, of Bardstown, was
chosen Junior Orator from a number
MoClaln has not been
of candidates.
In tho University for two years, but
several members of the class testified
as to his ability as an orator. He will
give the junior oration Arbor Day.
Heard Dawes, of Shelby villa; Dick
Duncan, of Lagrange, and Smith Park,
of Richmond, woro elected assistant
football managers.
It Is hoped by tho members of tho
class of "19 that they will be more
In keeping their officers
fortunato
than boforo. In tholr freshman year
tho first president loft tho University
after a few months, necessitating the
election of another. This year only
ono of tho four officors returned to
Frank Heick, last
tho University.
year's president, is now second lieutenant at Camp Zachary Taylor In
Loulsvlllo.

HELD ON

HALLOWEEN

Freshmen Hold Turbulent Rehearsals Should Begin
For Annual Stroller
Meeting Monday in
Performance
.4
Chapel
SOPHS ARE EXCLUDED PRIZES TO
W. D. Thompson was elected president of the Freshman class at a meeting at noon Monday. He is a brother
to "Fats" Thompson.
Amid the customary confusion of
eulogizing the candidates, nominating
them, and arguing points of parliamentary law, five candidates were
nominated. Robert Mitchell and Arthur Shanklin, of Lexington; Craig
Riddle, formerly of Madison vllle;
Thompson, of Falmouth, and a Sophomore, George Zerfoss, were called to
the platform.
Just in order to make the meeting
interesting, several sophomores prevailed upon Zerfoss to accept the
After his
nomination for president.
case had been argued and explained
by at least a dozen speakers, he was
declared a sophomore and asked to
leave the freshman meeting. When
he had retired and the acting chairman had composed himself again,
some one noticed several
in the rear of the room, and a
cry was immediately raised to eject
them. Impetuous hald heads arose
here and there in the meeting to accomplish this task by physical might,
but cooler reason prevailed and the Ingenuity of a girl saved the situation.
She said: "The freshmen girls would
consider it a mark of courtesy and a
recognition of the privileges of their
would resex if the
tire." Then, led by the gallant Virgil
Chapman, who wafted a kiss to the
as he left the door,
assembled
the "thorn In the side" was extracted.
upper-classme-

Miss Collins is Made
of Junior
Class

4

upper-classme-

Once more the machinery of election was set in motion. Someone asked
tho chairman to give up his position
to "a more competent" man, and then
the audience arose in a body to beg
the chairman's pardon. For a time
quiet reigned.
The domand of tho girls that each
candidate be introduced in person was
granted and tho Introduction proceedApparently satisfied, the Freshed.
men called for the vote. As soon as
the final result was announced and
Thompson had received "lo" in his
honor, tho audience stood up In a
body, and without any regard whatever for necessity of vice president,
secretary or treasurer, left tho chapel.
"Twas a most unusual proceeding.

GAME SATURDAY.

Time Hallow'een ! Place Chapel !
Person You! Amateur Night Is coming and everyone in the University is
expected to be there either as actor
or spectator. Rehearsals for all acts
should begin at once.
Always an important event, Amateur Night comes with an added Interest tills year. Since the majority of
the 1918 cast will be chosen from
those who demonstrate their ability
at this time. Less than ten wearers
of the pin are In the University this
year, and as the Strollers intend to
produce a play which will even surpass the successes of past years, new
members will be called upon to take
the places of old Stroller stars.
Membership in the Strollers Is prerequisite to trying out for a part, and
all those who show enough enthusiasm to appear on Amateur Night are
guaranteed election to membership.
inducement,
two
As an additional
prizes of five dollars each are offered,
and for the best act staged by one
person, and one for the best act
staged by more than one person. A
committee from the faculty will act
as judges.
Originality is encouraged. No stut
his
dent should be afraid to
acts,
act. In times past blackface
t
plays,
original monologues and
,
song and dance numcampus
bers, even selections from the immortal Shakespeare have all found places
on the program.
If any student is ready to hand in
his name, or if he is in need of advice he should see one of the members of the committee in charge. The
members of this committee are Estill
Wood, Freda Lemon, Gordon Marsh
and Eliza Spurrier.
try-ou-

one-ac-

take-offs-

FELLOW IN ENGLISH
TO GO TO ATLANTA
The position of Charles Leroy Bowers, fellow In the lEnglish Department
for the past two years, has been filled
by Lester Millor, B. S., graduate of
Vanderbllt, following Mr. Bowers' resignation which was tendered Professor L. L. Dantzler, head of the department, a few days ago. Mr. Bowers
has accepted a position In tho city
schools of Atlanta, Georgia. He Is a
graduate of tho 191C class.
Mr. Miller comes to the Unlorslty
highly recommended.

