xt7p2n4zhq5m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p2n4zhq5m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19330203  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  3, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  3, 1933 1933 2013 true xt7p2n4zhq5m section xt7p2n4zhq5m Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

FRIDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

T

UNIVERSITY
VOLUME XXIII

J. M'CONNELL

New York Methodist Clergyman Will Speak nt
Con vocation

assemih.y'wTll
AT 10 A.

M.

P.E

TUESDAY

"Religion in I he Modern
World" Is General Theme
of Lectures
Francis McConnell. Bishop of the
New York area, Methodist Episcopal church, who is president, of the
Federal Council of Churches of
America, will be the speaker for
Religious Emphasis Week beginning
Tuesday, February 7. His lectures
will be hnsed on "Religion in the
Modern World." from the point of
view of teaching students.
Religious Emphasis W?ek Is
d
annually bv the Y. M. C. A.
snon-sore-

and the Y. W. C. A. All students
and faculty members are Invited to
attend the lectures. Dr. 8. Parkes
Cadman, who spoke here last ysar.

Bishop McConnell
recommended
very highly because of his wide experience In speaking befors student
circles. The University of Illinois
had Bishop McConnell conduct their
Religious Emphasis Week last year.
The schedule for the lectures Is:
Tuesday, February 7
General
convocation for students and faculty at 10 a. m. In Memorial hall.
Business men under auspices of
club at the Lafayette hotel at
12 o'clock noon. General mass meeting in Memorial hall for students,
faculty and townspeople at 8 p. m.
EngiWednesday. February 8
neering convocation 'other students
can attend) 10 a. m. Pitkin club
12 o'clock.
Mass meeting 8 p. m.
Memorial hall.
Thursday, February 9 Meeting of
Kentucky ministers 10 a. m. Memorial hall. Meeting of ministers In
University Commons at 12 o'clock.
Mass meeting 8 p. m. Memorial halL
Bishop McConnell has travelled
widely and is much in demand as a
speaker. He has also written several books among which are "Democratic Christianity," "Public Opinion and Theology," and "The Increase of Faith."
Ki-wa-

Kampus
Kernels

63 ARE GIVEN
DEGREES IN MID
YEAR EXERCISES

Grand Giraffe
Hows to
Captain Grady
C aptain Clyde Grady,
military department adjutant, recently received his certificate

II Get Master Letters; 52
Acquire Rachelor Titles in
Spring Graduation

in Lowell
Story C lub,"
are
among1 whoe members
only men whose stories merig
on one of
ted
Thomas' regular programs.
The Inscription upon the
of membership
Thomas' "Tall

FRANCES FOXWORTII
MAS 2.6 THREE YEARS

radio-castin-

Col.

certificate reads:

Know All Men By These
Presents That It Is My Tall
Privilege to Give High Testimony That
Captain Clyde Grady
"lie Tells m Tall"
with lofty sacrifice of veracity has proven his
devotion to the
Great American Whopper,
and is hereby elevated to
the rank of Exalted Ananias
of the Tall Story Club.
(Signed:)
LOWELL THOMAS
Grand Giraffe or
the Tall Story Club
On another page will be
found Captain Grady's meri- tous prevarication.

Program

FIRST PRACTICE
ATTRACTS

FIFTY

Late Arrivals May Increase
Total to 80 Candidates;
More Expected

at

Close

of Basketball Season
HARD DRILLS IN VAN
Coach Harry Gamage's 1933 Wildcat football team took the field for
their first spring practice session
Wednesday afternoon.
Fifty athletes reported and 30 more are expected within the next two weeks.
This constitutes the greatest number of athletes that has ever reported for spring practice in the history
of the University.
The first afternoon of practice
was taken up with calisthenics, fundamentals,
and a few skeleton
plays. The squad will probably continue with light drills for the next
few days in order to get In good
condition for the scrimmages that
will follow.

