xt7p5h7bvp6z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p5h7bvp6z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610112  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 12, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 12, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7p5h7bvp6z section xt7p5h7bvp6z Fires An; Not

EIE IRKTTE

Laughing Mailer;
See Face Four

IL

Weather Today:
Fair And Cool;
High 55, Low 31

University of Kentucky

Vol. LI1, No. 52

LEXINGTON,

KV., THURSDAY, JAN. 12, 19G1

Eight Pages

Arson Suspected In Jewell Fire
n

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By MIKE FEARING
Wednesday News Associate
A major fire the second on
campus in two days burned
out Room 202 of Jewell Hall

Tuesday night and raised
strong suspicions of arson.
Some 125 freshman women
rushed from the building at
about 11:50 p.m. as the alarm
was answered by four fire
trucks and a resrue truck.

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1

flames seemed to be coming from
the area of the closet.
Miss Van Hoose described the
smoke-filled
room as looking "as
If someone had dropped a blanket
over it, and you couldn't see the
furniture."
The destroyed room was occupied by Kathy Campbell, a physical
education major; Nancy Moore, a
and Dottie
journalism
major;
Moore, an elementary education
major. All are freshmen.
Nancy Moore said she had been
studying on the fourth floor when
she heard the third alarm. When
she ran down to the second floor
someone said her room was on fire.
Sharon Grey and Ruth Ann
Jackson, who live across the hall
from the room, discovered the fire

when they noticed how much hot
ter their room had gotten.
When one of them opened the
door of their room they noticed
smoke coming from underneath the
door of Room 202 across the hall.
By the time the alarm was set
off for the burning room, the
Jewell Hall women were numb to
the emergency of the sound.
Two women, Anne Roberts and
Linda Jeffers, who live in Room
203, said when the third alarm
went off they thought it was another prank.
Earlier in the evening around
9 o'clock coeds had been alarm
ed when a fire was discovered in
a wastecan several doors from the
burnt room. The women put out
Continued on Page 5

E. B. Farris. University Chief
Engineer, suggested that the fire
may be the work of an arsonist.
Leo M. Chamberlain, University
vice president, issued a statement
yesterday In which he said UK is
cooperating with the Arson Squad
of the Lexington Fire Department.
Dr. Frank Peterson, vice president for business administration,
said it would take "at least two to
three thousand dollars" to repair
the building.
The fire, which set off the third
Rules governing second semester rush were adopted by
alarm of the evening In Jewell
the Interfraternity Council in a brief meeting Tuesday night.
Hall, is suspected to have started
The council approved the following plan presented by
In the closet of the room.
Karen Van Hoose, who looked Bill Sprague, IFC rush chairman:
Into the room before firemen
Silence will not be in effect from ieUer to be sent to all freshmen
reached Jewell Hall, said the Jan. 26 to Feb.
6, but fraternities explaining the rush procedures. A
will not be allowed to have any card wlu
enclosed in the letter
organized rush functions.
for the rushee to designate his pre- A mass meeting of men interest- - ference of five fraternities. The
ed ln fraternity rush will be held cards will then be made available
at 4 p.m. Feb. 6 in Memorial Hall, to each fraternity.
That is all we can defi- Sprague said the meeting will in- - McLellan stated that there would
Kentucky.
nitely say at this point."
elude a speaker and an explan- - be no IFC sponsored transporta-atio- n
tion for the rushees during the
of the rush program.
Jewell Hall was the scene of
three fires Tuesday. The third,
Open houses will be held Feb. 6 open houses Feb. 6 and 8.
In other action, Jack Gosney,
p.m. and Feb. 8 from
shortly before midnight, demol- from
ished the interior of a room on 6:30-10:p.m. No rush will be Kappa Sigma representative, asked
the council if something could be
the second floor. Fire Chief H. held on Thursday, Feb. 9.
An informal rush period will be done about the University cutting
L. Petit said the blaze might have
started in a closet of the room, held Feb.
During this time off the Kappa Sig telephone after
which was destroyed. The fire parties may be held as long as 11 p.m. Fd Angus, Phi Sigma Kap-the- y
125 girls to
are scheduled through the pa representative, said the Uni
caused Jewell Hall's
be evacuated.
Social Director's Office.
versity had done the same thing to
Men taking a minimum of 12 their fraternity phone,
Two small fires earlier in the
Angus said the fraternity was
day at Jewell put out by coed college hours and with a 2.0 stand- senot consulted on the move by the
residents, reportedly started in a ing or better for the previous
mester are eligible to be pledged. University. He added that they
janitor's closet and a trash can.
may accept a pledge pin ceived a letter stating that the
Another of the five fires reafter 12 noon, Feb. 6.
phone would be cut off at 11 p.m.
ported Tuesday was found ln
McLellan and IFC adviser Dr.
IFC President David McLellan
Miller Hall. Some papers were told
council that Dick Wallace, Kenneth Harper said they would
found burning in a storeroom. vice the
was preparing a Investigate the matter.
president,
was not
The fire department
called, and the fire was put out
by staff members.
Dr. Frank Peterson, Vice President for Business Administration,
said there was "definite evidence
that someone started the fire."
At 1:52 p.m., Tuesday, a scare
was caused in the Social Sciences
Av'
I
,
v
Building by the odor of burning
paper. Firemen searched the building for 40 minutes and found
nothing.
The fire which destroyed
Neville Hall Monday
morning is believed to have started
in an elevator shaft.

