xt7p2n4zkg6c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p2n4zkg6c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19661013  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 13, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 13, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7p2n4zkg6c section xt7p2n4zkg6c Inside Todays Kernel
University of Maryland student arrested for marijuana use, due process
questioned: Page Three.
Oberst, Axton lead Nexus program
on law, pornography: Page Four.
ZTA's plan father's weekend: Poge
Six.
Reeves

upgrade

says new constitution will
government: Poge Seven.

Editor discusses draft deferment of
college students: Poge Eight.
Role of college press discussed: Page
Nine.
series of Teach-i- n
programs: Page Ten.
Art Film Series movie, "Ten Days,"
is philosophic, says reviewer: Page
WBKY to broadcast

Eleven.

Vol. 58, No. 31

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KY.,
OCT.
THURSDAY,

elective Service Test
Offered In November
Students eligible for the draft
will be given the opportunity
next month to match their wits
against Uncle Sam's selective service standards on the controversial college qualifying test.
The test, which was first given
in May of last year, will "be administered on Nov. 18 and 19
at more than 1,000 centers across
the country, including the University.

Test scores, which reamin confidential with the local draft
boards, are advisory criteria in
granting student deferments. No
student is required to take it.
State selective service officials Thursday encouraged all
young men eligible to take the

test to do so. To be eligible,
a person must be either a college student or high senior or
graduate who has not taken it
before.
"We are encouraging all eligible students to take it," said
Col. Marshall Sanders of the
state selective service office.
"Even if he does not quite make
the passing score (70 for undergraduates, 80 for graduate students), we believe the local
boards will look in favor of the
young man who at least showed
enough interest to take it."
Application forms and information bulletins for the test are
available at all local draft boards

700 Hear Washburn
Speak On Socialism
A crowd estimated at nearly 700 students and
faculty members
surrounded the Student Center patio today as freshman Brad
Washburn outlined his concept of socialism and its place in
modern society.
speech from atop of Buell "Armory shoutDuring the
and the following
ed, "Kill the Cong" while a
session, campus police few others called "Commie."
mingled throughout the crowd. Periodic comments concerning
No incidents were reported, alboth Washburn's remarks and
though some students were seen appearance were heard in the
crowd. Washburn was attired in
holding eggs.
a tieless white shirt, dungarees,
During the
period Allen White, a and a sport jacket.
marketing major from Louisville,
Washburn endorsed the theory
asked Washburn for permission
of "public ownership" of soto come to the podium and refute Washburn's remarks. The ciety's labor producing mechcrowd cheered when White said anisms as a means to "economic
With the wealth
statements were based on his freedom."
equally distributed, Washburn
for "who's
(Washburn's) dislike
said, the workers would have
running society.
freedom from a
work
Dr. Frank Martini, an asweek or some other strict hour
sociate professor in the political scale.
science department, moderated
With the people working for
the program.
Only at the beginning of the each other the allotment of money
speech were jeers from the crowd
Continued On Page 6
directed at Washburn. Someone
one-ho-

ur

question-and-answ-

question-and-an-sw-

er

er

40-ho-

and must be received at the testing center by Oct. 21, Col. Sanders added.
Some 12,500 students of the
25,000 who were eligible took
the test in Kentucky last year,
with approximately 2,400 taking
it at the University. Through
September, 21,644 students were
eligible to take it this year.
There is no assurance that
the examination will be given
at any time other than the November dates this fall.
This year's test was devised
by Educational Testing Service
in Princeton, N.J., a different
firm from the one which gave
it last year. "So far we haven't
had the preliminary problems we
had comparable to this time last
year," Col. Sanders said. "We
had scheduling problems then
and a overflow of students in
some centers."
The 10 Kentucky test centers
include Union College at Barbers vi lie, Western Kentucky University at Bowling Green, University community colleges at
Covington and Elizabethtown,
the University at Lexington, University of Louisville, Morehead
and Murray State Universities
and Kentucky Wesley an College
in Owensboro.

