xt7p5h7btd9s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p5h7btd9s/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1937 journals 012 English Lexington. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Regulatory series, bulletin. n.12 text Regulatory series, bulletin. n.12 1937 2014 true xt7p5h7btd9s section xt7p5h7btd9s Regulatory Series, Bulletin No. 12. January, 1937 ‘ .
; Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station f  
 i UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY j  
-—— . I l
» Inspection, Certification, and Transportation of Nursery ;
. Stock in Kentucky, with a Brief Report for the E I i
Year Ended June 30, 1936.  
W. A. PRICE and HOWARD G. TILSON   ‘
— The Kentucky Nursery Inspection Law, enacted at the  
regular session of the General Assembly in 1926, provides for   1 _
p the quarantine of diseased or infested plants and for the inspec-    
tion of all nurseries in Kentucky where trees, vines, plants or l l
other nursery sleek are grown and offered for sale. The pur- l ,
· pose of the law is to prevent the introduction into the Stale and 2
· the distribution from one point to another within the State, of  
dangerously injurious insect pests and plant diseases. There-    
{Ofc, it is a law protecting the nursery industry and the heme- i i
‘ owners who have invested large sums of money in plants for
the beautification of their grounds.
TRANSPORTING NURSERY STOCK  
Whenever nursery sleek is given to a common carrier for
, delivery to another point, either within this State or in another _
state or county, the package must be accompanied by a valid
certificate of inspection. Transportation companies in Ken-
i““k>’ are required by law to notify the State Entoniologist at -
. Once when nursery sleek is received by them without a valid · ,
rerliticate of inspection issued by a state or federal authority. i l
The postal Laws and Regulations, Section 595, paragraph 2, · . `  
llm\`llI0 that nll paglmgos of 11ul‘s01‘y stOCl{ Scllt iil1l‘ll UIQ mail · I
1 mllei l)C21l‘ a (3(;1·[jHg;]lg of i]15p(*@ti011_ POSill1HSi'C1`S CHU ]`0lld(`l` I i  
"“lUt1l>le service in preventing the spread of diseases and i11S€€t ,   1  
· DMS by Observing this law. t l § i  
. l i
. l T _
{ l l

 ti
i 2 Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station  ¤
PHONY PEACH  , ,1,,,,5
Phony-peach inspection has been carried on in Kentucky mi   mu.,
° 1 a limited scale for the past two seasons. This work was done iii , as h
1935 during the months of June and July by two inspectors “ be C
from the Federal Phony-Peach Laboratory in Georgia. Ther mgtj
found seven peach trees infected with phony-peach disease, one -
each in Bullitt, XVebster and Union Counties, and two each in j
I T Henderson and Graves Counties. These seven infected trees were l
tagged and later removed according to recommendations. ln 1936 · fmt
the special inspection for this disease was made by the Federal i €$Pt
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and the Kentucky mst
Agricultural Experiment Station cooperating. The center of T me
activities was in \Vestern Kentucky because winter injury te i, mel
peach trees in Central and Eastern Kentucky was so severe as  ¢ ms'
to make identitication of the disease very difficult. During four   mu
if weeks of intensive work, all orchards where infected trees hail · EH
been found in 1035 were inspected. All nurseries growing pearll l ms
stoek and the environs within the radius of one mile were ilr _ Sec
spccted. Only one infected tree was found, that being in it i  mu
· commercial orchard in McCracken County.  ~ H C
JAPANESE BEETLE   “;;A
A Trapping for Japanese beetle was carried on in Kenturl<§'    
during the past srnnmcr, This work was done by the llrrwtlll  i St,
of Entornology and Plant (Quarantine. There were 2,400 l1'ill'*· _
400 each in Henderson, Lexington, Covington, and Ashland, tllltl Ah
800 in Louisville. Only three beetles were caught, two in AL Ar
Louisville and one in Lexington. ? AT
_ Ca
NURSERIES INSPECTED ANNUALLY   C,
In order to control dangerous pests, all nurseries in Ktlt Fi  
tueky are inspected at least once each year during the growlllt  g
season. The Entomologist and liiotanist of the Kentucky Mft ii Di
cultural Experiment Station is authori.ced to inspect, or lair-\‘·‘  , F,
inspected by his deputy, at any time he may elect, all 11lll`$‘?Ylf;  r
in Kentucky, and to notify, in writing, tho owners of Stltlll _   
nurseries ot' the presence of any dangerous pests on tlltll e, 
Q , 1
t , ;
f .