IFC Approves Rules
For Rush Program

Bare llcth
All the bedding In this once attractive

room was destroyed by the
fire, leaving only bare and blackened bedsteads. F.verytliing else
in the room was also badly burned.

Fire Origins Show Pattern
Firemen were considering
Wednesday what appears to
be a pattern in the places of
origin of six fires in two das
on the UK campus.
All of the fires, cither minor or
major, have originated in cither
a closet, Mureroom, or trash can,
according to current indications.
However, Omcr C. Cunningham,
deputy chief of the Lexington Fire
Department &aid the definite cause

of nil the fires is yet to be determined.
Three investigators from the fire
were on campus
department
Wednesday looking for the causes
of fires in Miller Hall. Jewell Hall,
and the Social Sciences Building.
"We are not ruling out the possibility of arson, or any other
possibility for that matter," Cunningham said. "We are having
several fires and they are all in
one location the University of

UK Band Will March

In Inaugural Parade

The University Marching 100 will definitely be among
the 71 bands attending the Jan. 20 inauguration of John F.
Kennedy in Washington.
gaU(m from Vermont and ln front
This will be the first trip to the of the Tennessee delegation,
inaugural parade for a UK band.
The band will leave Lexington at
5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 a'.d
will arrive in Washington Thurs- day.
The I'K Alumni Association, the
University president's administra- live fund, and Gov. Bert tombs
will assume the expenses for the
trip.
Along with the band, a Ken- tucky delegation Including the
governor, the Kentucky float, and
possibly an Air Force ROTC unit
will make the trip.
The Kentucky delegation will
follow Immediately behind a dele- -

The band will tour the capital
Thursday morning and will leave
Washington Friday to arrive back
in Lexington Saturday morning,
Band members making the trip
will be allowed to take their final
examinations early or after they
return. Warren Lutz, band direc- tor said.
Along with Dr. Lutz on the trip
as chaperones will be Miss Mil- died Lewis, Miss Jane Lewis, Mrs.
Lutz, and Jerry Ball, an lnstruc- tor in the Music Department. Dr.
Lutz will leave Tuesday to attend
a planning meeting for band direc- tors of parade units.

800 Free Books Given
To Students By Alumnus

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Arson Scare
Has Profs
Moving Out

Social Sciences Building personnel were taking precautions
after three attempts
Eight hundred looks were given away between 9 a.m. and yesterday
to burn the building were
12 noon yesterday in Margaret I. King Library 1) an anonymous
made.
UK alumnus interested in stimulating student look collecting.