From the appearance, of the material that was on hand for the first
practice session, Kentucky has the
makings of a mighty fine team. The
The Weather Prophet has done greater part of the material is made
his duty toward the nation. All day up of last year's crack freshman
yesterday, the sun shone down, and team. The letter men of last year's
according to tradition, Mr. Ground- team have been excused from the
hog scurried back to his subt:rran-eo- n first week of practice, but some of
home. Thus we are reminded I hem have already reported so that
the
to watch our coal supply, and not they will be in shape for folstrenuous practices that are to
yet to remove our winter underlow.
wear, for the Prophet says winter
The squad will not gain their full
is not over.
season
Let us not forget, also that there strength until basketball
are only eleven more shopping closes and releases some of the
Wildcat mainstays among whom are
months until Christmas!
Captain elect "Dutch" Kreuter, end,
There will be a meeting of the the other stellar flankman, Joe Ru
entire Kernel staff at 3 p. m. Mon- pert, and Kentucky's kicking ace,
day in Kernel news room. All mem- Ralph Kercheval.
Those debers must be present.
Among those reporting for the
siring places as reporters are invit- first practice was Jack Jean, star'
ed to attend.
of the 1931 Freshman team. Jean
was declared ineligible at the beteams ginning of last season and dropped
All intramural basketball
are hereby notified that the prac- out of school. He seems to have
tice schedule for intramural basket- developed more drive than ever and
ball will be posted in the west en- great things are expected from him
trance of the Alumni gym Febru- next season.
ary 6.
Those that have already reportThe date for bowling entries has ed for practice are Aulick. Adkins.
February 8. So Avers, Bryant, Bolton, Bertolini,
been extended until
far, only three teams have been en- Cobb, Dickey, Fish, Foster, Gilmer.
tered.
Hay, Janes, Jean, Jackson, Jobe,
Long. Crowden, McClurg, McCool,
It's a thrilling sort of thing to McMillan, Myers, Olah, Pritchard,
find yourself a part of the student S. Potter. L. Potter, Rhodes, Symp-sobody of the University of KentucFehrman, Kelley,
Tlchenor,
ky, a factor of its academic and ex- Mattingly, Fust, and CorTman.
The Y. W. C. A.
tra curricular life.
welcomes you. As you go trudging
back and forth to classes these
rainy February days, we invite you
to drop into the office, to ask impertinent questions, and to request
Dr.
our help in getting yourself accli- Communications
mated to conditions on this camand Mrs. Funkhouser Tell
pus. If you're homesick, if you're
of Wonders on Trip
discontented, if you want to get into things, and don't know how, we
Several communications
have
ask permission to assist.
been received from Dr. W. D. FunkSigned:
houser, dean of graduate school,
KATHERINE JONES
concerning his world trip. The last
President Y. W. C. A.
received was mailed as he left Singapore for Kuala Lumpur. AccordGirls' basketball practice spon- ing to his itinerary, Dr. and Mis.
sored by W. A. A. will be held each Funkhouser arrived in Kuala Lumafternoon of the week from Monday pur. January 23, at 6:57 a.m.
through Friday, at 4 p.m., in the
While Dr. Funkhouser is spending
Women's gymnasium.
two weeks in the Jungle, Mrs. FunkW. A. A. Council will meet at 4 houser is touring the Muluy PenThis includes excursions
p.m., Monduy, February 6, in Miss insula.
Laura K. Johnson's office, in the to Malayan mosques and temples,
tht Butu Caves, Sungel Besi, the
Women's gymnasium.
tin mines; sightseeing in Juhore,
Council meeting visits to the Sulton's palace; Bukit
at 6 p.m. Monday at the Kappa Timah, the Gap, various botanical
Sig house. Iniortant. Be There.
and exeprimentul gardens, the Monkey forests, government offices, co(Signed:)
conut plantations, rubber estates,
GOHDON E. BURNS
and finally Mandai.
President
They will leave Kuula Lumpar at
The next meeting of Strollers, 8 p.m. February 7, and will arrive
rumpus dramatic fraternity, will be In Renting 6:41 a.m., February 8.
held at 6 p. m. Tuesday in White The Island Is noted for having one
hall. At that meeting pluns for the of the must beautiful sightseeing
annual spring production will be drives in the East.
discussed and plays which can be
In his communications Dr. Funkgiven will be reported upon.
houser reveals that his work is proThe Fiench club will hold Us first gressing smoothly and that his
meeting of the semester at 3 p. m. health and spirits are In the best
In the reading room of Boyd hall. of condition. He has experienced
Mary Duntzler will be In charge of many Incidents that are Interesting,
exciting and dangerous.
(Continued on Page Four)
n.