Klsowhero in tho Kernel It Is stated

BE GIVEN

ho studied dramatic

For two years
In the school

art

of expression at Vanderbllt and was
Instructor In public speaking there for
with Maryville for a gamo Saturday. one year. Ho has also taken special
These arrangements have been com- work In Peabody College, Nashville,

that arrangements

are

being made

pleted and tho game is a "sure tiling." Tennessee.

* F
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Page Two.

STRAND

Open from 10:00 A.
Admission

The Kernel Is In receipt of the following
communication from Dr. P. P. Boyd, Dean of the
College of Arts and Science, which It
takes pleasure In reproducing and sincerely hopes that the student body
give to it the thoughtful consideration
that its contents so much deserve:
"To the Students of the College of
Arts and Science:

'Dear Friends: I would like to
urge upon you the importance of the
work of our various literary societies.
No one has asked me to write such a
message.
do it 'because I have observed with much regret the decline
of literary societies in most institutions, and because I know how valuable they are in the training of the
college man or woman for his or her
life work. There is no profession or
bsuiness where an ability to stand on
one's feet and express one's ideas
clearly, tersely, forcibly, and convincingly is not a distinct asset. There is
no time other than these college days
when you will have the chance to
practice at the job, when your clumsiness and mistakes will cost you nothing. You are here with serious pur
poses, you have made up your minds
that you're going to win. I believe
that you will make a serious mistake
in your campaign for success if you
fail to take advantage of the literary
societies.
"Faithfully yours,
"PAUL P. BOYD,
"Dean College of Arts and Science."
LEXINGTON

HIGH CLUB OFFICERS

ON OLD

SMOKESTACK

Numerals Appear Wednes
day to Surprise of
THRU SOOT TO GLORY
The painting of class numerals in
expeditions.
For
volves hazardous
several years, the University students
have considered it a class privilege
and duty to paint, in the most con
spicuous places, their class numerals
to perpetuate their memory.
The number of desirable locations
for numerals is rapidly diminishing,
Monday felt
and the
sure that the class of 1921 would have
no conspicuous or prominent place for
their numerals.
Not to be outdone by their prede
cessors, facing fire, darkness and s
hazardous climb up a rickety ladder,
members of the Freshman class have
succeeded in painting a large '21 on
the northwest side of the engine-houssmokestack, located directly east of
the Main Building. The feat was ac
complished by ascending
a ladder
placed inside the smokestack, braving
smoke and soot and swinging down
by ropes from the top of the chimney.
The only thing left unsolved in the
is how
minds of the
the daring freshmen kept the paint
white in their ascent up thru that
sootv darkness.
upper-clasme- n

e

upper-classme- n

LIBRARY CLUB ADOPTS
STUDY OF SOCIALISM
The Library Club held its first

pro-

At a meeting of the Lexington High gram meeting Wednesday, October 3.
School Club in chapel yesterday at The club has taken up the study of
noon, Tilford Wilson was elected pres- (Socialism for the first term's work.

ident, Miss Dorothy Middleton, vice
president; Miss Margaret Sexton, secretary, and John Davis, treasurer.
The Lexington High School Club is
composed of the graduates of Lexington High School who are now attend
ing the University. All the members
are very active and the club usually
gives an annual dance.

AT THE ADA MEADE.
"Getting in Golf," a frisky girl act,
and the "Russel Quintette," in comedy
music and song, will head another big
t
Keith feature program which
will show at the Ada Meade Theater
on Thursday, Friday and Saturday of
this week.
Monday starts a special
t
Keith bill of comedy with the special
attraction and hit, "Little iMiss Flirt."
Nine beautiful little girls and two
funny comedians of the other set
make up the "Little Miss Flirt" Company.
Call 012 for seats.
five-ac-

Utopian and Christian Socialism were
the two phases discussed in the meeting. A social hour followed the program.
The next two meetings will have as
topics, Marxian and Progressive So
cialism; Socialism vs. Other Forms of
Radicalism, and Definitions of Con
temporary Socialism.
This subject was chosen for discus
sion because it is becoming one of
the vital movements of our day. In
the universities of the North and East
there are many groups of students
whose trend of thought is almost entirely along the lines of socialistic
ideals.
PROFESSOR NOE AT

Y.