Dr. Lawrence S. Thompson, di- of libraries, said that ap- proximately 81 persons claimed the
He said the alumnus buys
private collections for giveaways
or twice every year.
once
Each student who received books
.igned a statement listing the

to

Maintenance
According
books received and saying the
will enter the annual student Operations men, there have
three attempts to burn it
s.
book collecting contest before
Tuesday. Two of the attempts
in(? the University,
made in a men's restroom.
books

at--

The

ranged

from works

and
been
since
were
They

scorched the ceiling.
by Shakespeare to Byron. They are only
A third attempt was made
duplicates of titles already on file
in the library.

Continued on Page

5

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iSA
Riches To Rubble

After Jewell Hall's Koom 202 was demolished by fire Tuesday night,
the furniture and the belongings of the coeds who used the room
were nothing but charred rubble.

* 2-- TIIE

Jin.

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

12, lOfil

r

Probation Students
By HAROLD

D. ROGERS

Kernel Staff Writer

rrolmtion. A word with an unsavory sound, to say the
least. To sonic students it is that driving force calling for extra
effort.
Hut what does it mean to he on probation?

Being on probation status means you are among some 500 other
UK students who did not attain a C average a 2.0 standing.
The number of students on probation this semester has been
estimated at 500 by Registrar Charles F. Elton. He also estimates that
somewhere between 100 and 200 students will receive their PSD
(Pink Slip Degree) at the end of the current semester. That Is.
they will "flunk out."
academic standing for
A student who falls to attain a two-poitwo consecutive semesters is not allowed to return to UK for one
year. This rule applies to students who have attended UK for three
Bcmeslcrs or less.
After a student has been at UK for at least three semesters, the
probation student's cumulative standing determines whether he Is
permitted to stay.
Dr. Elton describes the position of the probation student as
"certainly not desirable, but an indication that the student is not in
a good relative standing with the UK community."
How many students will be on probation after this semester?
Dr. Elton says It is hard to say. He said "fewer students are now
on probation than in recent years, and the number is expected to
gradually decrease."
"The quality of our students has increased materially this year,"
the registrar said.
If the number of probation students should decrease to an "insignificant figure," will the standing required for graduation be
raised again? This is unlikely, Elton said, because it would require
a change in the grade structure at UK.
But what about the probation student's side of the picture?
Shouldn't there be some collective representation of these students?

Organize!

What about UKAAPS. (University of Kentucky Association for the
Advancement of Probation Students) or SPCPS, (Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Probation Students.)
UKAAPS would be limited to probation students. After a few
years, think of the support a UKAAPS Alumni Association could give.
The SCPS would be comprised of teachers and professors who
feel sorry for the unfortunates, and other brighter students who are
haunted by the fear that they too, might someday be placed in the
probation dungeon.
But the cause would be spearheaded by UKAAPS. Pledging and
initiation would be held at the beginning of each semester.
The oath which newcomers would have to take seems to characterize the goals of the UKAAPS:
"The UKAAPS is my shepherd; I shall not fear.
"It maketh me to lie down on green lawns; it leadeth me beside
the still library.
"It restoreth my standing; it leadeth me In the paths of righteousness for my name's sake.
"Yea. though I walk through the valley of the shadow of probation. I will fear not much; for it art with me; the UKAAPS, it
comfort me.
chart before me in the presence of mine enemies
"It preparest
the bookworms showing mine new standing. It anointest my head
with brains, my standing runneth over.
"Surely good standings and mercy shall follow me all the days
of my college life; and I will dwell in the Alumni of the UKAAPS
forever."

4

p.m., Room

128.

KSEA, 6:30 p.m.. Room 1?8.
Home Economic Education
Committee, 2:30 p.m., Room 204.
American Chemical Society
Dinner, 6 p.m.. Room 205.
Ky. Music Education Association Dinner, 6 p.m., Room 206.
Special events party, 4 p.m.,
Music Room.