I ; 

  . Inspection of Nursery Stock, 1935-1936 3
; nursery stock. \Vhere infestation or disease is found, the ,
CIW ml uurseryman is required by law to take such measures of control
IOM HI » as have been found effectual. Such procedures of control must I
PQCION i be changed from time to time to conform with the most recent A
Thfl . methods of combatinrr ests and diseases. =
D P I
se, one · . I
Bach in -A DEFINITION AND CERTIFICATION ]
Bswl., The term "Nursery Stocl<" includes all fruit trees and I
[H lggg, Q vines, shade trees and forest trees, whether such trees are grown a
;Qd,,.,,l  A especially for sale or taken from the forest and offered for sale, ; I
,m,,Qk,. roses, evergreens, shrubbery, raspberry plants, strawberry plants, , A
um,. of sweetpotato plants, and all other plants which may serve as a  
1,,,.5, tm  I medium for disseminating injurious Ainsect pests or plant dis-
,\,Q,.c as _ cases. Persons who desire to sell, ship, or give away any such ,
W fom, nursery stock shall obtain a certificate or permit from the State J .
D . · ` . . . . Z
CGS had .  Entomologist. This certificate is issued after the stock has been g
0, pw], i 111Spected by an authorized agent and found to be free from in- I i
D , . . . ,
\.,,,,G i,,_ sect pests and diseases, An exact copy of the certificate issued , ,
,0. in ,, Z must be attached to each plant or bundle of plants delivered to I
° a common carrier for shipment. I
A Shippers of nursery stock should familiarize themselves    
’ with inspection requirements and restrictions of those states into I
.CAmAAk\_   Which they send plants, For convenience, a list of the officc1‘S A
`BAAAWA, i 111 Charge of inspection and quarantine service of the vari0uS
K) tA_AAA_,A ·A States is given below, as of August 1, 19236:
UMA ml ‘ Alabama B.   Livinglsgon, Chief, Division of Plant In-
_ . A _ ustry, ontgomery
tw III   Arizona D. C. George, State Entomologist, Phoenix
 ' AI`ka¤S¤S P. H. Millar, Chief Nursery Inspector, Little .
' Rock
A California A. C. Fleury, Chief Quarantine Officer,
 _ Sacramento
_ ,  _ COIOIWIO J. C. Jones, State Entomologist, Fort Collins ,
in lien- . Connecticut W. E. Britton, State Entomologist, New Haven
,,.,.0“·jug DBIa“’al`€ Ralph C. Wilson, -Secretary, State Board of ~
°   Q _ _ Agriculture, Dover , ;
ky Aw `  Dlslmt of Columbia Bureau ot Entomology and Plant Quarantine, ·
Ol- haw  — F1 _ Washington, D. C. `  
  _-K  ` Omda J. C. Goodwin, Nursery Inspector, State Plant .
lllII”CUL` . _ Board, Gainesville ‘ ¤
of gurl! t ?€°l'glB· J. H. Girardeau, State Entomologist, Atlanta I ,
M,.  ‘ who W. H. Wicks, Director, Bureau of Plant In-. , _ ‘
011 W , . A dustry, Boise _ 3 , ‘ ,
I I ‘
. I I I

 i
4 Kentucky Agriculz‘uraZ Erpcrtinzcnt Station
Illinois H. F. Seifert, Chief Plant Inspector, Division T
_ of Plant Industry, Urbana 5
Indiana Frank N. Wallace, State Entomologist,  ~ T
` Indianapolis » ~
Iowa Carl J. Drake, State Entomologist, Ames I I
Kansas Geo. A. Dean, Entomologist, Entomological
Commission, Manhattan Y
Kentucky VV. A. Price, State Entomologist, Experiment  
Station, Lexington . l
» Louisiana VV. E. Anderson, State Entomologist, Baton I l
I Rouge , _
Maine Stanley L. Painter, State Horticulturist, .