Grad School Dean,
Wife Near Malay
from

Inter-Fraterni- ty

Patrick II. Callahan Was
Principal Speaker on

Sixty-thre- e
students of the University were presented degrees at
the commencement
exercises in
Memorial hall January 27 by Dr.
L. McVey, president of the
Frank
University.
Of this number. 11
graduated with Master's degrees,
the remaining 52 receiving Bachelors' degrees.
Miss Frances Carolyn Foxworth,
Lexington, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank C. Foxworth. 109 Owsley avenue, was graduated "with
high distinction."
This commencement honor was bestowed, upon
Miss Foxworth for her having attained a standing of more than 2.6
In at least three years' attendance
at the University. Miss Foxworth
received her degree of bachelor of
arts in education.
An alumni banquet was held at
the University commons January
26 for the graduating students.
Keen Johnson, Richmond newspaper editor, was toastmaster, and R.
Miller Holland. Owensboro attorney,
was the principal speaker.
The speaker for the commencement program was Col. Patrick H.
Callahan, Louisville paint manufacturer, who addressed the graduates on "The Economic Eras."
The graduating students and their
degrees received are:
Master of Arts
John Samuel
Lysle Warrick
Brown, education;
Lexington, psychology; David
Croft,
Hampton McKinney, Richmond,
economics; Ronald MacDonald.
Valley, French; William Edgar
commerce;
Newbolt, Georgetown,
Eenjamin Stark, Lexington, political science.
Miss Eva Taylor, Wi'.more, English: Miss Amy Rose Troxler, Louisville, education; Clarence Milton
Whalin, Bowling Green; education;
Ray Herbert Wright. Cox's Creek,
physics, and Idali Munich, Lexington, home economics.
Bachelor of Arts
Edna Backer, Lexington; Pauline
Elizabeth Brisker, Knoxville, Tenn.;
Joseph Martin Ferguson, Wayne, W.
Va.; Evelyn Gall Freyman, Lexington; Grace Louise George, Fort
Thomas; Christine Heaps Innings.
Straight Creek; Gilbert William
Kingsbury. Covington: Edwin Roland Lane, Canton, 111.; Ernest Eric
McLefresh, Dayton; Willie Edna
Maddox, Prospect; Chester Walter
Malaskey, Cleveland. Ohio; Margaret Eva Morton. Lexington; H.
Farmer Norment, Henderson; Jean-l- e
Bell Parker, Madisonville; Lloyd
Emmett Rogers, Lexington; Edwin
Strother Scott, Lexington; Price
Sewell, Jr., Jackson; Ellen Catherine Sullivan, Lexington; David Fra-ze- e
Weaver, Dover.
Bachelor of Science
Stuart Cohen, Newport; William
Samuel Jackowitz, Hartford, Conn.;
Jack Lentz, Nashville, Tenn.; Luther Hermann Parr. Silver Grove;
George Rutherford Wesley. Middle-burClarence Robertson Yeager.
Middlesboro.
Bachelor of Science in agriculture: Henry Frederick Alms, Lex-- (
Continued on Page Four)
Pe-w-

Enrollment in the graduate school
rapidly, according to
Dean T. T. Jones of the Graduate
School. Last semester there were
234 students enrolled, and prospects
are that about the same number
will be in the school this semester.
At the end of last semester, eleven
candidates completed their work
and received their master's degrees.
The following received degrees:
Master of Arts in Education
Amy Rose Troxler, Clarence Milton
Whalin, John Samuel Brown.
Master of Arts in English Eva
Taylor.
Master of Arts in Psychology
Lysle Warrick Croft.
Master of Arts in Political Science
is increasing

Benjamin Stark.

