xt7p2n4zhb0m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p2n4zhb0m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19190306  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  6, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  6, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7p2n4zhb0m section xt7p2n4zhb0m THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, JCY., MARCH 6, 1919

VOL IX
FORTY PROFESSORS

AND

120

TRACK TEAM STOCK
GOING UP EACH DAY

STUDENTS

GATHER FOR TWO STATE CONFERENCES

"Prominent Men of Southern Colleges and Universities
dress Student Delegates to Y. M. C. A. Convention

Ad-

STUDENT SECRETARY KARL ZERFOSS DIRECTS
Forty faculty members and 120
student delegates from the colleges
and universities of the State gathered at the University last Saturday for the State Y. M. C. A. and
Among the
faculty conference.
most prominent men who addrest
the delegates were Dr. O. E.
Brown, of Vanderbilt University
faculty, now "Y" secretary at
Camp Oglethorpe, Ga..; J. Love
Murray, New York, educational
secretary of the Student Volunteer
Movement; W. H. Tinker, Y. M. C.
A. secretary of the South; H. L.
Seamons, State Student secretary
of Ohio. Dr. Fortune of Transylvania and Dr. Frank L. McVey.
The conference was under the direction of Karl Zerfoss, former student of
the University and now State Student
Y. M. C. A. secretary, to whose earnest
work and well laid plans the success of
the conference was largely due.
The first meeting was held Friday
evening in the Y. M. C. A. rooms with
an attendance of 114. Dr. McVey made
an address in which he said the welcome which he extended was in a spirit
of realization that such bodies would
solve the world problems in the years
to come.
Dr. Benjamin Bush led the devotional exercises and in a short talk pointed out the significance of service in
religion. A double quartet from the
Chandler Normal School sang several
popular glee club numbers.
Edward F. Dabney, a junior in the
College of Law, was elected student
chairman of the conference. A. E. Morris, of Centre College, was elected
recording secretary.

TENNESSEANS

Wllhelm Cornea Back and Grabfelder,
Ten Second Man, Matriculates
in University

ARE EASY

FOR WILDCAT ATHLETES

Kentucky Makes Shift or
Two in Lineup But Winning Game Results;
Score is 30 to 14.
DISHMAN UNEXCELLED

Kentucky clouded up and rained all
over Tennessee last Friday night in
the University gym, when the Wildcat
basketball quintet defeated the
by a score of 30 to 14.
The game was fast and clean, but
the boys who hail from the Dixie side
of Cumberland gap were smothered
from start to finish. Once in a while
they got their hands on the ball, but
they saw it passed from Wildcat to
Wildcat and shot thru the net more
times than they held it. The Kentuck-ian- s
got off to a good start and kept
the going good. At no time during the
hard fought game were they in danger.
New Lineup Presented.
In the Tennessee game the Wildcats
displayed rare form. Probably it was
because of the shifts and changes in
the lineup. Dlshman who is probably
considered the best guard in the State,
if not in the South, was started as forward, playing opposite Lavin who
made his interesting debut in the Cincinnati game. Everett continued as
center as did Burnham at guard.
George Zerfoss played the other guard
position. Thomas was out of the fun
The faculty and student representa- at the start, but he was shot in soon
tives met together Saturday morning enough to put over some good work.
Every Man Is Good.
for the devotional exercises led by Dr.
The unexcelled star of the contest
Henry Meiers, of Centre College; addresses on "Bible Study" by Dr. A. V. was Dishman. Tho playing forward
Fortune, "Social Service," by President almost the entire game, he was all over
McVey, and "The Obligation of Stu- the floor blocking, smashing and breaking up each attempt the Tennesseans
dents to Carry On," by Dr. Brown.
too, he got in his hand
The two bodies then soparatod, the started. Then,
(Continued on Page Three.)
faculty men adjourning to another
room for their special program, while
the student delegatus broke up into MAJOR BYARS TO BE
groups for the discussion of different
GREETED BY REVIEW
subjects. R. F. Sollors, Y. M. C. A.
A review of tho 300 members of the
secretary at Borea College, took charge
of the groups of college Y. M. C. A. R. O. T. C. Unit will be held Friday at
'presidents; Doctor Murray took those the regular drill hour to greet tho
interested in" the Student Volunteer newly appointed professor of military
Movement; Mr. Soamans, a group to science and tactics at the Uuiversity,
discuss social servico, and Mr. Tinker Major David O. Byars. This will be
the first review since the S. A. T. C.
the Bible study workers.
Dean C. R. Melchor presided ut the was demobilized, December 20.
The hour for the review is 11:45
faculty conference.
The speakers
were Judge Lyman Chalkley, of the o'clock, which is now the regular drill
period for the cadet battalion since It
was changed from 7:45 o'clock.
(Continued on Page Six.)