M.

C. A.

live-ac-

Professor J. T. C. Noe will speak at
the Y. M. C. A. meeting Sunday night
in the Y. M. C. A. room on "College
Ideals and How to Realize Them."
Every student in the University should
be out to hear Profesor Noe's address.
A musical program has been arranged.

o4DA MEADE
"Superior Vaudeville"
ALL NEW BUT THE NAME
NEW SEATS
Same Management, Same Classy Shows
"If a Laugh Was Worth $1.00, You'd Leave Here Rich"
Prices, 10c, 15c, 20, 30c, 35c
Boxes, 35c, 50c
612

PHONE

612

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

M.

WILDCATS MAY PLAY
MARYVILLE SATURDAY

L

I

to 11:00 P.

5c, 10c. and 15c.

T "0)1

DR. BOYD COMMENDS
F
LITERARY SOCIETIES

M.

Wildcats must be exercised every
Saturday, and when Southwestern
Presbyterian University cancelled its
game on Tuesday, the athletic committee and coaches combined to find
another worthy opponent. S. P. U.
has no team.
Four telegrams were sent to Mary-vlllBethany, Morris Harvey and
Marshall. A reply from iMaryvllle, at
Maryvllle, West Virginia, proved unfavorable and a second telegram was
sent. Up to three o'clock Wednesday
afternoon, when the Kernel goes to
press, no reply had been received.
Coach Boles said he was practically
certain the game would be player, but
their final decision must be received

DENTIST

Kentucky Kernel

For any kind of dental service call on

DR. J. T. SLATON

$1.00 Per Year

127 CHEAP8IDE
Office

hour,

8 n, m. to

A

p. m. Flione

5c

(Wl--

Per Copy

The College Boys' Store
CO.

GRADDY-RYA- N
INCORPORATED.

CLOTHING, TAILORING, SHOES & FURNISHINGS
"WEAR FOR YOUNG MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG"

to clinch the date.

"I believe they will give us a better game than Southwestern Presbyterian would have done," said "Daddy." "Dr. Tlgert says we have always beaten them In previous games,
but this year's results are hard to
forecast and we may have a tougher
contest than we expect."

EVERYBODY EATS AT

Uncle Charlie's

OFFICERS ELECTED
FOR HISTORY CLUB
The History Club held its first
meeting of the year In the Education
Building at 7:30 last Monday eevning.
Officers of the club were elected before the close of last year, but since
hardly any of them returned, the necessary new ones were elected Monday
night.
Virgil J. Pritchett was elected president; Miss Frances B. Spencer, secretary and treasurer. On the program
committee were appointed Misses Harmon, Conklln and Turner, and Mr.
Triplett. Both Dr. Edward Tuthill
and Professor W . E. Butt, of the
History Department, made short talks
to the members of the club. They
stated the manner in whioh the History Club aided the student in his

YOUNG MEN
HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX
Clothes For Style and Value.
can't find better ones; they're made right and priced right;
sport suits and overcoats,
the styles are the latest ideas in
You

d

regular sacks or full skirted overcoats
that you get it.

SOCIETY

Kaufman Clothing Co.

GRADUATE

C. D. Calloway

MEETS.

The Henry Clay Law Society held
its first meeting of the year in its
rooms in the Law Building on Wednesday at 7:30 o'clock witli President
Chapman presiding.
was staged,
An informal debate
much to the enjoyment of all. The
affirmative was upheld by Messrs. Sul
livan, Dabney and Dummit; the nega
tive, by Messrs. Hardin, Rice and
Campbell. The attendance was par
ticularly good, and the impromptu dis
cussions which followed the debates
showed promise of unusual ability and
enthusiasm upon the part of the pros
pective members. A course of work
for the ensuing year was outlined by
President Chapman, which should be
of great benefit to the young law stu
dents.

we see

BETTER MAKE IT TODAY.

class-wor-

LAW

anything you want

&

Co.