In other developments on the
draft, the Pentagon announced
it will cut its November quota
by 6,100 to 37,600 men because
of "a great than than expected
number of enlistments and
in recent months."
Kentucky's quota was lowered 14
percent to an estimated 900 men.
The department also announced an unusually low draft call
of 12,100 for December, but it
explained that all inductions during the month would be completed by Dec. 16 "to avoid the
entrance of inductees into active
duty during the holiday season."
The January quota, it added, is
expected to be back up above
30,000.

ft

13, 19(i(i

:

::m

Sixteen Pages

r

!::;,-''.- .

Photo by Dick Ware

Barbra Fichera, a University coed, tired of waiting for the bus
that didn't come so she experimented with another way to get
a ride.

Bus Users Stranded;
Strike In Fourth Day
The Lexington bus strike entered its fourth day Thursday with
no sign of progress being made toward a settlement.
An estimated 2,000 local school children, and an undetermined
number of university students, are having to find other means of
getting to school. Some 19,000 normally use the buses daily.
Lexington and University Police say that despite the strike
there has not been a marked increase in the amount of traffic
downtown or around the University.
The Lexington Transit Company says it stands ready to negotiate the strike issue but that it will not agree to the union
demand for a
hourly wage increase and other benefits.
The union has put its offer on a "take it or leave it" basis.
According to Hufus Kearns, president of the local, the union
has "no intention of making a move."
20-ce- nt

RESEARCH AND THE MULTIVERSITY

Universities Put More Emphasis On Research
ByJUDYCRISIIAM

Kernel Associate Editor
In the last decade a virtual revolution

has taken place on the campuses of many
of the nation's leading colleges and universities.

Once standing apart from society, as if
in an ivory tower, these institutions have
been deluged with new pressures and
responsibilities and have, in large measure, seen their role expanded to include
service to society.
By its very nature this service implies
an increasing emphasis on the research
function of the university.
The amount of research carried out on
the campus has proceeded at runaway
First of two parts.
speed since 1950 when the federal government -f- or military, political, economic,
to
reasons-decid- ed
and public-healt- h

support scientific and technological research in a big way.
In 1951 the Federal government bud

From the campus has come the expertise to travel to the moon, to crack the genetic code, and
to develop computers that calculate as fast as light. From the campus has come new information
about Africa's resources,
economics, and Oriental politics. In the past 15 years,
college and university scholars have produced a dozen or more accurate translations of the Bible,
more than were produced in the past 15 centuries. University researchers have helped virtually
to wipe out three of the nation's worst diseases: malaria, tuberculosis, and polio. The chief
work in art and music, outside of a few large cities, is now being done in our colleges and universities. And profound concern for the U.S. racial situation, for U.S. foreign policy, for the
problems of increasing urbanism, and for new religious forms is now being expressed by students
and professors inside the academies of higher learning.
The Kentucky Alumnus, Spring 1966
n

geted

$295

million

versity research.

for college

and

uni-

In 1965, ttic vast miltiversity of the
University of California carried on $300
million worth of research alone a large
percentage of this being paid for by the
federal government.
The total government budget for college and university research jumped to
$1.7 billion in 1965, and every indication
is that it will increase by even larger
proportions in the future. During the same
period, private philanthropic
foundations also increased their support
research substantially.
of campus-locateThe annual survey of the 164 insti
15-ye-

d

tutions doing the bulk of the nation's
research by Industrial Research Magazine
showed that in 1965 these schools did
an average of $11.3 million in research.
Figures for the University of Kentucky
indicate that UK falls slightly behind
the average, having done only about
$10 million in research in 1965.
Even more important, perhaps, is UK's
relative rank in the amount of research
done at schools with which the University competes. Of the 11 schools the Academic Flan has designated as comparable
to the University, seven are pulling in
more research money. No figures are
available for West Virginia University,

VP I reports $5.4 million in research done
there, and the University of South Carolina only $990,000.
Of this group of 11 schools, the University of Illinois ranks first with a $44
million research budget in 1965. Indiana
University, the University of Missouri, and
the University of North Carolina all fell
at the $15 million makr or exceeded it.
The figures for Tennessee and Ohio State
were only slightly above those for the
University.