Master of Arts in Commerce-Willi- am
Edgar Newbolt.
Master of Arts In French Ronald
Macdonald.
Master of Arts In Economics-Da- vid
Hampton McKinney.
Master of Science in Physics
Roy Herbert Wright.
Master of Science in Home EconomicsIda Munich.

U. O. T. C.

Petitions

Due February 4
Captain Clyde Grady, yesterday,
announced that all petitions fur
sponsors of the vurious divisions of
the R. O. T. C. unit must be turned
in to the military department Saturday, February 4. The election
will take place the latter part of
next week.
Each petition niust be signed by
the officers of the company to
which the candidate wishes to belong. The requisites demanded of
the candidates are the same that
ofapply to any
fice. No freshman is permitted to
occupy the position and a definite
standing must have been made by
each aspirant.
extra-curricul- ar

.1.

NEW SERIES NO.

1933

31

Registration Figures Reach,
2335 For Second Semester
Mexico University Quint
Is Wildcat Foe Monday
m--

m

OPENS

EMPHASIS WEEK
Third Annual Religious Program Regan February 1;
Pepresentatives Speak
in Group Houses
McCONNELL TO SPEAK
Tho third annual religious emphasis week, sponsored by the Y. M.
and Y. W., was opened Wednesday
night with speakers appearing in
various, fraternity and sorority
houses for discussion of moral problems which confront students in
present times. Religious emphasis
week will be culminated with the
appearance of Bishop Francis McConnell on the campus next Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
In all of the discourses made
Wednesday an emphasis was placed on the value of religion and its
cognation with student life. An effort was made to point out the essential weight of a University moral

attitude.

Girls In the two dormitories, Patterson hall and Boyd hall, will hear
Mrs. Frank L. McVey Monday night
at 10 o'clock in ths lecture room.
Mrs. McVey will discuss religious
Speakers will be heard
emphasis.
at the Delta Chi house Monday
night and at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house Wodnesday night.
Fraternities and the persons who
spoke Wednesday night as part of
religious emphasis week are as follows: Alpha Gamma Rho, Dr. Jesse
Herrmann; Alpha Lambda Tau.
Prof. E. A. Bureau; Alpha Sigma
Phi, Dr. Amry Vandenbosch; Alpha
Tau Omega, W. C. McCarty; D?lta
Tau Delta. Dean C. B. Sparling;
Kappa Alpha, Rev. George H"aton;
Lambda Chi Alpha, Prof. Lucien
Carter; Phi Delta Theta. T. A.
Morse; Phi Kappa Tau. Prof. W.
S. Webb; Phi Sigma Kappa, Dr.
Otto Koppius; Pi Kappa Alpha,
Father George J. O'Brbn; Sigma
Beta Xi, Prof. T. R. Bryant; Sigma
Chi, Dr. J. Holmes Martin: Sigma
Nu, Prof. Roy Moreland; Triangle,
Rev. Horace Sprague; and men's
dormitory, Bart Peak.
Sororities and the persons who
Continued on Page Four)
i

TWOTlIANGES IN
DANCE CALENDAR
Delta Tau Delta and Alpha
Gamma Delta Postpone
Dances until Later in Year;
Other Dates Unchanged

g;

Grad School List
Increases Daily,
According to Jones

WILDCATS VS. MEXICO II.
MONDAY NIGHT IN GYM

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, FERRUARY

STUDENT BODY
TO HEAR BISHOP
F.