Basketball Attendance
Drops Below Normal

Murray Raney, a 1909 University
graduate In mechanical engineering, has been named "Chemist of
the Year."
The Chattanooga, Tenn. section
of the American Chemical Society
made the award to Raney for his
dtscoveiy of a new process to convert cottonseed oil into shortening.
He that
earns it.

marries

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In the five home basketball games this season, student
attendance has fallen short of previous years.
Harvey Hodges, ticket manager, attributed this drop to
seVeral factors.
Hodges said that games during three teams that were Invited sold
the middle of the week have hurt only 17 tickets between them. Last
student, as well as overall attend- year at the Ohio State game, about

ance.
1,200 tickets were sent to Ohio
He pointed "out that only 2.884 and all were sold.
stadents turned ant for the Thursday night, Dec. 1, game against
Virginia Military Institute.
On the following Saturday night,
3.800 students showed up.
Lf 1 1 m 1 1 on t mw t
Complimenting student behavior,
NOW SHOWING
Hodges said that 687 student tickets were used when the Wildcats
entertained Missouri's Tigers on
New Year's Eve.
When the Miami (Ohio) Red-hkiwere in town many students
ALSO
had not returned from the Christmas holidays and only 1,800 students attended.
Opening the SEC season here
Saturday afternoon against
Georgia Tech on national television, 3.140 students watched as
the Wildcats defeated Tech In their
Lay PHONE
first conference game.
ENDS TODAY
.Hodges pointed out that during
the Christmas tournament
the
"The Wrong Mon"

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Starts

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FRI. & SAT.

THURSDAY

10:30 o.m.-- l 00 p.m.
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m. 12:00 p.m.
10:00p

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SESSION
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OTHER SESSIONS

$1.00 Adult
75c Children

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We Buy Used

Psychology Books
Run, Don't Walk To Kennedy's To Sell Your
Books While They're Hot. After All You Don't
Need Them Anymore!

Ice Skating Indoors Or Outdoors
SUNDAY
1
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4:30
1:00 p

p.m.
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P.S. WE BUY OTHER BOOKS, TOO!

Crystal Ice
Club

Restaurant
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RENTAL SKATES '50c
ARRANGE A PARTY NOW
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Marriage is a public confession
of a private intention.

money

STARTS TOMORROW!
The Most "Different"
Picture In Yeors!

SUB Activities
Keys' Initiation,

Alumnus Honored

KENNEDY

BOOK STORE

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TIiurlay, Jjm.

NEWMAN

K5-

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-

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.

XL
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Eight New Sponsors

Eight (iris were fleeted as Army ROTC Sponsor
last Friday. They are, front row, from left: Sue
Kay Miller, Lili Clay, Barbara Harkey, and Mifnon

Nelson; back row, from left: Janet Lloyd, Phyllis
Patterson, Sallie Gaul, and Linda tollman.

Bowman Women Describe
Last Semester's Pranks
By TITA WHITE
Kernel Staff Writer
Bowman Hall girls have endured
many pranks living in the quadrangle during this semester.
This was to be only a temporary home for the girls until next
semester when they will move into
other upper cla&tmen dormitories.
Most of them seem to have
their being surrounded by
boys, but some feel that it was
unjubt to notify them three days
before arrival at UK that they
were not to be in Holmes, Keene-lan- d,
or anywhere el.se but Bowman.
Judy O.sterman and Emily Riley
both would prefer living elsewhere. According to Judy, "I would
rather live by myself away from
the multitude."
"I would have preferred the boys
not being such astronomers with
their telescopes aimed at our window," one coed commented.
Many girls seemed to agree on
their dislike of "the beady eyes
constantly watching you." None of
them feci safe walking Into another room half undressed, because they never know if someone is looking in.
Lyne Williams thinks that breakfast was the worst with a couple
of hundred boys staring at you.
The screaming drunks in the
quadrangle about 2:00 a.m. during
homecoming weekend disturbed
several of the girls. One challenged
th whole quadrangle to a fight,
screaming for them to come on
"
out and fight, "you dirty
Lewd comments because almost
commonplace after the first month,
according to several coeds. But
uninvited guests from the boys'
section are even more disturbing.
Just last weelc two boys walked
into the girls' Section B, vowing
they thought it was Section A.
They did leave though when they
noticed the girls were in their
slips.
The Christinas season was especially eventful for Bowman Hall
residents. One niyht some of the
pirls decided to sing Christmas
carols for the rest of the students
from one of the balconies. They
were answered by the rest of the

quadrangle. At 1 a.m. that same
morning some boys filled with
much Christmas cheer returned the
thoughtful girls' Christmas serenade.
"When we first came it was sort
of nice to hear boys whistling beneath our window. But then when
the ladder knocked against the
window, the sweet aroma of roses
floated in with mellow guitar music we were really swept off our
feet," one witty girl added.
"Tis better to have lived and
been watched, than never to have
lived."