Figures for the type of research done
at the University also show a departure
from the national picture. Nationally,
the largest share of research funds $321
million total goes to work in theph sieal
sciences. The medical sciences are second
with $2S2 million, and engineering is
third with $215 million.
The biologic al sc ienc es get $179 million
a year; agriculture science, $173 million,
social sciences, $116 million; and other
fields, $112 million.
Continued On I'age

2

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, (Hi.

2

13, 19(i(i
OF PERCENT
Indnt- -

HOt'RC'F.A

Dollar

INSTITl'TION

University of Kentucky
Duke University
University of Illinois
Indiana University
University of Louisville
University of Missouri
University of North Carolina
University of South Carolina
Ohio State University
Purdue University
University of Tennessee
Vanderbilt University
VPI
West Virginia University
1964

fnlTfrnlty
Fands

Volume

26
5.7
5
39.6
4
64.2
34
5
37.5

2,600,000

1

52

2
9

2

86
86
63
73.9
80
53.9
86
30.8
52
51.3
49
84
40

1

19.500,000
14.220,000
990,000
28,921.000
14,353,492
10,360,000
10,638.000
5.407.500

tract

Fond

7

5,300,000
11,500,000
44,000,000
19,671,000

(rial Fsnnds
Con- tlon
tracts Grant

RUle
Con

Ffdrrsl

A

1

1

3

2
3.1
5
1.9

1

1.5
4
2.6
3
2.3
.5
2

Alomnl
A other
(lift
3
2
5
4.9
5
.8

1

.7
3
8.4
.5
.5
6

DOLLAR

(IF.

11.4
5
2.3
5
1.2

9

'11

Sciences
Med.

sh.

6,000,000
2.507,000

2,000,000
871,000
100,000
1,950,000
1,860,250
113,500
1.157,000
1,598,667
400,000
425.000
853.200

150,000

2,730,000
2,418,000
475,300
3,760,000
3,234,525
440,000
1,403,000
157,100

allure

Iloman- Itlea

1,400,000
55,950
8,000,000

227,700
0,000.000

4,479,000

6.045,000

2,889,000
150,000
1,170.000
2,727,750
185,000

2,603,000

1,735.000

Emrl-neerl-

Sciences

3,500,000
3,605,875

2,612,880

A

Science

Mfdlcsl

niologlral

430,000

.5
8
32.4
4
3

.6

rhynlrl
Science

Ependl-Sc- l.

Social
Arl-- r

1,311,700

1

DISTRIBUTION

7,000,000
8,925,000
2,100,000
4,095,000

6,724,000
5.495,000
67,375
4.300,000
7.600,000
364,500

400,000
195,700
15,000,000
100,000
2,925,000
1,000,000
215,400
8,387,000
2,755,102
475,000
425,000
394.700

5,784,100
5,827,583
4,400,000

Intrae.

Other
650,000
3,490,195

1,100,000
10,500,000
1,560,000
400,000

2,481,700

585,000

1.65,000

593,221

277.017

75,000
750,000

5.000,000
5.525.000
2,300.000

100,000

35.000

125.000
1,256.000

3,638,000

No Answer

Figures.

UK Lags Somewhat In Getting Research Funds
Continued From rage 1
In 1961, research at the University was done mostly in the
biological and medical sciences
with $3.5 million being spent
for those two areas. Agriculture
pulls in the second largest share
of the University's research dollar, getting $1.4 million in 1961.
Some $130,000 was spent in the
physical sciences and $400,000 in
engineering. (The 1961 figures
were the ones reported by UK
to the magazine.)
The national survey found