OF

BASKETBALL GAME

Two changes have been made in

the social calendar, according to
John Ewing, student council president. They are Delta Tau Delta
guest dance. February 4, and Alpha
Gamma Delta tea dance, February

Transy's Singers
Will Appear In
Sunday Musicale

Rupp and Team Will Return
Program Will Include ApFrom Three Game Tour
proximately 15 Numbers;
Saturday
Harborne To Direct

After having met and defeated
teams from five out of six conferences, the Kentucky Wildcats will
meet an International foe when
they engage the University of Mex
ico in the Alumni gymnasium at 8
p m. Monday. This Is the Mexicans' first appearance on local
courts and little Is known of their
style of play, but it Is generally believed that they are an aggressive
and shifty quintette.
Coach Rupp and his crew will
have Just returned from a tiresome
tour of the South during which
time they played Vanderbllt, Clem-soand South Carolina, but It Is
hoped that Sunday will give them
time to rest. At the same time, the
boys from south, of the Rio Grande
will enjoy the day In relaxation.
Examinations did not help the
Big Blue as far as thCir basketball
went, but in spite of the lay-othe 'Cats are able to whip the best
in the South. What another nation
has to brag about is still to be seen.
And the teams that the University
of Mexico send out into other nations is Just about the best that
Mexico has to offer.
Basketball and football are very
recent Innovations to Mexico. They
suddenly became interested in the
sports as an activity a few years
ago and since that time they have
concentrated on championship
teams. A team representing Mexico
played here at the University about
10 years ago to a packed house. It
was in the days before the Alumni
gym, and the women's gym was
packed to overflowing by a curious
crowd.
According to witnesses, the Mexicans were as fast at Hot Tamales
on the floor, but rotten as ze diablo
at hitting the basket, which after
all. is all that can win a game. And
as a result the local talent turned
back the best of Mexico.
The itinerary of "Internationa!
Friendship Tour" includes leaving
Mexico December 25 and winding
up the extensive trip February 24
back in Mexico with a game between Circulo M. Mutualista and
the U. of Mexico. Their schedule
calls for games with 25 schools and
organizations ranging from the Chiropractic college to the Brown Paper Mills. And it includes Delphi
High school, of Indiana, Oak Park
n,

ff

Y. M. C. A., Southern and Southfoes, eastern
eastern conference

The Transylvania
college Gl.e
club under the direction of Thomas
Harborne will present the Sunday
fftrrrioon musiralo in the Memorial
auditorium at 4 p. m. Trbruary 5.
Miss May Hughes Noland of the
music faculty will be at the piano
This wil be the first appearance
of the Transylvania singers on the
Sunday afternoon series. Mr. Harborne kindly consented to prepare
the program on short notice, when
it became necessary to make some
changes in the scheduled Sunday
afternoon recitals.
The soloists for the afternoon will
soprano;
include Estelle Paritz.
James Curtis, tenor and Vernon
Burkhart, baritone.
The program is as follows:
a. The Open Road. Stickles
b. When a Maid Comes Knocking.
Friml; Glee club.
a. Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal,
Quilter.
b. Morning, Speaks; James Curtis,
tenor.
a. In the Hour of Softened Splendor, Pinsuti.
b. John Peel, Old English; Incidental trumpet solo by J. B. Knapp.
c. Three Bumble Bees, Truhn;
Glee club.
a. Laughing Valley. Sanderson.
b. Message of Spring. Meta Schu-maEstelle Paritz. Soprano.
"Regular Royal
Alice
Duryea,
Queen." Sullivan:
Jan? Ratchford, James Curtis. Roy
Hulrn
a. Invictus. Bruno Huhn
b. Rolling Down to Rio, Edward
German; Vernon Burkhart. baritone.
a. Land Sighting,
Incidental solo by Gentry Shelton.
b. O. No John, Thyman; glee club.

Ep-sil-

n.

