xt7p5h7bsx6s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p5h7bsx6s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581209  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  9, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  9, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7p5h7bsx6s section xt7p5h7bsx6s Highway Accident Figures Climb Higher
ne truthful with yourself. What about the times

The number of people killed annually on our nation's
highways has reached astronomical proportions. Last
year alone, 38,500 people died as a direct result of traffic
accidents.
Just what kind of people are these 38.500 that are
d
annually slaughtered? Are they all
speed
maniacs? Aie they all ducktailed.
hot rodders cut to get their kicks? Are they all
alcoholics who ate unable to control their actions or their cars?
1'nfortunately, they're not. Statistics bear out the
fact that most people killed in traffic accidents are ordinary, eer day people . . . people like you and me.
Weil then, what kind of people are we? Let's analyze
ourselves. Ycu first.
,
This is jour portrait: You are a typical college
student. Ycu enjoy .the convenience of having your own
car here on campus. You drive nearly everywhere you
go. You modestly admit that you are a good driver.
And why shouldn't you, you think. You never go
over the speed limit. You always obey traffic regulations. You aie always considerate of the other fellow
while driving. And most important, you always keep
your eyes on the road and your mind on your driving.
You lie and you know it.

you were late for an appointment or a date and you
were supposed to be there at a certain time? Did you
ever stomp the accelerator to the floor to try to save a
few minutes? You know you have. At times like this
you were driving with your foot, not your head.
'
You were lucky to get there at all.
Or what about the times you've sneaked through
stoplights, or failed to signal your turns to the ear
behind, or failed to slow down in school one, or a
host of other things? You were hardly paying strict
observation to traffic regulations when you did things
like these.
And you've certainly done them time and time again.
What about the times you neglected to dim your
lights for oncoming cars, or impatiently blew your horn
for a slower motorist ahead to get a move on. or refused
y
to yield the
to another driver at an intersection? Were you being considerate in these instances?
y
The fact that, legally, you have the
won't
keep you from having. an accident.
Nor will it guarantee to keep you alive.
And remember the times you were so emotionally
upset you were a menace to yourself and other drivers?
Think back a little before you try to answer this question.

half-craze-

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Remember the ttirce you were in a bad mood bciuv
of an argument with someone? You whipped your cir
around pretty recklessly that day. And what about th
time another car pulled out in front of you? You ranted
and rami and threatened to grt even with "that crazy
fool." At times like that, your mind was on anthin
but your driving.
In fact, your mood could have killed you and prrhapi
some other innocent persons.
Any of the things mentioned above could have kllle.t
you. regardless of how good a driver you fancy yourself to be. You may know and abide by all traffic regulations, always drive nt safe speeds, and be rourteoui l
other drivers.
Hut that's not enough. It's also your Job to avoid th
errors of other motorist if you value your Own life,
lienx-mbrr- .
you are no safer than the worst drlrrr yo

meet.
Well that takes cure of you. Now. what about nW
I don't think we nerd to go into detail on my part, however. Nothing like that will ever happen to me.
You see. I'm a gmnl driver.
(Editor's Note: This article was written by the lata
Rig It Mortis, a former I K journalism Mudrnt. lie wa
killed recently in an auto accident.)

TTT

"TT- n
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2

'A

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Vol. L

LEXINGTON. KY., TUESDAY, DEC. 0. 10:8

No.

A'l

Faculty Recommends
KegistratioB Chanees
Ufcfc '

........