Ivey Presents

Recital Friday
a memBaritone Donald

Ivey,
ber of the University of Kentucky
music faculty, will be heard in
a recital at 8 p.m. Friday at
Memorial Hall.
The program, which is open
to the public, will be sung entirely in English. It includes
selections by Campian, Dow-lanHandel, Williams and
Britten.
Serving as accompanist will
be the singer's wife, Helen.
A member of the UK faculty
since 1961, Ivey has had extensive experience in opera and oratorio, and has been heard in many
radio broadcasts.

d,

that nearly half of the nation's
research
collegiate-associatewas done by state and
d

land-gra-

members
schools. The
National Asof the
sociation of State Universities
and Land-Gran- d
Colleges reporting to the magazine showed expenditures of about $1.2 billion.
colleges do
Thus, land-graan average of roughly $15.6 million a year in research. The University's $10 million falls well
below this level.
77

Of the estimated $2.5 billion
in research done annually by
colleges and universities, $100
million is supplied by industry,
another $100 million by private
foundations and other
sources, and $400 million
comes from institutional funds.
The rest a massive $1.9 billion-- is
supplied by the federal govnon-prof-

it

ernment.

Engineering; Food and

DrugAd-ministratio- n;

MerrellCo.
Tractor

Oct.
Co.; Lockheed-Georgi- a
Phone

Co.;

Lu- -

255-557-

Strand
NOW

these interviews for next

brizol; Marathon Oil Co.; The
Proctor & Gamble Co.
Oil Co.;
Oct.
Eaton, Yale & Towne; Haskins
6c Sells; McAlphins;
National
Cash Register Co.; R. J. Reynolds Tobacco; Union Carbide.
Oct. 20 Cummins
Engine
Co.; Magnavox Co.; Mead Corp.;
Owens, Potter & Hisle; Shell
Companies; Union Carbide.
Oct. 21 Humphrey Robinson; Martin Marietta Corp.; U.S.
Naval Missile Center; Vitro
vron

IncorGenesco,
porated; The Kendall Company;
Mason & Hanger-Sila- s
Mason
Co., Inc. and The William S.

SHOWING!

uninhibited
exposition of the onrush
of physical desire!"

'A

frank-an- d

Bosey Crowther.

Gov. Edward T. Breathitt
thinks that research is a key to
raising the per capita income of
the state. He said recently that
Kentucky must obtain more of
the nation's research dollar in
order to compete with richer
states.

"We cannot expect to reach
the economic level of those states
hav ing great centers of scientific
research unless we too broaden
our scientific research," he said.
He said the state's immediate
goal is to obtain more federal
money for projects that are already underway in state. Kentucky, he noted, is among the
40 states that do less than 30
percent of the nation's total

EXTRAMURAL AWARDS RECEIVED BY UK DURING 1965-6- 6
IN SUPPORT OF RESEARCH TRAINING
AND RELATED ACTIVITIES
$ 681,817
College of Agriculture
$ 850,740
College of Arts and Sciences
$
8,529
School of Architecture
$ 195,175
College of Business and Economics
$ 171,075
Community Colleges
$
5,400
Computing Center
$1,205,626
College of Education
$ 662,468
College of Engineering
$ 352,178
Graduate School (Traineeships and Fellowships)

re-

Institutional Grants

$

of Medicine
of Dentistry
of Nursing
of Pharmacy
Center For Development Change
Kentucky Geological Survey
Total
Approximately

$3,778,500

College
College
College
College

59,471

$ 415,593
$ 136,393
$
29,980
$ 628,664
$ 808,900

$10,400,000

iBssssa
r

WED, and SAT.

MATINEES

1 WINNER OF

I

METRO GOLDWYN

EVERY EVENING

at 8:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.;

6 ACADEMY

MAYER

mum

A CARLO

fz DAVID LEAN'S FILM

Its . adm.n00

SUN. 2:00 p.m

AWARDS

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P0NT1 PRODUCTION

OF BORIS PASTERNAKS

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EXECUTIVE ROUND TABLE . . .
HEAR THE VICE PRESIDENT OF
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"The Airline Strike; Management's
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TUESDAY, OCT. 18, 7:00 p.m.