THIS TIME LAST YEAR
Five Dollar Limit to Fee For
Late Registration, Snv
Officials
Despite the rumors that the University would suffer a prodigious
decrease in enrollment this semester from the preceding one. registration figures available late yesterday afternoon at the close of the
fourth day of enrollment signify a
promise of attaining approximately
the number enrolled at this time
last semester.
Figures show that the number
thus far has surpassed 2.335, while
at this time last semester the figures stood at 2.356.
Monday, the first day of the registration, the long line outside the
Administration building and the
huge throng that assembled in the
gym annex threatened to render
false the prediction regarding the
Tuesday,
decrease in enrollment.
the second official day before the
late registration fee is added, students again lined the Administration building. However, the number was comparatively smaller Wednesday and yesterday,
and few
more are expected before the end
of

the

week.

A

Quartette

Grieg-Spicke-

r;

Norfleet Concertists

Will Hold Recital

ART SCHOOL

two-cred-

2,:rfi REGISTERED AT

fee of one dollar for late registration went into effect Wednesday
and will increase a dollar each day
until the fifth day. However, students registering late will not, be
required to pay more than five dollars extra. February 13 is the last
day that students may drop a subject without the grade of "E".
Economic conditions throughout
the country have had noticeable effect upon the attendance of colleges and universities.
This cause
is attributed to the slight decrease
in the attendance of the University, although conditions, according
to figures, remain on level with
those of the semester before.
Many students have been forced
Lexington College of Music
to drop out because of lack of maSponsors Trio's Program,
triculation funds, while the scarciFebruary 7
ty of jobs for the many desiring
Including Catherine Norfleet, vio- work in order to stay in school,
of
linist, Leeper Norfleet. 'cellist, and brought about a similar action secHowever, the
Helen Norfleet, pianist, the Norfleet many students.
a
Trio will appear in a recital at the ond semester finds the return of.
atLexineton College of Music. Tues- number of students who did not
now able
tend last semester, who are
day, February 7, for two performthe instituion.
The to
ances, matinee and night.
presentation is under the management of Miss Anna Chandler Goff.
director of the college.
The matinee concert with a program designed to appeal to children as well as to adults will begin
at 2:30 p. m. and the night performance at 8:15 p. m.
Group Were in Session From
The trio, two sisters and a brothJanuary 21 U 28; Attenprodigies.
er, were accepted as child
dance Was Equal to Expecplayed before the public
They have
tations
sine? they were three and four years
n,

COURSE IS ADDED

TO

ARE SHATTERED
Late Arrivals Are Expected
To Increase Total In
Closing D.tes

and western colleges.
Before arriving in Lexington they
play Hanover college, of Hanover,
jndiana. a two game series Thursday and Friday. From Lexington
the Mexicans travel to Knoxville
where they will play the University
of Tennessee, followed by games
with Chattanooga and Georgia
Tech.
The squad is made up of 12 players with an average height of 5
feet 9 inches. Only one player
rises above that height and he tops
them all at 6 feet 2 inches. The
team is coached by Coach Leoncio old.
Ochoa.
Since their New York debut in
1923,
the three have concertized
throughout America. They have
played at the White House, have
appeared as soloist with orchestras,
and have presented recitals.
Of their recent New York concert
the New York Telegraph wrote,
has not
Course in Studv of American "Their recitalseason in been surthe unison,
passed this
Arts and Crafts Will He musicianship, and beauty which
Conducted Under Direction distinguished yesterday's performance."
of Miss Callihan