Together with a likely looking bunch
of candidates, the return of one star
and matriculation of one of tho best
track men ever turned out at Louisville
High school, the 1919 track season at
this University promises to be worth
while. Jimmy Wilhelm, who attended
this University last year, has returned.
Louisville high school furnishes a
man in the person of Earl
brother who matriculated this
week. The boy is said to be even
better than "Grabby" was.
Even tho there is pretty good material on hand the track squad and
Coach Gill are now working under difficulties for the reason that outdoor
work Is impossible because of the condition of Stoll Field. During the interim betwees the present muddy and
the hoped for fast track, members of
the squad are loosening their muscles
and working up their speed on the indoor track in the University gymnasium.
Approximately thirty students have
signified their intention of coming out
for track. Among these are Planck,
Kahn, and Knight, letter men;
Foreman,
Gray,
Waller,
Propps, Lavin and Gay.
Grab-felder- 's

STROLLERS ADMIT ONLY
TWENTY-SIXCANOIOAT-

ES

Membership Committee is
Forced to Strict Censorship, by Large Number
of Applications
Twenty-sisuccessful
candidates
from a field of over seventy-fiv- e
is the
result of the Stroller membership race.
Competition was keen and a few favorites may have failed to get under the
wire, but the membership committee in
rejecting such a large per cent, of the
applications, hopes not to discourage
the candidates from coming out for
amateur night next year. No Junior or
senior applications from old students
were considered, and but few sophomores' dramatic achievement lists
wero formidable enough to pass tho
strict censorships.
The play committeo expects to announce its selection within the next
week, with rehearsals boginnlng as
soon as manuscripts can bo obtained
from tho publisher. All now members
aro invited and all old members are
expected to try out for parts.
The names of those admitted to
membership follow.
Upon tho payment of tho fifty cent initiation fee
their names will be entered upon tho
roll book.
Euryno E. Bell, Margaret Smith,
Lougenia Billings, Angle Hill, Duaue
x

(Continued on Page Five.)

WARTIME

No. 13
ENERGY

METHODS TO BE

AND

APPLIED

JO

KENTUCKY PROBLEMS

State Conference on Kentucky Problems Faces Reconstruction Period Full of Hope and Determination
UNIVERSITY HOST TO SIX HUNDRED DELEGATES

NINE LETTER MEN EORM
NUCLEUS JFORJBASEBALL

Squad Called Out Last Monday; New Comers are

Promising

If the weather of the last few days
keeps on coming strong, the crack of
ball and bat will soon be heard on
Stoll Field for Coach Gill issued a
call last Monday for 'varsity baseball
candidates.
The outlook for a high
caliber team seems highly promising.
Nine baseball letter men answered
the call for practice. They were
George Zerfoss, captain and shortstop;
Else McClelland, pitcher and 1918 captain ; Doc Laslie, pitcher; Henry Thomas, catcher; Propps, third base,
second base; Kahn, left field,
Muth, center field, and Mizrach, right
field. Newcomers were Slomer, pitcher from O. M. I.; Winters, pitcher from
Owensboro High; Dishman, first base;
Blakey, third base; Wood, pitcher and
inflelder; Brown, short stop from Louisville High; Faulconer and Morris
from Lexington High, and several others whose names couldn't be learned.
Zerfoss, Captain and Shortstop.
From the list given above it is seen
that the University has enough "K"
men to make a baseball team. George
Zerfoss, who will captain the squad
this year, has several years of good
baseball to his credit. He is one of the
best inflelders in the South and is no
slouch with the stick.
McClelland Is veteran of the squad.
He has pitched varsity ball for three
years and has won more than one game
for himself. His good right arm was
not at its best last year, but woo to
tho batsmen that face his fast and
curved ones this season, "Doc" Laslie,
the other letter pitcher, won himself
a name and several games last year.
Cam-bro-