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LMMMMMMMMt

By ALICE REDDING

J

universities having such programs.
Florida State University and Duke
University are among the larger
schools in the South which have
instituted
and
registration.
,
gradA faculty spokesman said I'K's
The proposed
registration problem was studied
system was also passed.
ing
changes recommended by
of all regis- and
expected to be effected by every college a year ago, but a fortrants is
mal proposal had never been subthe first semester of the 1959-6- 0
year. Dr. C. E. Elton, dean mitted to the University' Faculty
school
of admissions and registrar, said before yesterday afternoon's meet
the development of a
system will follow
in a minimum of "one or
two years."
The actual planning of workable
and
systems in
now in the
hands of the registrar's office. Dr.
Elton said the program which will
probably be used has already been
decided upon, but until the meDr. Howard Eckel, associate prochanics can be worked out, defessor of education, moderated a
tails will not be released.
panel discussion of the 19G0 KEA
With the vote to establish a
legislative program at the Kappa
and registration sys- Delta Pi meeting Thursday night.
tem, UK joins other colleges and
One of the points of the projected program was the use of
textbooks. Proposals also call
Chverleuding Clinic free longer school years, adequate
for
A clinic is being held in the
finances, and adequate of colleges.
Euclid Avenue classroom from Higher
salaries for teachers were
5 p. m. to 6 p. m. for those inalso asked for in the program.
terested in becoming cheerleaders
During the program, the need
for the coming year. A 2.0 standfor informed teachers was dising and attendance of two of
the meetings is necessary for cussed.
Panel members were Miss Elizaeligibility.
beth Dennis, head of the business
The University Faculty yesterapproved recomday afternoon
to establish systems of
mendations
and

"Their Finest Hour"
A new photographic display opened in King Library last week.
The display features a pictorial review of England during World
War II. Also included in the displays are comments written by
Wintcn Churchill, Britain's wartime prime minister.

mid-semest-

er

on

New Photo Display
Now In UK Library
"Their Finest Hour." is the title
of the pictorial display now being
shown in the main hall of the
Margret I. King Library.
The display, which was set up
by Dr. Lawrence Thompson, director of the library, is based on
Vol. II of "The Second World
War," by Sir Winston Churchill.
The same display was published in
Life magazine.
The exibition records that period in World War II when Britain
stood alone against the axis forces.
It is supplemented by quotes from
Churchill when he served as prime
minister.
The epic that showed the determination and courage of the
British peoples are characterized
by Churchill's words, "We shall
we shall
fight on the beaches
we shall
fight in the fields
fight in streets . . . . "

...
...

ing.

The mid-tergrading system
approved yesterday Was described
as "essential" to the
proand
gram, and "very useful" with ths
present scheduling system.
grade
Whether
will be available next semester U
uncertain. The registrar "hopes so."
but was not able to make any mors
definite statement because the details have not been worked out.
m

on

mid-Remest-

er

on

Historic scenes of old England are
shown converted for modern war.
There is an ancient Roman fort
with slots in the walls for machine
guns. Ditches and intrenehments
dug to repel the Normans are
shown in use for a modern war.
Aviation is pictured with the
Spitfires and
famous
British
Churchill's tribute to the airmen,
"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many
to so few
There are pictures of London
during the
blitz, the German
bombings, with famous landmarks
burning and
destruction everywhere. People are sleeping in subways as the only place safe enough
to escape the bombs.
The display ends with pictures
surveying the damage after it
was over, with the start of the
cleaning up and the rebuilding.

..."

KB Pi Hears KEA
LegislativePrbgram
department at

Lafayette

High

ScIkxjI, and past president of KEA
and CKEA; Mrs. J. E. Hernandez,
a member of the state board of education, and the legislative chairman of the seventh district PTA
and Mitchell Davis, executive secretary of the Kentucky Council of
Education, and president of KEA.
Mrs. Hernandez presented
the
parent's side of the dl.scu,ion,
while Davis presented the argument for the lay people.
The education honorary, Initiated two faculty members and ZZ