Tau Kappa
Initiates Five

Panhel Scholarships
Awarded to Nine
Council has anPanhellenic
nounced the winners of nine $100
scholarships awarded to UK women
on the basis of satisfactory scholarship and need. They are:
Betty Mace, Fonde; Peggy McDonald, Louisville; Bessie Hill,
Lexington; Mary Morton, Falmouth.
Margaret Ryan, Paris; Lorna
Linhart, Miami, Fla., Patty Caldwell, Somerset; Janice Crist, Louisville; Lenore Ncwland,

The National Forensics Hon-- !
or Society, Tau Kappa Alpha,
WANT TO DO
initiated five nicinlxTS at a1 SOMETHING DIFFERENT?
recent meeting.
Why not try . . .
They are John Bozeman, Lex- ington; Kathleen Cannon,
Sharon Chenault, Fern
Creek; Deno Curris, Lexington;
and Gary Wright, Bedford.
The chapter also elected Deno
Curris as president for the com- ing year, Gary Wright as vice
president, and Kathleen Cannon
as secretary-treasure- r.
To qualify for membership in
Tau Kappa Alpha a student must
participate in at least two years
of intercollegiate forensics, dem-- ,
onstrate superior ability as a de- bater or public speaker, and rank
in the upper 3a percent of his
college class.

SLEEPY HOLLOW
PARK
The Pavilion at Sleepy Hollow
heated for
Park has been
your fall and winter dances,
and social functions.
parties,
We cater to church and
family groups, fraternities and
and other social
sororities,
activities of orderly nature.

CLIB

KSEA

Newman Club will hold Its
monthly communion breakfast following the 10 o'clock mass on Sunday, Jan. 15.
Dr. James Hopkins, professor
of history, will be the guest
speaker.
DR. BROWN TO SPEAK
Dr. Ellis V. Brown, professor
of organic chemistry and director
of freshman instruction, will speak
to the UK chapter of the American Chemical Society, at 4 o'clock
today, Kastle Hall, Room 214.
Dr. Brown's subject for his
as Cancer
speech will be "Azo-DyProducing Agents." Everyone Is
invited to attend.
SAE ELECTS OFFICERS
Robert H. White has been elected
eminent archon of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon. Other officers are:
Harry B. Nicholson, deputy
archon; Steve Clarke, recorder;
Joseph Sprague, treasurer; James
B. May, chronicler;
Robert B.
Roach, correspondent.
John P. Broderson, warden;
Gregory F. Moncrief, herald; Robert Miller, chaplain; James T.
Dean
Holt, IFC representative;
Henderson, IFC representative;
John Chewing, social chairman;
Dart Andrews, publicity chairman.

Student
Education
Kentucky
Association will meet at 6:30 p.m.
tonight In Room 128 of the SUB.
Dr. Alfred Crabb will be the
guest speaker. He will discuss the
"Standards in Teacher Education."
RECENTLY PINNED
Jean Maiden, a Ft. Thomas
Junior majoring In education and
a member of Kappa Alpha Tb.'ta,
to Dick Dee, a biological chemistry
major at Western State College
from Buffalo. N. Y.
'
RECENTLY ENGAGED
Paula Buchanan, a Kappa Alpha
Theta junior from Franklin, Team.,
majoring in education, to John
Thome Flaugher, a '58 graduate
from Falmouth.