11.
Both dances have been postponed until later in the year, the
exact dates not officially known.
The following Is the social calendar, complete for the semester, with
the above stated exceptions:
February 4: Alpha Sigma Phi
guest dance, and Alpha Lambda
Tau dinner dance.
February 11: Delta Zeta guest
dance, and Kappa Delta guest
dance.
February 17: Sigma Alpha Epsl-lo- n
dinner dance, and Triangle dinner dance.
February 18: Alpha Gamma Rho
course in the
it
A new
house dance, Zeta Tau Alpha tea study of American Arts and Crafts
guest will be conducted at the University
dance, and Delta Delta Delta
this semester under the direction of
February 24: Phi Delta Theta Miss Anne Worthington
Callihan
Military ball.
dinner dance, and
of the art department. The course,
February 25: PI Kappa Alpha which was scheduled to begin Febguest dance, and Alpha Delta The- ruary 2, will consist of a series of
ta guest dance.
illustrated lectures each Thursday
March 4: Sigma Nu house dance, afternoon from 3 until 5 o'clock in
and Sigma Chi guest dance.
the Library building.
March 11: Phi Sigma Kappa
Actual materials such as silver,
guest dance, and Sigma Alpha
glass, and china from Lexington
guest dance.
homes will be presented from time
March 18: Cadet Hop, Lambda to time and early houses in
guest dance, and Chi
Chi Alpha
contemporary with the perOmega guest dance.
iods and arts under discussion, also
March 24: Tau Beta Pi guest will be visited, so that interiors may
dance.
be seen and special excellence of
March 25: Kappa Sigma house style understood at first hand.
dance, and Triangle guest dance.
Miss Callihan's researches in the
March 31: Alpha Sigma Phi dinfield of American Arts and Crafts
ner dunce.
have ranged from the household
April 1: Phi Delta Theta guest arts of Colonial days through all
dunce.
the Victorian era to the opening
April 7: Sigma Alpha Epsilon years of the present century. Her
course will trace the development
dinner dance.
April 8: Kappa Alpha guest of native characteristics in all the
dunce, and Phi Kappa Tau guest useful arts of these periods. Sectul
dunce.
attention will be given to furniture,
April 22: Sigma Nu guest dance. silver, pottery, tapestry and glass,
April 29: Phi Sigma Kappa house these being some of the arts of dedance, and Alpha Gamma Kho sign in which American craftsmen
guest dunce.
have made lusting contributions.
May 5: SuKy guest dance.
The course is timely, as American
Kappa Alpha house cultural traditions were never studMay 6:
dunce, and Sigma Chi house dunce. ied with more intelligent
Interest
May 12: Triangle dinner dunce.
and enthusiasm than now. Recent
Muy 13: Alpha Lambda Tuu exhibitions and reviews of Ameriguest dance.
can painting, American architecMuy 19: Alpha Sigma Phi din- ture and more especially American
ner dance.
folk art at the Newark museum and
May 20
Kappa Sigma guest elsewhere, have demonstrated the
vitality and significance
dance.

RUMORS OF DROP
IN ENROLLMENT

Bureau May Place
Few Spring Grads
"It is quite possible that we shall
be able to place some graduates
this spring," was the cheerful announcement made by the Personnel bureau of the University yesterday.
This welcome bit of news should
be particularly interesting to the
63 members of the 1933 graduating
class, and also to the many "under-grads- "
who are beginning to wonder what follows a college education.
According to Dr. Beaumont, who
Is secretary of the Personnel bureau, negotiations have been made
with two well known departmental
chain stores concerning the filling
of vacancies by University graduates.
will reThe Personnel bureau
ceive from these stores application
cards which may be filled out by
graduates who desire to leave their
application on file. Any interested
graduate can get further information from Dr. Beaumont.
PI