students preceedlng the discussion.
Dr. James T. Moore. Jr.. chairman of the division of the curn,
riculum, and Mrs. Jeanne Q.
instructor in home economics education.- - were the faculty
members initiated.
Students initiated were Anna
M. Collier, Louisville; Betty
I'
Cornett. Garrard; Dorothy Edwards, Decatur, Ga.; Ann B.
Louisville; June W. England.
Marilyn R. Goins,
Winchester;
Madisonville; Margaret Hare Lexington; Clara Sue Hedger, Lexington:
Wilbur Herrmann. Ft.
Thomas; Patricia' Shelton Kopp-ma- n.
Covington;
Sandra Luce;
Falrburg, Nebr.
Lynda Lee Miller, Lexington;
Jean Moore, Lexington; Estelle
B. Nickell.
West Liberty; Gail
Shoemaker. Paris; Lucille Stiles,
Munfordville; Linda Stoltz, Fera
Creek: Delma Walden, Tompkln-villSara Walker, Princeton: Leo
Weddle, Somerset; Helen O. Wood.
Campbellsburg and James Youti,
Hazard.
Cal-liha-

'The Enchanted' Is Amusing Play
By SCOTT LONG

The Guignol Players presented
their second play of the season,
Jean Giraudoux's fantasy-comed-The Enchanted," last night in the
Guignol theater.
"The Enchanted" in Giraudoux's
words of introduction is "the biography of a critical moment in. the
life of a young girl the moment
when she turns from girlhood to
womanhood." In this transition,
the young school teacher, played
bv Phyllis Haddix is aided andor
l. ndered by a
Gost, (Howard
Dolb; the Supervisor of Weights
and Measures, Alec Murphy; the
Inspector, David Slack: the Mayor,
John Pritchard; the Doctor, Russ
Manley; the
Mangebois sisters,
Jackie Mundell and Liz Eblen, and
y,

various other townspeople.
In particular, David Slack and
John Pritchard take advantage of
the humor of their roles, so that
one is amused not only by their
lines but also by their specific

interpretations.

both must convince the viewer of
those important changes that make
them the play's chief concern. Miss
Haddix seemed to me too
to be thoroughly convincing
as a young girl enchanted by the
wonders of life and death, a difficult-jobfrr anyone. The task is
made more difficult by Vines involving
the "magnitudes
and
meaning of life" and "a bright new
world in terms of the eternal life
which is ours" while all around
her are floating the quick metaphorical lines of the other chrac-ter- s.
self-conscio- us

Although
Alec Murphy's role,
does not hold as many opportunities to become an audience favorite
as do those of the Inspector and
the Mayor, his performance was
consistently good. He managed to
lead his role smothly up to the
final scene without the jerks ..hat
sometimes marred Slack's work,
thus hurting the creation of f anghost seemed
Howard Doll's
tsy.
heaier than the lines indicated alPhyllis Haddix and Howard Doll though In his first scene with Isawere assigned the two most dif- bel in the forest, one cannot help
ficult roles of the production since betcrning entangled in the ma;lc

i

woods. The scene Is not only a
compliment to the acting of Ituss
Mobely as the Doctor, Isabel and
the Ghost, but also to the technical
work of the crew.
The set itself is very simple and
leaves one free of detail that might
hamper one's access to the moods
established by the lines, the lighting and the music. Jim Read's intricate lighting system is very effective in creating the fantasy, as
is Francis Poulenc's music form the

original production.
Doug Ray should be complimented for his choice of "The Enchanted" and for his direction which
make an entertaining evening at
the Guignol practically

Em-ma-

rt.

e;

* 2-T-

KENTUCKY, KERNEL, Tuesday, Dec. 0,

1IE

19.18

'

Filing Ends Tomorrow
For Dec. 17 SC Election

The fall Issue of Stylus campus literary magazine, goes on
sale today In the Campus Book
Store and in the English Department office in McVry Hall.
maganne contains
XLe
two short stories, one essay and
several poems, as well as a four-pag- e
section of student art.

Henry Clay once said, "I woukl
rather be right than President."
There were no psychiatrists in

U!
iMwiirf iiitn

1850.

ge

Sturgill Gives
Young Demos
Politics Talk
"The young people are the backbone and strength of the g6vern-ment- ,"
state safety commissioner,
Don Sturgill said, speaking before
the Young Democrats Club Thursday night.
Sturgill feels that if the young
people do not take an interest in
the government, there will be no
government.
For the young person with political ambitions, the city or county levels are the best places to begin a career In politics, Sturgill
said.
In order to do well in politics
you should
start in something
interests you and work at it
that
you
hard. Later, if you want,
can advance to the state or federal government," he remarked.
Sturgill stressed the importance
of having the"" right ideas instead
of the most popular ones.