FLOWERS
For Any

Occasion
CALL

MICIILER FLORIST

SOUTHSIDE

CHURCH OF CHRIST

DIAL

Mile South of UK Campus
1533 Nicholasville Rd.
BASIL OVERTON
Minister
Phone

Vz

417 East Maxwell

...KEEP

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.;

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of each member
of your family

PORTRAITS

Dorothy's graduation day, her trim nurse's cap and gown. One of
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the picture will be different tomorrow.
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Social Activities

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* No Laughing Matter

Some people apparently have perwho finds joy in setting fires would
verted senses of humor.
,find his laugh becoming forced if he
In spite of the feelings of some knew the fate awaiting him if apprehended. Kentucky Bevised Statutes
person or persons on campus, howcall for a penalty of from two to 20
ever, a fire is not funny.
We did not see the Psychology Deyears in the penitentiary for "any perpartment staff laughing at Neville son who willfully and maliciously sets
Hall Monday; the Jewell Hall girls fire to, burns or causes to be burned,
found nothing to laugh at Tuesday or who aids, counsels or procures the
night; political science professors were burning of any dwelling house." There
not smiling as they moved books and is a similar statute applying to arson
other iK'longings from the Social Sciinvolving public buildings which provides for a sentence of from one to
ences Building yesterday.
A fire that destroys five years of 10 years.
If an act of arson results in the
doctorial research; flames that ruin
death of any individual, however, the
all the clothes and books of three
coeds; or 20 girls standing at the top charge could become that of murder
of a fourth-floo- r
fire escape that canor voluntary manslaughter. The only
not be lowered while smoke billows penalty for murder provided for in
from windows two floors below none Kentucky is life imprisonment or
of these brings even the faintest trace death. Perhaps the knowledge that
of a smile to our lips, yet someone his acts endanger his life as well as
finds such things humorous enough to the lives of others will bring a halt to
this arsonist's terrorism by fire.
try time after time to ignite the SoIf not, we trust it will at least
cial Sciences Building.
There is a chance, however, that lessen the pleasure he will find in his
even the type of demented person fiendish pursuits until he is caught.

Associated Press News Analyst
It's raining recommendations.
President-elec- t
John Kennedy, during the campaign and after his election, wanted ideas on how to do better for the government and the people. And he wanted them before he
was. sworn in Jan. 20.
So he appointed study groups
which went under various names-ta- sk
force, committee, study panel-- to
look into the problems assigned'
them and come up with proposals.
They're coming in now: recommendations which range from reorganizing the Defense Department to
sending a Peace Corps of young
Americans to newly independent
Asian and African countries as technicians.
This is a big advantage for Kennedy. U gives him a head start in
putting together programs he can submit to Congress in a hurry, once he
takes over.
President Eisenhower was prodigious in creating commissions but he
waited until he moved into the White
House. As a result, the long delay in
making some of the studies simply delayed action on the problems.
The unknown quantity about the
recommendations being given Kennedy is what he will do with them
when he gets into the White House.
For instance: a committee headed
by Sen. Stuart Symington
was the first group to report and called for a reorganization of the Defense
Department.
Symington, under President Truman, had been Secretary of the Air
Force and knows the inner workings
of the Pentagon. But Kennedy was
careful not to give the Symington report a hearty endorsement.
He hadn't yet selected his Secre
(D-Mo- .)

Defense, so he didn't know
tary
how he'd feel about. He finally made
Robert S. McNamara secretary, and
McNarnara so far has exhibited no
enthusiasm for Symington's ideas.
On the other hand: he appointed
a
committee, James M. Land-ia former Harvard law school dean,
to look into the government's regulatory agencies and make suggestions
on improving them.
Those agencies like the Interstate
Commerce Commission, 'the Federal
Power Commission, the Federal Communications Commission have controls in most areas of American life.
Landis, who had once worked
among them himself he is a former
chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission turned in a bristling criticism "of the operations of
these government agencies with proposals for improving them.
Kennedy promptly assigned Land-i- s
the job of overhauling them. This
won't be easy since Congress will have
a strong say in any change.
Yesterday came the latest study
group's report on welfare with recommendations which suggested a broad
expansion of social security, public assistance, unemployment pay, medical
education, and this one:
Immediate passage by Congress of
a program Kennedy himself unsuccessfully backed last year in the
Senate a medical care program for
the aged tied to social security.
Other Kennedy groups have given
him recommendations on distressed
areas, the nation's economy, education, housing, and the Peace Corps.
But the quick work of these study
groups will let Kennedy lay down
programs to Congress faster than
Eisenhower did when he took over.
Eisenhower, starting out, had his
hands full with Sen. Joseph McCarthy
and the Korean War.
one-ma- n

s,

The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

Kentucky

Entered at the post office at Leiinifton, Kentucky at second class mutter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Published tour times a week during the regular school year except duriug holidays and eiaaJ.
SIX DOLLABS