Augusta . _
Maryland E. N. Cory, State Entomologist,_College Park  ° _
Massachusetts V R. H. Allen, Director, Division of Plant Pest _,
    V Control, State House, Boston · _
Michigan . E. C,. Mandenberg, Orchard, and.Nursery ln» ·
  · ‘ —·     spection, Dept. of‘ Agriculture, Lansing "
Minnesota . LL   A..G. Ruggles, State Entomologist, University
Farm, St..Paul ,
Mississippi R.·P. Colmer, Chief Inspector, State College -_
Missouri J. Carl Dawson, Plant Officer, Jefferson City  
Montana · Geo. L. Knigl1t,_Chief, Division of Horticulture. ~
Missoula Q
Nebraska ` L. M. Gates, Entomologist, State Department
‘ of Agriculture, Lincoln `,
Nevada Geo. G. Schweis, Division oi Plant Industry. ”
- Gladianos Building, Reno _
New Hampshire VV. C. O’Kane, Deputy Commissioner ot
Agriculture, Durham L
New Jersey Harry B. Weiss, Bureau of Plant lndustry,  
State Department of Agriculture, Trenton
New .Mex1co...   .. R. F. Crawford, Plant Quarantine a.nd Regula-
tory Office, State College · . _
New York B. D. Van Buren, Bureau of"Plant lndustry. i
_ _ A Department of Agriculture, Albany . i
North Carolina R. W. Leiby, Entomologist, State Department ,
of Agriculture, Raleigh = 
North Dakota J. A. Munro, Entomologist, State College,  =
Fargo ”
Ohio Walter J. Marion, Chief, Division of Plant ltr Z
dustry, Dept. of Agriculture, Columbus  Q
Oklahoma R. E. Montgomery, State Nurse1·y Inspertor. _.
Oklahoma City AV
Oregon _ Frank Mcliennon, Chief,_Division oi Plant lu- f
dustry, Dept. of Agriculture, Salem __ 
Pennsylvania R. H, Bell, Director, Bureau of Plant ln Q
nlnntn ; Green, T. W. |B0w1ing Green, | I I
plants I R- I I 1¥§IGBH€l`3.l ,
_ Green River Home | I I I
plants I Nursery, W. A. Sandefur |R0bards I 8 IGeneral I
and » Guthrie Service Nursery, I I I I
plants { E. C. Meriwether IGuthrie I %IOrnamentals ‘ r
Haag’s Nursery, R. L. I I I I '
` Haag |Jeffers0ntown | 30 IOrnamentals
,—  Harrell, W. J. IKirksey, R. 2 | ISweetpotato plants
Heitz, Adam Il166 Barrett Ave.,I |
I Louisville I 1 I Ornamentals
‘ Highland Nursery C0., I I I
plants Joe Buenger Ft. Thomas I 1 IOrnamentals
` Highland Place Nursery, I I
· ·Mrs. Jos. N. Garrett |Versailles I 8 IOrnamentals
plants Hllléllmeyer Nurseries ILexingt0n I250 IG€H€l‘al
' H“¤1Dh1‘€y’s Landscape I I I _
’· Service IMt. Sterling I 5 IOrnamentals
plants · Immegart’s Nursery, Fred I I I
plants ` J- Imm€g&l‘t I250 S. Alexandrial I
Ind  · _ I Pike, Newport I 12 IOrnamentals
plants I Jalncke Brothers I3340 Taylor I I
 z | Blvd., Louis- I I .
_ I ville | ISweetpotato plants .
Judfli Dudley W'. Ilievil, R, 1 I 2 IStraw·berry plants   '
ladioli I Jum0l` Club Nursery, I I I - I
Kt? C- H€1‘1`i¤ ISl10pville I %|Fruit `
. KaII§1‘t Flower Farm IShively I 15 |Narcissi ·
· GEMS, J. W. II-Iopkinsville I 2 IStrawberry and I _
K. _k I I I sweetpotato plants ~
Il $83/ Plant Farm IKirksey I ISWeetpOt3.t0 DIZIHIZS I ' ~
 ’ I  
’ I I

 II
8 Kmzfurky AgricuHuraZI E.rpw‘inzmzz“ Htatirm
KENTUCKY NURSERYIVIEN WHO RECEIVED CERTIFICATES OF KEII
INSPECTION, —-1935—I€·3"5—-ContIr1¤;cd
Name I Address   I Kind ot Stor]; .  