FOOTBALL SUPPLIES, SWEATERS, KODAKS
146 WEST MAIN STREET

A

Guaranteed Personal Tailoring Set vice

That is what you get when you order a Justright Suit or Overcoat. A GUARANTEE that assures you that the quality of the woolens used is of the highest grade, the linings and other findings of the
very best, the workmanship equal to that which you get from the highest-tailors, and the Styles the very latest.

priced

Wo can make you this sweeping guarantee because every garment is made under the direct personal supervision of our designer,
Mr. M. Levy the cuttings and fitting being done right on our premises.
Our line of new Fall Woolens Is ready for your inspection.

Suits and Overcoa's $18 to $25

OF 1897 VISITS UNIV.

Joseph C. Frazer, Professor of Analytical Chemistry and chairman of
the chemical faculty of Johns Hopkins
University, was a visitor at the University Friday. Mr. Frazer graduated
from the College of Arts and Science
in 1897 and was a student under Dr.
Joseph Kastlo.

Justright Tailoring Co.
WE FIT YOU.

145

West Main Street- -

--

Lexlngton, Kentucky.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
44.

.i,

STUDENTS' FORUM
UNIVERSITY "PEP."
Kdltor Kentucky Kernel:
Tlioro arc dogs Hint arc so appreciative of the caresses of their masters that they will wag their tails
nearly off to express their gratitude.
There are animals, normally wild and
free, that suffer captivity and perform
strange tricks at the slightest nod of
a trainer In appreciation of his approval. There are men even who
would lay down their lives for friends
. In appreciation of a good deed or a
favor.
IS very activity
in the University
presents some opportunity to show
appreciation of another's efforts. It
has long been the custom to speak
and write at length on the subject of
enthusiasm and "pep" in athletic affairs. In tho University of Kentucky
there should 'be no need to speak of
this further. We have heard enough.
Let us now realize our obligation and
show that we appreciate what is done
for us.
It would be well to begin in a
matic way. Think of the school activity that is next on the calendar, and
(determine if your presence
or influence is required, then act accordingly. When it has been made clear
to you that you should join a literary
society, do it. When it is a settled
fact with you that your influence
should be used to help the cafeteria
that Is anxious to help you, help it.
When you are asked to be present at
and take some part in the weekly
Wildcat fights, be there.
The interesting activities of campus
life are too numerous to mention all
at one time. Therefore, consider the
immediate subject of football.
Men play because they want to.
They stop when they have had enough.
Wildcats do not. After the ball has
remained in the hands of the opposing team for an exasperatively long
time; after the last ounce of energy
has been extracted from his tired
body, the player has had enough play.
Here by all laws he should stop. One
yell from the loyal rooters, however,
reminds him that it Is not himself
but the school that is doing the playing, and his philosophy is that the
school is not through playing till the
ievtory is on its side. And he goes
on playing.
A member of the band gets enough
music to satisfy him in three practices a week, but when the call for the
band for a football game is sounded,
he remembers that the school wants
more, and he does his part. After
the yell leaders have sweated down
one collar each, they feel they are
through. But the team needs more
encouragement and they begin again.
What is your part, and how far does
your appreciation of the efforts of
others carry you?
ONE OF THE BOYS.
SPEAK.
TO
HAMILTON
Dean Anna J. Hamilton will address
tho Woman's Club of Shelbyvllle Saturday on "Woman awl tho War." The
underlying theme of her talk will be
tho need for women in the present
DEAN

crisis.

ANNUAL VICTIM.

Continued from Page One.)
bull but was dropped by BaBtin before
ho had made any advance. After three
Butler kicker punted wild, the ball
going out of bounds. Kentucky's ball
downs without tho required gain, the
and seven points to come. Walker
(