A SCHOOL

Bob Anderson,

J

rr-.- l"

.

uri'.Ma

j

hv,

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i

"Yessuh, boss, I use to be tie Congo premier."

THE READERS' FORUM

Raining Recommendations
of
MARLOW

By JAMES

t.

YEAH

Editor

Newton Spencer, Sport$ Editor
HrxK Wennincer, Managing Editor
Doubib Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Stuaht
Advertising Manager
Alice Akjn, Society Editor
Skip Taylor and Jim Chanson, Cartooniits
Nicey Pope, Circulation
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THURSDAY NEWS STAFF
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Likes Letters
To The Editor:
I think Wes Morris and Doug
Roberts are to be commended for
their interesting and stimulating correspondences which have been appearing in the Kernel. The "Addison
and Steele" idea by which they seem
to have patterned their column is
original and has aroused the interest
of students and professors alike.
I hope to be reading more of their
letters in the Kernel soon.
Babbara IIaiucey

Praising 'TV Workshop'

To The Editor:
I have been severely criticized, Mr.
R., during the past few days for my
derogatory outlook on life campus
life in particular. I have been accosted by several people who vow
eternal enmity to our
endeavors. It would seem our efforts
to enlighten and expose are little appreciated, and, thus, I deem the time
appropriate for a reversal in policy.
During my years of cavorting
about the campus many pleasing
events have transpired along my well
beaten path. One activity boasting
truly amazing achievements and deserving the highest praise is UK's first
venture into television under the guidance of Dick Lowe, the show's executive producer. The undertaking of
program selection, script writing,
editing, directing, and weekly production is no simple task, and the
respect Mr. Lowe and his staff have
won from the video world is comparable to that shown our basketball team in the realm of sports. This
activity, Mr. R., is a credit to the
University, and one obviously professing a purpose.
The objective of this work, I am
told, is to convince the proper University authorities that educational
TV is no longer a mere possibility
for the future but a reality of today.
I believe, Mr. Lowe, your point has
been well made. "UK TV Workshop"
stands as one of the most successful
of all
activities on
campus. By acquainting the community with campus life, it performs
an invaluable service to the faculty,
administrative personnel, student organizations, and individual citizens of
the Lexington area.
Also to be considered, Mr. R.,
many campus residents (I hesitate
to call them students) are extended
letter-writin- g

student-operate-

d

the opportunity to observe events
outside their normal haunts:
the Grill or Danceland. For example,
one could have seen an excellent
program on the Margaret I. King
Library as well as 'shows alout the
campus newspaper ( I am forbidden
by new payola laws to mention it
by name), and IM football. Why, in
the near future, Mr. R., I will Ik; permitted to look behind the mysterious
Cuignol scenery and explore the Fine
Arts Building's most secret cults! So,
Mr. R., let's tune in this program next
Saturday Channel 27 at 5:30 p.m.
Wts Moiuus

Film Series Hailed
To The Editor:
We have often heard students
complaining about campus activities,
both social and academic. At times
it is depressing to feel that one is in
the midst of such dissatisfaction and
boredom. We should like to direct
the attention of all such students to
the English Department Film Series,
which, by the way, is nonprofit and
doesn't rob the bored student of one
single cent! Dr. Ward and his committee should be sincerely commended for the selection of films
which have been and will continue
to be presented in the Cuignol
Thratre.
1st Monday evening's film was a
highlight for those of us vitally interested in American theater. We had
the rich experience of watching the
late W. C. Fields in some of his
classic comic roles. True, we are
dramatic arts majors ami probably
revere the name of W. C. Fields