Infisld Looks Good.

Thonuis is good behind and at the
(Continued on Pago Five.)

KERNEL NOTICE

The University of Kentucky was
host to about 600 delegates to the
Problems Conference this week
and has profited greatly by its
hospitality.
The discussion of
such questions as made up the program of the conference is certain
to have an effect on the life of
the University and every student
that will help. Association with
the big men of the State and with
big men from outside the State, is
sure to enlarge our academic outlook.

Determination to continue the community relation and the earnestness
that has marked Kentucky's part in
the war in the solution of after-wa- r
problems, was the theme of the Conference on State Problems of Kentucky, the first conference of its kind
yet held in the South. The first meeting of the conference was called to order by Judge Edward W. Hines, of Louisville, Tuesday morning.
The program Tuesday consisted of
addresses by President McVey and Arthur W. Macmahon, of Washington,
assistant chief of the Federal Agencies Section, Council of National Defense. Community singing was led by
Professor Lamport and consisted of patriotic songs by the audience.
In his address on "Some of Kentucky's problems," President McVey
spoke of the importance of a more liberal education and a more sympathetic
attitude on the part of civic and State
committees toward it, as being essential in solving the problems facing the
schools. He emphasized the necessity
of having a better' school system and
a more adequate organization recalling
that there are only 220 high schools in
the State, and only 2,400 seniors annually graduating yearly from these
schools. He also mentioned the health
problems confronting Kentucky, revealing excerpts of the reports of the
war department concerning men sent
from Kentucky to national army camps
which indicated the need of a larger
program of public health. As a remedy,
ho suggested
bettor sanitation and
larger and more comprehensive views
relating to ventilation and care of public buildings.
President McVey also
callod to mind tho declining fertility of
tho soil and tho importance of a change
in agriculture to meet this condition.
Ho connected with this the necossity
of building good roads and tho establishment of the agricultural population
as an independent people, which ho
said was "tho backbone of the Com-

Members of tho Kernel staff will
please get all assignments from tho
desk of the managing editor in tho
Journalism Department on Friday or
Saturday of each week. This upplies
to all contributors who have regular
assignments to cover. You will find
your instructions on the hook below
your nume. If these are attended to
promptly, the copy will be in by Tues- monwealth."
day noon.
The problems of capital and labor

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

fAGE2
CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON
AND EVENING

STRAND

Orchestra
The Best Orchestra in the South?

S. R. Griffiths

an

in Kentucky Industries wero dlscust
and he emphasized that these problems
must bo adjusted In such a way as to
Insure successful
Chairman Hines emphasized the idea
of keeping tho "community spirit"
which was aroused during tho war,
alive and active during peace in order
that theso problems might bo more
easily solved and a real Democracy
established.
Prof. Macmahon of the Department
of Law, of Columbia University, now
on a leave of absence in government
work in his discussion of the "Reconstruction of the United States," said
that the present problems were not new
ones, but old ones brought into notice
by tho war. He said that these problems require Increasing community organization for their solution and that
the war had created a new right for
the unemployed, the right of every
man willing to work to have regular
employment at adequate pay.
He told of problems growing out of
conflicting interests, but expressed the
confidence that organization of community life would be an effective adjustment.
Judge Thomas D. Hines of South
Dakota, who recently returned from
overseas with the Y. M. C. A., spoke
in the place of Prof. Elwood, who was
not present. In his introductory remarks, he paid tribute to the works of
President McVey. He said that returning soldiers would not tolerate camouflage, but would demand real
things, and added that this fact might
prove a stimulus to the undertaking
of Kentucky's reconstruction.