ROOM 422, COMMERCE

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N. Y. Times

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"AS FUNNYAMOVlEASAml
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-- Newsweek Mag nine

-

COLUMBIA PICTURES

Presents

I fc

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Nick Pope,
chairman, and Patricia Ann Nickell,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet In 18M. became the Record In 1000, and the Idea
in 1808. Published continuously as the
Kernel sine 1915.
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Per copy, from files $.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
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Complete Fountain Service
Cosmetic Dept. & Drug Needs

BRYAN FORBES'

Recommended for

SUBSCRIPTION

ognition.

at

a nnounced

week:
Oct. 17 Abex Coqioration;
Bailey Meter Co.; Combustion

jumped from $6.3 million in 1961
to about $10 million in 1965 is
only one reflection of that rec-

search.
Eighty-si- x
percent of the reDr. Raymond C. Bard, UK
search money at the University
from the federal government assistant vice president for reis
while only seven percent comes search and executive director of
from institutional funds. Gifts the University Research Foundafrom alumni and other sources tion, writing in a recent Kena
provide a scant three percent of tucky Alumnus, states, "As
total UK research budget. result of World War II and with
the
the continuing involvement of the
University officials are well
UK's back-seaware of
position so far as getting research
money is concerned. That the

Placement Interviews Set
The Placement Service has

make the best possible use of
limited resources.
Even though the research facversities have been sought by
and industry to tor grows, lx)th here and nagovernment
research tionwide, the opM)rtunities ofassume
fered by the increased research
support."
dollar and better lalx)ratory facDr. Bard said, in an interview, that UK "must build ilities hav e been accompanied
problems.
enough strength to serve the
So the land of research is not
20 years
needs of Kentucky-n- ot
necessarily the land of milk and
ago but 20 years from now
and not attempt to imitate what honey.
FRIDAY: An examination of
somebody else has done.
The University, he said, must the problems.

United States in global affairs,
the capabilities of American uni-

University's research budget

THE WRONG BOX

11

liimiMiiiisssMssnsswaswinsWswmsM

I

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1

vVgp

FIRST
RUN!
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Mrm

r

So.

RALPH

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MICHAEL CAIIME
at tPCRt SS HIE" tern

PETER COOK
DUDLEY MOORE
NANETTE NEWMAN

TONY HANCOCK
LPETER SELLERS! J
mXm,
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IMTMOWPBlPt
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Phone

252-269-

Si7A Mick

8

1

JOHN MILLS

(

Nidhols Pharmacy
250
Limestone

..L V.i

TICKETS FOR THE

Righteous Brothers Concert

LJ

: HAND

:

IN MEMORIAL COLISEUM
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, AT 8:00 P.M.

At Dawahare's, Graves-CoBloomfields,
and the Student Center Info. Booth
Advance Tickets $Z00
At Door $3.00
x,

: VV1J0ANNE
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CHAkiis

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LXty.lfeb itpy

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sooy

* Till;

Due Process Issue
In Maryland Arrest

KENTUCKY

KERNEL. TliiUMlay,

((t.