14

started tho ball down tho Held with a
gain.
Thou, plunges by
Walker, Brlttaln and Clay, who carried
!lt over, advanced
tho pigskin and
stood for six points. "Brit." kicked
goal.
The second quarter netted nothing.
In tho first quarter of tho latter half,
however, Brlttaln battered his way
thru the Butler defense and stopped
for the time being only when ho had
crossed tho last chalk line. I'ullen
and Shanklln took tho places of day
and Walker In the second half. Craig
Rlddcll was sent in for Hedges. Brit
tain, going to Downing's tackle, Adair
went to full.
Brlttaln, not content with one touchdown for himself and two for tho
team, got busier. Butler's quarter,
eager to make complete one of his
numerous attempts, tried another forward pass. Brlttaln Intercepted it,
started like a bullet, and scored after
being chased all tho way by Meyers.
In tho fourth grame I'ullen made the
fourth touchdown of the game. It
was this way. Butler punted. With
confidence did Riddle gather up the
object which Butler had booted and
returned it for considerable distance
thru the broken field. Arthur Shanklln, another freshie, tore thru the line
on the next play for fifteen yards.
Riddle called a formation for a fake
drop kick. Dempsey snapped the ball
to I'ullen who flung himself between
the bars. Brittain kicked goal.
It was near the end when the linal
touchdown was maJe. Shanklln carried the ball up close to the Wildcat
goal on a fine off tackle run. Then,
Riddle, getting behind the bulk of big
Uompsey,
who had thru the entire
game been sweeping everything before him in a manner similar to the
way these monstrous British tanks do
In the war films, crossed over for the
last six points of the game.
flvo-yar-

4

n

e

At an organization meeting of tho
engineering professors tho following
officers wore elected: F. Paul Anderson, president; C. J. Norwood, Dean of
the College of .Mines, vice president;
D. V. Terrell, Dean of tho College of
Civil Knginecrlng, secretary and treasurer. The society meets once a month
and tho discussion is usually of some
engineering or technical process.
Louis Piper, of the College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering,
for Coalmont, Tenn.,
left Friday
where he has accepted a position with
the Louisville and Nashivllc Railroad.

fields.
Mr. J. E. Boiling, of the class of

Right Guard.

Mullane 1917, tells an interesting story about
the work that he is at present engaged
Drayton in tho conseration of food by a meBastin
Left Guard.
chanical process that extracts all the
Sullivan moisture, without the use of injurious
D. Downing
Left Tackle.
chemicals. This reduces the weight,
C. Downing
Seifreid space necessary for storage, as well
Left End.
as making decay and waste almost imMeyers possible. By this process one barrel
Hedges
Quarterback.
of potatoes will be equal to twenty
Dailey barrels In their natural condition and
Gay
represents a food value equal to twen
Right Half.
Wood ty barrels thus each ship crossing
Walker
Left Half.
the ocean accomplishes the work of
Agnew twenty ship bottoms carrying the nat
Brlttaln
Fullback.
ural food product. All starchy fruits
SubstitutionsMoore for Downing, and vegetables, especially those con
DoBrovoy
for Downing, Pullen for taining a good deal of moisturo, may
Gny, Shanklln for Walker, Mahoney be treated to this process. Quoting
for Moore, Thompson for Bastin, from Mr. Boiling's letter ''tho Depart
Riddell for Hedges, Adair for Brittain, ment of Agriculture's recent declaraBrittain for Herndon, Harrison for tion that we have a 200,000,000 bushel
Mahoney. Butler Martin for Meyers. surplus production of potatoes has
lent a now impetus to our effort and
Score by Quarters.
7 0 7 1933 a now contontniont to our sorivco."
Kentucky
Dempsey

Center.

00

000
Butler
2,
Touchdowns Gay 1, Brittain
Pullen 1, Riddoll 1. Goals from
touchdown, Brlttaiu 3 out of 5.
Time of Quarters 10 minutes.
Hlnton, of Georgetown. Umplro
Head
iliaker, of Williams-Jewell- .
Linesman Dr. Fousheo, of