DR. FUNKHOUSER TO
ADDRESS AG. SOCIETY
On March 10th Dr. Funkhouser will

address the Agricultural Society at Its
regular meeting at 7:30 p. m. Dr,
Funkhouser is the head of the Zoology
Department, and in spite of the fact
that he has only been here since the
beginning of this year is one of the
best known and most popular members
of the faculty on the campus. He will
deliver the address which he gave to
the mechanical engineering society by
special request.
The meeting is open to the student
body.

OPEN

ADMISSION

DR. TIGERT COMING

and the goal

posts

EARLY SPRING

were

poles.

(Purdue Exponent.)

FACULTY FACTS

Remember, We Show Only The Best in
Moving Pictures.

and 20c., War Tax Inclwdtd

Postponed Engagement.

I sincerely hope that this postponed
The sldo lines were filled with both
winter does not decide to fulfill its en- tho contending regiments, as well as
gagement during the canoeing season.
the thousands of curious Frenchmen.

"Tlgo is coming home." This Is the
message received by Doctor Boyd In
a letter from Coblenz, Germany.
"In regard to my return to Lexington," writes Doctor Tigert, "let me hasten to say that 1 have been planning
to return in the summmer tho the Y.
M. C. A. expects to have employment
for everyone available for at least another year. I am very grateful to you
for allowing me to come for the year,
and I am sure that my experience here
will render me more efficient upon my
return. I have learned more psychology of a certain kind than I could have
learned in many years In a laboratory.
At present Doctor Tigert Is employed
In lecturing to the A. E. F., "I am now
in the lecture business pure and simple. I am going thru the A. E. F.
just lecturing. I spent several weeks
in France around Dijon and Chaumont
before I joined the army of occupation
some weeks ago. I had a most interesting trip up here crossing the old
battlefields of the Marne and passing
thru some very historical points, "Dr
Tigert continues.
"My work just now is to work up a
better appreciation of what our Allies
have accomplished in the war, as our
boys have had little opportunity to
know what other countries have done;
to give historical instruction; to en
tertain to some extent, and help the
morale of the boys in every way possi'
nie. I nave rour lectures that I use
for the most part: "Our Allies," "The
"The Cross of Iron," (a
modification of the address that I made
in chapel last year), and "The League
of Nations." So far I have got along
finely. I have spoken to thousands of
soldiers and officers and have never
had an egg thrown at me yet. Perhaps
the price is prohibitive but yet I get

Grid Champs

Star Abroad

wig-wa- g

(Florida

a year's Borvice.

Alligator.)

He was a new but conscientious soldier on duty as sentry, one evening
at one of the national camps. As an
officer appeared the "rookie" called
"Halt."
The officer obeyed, but the sentry
called again: "Halt."
"See here," said the
halted the first time!"

officer,

"I

"Yes, but the sergeant told us to
say 'Halt' three times and then Are."
Needless to say, the officer did not
linger.

SUITS AND TOP COATS

POPULAR PRICES

$25,00

$27.50,

$30.00

$32.50,

$35.00,

$37.50

Jus tright
Tailoring Company
Lexington, Ky.

St.

145 W. Main

W. B. MARTIN'S

THE BIG VALUE
"GET IN" on it

BARBER SHOP
HAIR CUT

25c

SHAVE

18o

SHAMPOO

26o

TONIC

A Good Warm Over-

153

16c

3. Limestone St.

Lex., Ky.

coat at

$15,$I8
or $20

PRESCRIPTIONS
Everything a

Drug

complete

Store

Should Have.

Join's Drag store
The Post Office Pharmacy

They're Good Styles
too, they're worth
much more than this,
but it is a collection of
broken lot Overcoats
that are Big Values.

by.

"The schedule that I have now will
not be completed until about the mid
dle of April. This will take me thru
the American Army of Occupation."