Club Festival
Has Heifers
And Hoopers

fmifT'liU.'U.I

40-pa-

--

non-president- ial

Arthur Garden, senior, and his
Holstein heifer took the grand
champion showmanship award of
the annual Dairy Club Festivities
Nirjht Thursday.
Garden and Billy Bob Toadvine,
senior, received trophies for showing the Holstein and Jersey class
winners, respectively.
Included in a series of comic
skits was a hula hoop contest for
students and faculty members of
the Dairy Department. The "hula
hoopers" included faculty mem- bers Dr. Don Jacobson, and Mr.
Elmer Schcidenhelm and students
Billy Joe Mitchell, Georfe Duncan,
Peter Key. and Carroll Graves.
dairy cattle
Nine upper-clas- s
feeding and management students
showed the an.mals they had pre- pared for one month prior to the
show as a project for their laboratory. The animals were selected
from the Experimental Farm herd.

cl

Stylus

and Dirk Watklns, Engineering and
Dick Vimont, Law.
With the nomination of Greenland, the BP slate has been completed. Other Students' Party candidates are Leroy McMullin, Agriculture and Home Economics; Rose
Mary Billings, Arts and Sciences;
Terry Kuester, Commerce; Jo
Moyer. Education; Carleton God-se- y
and Colin Lewis, Engineering
and Bob Manchester in Law.
Dan Millott, Students' Party
chairman, said the SP Fall platform will be released tomorrow.
The Campus Party will also release
its platform tomorrow.
All eight seats being contested
Dec. 17 will be for one year terms.
Those elected will take office in
early January.

Campaigning for the Dec 17
Student Congress election moves
into Its final seven days this week.
Both the Campus and Students'
Parties will have full slates In the
general election. As of yesterday
the Campus Party had not named
a candidate for the Graduate
School post, but party chairman
Bob Chambliss said the CP would
telect a candidate before tomorrow's filing deadline.
Under SC election rules it is
possible for a candidate to run
without any party designation. As
of Monday no such applications
h.id been filed with SC elections
committee.
Prospects for a heavy vote in the
Hoc. 17 contqst seem quite good.
The Nov. 19 primary drew J.407
voters, only slightly less than the
List
election when
there were two slates of candidates.
A year ago the Students' Party
was unopposed in the SGA fall
femeral elections. In the full of
1956, the December election drew
'
1,535 voters in a contest where
both parties had slates.
If lTK students follow the general national pattern, the size of
the primary vote would indicate a
possibility of a record fall election
vote next week.
The weather may also be a factor in the size of the vote and
a warming trend would greatly enhance the possibility of a record
vote on Dec. 17.
Both Parties nominated nearly
pll their candidates in the Nov.
19 primaries. The Students' Party
nominated Tom Greenland as its
Graduate School candidate in a
meeting of the party central committee last week.
Campus Party candidates and
their colleges arc Maitland Hice,
Agriculture and Home Economics;
Charlotte Bailey, Arts and Sciences; Taylor Jones, Commerce,
Thil Cox, Education; John Bailey

UK Signs 10 Granls-In-AiAs Scarcli For Talent Opens
Two linemen from Jenkins were
UK has signed 10 high school
awarded grants-in-aiThey are.
grants-in-ai- d
football stars for
220 pound
Tommy Brush, a
since 12:01 a.m. Sunday.
tackle and Mickey Dann, a
Barnett, a
d.

6-- 3,

6-- 4,

223-pou-

6--

nd

200-pou-

nd

170-pou-

1.