1.1, l9Mi- -3

Mi

ill

i

V
m

I

II

I

i

The CollegUte Press Service

COLLEGE PAHK, Mil. Recent disciplinary action against a
University of Maryland freshman charged with possession of marijuana has raised due process questions over the university's judicial
procedure.
Robert F. Saner, 18, of Baltimore, was released Oct. 9 on bond
after being arrested in his dormitory room for illegal possession
of marijuana and barbituates two days earlier.
A university spokesman reported that the Office of the Executive Dean for Student Life has suspended Sauer from housing for
"believed possession of marijuana."
There is no specific regulation at Maryland prohibiting the
possession of the drug, but university regulations state that residents who fail to observe "accepted standards of condust" may be
asked to leave their dormitories.
In "extreme cases where the conduct of a student may not
be in conformity with the best interests of the university," the
rule continues, a student may be dismissed from school.
Saucr's status as a student will be decided soon by University
officials, the spokesman added. The case will probably go to
Darrell F. Rishel, director of judiciary affairs, he said. Rishel's
office usually handles student disciplinary cases.
Sauer's status as a student will be decided soon by University
Several students questioned whether the university's disciplinary
a system of student courts, constituted
action, which
a denial of the rights to due process of law within the university.
University action was likewise questioned because it paralleled
legal proceedings by the state, thus possibly subjecting Sauer to
double jeapardy for his alleged offense.
In a similar marijuana case at the University of Pennsylvania
two weeks earlier, a sophomore student was put on disciplinary
probation until he graduates. Prosecution was subsequently initiated by the State.
In that instance, students protested that the University took
action before the legal guilt of the accused student was determined.
A preliminary Maryland hearing for Sauer has been set for
Nov. 15. Officials emphasized that he was arrested for possession of marijuana and barbituates and not for the use of drugs.
Possession of barbituates is a misdemeanor in Maryland. However, possession of narcotics is a felony. Marijuana is considered
a narcotic.
Police reportedly acted on a tip in making the arrest. A search
warrant had been obtained before officials entered the dormitory
and arrested Sauer, who was alone at the time.
Federal narcotics agents, state police, and university officials
cooperated in the arrest.

-

FOR SALE
SALE Suziki Sport 50 Cycle.
weeks old. 550 miles. Chrome
fender, deluxe muffler, tool kit.
12 mo., 12,000 mile guarantee,
$225.
Call
606t
FOR SALE 1965 Chevrolet Impala
hard top 327
Power steering
brakes.
Comfortilt
and
steering
wheel. Excellent condition. Call
10O5t
after 5 p.m.
1961 Buick LeSabre conv.
LOOK!
for sale by owner. All power and
or
excellent condition. Call
see at Brattons Sunoco, 915 S. Lime.

0FpivicH

mMMfi

"

j

-

CLASSIFIED

Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113. Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.

JoUn MeYer.

WANTED
WANTED

HELP

Part-tim-

e

appren-

tice bartender. Also waitress wanted.
Levas Restaurant. 119 S. Lime. 10O5t
HELP WANTED Zandale car wash
2239 Nicholasville Rd. Work as many
hours as desired mornings and all
day Saturday if you need money.
10

O 5t

Waitress and grill
No
experience
necessary. Apply Dog House Restaurant. 185 Southland Drive. Phone

HELP WANTED
Part-tim- e.
cooks.

1105t

FOR
2

V--

1

278-59-

1105t

FOR
2.800
$175.

SALE

1965

miles;
Phone

good

Honda Sport 50;
condition, only
1202t

1.

Honda 90. 4 speed syncro.
Engine recently tuned, new plug,
Excellent condition. New
points.
Bucco helmet included. ' Call
7
1305t
pan.

FOR SALE

All

r

j2rvW the

r

prices are "about.

nnhhv n'rpfV with thf r1itrinlinfci t.iilnrinc
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that's indelibly John Meyer. Good little Girl suit in cottage tweed $45.
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A

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rii r--.

11

Nif

(

Jl

7i8
It was the first of a series of similar discussions
at the coffeehouse.

Prof. Paul Obcrst, left, and Dr. William F. Axton,
right, participated in a panel discussion on pornography and the law at Nexus Wednesday night.

Kernel Thoto

$1 Million Effort To Improve
Non-MajChemistry Courses
Goes Into Full Swing In U.S.
or

The Collegiate Press Service

grant from
try under a
the National Science Foundation.
The usual offering to the
major has been the
"survey course." But, King says,
"The survey course has never
really worked. Its general shortcoming is that it teaches theory
as fact. The whole character of
scientific knowledge and the
means scientists use to solve problems have been neglected."
As an alternative, King suggests that a specially designed
"general science" chemistry class
might be offered to
Such a course would be designed,
to explain to the students what
science is and has accomplished,
how it operates and why it is
doing what it does.
The course would explain
something of the nature of sciences as well as its content to
the
students who will
be future legislators, historians,
artists, and teachers.
As future taxpayers, King asserts, students should be better
prepared to evaluate objectively
and to criticize the many scientific projects their money will
be paying for.
The Advisory Council on College Chemistry,
according to
King, does not intend to write
one special course or program to
be applied throughout the country, but to try to improve on existing instruction.
two-ye-