I I I I T
Klein Nursery & Floral I I I Sisk
Co., Theo. R. Klein ICrestw0o:l I 10 IGeneraI · Snli
_ Klein, George J. ICrestwood I 1 IOrnzm1entztls _ SI
Luvin, Joe I332 VV. Sth St., I I , SHY
I I Paris I ISweetpotzxto plums SIIII
Lee, T`. H. IMurre.y, R. 3 I ISweetpota1to plume V gw
Leeming Nursery, NV. H. I I I Stol
Leeming ISl1ivelY I 14 IOrnanient2.ls .4
Limestone Dahlia Gardens, I I I . Tap
Purnell and Galloway ‘M;tysville I 2 IDzLh1iz1s v_ Tay
Lindberg's Nursery & I I I Tod
Landscape Co., H. I I I J
Lindberg ILexington I 16 IOl`HIlllIGI1t2lIS — Tri-
Louisville Nurseries, I I I “ Yer
W. N. Arterburn ISt. Matthews, I I  3 Wa
I R. 7 I 48 IGeneral J
Nlztrtin’s Nursery ICurroIlton I 4 Itlrnzimentuls ·- We
McGowan, Emery ILamero I 1 INative SIlI'llI)IlI`l`}' We
Miller, Mrs. H. L. II/`ztlley Station, I I T
I R. 1. I 2 IGlzidioli We
Z\‘lt. Airy Nursery, Dalton I I I “ Wt
Brown IHm·rodsburg I 2 I Ornzunentals , \\'I
— I I I
Newsom, H. C, I517 HopkinsvilleI I · A
I St., Princeton I ISr:eetpotnto plume I \\‘I
Nit·l<'s Nursery, Nick I I I  I WI
Verburg IAncl1oruge I 5 I ;)I`ll2I1]1GIltillS V   .
Niukles, R, J. 3Fru11kfort, R. 1 I 1l,§IGenerul YU
Patton, \V. (). IAl1no I ISwe;>tpotulo I»I1I1II* · __
Pomonzi Nurseries, A. A. I I I ,
McGinnis Iliowling Green I 15 Itienerul  .
Poole and Purlnnt, Florist I\Vincliester I 2 IOrnn-inentuls
Pullum-Tlirelkeld Nursery I I I I
Co. IClay I 5 I General `
Ridgeway Nursery, Theo. I I I I·
Zollinger ISt. Mattliews I 5 QOl'1l1`t]]10llI2IIS I
Robbins, Robert R. Illnion I 2 IGenerzil
Roberts, R. E. IBenton I IS\veetpot;it.o pluuli  I
Rogers, l\lell E. glrlicltory ‘ I Iitrztwberry plnnlé I
Rottgering Gr<·enl1ouses `Puduczili I 1 II’erenniuIs
Ruclcel, Gilbert VIni<=elnu·g I 1,}I€.t.I·;m»I>m·i·y pIH11I> _
Russell, C. (I. Maiyiielrl I 3 ‘Perenni;iIs & I>IlII‘—‘ I
Russell Plunt I"iIl'Dl, I I I ;
Jesse Russell Rowling Green I 1..II$wn¤1p<>tnto DIIIIIII
I I I and bulbs ‘
Sliupe Nurseries, H. R. I I .
gnupg fSeduliu I 20 Iueiierul =
Singer Gurplauts Spillnian, H. C. IMayiield I 1 IStrawberry plants
> plants Stewart, J. H. IMurray, R. 4 I ISweetpotato plants I
Stoke, Louis I2340 Payne St., I I ` ,  
is . I Louisville I 1/§IPerennials & bulbs I ‘
I Tapscott Florist IOwensboro I 8 IO1`llEiIll@lltlllS ` I A
Taylor, Truman IWaynesburg I 3 IStrawberry plants; » I
` Todd County Nursery ‘ I I I _ j_j 1 I
‘ J. M. Green ITrent0n, R. 2 I 1%IGgpgmI -=- _ _ `
Is Trimborn,. Charles I , IHenders0n I ISweetpotato plants
· VGFSIIGI James IVanceburg I Isweetpotatoplants ’ Q
· Walnut Lawn Farm, R. L. I I I '· I I
;  _J¤m€S I D€Xi11§t011I R- SI 11/QI Ornarnentals Q
ls , “‘€I>I)I CIZU011 . IH&W€SVill€ I ISweetpotato plants I
-;iI>I1<·r)‘ \V€bb’s Evergreen I I I I I
— _Nul`$@l'YI R· F. VVGIIIJ IW€l1`S?1W I ],éIOrnanientals` ‘
_ “v@I)I), S. T. I\IV2Ly1l€Sbu1‘g I 1%I$t1·awbe1·ry plants I I
I ‘ WPIISIQIUI H· C· ICh¤mIJ€1`S I ISweetpotato plants ·
iis  _ \\’luLe’s Daluia Gardens I1S14 Richmond I I  
. I Drive, Louis· I I , I
, _ I ville I 1 IUahli;1 I ‘
I0 pliuiw — \I`II.tti1igliill, Lonnie M, ILove I I/QI Fruit ' I
_ Y Wlilzirleziii Nurseries, Inc., I I I
uls VA-   KIGWCII, Mgr. ISparta · Il00 IGeneral
.  \Ui>1>s Nursery, M. J. Yopp Paducah I 20 |Gene1·al "
to pI:IIII* , _ __w I I   I ’ .