170-pou- nd

1,

185-pou-

5--

8,

nd

180-poun-

a

Open 5:30

Admission

i

65c

Now Open
Indoor Theateratorium!
Only

LEX's

2-i-

Indoor Theatre

Outdoor
NOW
(First Time
Liz Taylor Paul

I

SHOWING
at Reg. Price)
'Big Daddy' Ives

Newman

"CAT ON A HOT TIN
(Color

6:30

2nd feature

!

10:30)

Betsy Palmer

cultyred pearls, accented
with white Austrian crystals.

Mounted in untarnishable
14 Kt. white gold overlay
These are really exquisite!

Open 5:30

Admission

Pendant $17.50 plus tax
Earrings $15.00 plus tax

65c

In fine leatherette gift cases.

Perils of Africa!
Richard Todd - Juliette Greco

"NAKED EARTH"
(Cinemascope)

HANCOCK
WATCH SHOP
E.

Large, premium quality

settings.

Watches
Lighters
Jewelry

j

&

"TRUE STORY OF
LYNN STUART"

SERVICE
Clocks
ik Electric Shavers

Pearls of Tropics!
Stewart Granger - Paul Douglas

GkEEN FIRE"
(ColorScope)

Main Opp. Wolf Wile

Phone
127 W. Main
9 to 5 Daily
Store Hours:

NOW! ENDS WED.
Piumouil pticnt

mvsm

TECHNICOLOR

TOMORROW EVE.
AT 9:00 P. M.

Coming December 15
HOLLYWOOD

pAiL.

SNEAK PREVIEW
Plus the regular feature!
See "Houseboat" at 6
o'clock followed by the
'Sneak' at 8:00 or see

the 'Sneak' and then the
last showing of "Houseboat" at 9:40. It's an
all-lau- gh

t

show!

MtWtlOW-K1WTMC-

j.
j

VjJ

fj
til
It

Students,
CASH

13
Off
& CARRY!

Oo

Dy

Better

Dry

Service
Cleaning

Minor Repairs Free!
Acrest frem Memorial

.11
H

7
U

isj
j

KV

BIG CAST!

V

BIG PICTURE!

Now Showing

jvJ' VMD
JOHN

FGKO

WOT

for an appointment.

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY

starts TOMORROW!
BIG BOOK

Hughes announces
campus interviews for Electrical Engineers
and Physicists receiving B. 5.,
M. S.y or Ph. D. degrees.
Consult your placement ojjice now

HUGHES

ENDS TODAY
"TUNNPL OF LOVE"

Culver City, Los Angeles, El SegunJo and Fullerton, California
and Tucson, Arizona

H

PHOQUCHON

jprci arm
7

4,

Kenton
end.
tackle from Cynthlana and
UK also signed two ends from
Doug Sands, a
High at Corbin, Keith Hutson and Rodney
fullback from Harriman
Chattanooga were the first to be Barton. Hutson weighs 183 whilo
Barton scales at 102.
signed.
Others signed were Corky May-fiel- d,
Barnett played his high school
a
halfback from
school ball at Cynthiana
and prep
Military Academy. Black Star; Elmer Patrick, a
and Staunton
guard from WilliamsSands scored 101 points for the
High 11 during the past burg and Howard Dunneback, a
Harriman
from Oak Ridge
season.
(Tenn.) High.
Eight other high school grid
stars were signed later Sunday.
Jerry Woolum, a standout at Madison-Model
at quarterback, was
signed by Coach Blanton Collier.
Woolum twice was the recipient of
the Recreation Bowl's most valuable player award.

ROOF"

j

--

J

* f

Till: KI'.NTtTkV klRNLI.