Mitt Sweeney With A. E. F.
Miss Mary E. Sweeney, former head
of the home economics department,
now with the A. E. F. abroad is "work
DADDY BOLES' STARS
ing too hard otherwise doing fine, acTO OPPOSE CITY Y. M. cording to a card received by Doctor
Boyd from Coblez, Germany.
The star members of "Daddy" Boles'
"Miss Sweeney is here," writes Doc
faculty "gym" class will show their
tor Tigert, "and is doing a splendid
forms (beg pardon form) Saturday
work."
night in a volley-bal- l
game with the
City Y. M. C. A., which will precede the
mix-uwith Miami. The Y. M. C. A. OLD STROLLER STAR
team is headed by George R. Smith, a
SAYS HE WILL LEAD
prominent alumnus of this University,
"I don't know who expects to play
while the superannuated Wildcats
the lead, but I am going to give him
have not chosen their captain.
a run for his life," is the message
Kentucky's line-ufollows:
Owens, Vansell, Lamport, James, Emery Frazier, former student and
Summers, Bureau, Smith, Butte, Free- Stroller star, sends back in writing
University authorities that he will reman, Mable.
turn to school on March 10.
REASSURANCE
Frazier was recently discharged
"There isn't room enough in this flat
from the array. When in the Univerto turn around in."
sity, he was a popular student and
"Wait till you have lived at our cafe
awhile," said the landlord, cheerily. was leading man in "Father and the
"Then you'll find you won't take up so Boys," and "The Lion and the Mouse,"
much space." Washington Star.
'16 and '17 Stroller production!.

QUALITY WORSTEDS
that holds Its shapo splendidly under
all conditions and loks like new after

Obeying Orders.

(Miami Student.)
Three of tho eleven football champions of France are Miami men, who
are extending tho fame of the Big
Red eleven even to Europe. With
Bauer at left end, Shupp at left tacklo
and Red Hale at center, it is not surprising that the pride of tho 136th
F. A., Col. Mitchell's Cincinnati team,
Bhould be the champions of France.
The gridiron for the game between
the 136th F. A. and the Cleveland
team of the 135ht, was laid out on an
old battlefield near St. Mlhlel. Old
flags marked the side lines,

SHOWING OF

The good reliable, all woolen fabric

HOME
Miami

I

nrl SfUrr PfrfurM

10 A. M. to 11 P. M.

10c.

I

Home of Paramount, Artcraft, GoMwyn

MAIN & WALNUT

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO
INCORPORATED.

PHONES 1M4-3ttDAY AND NIQHT SERVICE
O

CITY RATES 50 CENTS

Come Down Today.

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

cwrrfiht ims

iltutolInppHUan

P

B Robards

COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR

Graves, Cox & Co.

p

INCORPORATED.

SUITS

AND

PRESSED'
Suit
Suit

Cleaning,
fl.If
Cleaning,
fl.it
Suits Pressed
f9.lt
ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY
ALL WORK GUARANTIED

PHONE

1550--

152 S. Lime.

Y

Lex., Ky.

p

Lexington Drug Co.
INCORPORATED.

102

East Main St.

HEADQUARTERS

Phone 154
FOR STUDENTS

Matthew

A.

Mingione

Progrteiive Shoe Hospital
My work and pricea always

ktepMtbuiy
140 South LiMtatone
ShoM repaired while yo

wait

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
COMMITTEE

Kernel Hop

ON DEBATE

MAKES ARRANGEMENTS

Arguments With Center Col
lege and Transylvania
Will Be Held On April 24
FACTS ARE OUTLINED

PAGES

SCHEDULE CHANGES

PAN

Tho following notico has been posted:
To Instructors and Students:
Beginning with Monday, March 3rd,
schedule of recitations will be as follows:
Second hour classes will recite the
first hour.
Third hour classes will recite the
second hour.
Fourth hour classes will recite the
third hour.
Fifth hour classes will recite the
fourth hour.
Chapel and drill the fifth hour.
EZRA L. OILLIS,
Registrar.