als ·
aals II
ato plums I
I-y plmili ,
is  `
py plauiis ‘ I I
IS & IIIIIIIP · _ I
zito DIIIIIIS I A I I I I  
lbs _
 A . . _ I _ < I _ _ __ _ ,» | ,
. ‘  
. I I

 2 I  ·
‘ 10 Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Statwn ·
LICENSES ISSUED TO NON-RESIDENTS, DEALERS AND AGENTS, ` ll
1935-36 _ Q
_ Non-resident nurserymen’s permits ...,............................»......,............ 128 Q O
Nursery dealers' permits ...................,.................................................... 119   E
Nursery agents representing non·resident nurserymen ................ 44 j P
Nursery agents representing resident nurserymen ........................ 11 “
APPROXIMATE NUMBER OF VARIOUS PLANTS GROWN IN ·’ C
NURSERIES OF KENTUCKY, 1935-3*5 »—- E
` Apple Catalpa .............................. 4,991 '_  l
Grafts ............................ 79,200 Sweet Gum ....,................... 3,395 I
2-yr, old ,,,,.......,......,i.... 21,933 Soil; Maple ___________________,___, 38,213 ` l
3-yr. old ........................ 15,803 Sugar Maple .,_..............   24,835 _.g l
I 4—Y1‘. 0ld ........................ 1,525 Red Maple ......................,. 7,900 I
Pear Other Maples ..,............... 8,406 Q
Grafts ............................ 1,298 Black Locust .................... 200,000 ]
Seedling .,..,..............,.... 290 Oak _______,,,_____,_,__...,_.........,. 44,725 _- -
Quince ................................ 200 Tulip Poplar .................... 6,580   ?
Plum .,.......................,.......... 3,048 Magnolia ............................ 9,833 Y
Peach Sycamore .................... , ...... 13,350   Q
Budded ............................ 45,998 Willow ................................ 13,184 . - ,
Seedling ........................ 83,650 Lombardy Poplar ............ 14,867 .— V
Cherry Chinese Poplar ................ 4,580 T
Budded __________________________ 8,898 Dogwood ______,,____________________ 23,014 °
Seedling .,............,........, 5,000 Holly ...,._....,...............,,...... 4,484
Grape ...........,,.......___,...__,,__. 82,150 Boxwood .....l.....,......,.,....... 30,457  
Gooseberry ......................I. 675 Carolina Poplar ................ 192  ;
` Currant ...........,.................. 125 Ginkgo .__,_,.,......,..,.............. 4,100 .
Hedge plants .................... 369,706 Red Bud ..,.....l......,............ 150 ,¤
5-leaf pine .......................... 5,241 Narcissus ,,.......... . ........,.... 40,000
Other conifers .................. 509,200 Gladiolus ...,,,.,......,..l........ 199,500 J 
Woody shrubs .............. , .... 623,331 Dahlia ___,...,...._,,....,,.__.__..... 130,550  
` Herbaceous ornamentals Iris ._,,......,.,......................... 319,100 V
(Perennials) ................ 581,325 Canna ............................,,.. 13,000
Chestnut , ........................... 50 Tulip .....__.........,,...l............ 5,000 ‘
Elm Rose .................................... 4,900 Q
Native ............................ 25,898 Tuberose .,.................. , ....... 95,000
Chinese .......................... 16,560 Weeping Mulberry .......... 45 ~
Linden ................................ 2,610 Mountain Flowering Ash N5 ·
Ash ...................................... 5,690 Horsechestnut ..........,..... 250 ,
Birch ...........................,..,... 3,794 ’
FREQUENCY OF APPEARANCE OF 1NSECTS AND DISEASES OF  .