Rof-ore- o

Sam Gullo

Marlins

Davis

Herndon

Three

Jersey, when tho development of tho
P. B. ROBARDS
"Dryventor Equipment" wns under-lakeCOLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR
directly under his supervision.
ENGINEERING
A handsome
little pamphlet, describSuits Dry Cleaned and Pressed.
ing the Dryventor System, has boon Cleaning
$1,25
received at Mechanical Hall and .Mr. Sulfa Pressed
$ ,3s
Miss .Margaret Ingles, formerly of Boiling said of It that he could
Alterations a Specialty.
Lexington, of tho class of 191(5 of the
fully to Its claim. and could subAll Work Guaranteed.
College of .Mechanical and Electrical stantiate all statements therein, wonPHONE 1550-Y- .
Engineering, hns taken a position with derful as they seem, as they are all
152 S. Lime.
Lexington, Ky.
the Carrier Engineering Corporation scientific facts.
of New York. Miss Ingles enjoys tho
(Continued on Pago Five.)
unusual distinction of being the only
woman of a Mechanical Engineering
College in the United States. Since
W. B.
Barber
PROGRESSIVE SHOE
graduation, she has been In the emREPAIRING SHOP
ploy of the Chicago Telephone and
SHOP
My Work and Prices Always
Telegraph Co., of Chicago.
The Closest Shop to University
Keep Me Busy.

The spirit of organization took hold
of the freshmen engineers at Mechanical Hall, Monday morning. After
much turmoil and excitement. G. H.
Oliver was elected president; E. S.
Prothro, vice president; E. Watkins,
secretary, and A. Muth, treasurer. A
constitution.
The committee, which
constitution.
The committee which
had been charged with selecting a
name reported, and the name "John
Hays Hammond Engineering Society"
was adopted. The society will meet
The old men, who steadied the new, every second Monday at the third
the new men, who played like veter hour.
ans, and the cheer leaders, Planck
and Revill, who kept up the courage of
Mr. Earl Dissinger, who was an asboth, deserve credit and much of it.
sistant instructor In the College of
and summary follows: Mines in 1914, visited the University
The line-uFriday. Mr. Dissinger has been locatButler.
Wildcats.
Wolmsley ed in Tampa County, Mexico, for a
Heber
few years and has been most success
Right End.
Dais ful in his work in the oil and coal
Murphree
Right Tackle.

Ptf e

Tho firm manufacturing tho
Equipment" is called "Drying
Systems, Inc." It is located in Chicago, associating tho Wonborne-Kar-peDryor Company and tho Greof
Engineering and .Manufacturing Company. Mr. Boiling was chief engineer
of tho Greef Engineering and Manufacturing Company at Newark, Now
"Dry-vont-

n

HAIR

153

CUT

.25

Shave
Shampoo
Glover's Shampoo

.15

S. Limestone

140

South Limestone.

.25

.50

St., Lexington,

Ky.

HtWH!H"t"l"t"?"t"l"t''l"I"l''r'

J. D. PURCELL CO.
LEXINGTON,

Patronize Our Advertisers

r

(TO

KY.

NEWEST FALL MODES IN
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS,
SKIRTS and WAISTS.
Pleasingly Priced.

YOU

Hair Cut

25c
Geo. T. Martin Barber Shop
139

KAST MAIN

STRKKT

t
Opp. I'hoenix Hotel
I'l.AIN, SHOWER AND

lOlK

TURKISH B
CHAIRS
Ilrot of

Patronize Our Advertisers

Service

Your Attention
POR A FEW MOMENTS
PLFASE THAT IS IF YOU
ARE INTERESTED IN

WHAT IS GOOD AND
ECONOMICAL IN FALL
AND

WINTER WEARABLES

THIS NEW IDEA SHOP BEGAN PROVING
TO THE UNIVERSITY MEN TWO YEARS
AGO THAT IT IS USELESS AND FOOLISH
TO HELP PAY THE BIG RENTS AND HIGH

FALUTIN FIXTURES OF STORES WHEN
BUYING CLOTHES.
THE REMARKABLE

AND

EVER-GROWIN- G

RESPONSE TO OUR ECONOMY PLAN
SHOWS THAT YOU FELLOWS

KNOW A

GOOD THING WHEN YOU SEE IT.

WE ARE GOING TO SHOW YOU SOME
REAL SPEED THIS FALL. SEE OUR FIRST

OFFERING OF NEW FALL AND WINTER
SAMPLE LINES NOW READY.
FALL
HATS, CLOTHES, UNDERWEAR.

* 1

Page Four. r

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

The Kentucky Kernel
Published every Thursday throughout the College year by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the bcnollt of the students,
alumni and faculty of the Institution,
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL Is the official newspaper of the University.
It Is Issued with a view of furnishing to Its subscribers all the college naws
of Kentucky, together with a digest of Items of interest concerning the
universities of other States and Canada.
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
mail matte