Tho Committee on Oratory and Dc- bato has comploted arrangements for
the intercollegiate debate to bo held
this year. Tho debates against Centre
College and Transylvania University
will bo held on April 24. Tho trials
in which the teams will be chosen will
bo held March
There will be no
debrfte with the University of CincinTENNESSEANS EASY
nati this year. Tho law school debate
(Continued From Pago Ono.)
will be postponed until next fall. It
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
is thot that tho University will be able
at somo goal shooting for tho Wild
to hold a triangular debate with the
cats, scoring 10 of the 30 points or
law schools of Vanderbilt and Cincinmaking five "mean" goals from the
nati in December.
floor.
Everett, at center, proved to
The following facts concern the de- be a pleasant surprise, getting the
bates for this semester:
Jump on his opponent and four field
'
1. Proposition for the debate this
A Metropolitan Hotel
goals for Kentucky. Burnham, who
year: Resolved, That the American thru the entire season has spoken for
Rsspsctfully sslicits the patronage of University People
system of trial by Jury should be abol- himself in basket ball
rather than let
ished. (Constitutionality admitted.)
the different sportwrlters on Lexing2. Date of debate, April 24, 1919.
ton newspapers Juggle his name,
3. This year U. of K. will have two
played his usual hard, energetic game.
teams of two men each. The affirma- Lavin, to'o, comes in for a share of the
tive team will debate with Transyl- glory, altho he fell just a little below
vania in the University chapel. The the mark he set in the Cincinnati and
JOHN SKAIN, Manager
U. of K.'s negative team will debate Centre games. The lad from Paris
an afflmatlve team representing Centre was especially good on fioorwork, mak
College at Danville, Ky.
ing straight, sure passes which counted
4. The time and order of speakers
for goals on the ball's next Journey.
MARTIN &
in the debates will be as follows:
Zerfoss played a conscientious game
STOCKWELL'S
Constructive speeches:
at guard. Thomas and Parker went
First affirmative, 15 minutes.
RESTAURANT
in towards the last of the game, but
ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE
First negative, 15 minutes.
neither of them were "also rans."
SEASON
Second affirmative, 15 minutes.
Wildcats Even Standing
115 S. Limestone.
Lexington, Ky.
Second negative, 15 minutes.
I
For Tennessee, Reeder and Bell did
H E pcrfec 4.
Rebuttal speeches:
tion of
I Quality pencil!- IV
the best work. They were especially
unFirst negative, 10 minutes.
accurate in making distance shots
uniFirst affirmative, 10 minutes.
MMotnneM,
good. Lack of teamwork was the most
formity of grading
Second negative, 5 minutes.
and durability.
glaring fault of the visitors. When
Second affirmative, 5 minutes.
17 black degree
one of the quintet had the ball, the
5. An important amendment to the
from 6B softest to
others were hard to And.
9H hardest,
to
constitution of the association was
hard aad sstIIsm
Acres used and cultivated passed at the conference on February By the victory Friday night Ken(indsUMa) copytime and again, and gone 10. Heretofore only undergraduates In tucky evened the standing between the
ing.
over to get the fodder, are the College of Arts and Science have two teams for the season, the Wildcats
Lomkfor if VjtfiM-VENUS finlM
the big items in cost.
being defeated on the floor of the Tenbeen eligible to represent the Unlver
Top Dressing sity in these debates. This provision nessee aggregation by a score of 46
Nitrate,
worked in when cultivating, was changed to make all undergrad to 22.
will cheapen production.
The score and lineups follows:
uates in all colleges eligible to debate
"OP
Kentucky
Tennessee
TT3
Bigger, better stalks and The provision did, however, eliminate
roa Bmmt
aw,
Reeder (4)
all men who have been regularly en Lavin (4)
bigger ears will result.
F
fWlti
Bell (2)
rolled for more than four years and Dishman '(10).... F
Send pott carJ for res book on
C
Jones (6)
ail who are over 27 years of age.
Everitt (8)
"Com CulHoaUtn"
Aaaaric
L d P oM Co.
Q
A new plan will be followed in choos Burnham
Calloway (2)
Fifth
DR. WILLIAM S. MYERS ing men to represent the University Zerfoss
Majers
6
Dept.
York this year. This plan has been worked Referee, Hansen, lieutenant of Tran
Madison Araauc,
Mm
25
Try tht VENUS Erwmr.
In UaUu. V.OQptUx.
out by the Senate Committee on Ora sylvania, substitutions, Thomas (4) for
tory and Debate and has for its objects Zerfoss, Parker (2) for Lavin, Tennes
the promotion of Intereste in the lit see, Trautman (2) for Bell. Goals
erary societies and the raising of the thrown, Lavin, Kentucky (4), Tennes
standard of the intercollegiate debates, see, Reeder, 4. Time of halves 15 mln
you want the best pipe
The Union Literary Society will fur utes.
can be made, you
nish the team which will represent the
can get it in a W D C up
University against Transylavania Uni kor trophy cup will be held after the
to $6. If you want the best
versity in Lexington. The Patterson intercollegiate debates this year. It
genuine French Briar that
Society will furnish the team which is expected to create a great deal of
as little as 75 cents will buy,
will represent the University against Interest because the Union and Patteryou can get it in a W D C.
Centre College in Danville.
son societies are both determined to
American made, in all sizes
A student who wishes to compote win the cup this year.
and styles, and sold at the
for a place on the varsity debate teams
The Committee on Oratory and De
best shops.
may do so by first becoming a member bate which is promoting interest in
of ono of the literary societies. Both the activity this year is composed of
literary societies welcome new mem- three members of the faculty, ProfessKo man ever bad a better
bers. The trials for places on the ors J. T. C. Noe, L. L. Dantzler and E.
pipe than this one. Carefully selected genuine
teams will be held in the societies un- C. Mabie. Student representatives who
French Briar, a sterling
der the supervision of the Committee Bit with this committee are E. A. Dab-neHair and vulcanite bit.
haad fitted and finished
on Oratory and Debate on March 1144.
of the Union Literary Society, E.
WJr an expert
In the trial each contestant will be S. Dummit of the Patterson Literary
WM. DEMUTH fc CO., New York
allowed ten minutes in which to apeak Society and W. J. Kallbreier of the
World' Largut Pipe Manufacturer
on the side of the proposition he de- Henry Clay Society. Professor E. C.
Mable will coach the debate teams this
sires to discuss.
The lntersoclety debate for the Bar
aaaasBBBBagaggaa
isasBBBBg