Workers UK Wins Dixie Classics
Number 52 At Library Afler 'Bomb Scare' Delay
Part-Tim- e

student

assistants
play a major role in the day to day
(peration of the University Library. These students work anywhere for two to 25 hours
n week at various Jobs within the
library, and are paid by the hour.
At the present time there are
2 student assistants
on the
payroll, 27 of whom work on
the Ion:: desk. According to Miss
Kate Irvine, Head of the Circulation Department, this represents
on increase of 10 in the same number of years.
More student help was necessary
since the total circulation for the
month of October alone has almost doubled since 1918.
Working as student assistants in
the UK library has helped students
train for many professions. Form-- r
student assistants have become ministers, advertising executives, government workers, teachers,' geologist and commercial artists, as well as librarians.
Ben Reeves, a former UK student now with the Louisville Cour
Part-tim-

e

li-tr-

PHARMACY

was once a student

ier-Journ- al,

as-

sistant.

who h now the
David Clift
Executive Secretary of the American Library Association, (tot his
start as a student assistant to Miss
DeMargaret Tuttle, Head of
partmental Libraries.
Although the student assistants
take their work seriously, occasionally they misunderstand a request for a book. For example,
one assistant conducted n franfor a book entitled
tic search
"Wrap It Up and Tie It Up." only
to find out that its actual title
was "World Enough and Time,"
UK won the second round of
and another combed the stacks for the Ohio
and Ktiuiukv Rifle
"A Manly Peach," which turned League on Dec. C,
civi:i. thnn an
out to be "And Madly Teach."
eight point lead after the vtmple-tio- n
of the first two
The team scoi',f
round were UK. 1381; Ohio state'
University AFROTC. , 1379: Ohio
State University AROTC. UjG and
Xavier, 1315.
SuKy Circle has been given a reIn the inaiviuua: competition
served section at basketball games
for the use of all campus organiza- Donald Harnvn is first anc Jerry
Wade is second.
tions.
A representative of each organiTwelve men fired for each U-- m
zation is requested to attend a and the top five scores counted.
meeting at 3 p. m. Thursday in the The team was composed of Donald
SUB.
Harmon, Douglas Searcy, Marshall
An organization can be eligible Turner, Jerry Wade, Tommy Muelto use the seating section only if a ler. David Stith. A. L. Smith, Georrepresentative brings a list of the ge Dean, Millard Lakin, Dennis
members of the organization.
Campbell and Winfred Campbell.

UK Rifle Team
Wins 2iid Round

di

3

.t

P.c Ri f.txHl ' -

Should
li 4

i:

"tn.

.VS.

!

.

t

GO FORMAL

HATa?

COMPLETE

RENTAL SERVICE
For ALL Occosioni

ii

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V.
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rents

3

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MEN'S
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Dave Chjdwick Campus Representative

DRIVE SAFELY
OVER 50

OF ALL FATAL
ACCIDENTS ARE CAUSED BY

SLICK TIRES!
YOUR PERSONAL APPEARANCE

Your Car Is No Safer Than The Tires
You Have On It.

Is

Let LEXINGTON U. S? TIRE CO.

IMPORTANT

-

Prescriptions
O Fountain
0 Cosmetics
O Men's Toiletries
O

Equip your car with a new set of Safety '8' tires or put
a new Safety '8' retread on your old ones.

Try our excellent Laundry's Dry Cleaning Service.
The "Best Dressed" on the campus do!

FREE PARKING
LAUNDRY

etc

Claude McGaughey

Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

815

CLEANING CO.

is

Recap Service At

One-Da- y

LEXINGTON US TIRE Co.
131 Midland

Q&Cfm

Grad. UK '48, manager
f lliiiii

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iiliiii

tel.

2-30-

20

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to pound but without the
you miss the whole idea of q

to smoke -- but without flavor
you miss the whole idea of smoking!