MU IPS1LON

TO

er

FARM AND HOME
CLOSES 21ST MEET

The 21st annual Farm and Home
meeting was held at the experiment
station from January 24 through
January 28. Authorities in every
field of agriculture from various
sections of the country were present
and delivered addresses.
The first session on Tuesday was
held at the livestock pavilion, and
A. J. Glover, editor of "Hoard's
Dairyman" spoke on "The Penalties
of Progress." R. F. Guy, lamb buyer for Swift and company, M. D.
Royse, and Marsh Henshaw also
spoke on the program.
The United States Department of
Agriculture was represented by Dr.
E. M. Nighbert who addressed the
Kentucky Veterinary association.
At the dairy farmers' session, a
special address was given Dy air.
Glover, J. C. Peterson, and member
of the faculty of the College of
Meetings of the vaAgriculture.
rious cattle clubs were held Immediately after the session.
Other feuture speakers were:
Leon Todd, specialist at Purdue
University, who spoke to the poultry keepers; Dr. J. Holmes Martin,
and Fred J. Lowe; Lander Skinner.
Winchester, president of the Kentucky Beekeepers' association; Kenneth Hawkins. Watertown, Wis.:
A. J. Walker, G. T. Sulyer. Dr. H.
Ouriiian, W. W. Price, uiul H. H.
Jewett, also took part in the program.
Mis Mildred Lewis of the University, had charge of the singing
program at 10 a. m. each day. Special music was provided throughout
the convention.

fileeCIubSinsrs

At Carlisle High

MltT

The Men's Glee club of the University presented a concert in Cur-listhe fust
at 8 p. m. Friday, January 27,
meeting of the second semester at in the Carlisle High school gym9, In room 109 Mc4 p.m. February
Several solos and choral
nasium.
Vey hall.
At that time Professor numbers
ere presented by the
group on group. Two instrumental solos were
Latimer will address the
and the Theory of given and the men's quartette
"Factorization
Ideals." The meeting will adjourn rendered several selections. About
after a short business sessiou. Any- 40 members of the Glee club made
one interested Is invited to attend.
the trip to Carlisle by bus.
PI Mu Epsilon will hold

le

* Best Copy
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Published

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In addition to this feature concerning a tale of thirst for human
blood, the Ben All Is presenting several interesting vodvll numbers as
their stage attractions. It seems
that the local theaters are set upon
doing their bit to turn Lexington
theater-goer- s
Into the path that
may lead to brighter days of stage
presentations.
Once ever so long bro, Lexington
held an enviable position of prestige in the world of the legitimate
stage. In the latter years this pres
tige has supped from Its possession.
who
There are Lexingtonlans
yearn, to see Lexington hailed again
as "the best
stand In
They
America."
are hopefully
watching current attempts to begin
the task of polishing up the dust
covered scutcheon.

WE SEND YOU HOME FREE OF CHARGE
No hour charge on Sunday until after 0:00 P. M.

ALE MAKES

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Nail

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TYPEWRITERS

SALE OR RENT
Special Rental Rates to Students
Dealer: L. C. Smith and Corona Typewriters

CO.

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We Join them with all our heart. and. to all appearances, a welcome
addition to the ranks.
the good work.
Other members of (he cast will
be Minna Bloomfield. Marjoiic PowWith the presentation of W. Somell, Margiret Furr. L. Casse Robinerset Maugham's social satire, "The son, and Wlldan Thomas.
February 13 at the
Cirde," opening
.
Portrait of Dirrcmr Frank Fowler,
Eurlld avenue playhouse, the Oulg-nintroduces three newcomers to Instructor whose consent Is necesits boards. These Include Prof. L. sary for aspirants to the class In
L.
Dantzler. English department, advanced dramatic production, perwho, according to his own state-m"n- t. plexed about rum. irs that registrahis not attempted a dra- tion at the University has fallen off
matic role since he was lfi. though this semester., h" shows signs of
A
new Majestic picture. "The his woik In the play tends to give douhtiii" the veracity of authorities
fact... he
Vampire Bat." brings Lionel Atwill him the lie; Mrs. Wllkrrson. a re Intima'ing such to be a with bud- swamped
finds hitv-eland Fay Wray to the Hen All the- cruit from Cincinnati and an ex- 'ding dramatists. .y t the reglstra-- n
ater. Friday and Saturday. Tills cellent leading lady, and Littleton
is said to be falllnr off.
mystery thriller presents a different Daniels, a grntleman from OenrgU
though no less harrowing version of
the vampire legend which has provided the theme for sue h gruesome
novels as Dram Stoker's "Dracula."
The mysterious menace It Is
( Al - CI. AY CIS
139-11- 1
man or beast In this story
E.