Watch for the Date

THE PHOENIX HOTEL

11-1-

Vends'
rw

--

qusllad for

ud
U

1

FREE!

What Does
Silage Cost?
as

wS

f

At,N.Y.

a.

a

Nw

w

IF

HELLENIC DANCE
BE FRIDAY

TO

NIGHT

Major Event on Social Calendar to be Informal This
Year; Grand March
Will Be Held.
The Pan Hellenic Danco of tho Uni
versity of Kentucky, the major event- of tho University's social calendar,
will be held Friday evening from eight
thirty until ono o'clock, in tho ballroom of tho Phoenix Hotel.
This year the event will not bo given
formally in regard to dress. However,
the Grand March will be held as usual,
being led by the President of the Pan
Hellenic Council, Edward S. Dabney,
and Miss Lucy Young, followed by the
members of the council and the members of the fraternities.
The event is always an enjoyable oc
casion, but the Pan Hellenic Dance this
year promises to surpass any former
occasion, because of the presence of
so many of the boys who have been
away from the University and the fraternities for as many months in the
various phases of war work.
The music will be furnished by
Smith's Saxaphone Quintet. The walls
of the ballroom will be decorated with
the shields of the fraternities.
A
luncheon will be served in the Phoenix
Hotel dining room during the intermission between the tenth and eleventh
dances.
visitors expected