CONSEQUENCE IN KENTUCKY NURSERIES, 1935-36 -
Insects Woolly aphid ........,................ 5
Red Spider ______________________________ 31 Apple leaf aphid ................... . 4 .
Strawberry crown borer ...... 21 Dogwood borer ..........., . ...»---- · 4 _
Bagworm .................,.............. 19 Peach tree borer ...........----   4
White grub ...,....l................... 12 Gladiolus thrips ...,......... . ,-----    V
Oriental fruit moth ,,l.........,_ 11 Catalpa sphinx .................~   "
Apple leaf skeletonizer ........ 11 Boxwood mealy flata ....,·-- --  
San Jose scale ...................,.. 7 Blister beetle ................----   ‘"’
Dahlia leaf hopper .............. 6 Dahlia stalk borer ............... , 3 _
I ~
i
I );Y 
9* ' \·..

 · Inspection of Nursery Stock,-1935-1936 11
11-S White pine cottony aphid .... 3 Raspberry anthracnose ........ 9 x
’ Oak scale .............................. 2 Cherry leaf spot .................... 8
Poplar leaf tyer .................... 2 Lilac blight ............................ 6 _
128 ~ Oystershell scale .................. 1 Delphinium crown rot .......... 6 I
119 * Boxwood leaf miner ...,........ 1 Sweetpotato black rot ........ 4 , I
44 “ Pine tip moth ,....................... 1 Rose mildew .......................... 4
ll _ Rose black spot .................... 4 r I
__ D'$°¤S°$ Apple scab ............................ 3 I
IN I 1 Cedar rust .............................. 19 Apple crown gall .................. 3 3
_ . Lombardy canker .................. 16 Iris rot .................................... 2 I
` Strawberry leaf spot ..l......... 15 Gladiolus smut ...................... 2 ,
4,991 Peony blotch _,,,.................,.... 10 Phlox rust .............................. 2
3,395 _ Pussy willow canker ............ 9 Rhubarb crown rot ................ 1 I
8,213 · Raspberry leaf spot ............ 9 Damping 0E ......,..................... 1 2 3
4,835 l Lilac mildew ........................ · 9 Gladiolus corm rot ................ 1 j
7.900 ` I
8,406 V SUMMARY OF NURSERY INSPECTION, 1935-36 I
M0? Inspections of growing stock ............................................................ 184 I I
‘4*7§° Nurserymen growing fruit stock only .......................................... 6
65 0 Nurserymen growing ornamental stock only .............................. 54 .
Mig Nurserymen growing both fruit and ornamental stock .......... 36   _
-3*34 _ Growers of strawberry plants ...._......,............................................ 44 * .
gag? J Growers of raspberry plants ,___.......................................................... 11 I  
# * · Growers of blackberry ........................................................................ 3 I I
)4*'g§Ii · Growers of sweetpotato plants ..,..................................................... 46 g
*2*484  r Inspections of sweetpotatoes in storage ........................................ 4 :
;0*457  ` Growers refused certihcates of inspection because of pests . ·
· found ......................................................,......................................... 22 I Z
if 4 Acres of all nursery stock ..................l............................................... 1,050% I
4*153 » Acres of raspberries ...,,,............__,...,.,.....,_.._..,...._.__,........................... 35% I 5
0000 I AG1‘eS of strawberries .......................................................................... 89 I I
g9·500 AG1‘€S of blackberries __,,_..........,..._...,..................................l........l...... 3 `
0*5,0 _ Acres of tomato plants .................................................,..............,.,..... 14
isflgo Sflual'9 feet of sweetpotato plant beds ____.,,......,...,...........__,l....,_,.... 80,170
13*000 Bqshels of sweetpotatoes in storage ................................................ 1,050
5*000 » MIIQS traveled, July 1, 1935, to June 30, 1936 ..............................i. 18,774
4*900  ' Number of counties visited .......................,...............,......................_. 116
95,032 I v1or.A·rIoNs
225 During the season, three persons were apprehended, tried and
250 _ gollvicted of charges of violating provisions of the Nursery Inspection .
 · ct.
ES OF
.... 5 · ’
  4 1 I
.... 4 A ' I
.... 4 i I
.... 4  · , ,
.... 3 `
.... § · , I 3
_ I I
. E I