AX

4

AI.I - ' Ihe Nirr I.Utlo II

1

Reserved Sealing
o

riaimed

tlu'

-

;uni:

momi:
I1F.N

ir.S-

,

and the
bate
:i.
hours.
dun Runnet - 2 in. 10. a
- the further development of ir.io- - CIRCLE 2
Cat On A Hot
topic di bated
""" - 6 30. 1(1 3.V
Thr
"!M'lnl "
leur wapon.s should lx prohibited
tTl.. Story of Lnn H'utt
py International agreement."
'
The affirmative team of Ronald
The Naked Faith'' Polly ami Tex FitGerald was the nno, id :o
' (jUl"'
only undefeated team at the meet.
F.t t'" - 8 3D
They were Judged as the best af- KKN
ebvit" - 12 22,
It CKY
firmative team in the inert.
2 42. a 02. 7 22. 9.43.
UK's negative Irani, which waa STRAND "Tunnel of
I nc"
r, on. r.oo. 1'i.rx).
jiivlced the best at the tourna12 no. 2.nn.
ment was made
up of Michael
!ron and Richard Roberts.
was diMi'i.vsrd
rli'hiyi d for

lo-inds-

The Prescription Center
915 S. Lime
Near Rose

REAR OF STORE

UK's r'.ebate team r.ur.e home
winners from their must iro n? debate at Wake
Forest, WmMon-SalcN. C. They won 11 out of
12 rounds at the
Dixie CI.i.vmo.
meet.
A "bomb scare" .made ,n interesting sidelight to the debate. In
recent weeks, there had been calls
warning of bombs scheduled to
explode at certain times. Ienuse
of one of these calls, the school

!,,.

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* A Child Is Often Careless . . .

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

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undor th Art
t 1h Fot Office at Lfington, Kentucky at rcond
Publmhfd lour limn a wrili during the rrfulur ftrhnol ymr rtcrpt holidays
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

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3, 1879.

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Jim 11 tt3JJsirEdite9-in-Chie- f
Larry Van I Ioose, Chief Sports Editor
News Editor
Eiterson, Chief
Ann Ron l HHt Society-Edit- or
Fiowy Ashley, Business Manager
Now MAN McMullin, Advertising Manager
rhotographer
Hank Chapman, Cartoonist
.
Cordon Balr, Staff
Marilyn Lyvew and JudyPmnbaker, Proofreaders
Andy

"ZIL

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan Millott, Editor

Ann

Pacl Scott,

Redding, A ssociate Editor

Sports Editor

The Teaching Profession

U.S.A. Versus USSR
extracted from a
(The
study of the teaching profession in
the United States and the Soviet
Union. It was prepared by the Department of Economies of the McGraw-Hill
Puhlishing Co., Inc. THE
following is

EDITOR).

That American college and

uni-

versity teachers are underpaid is not
a novel observation. But what has happened to the economic status of their
profession can be put in more candid
terms.
As far as financial incentives arc
concerned, we have virtually socialized the academic profession.
Teaching has become such a poorly
paid career, with so little prospect of
material reward for outstanding per
formance, that it simply does not attract enough highly qualified young
ruen and women.
Ironically, the Soviet Union has
deliberately and successfully used
capitalist incentives to improve its
educational system.
Although the Russians show an
utter disregard of civil liberties, they
pay their teachers well and confer on
them all the prestige and privileges
that Soviet society can offer.
Russian professors, together with
party officials and scientists, have become the privileged upper class of a
supposedly classless society.. In the United States, the average
faculty salary is little more than the
average income of industrial workers.
According to the National Education Association, the average faculty
salary is about $5,210. College instructors receive $1,100, associate
$3,730 and lull professors
pro-lesso-

$1,100.

rs

earn significantly more than teachers
in high schools, and university instructors can look forward to a sharply
progressive rise in earning power as
they advance to higher positions. The
spread between the income of a full
professor and the lowest academic
position is greater than 15 to one. In
addition, full professors can earn a
healthy bonus if they are elected to
membership in the Russian Academy
of Sciences.
In the United States, by contrast,
full professors on the average earn
less than twice as much as beginning
instructors. And many college professors earn less than public school
teachers in large cities. Even a full
professor's pay does not compare with
earnings in other professions or in
professions j in industry requiring
similar training.