CHICAGO -- A $1 million effort to improve U.S. college chemistry courses particularly for the
major went into
full operation this fall.
'Most universities are already
doing a good job with the students who will make their careers
in the field, according to Dr.
L. Carroll King.Chairman of the
newly organized Advisory Council on College Chemistry.
"The biggest problem in the
area," he explains, "is how to
devise a good chemistry course
for the students going into the
ry

arts, the humanities, journalism,
education or the social sciences."
The Council, with headquarters at Stanford University, will
finance the development of new
educational aids and curricula on
college campuses across the coun- -

ar

non-major- s.

non-scien-

Students Plan Panel
On New Constitution
Five University students will
a program on the proposed revised Constitution of
Kentucky Sunday. The 12:45 p.m.
program will be presented on
WKYT-TV- ,
Channel 27 in Lex-

conduct

ington.
Barbara Curtin, Winston
ler, Henry Vance Jr., Phil
and Billy Prebble, will

MilPat-to-

n,

moderate crowd at Nexus Wednesday evening heard a
between Dr. William F. Axton, associate professor of
and Paul Obcrst, acting Dean of the Law College, on
Fnglish
Law and the Peop e.
the subj'ect "Pornography-Th- e
Oberst first explained the legal questions involved in the marketmaterial citing the recent Supreme
ing of potentially pornographic
Gins-burCourt decision on "Eros." "The magazine s publisher, Halph
not on the actual pornography in his pubwas convicted
lication, but rather on the manner in which Cinsburg attempted
to solicit subscriptions."
Oberst further told the meeting that the contemporary test for
and has become known as
obscenity grew out of Roth vs. U.S.
the Roth Test. It states that "to the average person, applying condominant theme of the material
temporary community standards, the
taken as a whole appeals to prurient interest."
Axton said he regarded any magazine that was to be mailed
from Intercourse, Pa., which Cinsburg had planned to do with
"Eros," a huge joke because of its terrific bawdyness.
of persons when placed in sexual surround"The
makes them pornographic," said Axton.
ings
in "Playboy" magazine as porAxton classed the center-fol- d
nographic because it "reduced the human body to a machine"
and "might stimulate a sophomore's fantasies but has no relation
to real life."
Oberst pointed out that "pornography bears the signature of
for
and that "'Adults Only' is only a come-o- n
lively-dialogu-

A

t

A- -

11

Pornography, Law
Discussed At Nexus

hi

The thirty will experiment
with electronic teaching aids,
such as video tape recorders and
computers, as well as working
on the basis orientation of classroom and laboratory sessions.

immature people."
"The value of sexuality lies in its relation to real human experience,' concluded Axton.
The discussion was the first in a series of such forums conducted
at the coffeehouse.

CKEA Members Distinguish
Between Protesting A nd Striking
College of Education study
that Central Kentucky
teachers feel obliged to support
group policy, but distinguish between "protesting" and striking
to emphasize their demands.
Some 1,500 of the 4,500 educators in the Central Kentucky
Education Association were responded to the poll.
They seemed to see a clear
difference in striking, which in- A

shows

volvcs contract violation, and
action such as last February's
"professional protest day," not
in conflict with written agreements. The study was undertaken
to answer questions posed by
that" day, when teachers across
the state did not meet classes.

The teachers' "fundamental
loyalty" prompts them to support their professional organiza

KERNEL

tions, even if policy conflicts
with personal feelings, the study
showed.
Teacher qualifications was
ranked highest of topics groups
should discuss or act upon. Second was "professional negotia-

tions."
The CKEA, which financed
the study, serves 43 school

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