Some

are: Miss Lula Swinney, Louisville,
Miss Jane

Adams, Frankfort, Miss
Jane Williams, Frankfort, Miss Myra
Warren, Louisville, Miss Elizabeth
Gaines, Frankfort, Miss Lucie Smith,
Maysville, Miss Caroline Phillips,
Flemingsburg, Miss Elizabeth Hayes,
Eiizabethtown, Winona Cormichael,
Louisville, Miss Margaret Mantle,
Eiizabethtown,
Miss Anna Grayot,
Frankfort, Miss Evelyn Smith, Maysville, Miss Virginia Cresap, Elizabeth-town- ,
Miss Daisy Thomas Albert, Danville, Miss Fannie Grosse, Elizabeth-towand Miss Marion Massie, Eiizabethtown.
The order of dances, the
and dance are as follows:
1. Fox Trot

"I'll Think of You.

2. One Step

"Indianola."

3.

Waltz "Sweetheart
Sigma Chi."

Step " A Good Man
is Hard to Find."

4. One

5.

6.
7.

of SigmaChi
Now-a-Day- s

Watlz "Kiss Me Again."
Alpha Tau Omega.
Fox Trot

"I Say She Does.' '

Waltz "Rose in the Bud."
Phi Delta Theta.

8. Fox

Trot

"Smiles."

9. One

Step

"Tickle Toe."

10.

'

t

Waltz "Sleep, Sleep, Sleep."
Kappa Sigma.

11. Fox Trot

"Everybody Shimmies

Now."
12.

Fox Trot

13.

Waltz"

"Siren Song."

'TiirWe Meet Again."

Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
14. Fox Trot
15. Waltz
1C. One

Step

17. Waltz

"Hindustan."

"Sometime."
"Jingle Bells."

"I'm Always Chasing

Rain-

y

"

bows."
18.

Sigma Nu.
Fox Trot "Tacken 'Em Down."

19.

Fox Trot

"After You're Gone."

"Georgia Moon."
Kappa Alpha.

20. Waltz

'

* PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

1 ST NATIONAL Y.

CONFERENCE ATTENDED

Published every Thursday thruout the College year by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of the Institution.

FOOD

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL Is the official newspaper of the University.
It Is issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all the college newt
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTS A COPY
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clas- s
EDITORIAL STAFF
THORNTON CONNELL
Charles Planck
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Eliza Piggott
Lee McClain
Frederick Jackson
Robt. J. Raible
Donald Dinning
Miss Mildred Graham
Miss Austin Lilly
Miss Virginia Helm Mllner
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrln
N. D. Witt
Adele Slade

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Managing Editor
Assistant Editor
Associate Editor
Squirrel Food
Feature Editor
Military Editor
Sporting Editor
"
Editor
Home Economics
Patterson Hall
Phllosophian
Law
Engineering
Club Notes
"Co-Ed-

Frances Marsh, Margaret

REPORTERS.
Smith, Roberta

Blackburn

and Margaret

McClure.
BUSINESS STAFF
Edwin T. Tapscott
J. P. Barnes and Carl Denker

Business Manager
Assistant Business Managers

NEW DAY DAWNING FOR UNIVERSITY.

W. C. A.

Miss Mildred Graham, U. K.

Representative, Brings

Back Interesting Report

From Student
Gathering
(NUTS)
Since the fair sex have been so eag
The Kernel's Koachman is very anx er to Berve with the Colors the 20th
lous to know whether the young bloods Century historian has been eagerly
desire their carriage and fours for Frl scanning
the war bulletins for a Joan
day night, March 7.
of Arkansas. If the present red which

The first natlonnl Y. W. C. A. Student
Conference was held February
in
Evanston, 111., Mildred Graham attended the conference representing the
University of Kentucky.
seems to be the predominating color
"I found out a good deal about uniA number of our former would-bthis season, continues in the lead, there versities in general and about tho Uniescaped
wearers of the
versity of Kentucky in particular," said
certain Injury and discomfort when will be several young men on this cam
Miss Graham. "One night there was
the supply of yarn gave out before pus who might be added to the list of
a meeting of State Universities to disthey had received those dear darling Joans.
cuss problems peculiar to them, a