Our colleges and universities,

as

well, as our teachers, find themselves
in a serious predicament. Faced with
a shortage of both funds and teachers,
they cannot reward distinguished performances. Limited resources for
salary increases have gone predominantly to the lower ranks, so that'
an adequate number of teachers could
be retained. Meanwhile, potentially
fine teachers are being siphoned off
into better paid occupations.
The shabby treatment of our teachers threatens to undermine, not only

our educational standards, but our
free enterprise system itself.
There is the recent example of a
liberal arts college which discovered
that live of its graduating seniors
were being offered starting salaries
higher than those paid any of their
professors.

It would be surprising if
In Russia, on the other hand, thei ences like this did not place a strain
young Soviet graduate can see that it on the enthusiasm with which these
pays and pays very well to choose professors deal with some key aspects
teaching as a career.
of American capitalism.
The head of a department in a
Also important is the role education
Russian university can command a
is playing in the cold war with the
salary of about 6,000 rubles a month.
Soviet Union. The Russians have
This is about eight times the income
made great strides in raising the
of the average Russian worker, who
quality of their education particuearns 750 rubles a month.
lar ly in science and engineering. Both
The Russian professor comes off the number and the technical calibre
Very well in terms of what his income
of their graduates are impressive, as.'
will buy. It has been estimated that,
recent Soviet achievements testify.
based on Soviet consumption patterns, These successes owe
much to the
,000 rubles a month is worth about
generous economic treatment the Rus$7,200 a year-- or
higher than the sians have given their teaching proaverage American professor's salary. fession.
Of course, it is dillicult to compare
Russia clearly has set her teaching
living standards in two countries as
salaries well above the "right" figure.
different as the United States and
We are nowhere near it. What this
Russia. But particularly in the field
adds up to is that the Communists
of science where the salaries can run
not we have become the shrewd capito 15,000 or more rubles a month-- it.
talists. in the vital field of education.
is dear that the- Soviet professor"
enjoys a higher real income than that
KERNELS
ofleied his American counterpart by
a much moie prosjerous economy.
Mankind censure injustice, fearRussia also offers much higher preing that they may be the victims of
miums than the United States to those it and not because they shrink lrom
who attain distinction in teaching.
committing it.
Teachers ar the University level
Flato
-

--

X

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v

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sv

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...

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A Driver Must Never Be

The Readers' Forum
Editor's Notes Unneeded
To The Editor:
Although I hae never written to the
Kernel editor (nor to any other for th:
matter). 1 led it necessary to toss in a
lew words in delense of the regular con,
tributors to the Readers' Forum.
is my opinion and 1 am not discardIt
ing the possibility that it may also be the
opinion of some others that the editor is
placing, in many instances, uncalled for
and unnecessary comments at the ends of
the letters.
Now, I don't want to give you the impression that I think all editor's comments should be abolished. I merely advocate that unless a writer is in error and
needs, correction, or unless he spccilically
requests information, the column should
be left to its contributors. Certainly the
editorial page has sufficient space to print
the editor's comments outside the. readers'
space.

ours," we arc told but
it's still your baby. Is it worth a little
thought?
Scott K. McIIenry

"The paper

Bad-Luc- k

is

Support And Success
To The Editor:
The members of our

cross-countr- y

team join inc in thanking you for the

splendid repotting of our successes
this fall and the unexpected pleasure
of making your editorial page.
It is dillicult to estimate the amount
of good that such support does for a
team, but feel certain that it played
a significant role this lall.
1

coach asks a group of
young men to make the sacrifice of
training, to run at least 40 miles each
week, and to compete against worthy
foes, it is downright discoui aging for
them to go unheralded. So I attribute
a fair amount of our success to your
wonder ltd support.

When

a

Don Cash
Coach,

Slaton

Track and Cross Country

Legend

The Hope Diamond
fabulous
Hope Diamond,' a stone of beauty and
ill lot tunc, has passed from a New Yoik
gem menhant to the nation.
The deep blue diamond has been given
to the Smithsonian Insitution's Hall of
Gems and Minerals here. It is the largest of all blue diamonds in the wot Id,
and the most storied.
The midnight blue diamond is not
piece but
quite the size of a
has been insured by VMriou