xt7p5h7bvq3r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p5h7bvq3r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19611121  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 21, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 21, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7p5h7bvq3r section xt7p5h7bvq3r Give 'Eur Hell, Wildcats!
IRW1E Ei
Vn

V.

I.I II. No.

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I.EXINCiTON.

.'57

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F

o f I p it t n c k y

KV., TUESDAY, NOV. 21. lfMil

Twenty-fou-

r

Pities

:::; ;:':'.

'

AK

-

y

t;

4,7

Gay Saturday
Set For Alumni
By JEAN BROWN
Kernel Staff Writer

Tin- campus will rock with gaiety, laughter, and frivolity
Saturday as hundreds of old graduates return for the 1961
I
Inmccoming.
0
The day will begin with the alumni registering from
a.m. in the Lafayette Hotel, l'hoenix Hotel. Kentuckian
Hotel. Campbell House, Springs Motel, and the Student Union
-

-

a

5!
?

t

-

-

.

9:30-11:3-

building.
The Homecoming Tarade will begin at 10 a.m. in the drive of the
convertibles and 28 queen conAdministration Building. Thirty-tw- o
testants will proceed down Limestone to Main Street where they
will pass the reviewing stand in front of Stewart's parking lot. They
will then turn up Rose Street and proceed down F.uclid Avenue.
The Alumni Association will sponsor an Alumni Brunch from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Ballroom of the SUB. The brunch will
be buffet style and the price $1.55.
Following the brunch everyone will head for Stoll Field to View
the famed fight for the Beer Barrel with Tennessee, Kentucky's traditional rival.

J
Pigzybuck Pigskin Pucker

Dean, City Police Investigate
Tivo Taverns Near University
By JACK (il'TIIKIi:
Kernel Daily Fditor

Dr. Leslie L. Martin, dean of
men. collected ID cards Iroin
nine l'ni ersity students under
21 years of age Friday night
while assisting Lexington Police in an investigation ol two
local taverns.
Dean Malt m was called into the
investigation by Assistant Chief
Of Police W. B. Davis.
"We called Dean Martin to come
down because we did not want to
place uny of the students under

X

ASSISTANT ( 1IIH

v.

.

)

B. DAVIS

arrest for not Identifying themselves properly," Davis said.
Some students were reluctant
to show their proper identification to officers.
"To obtain identification without t he students' consent, it would
have been necessary to place them
under arrest, and we did not want
to arrest them," Davis commented.
The Lexington Detective Bureau made the investigation after receiving
an anonymous
phone call about alcoholic beverages being served to minors
in the
and the Taddot k.
Upon leceiving the report Chief

r"t
Dl AN I.LSI.IL L. MAKTIV

Davis, accompanied by Detective
Capt. Gilbert Cravens and Detective Donald Duckworth, conducted
the investigation.
The
Restaurant. 919 S.
Limestone St., was the first stop
made by the investigators.
Chief Davis commented that
from 25 to 30 University students
were in the restaurant at the time.
Dean Martin said: "There were
many students there who were
not drinking an alcoholic beverage. I collected ID cards from seven students who were drinking
beer and were under 21. These
students will have to apear before the Student Congress Judiciary Board."
Forest Payne, owner of the
was arrested and charged
with serving alcoholic beverages to
a minor.
After leaving the
the
detectives, along with Dean Martin, drove to the Paddock Club
where they staged a second investigation.
Dean Martin collected two ID
cards at the Paddock. Chief Davis
remaiked that there were only 15
to 20 students in the club at the
time.
The owner of the Paddock,
Fred C. Gardner, was arrested
on two charges:
1. Serving alcoholic beverages
to a minor.
2. Having a person in his eni- Continued On Pate 9

During halftime ceremonies the Homecoming Queen, the first and
second place winners in the float contest, and the winner of the
convertible contest will receive their trophys. The queen will be
awarded the rotating trophy which honors the organization which
she represents and her personal trophy.
Immediately following the game President and Mrs. Frank O.
Dickey will hold a reception in the Music Room of the SUB. All
visitors, alumni, faculty, and students may attend.
And then the night activities begin in a whirlwind of dances and
parties.
The Alumni Association will sponsor a dance for the alumni and
their friends from 8:30 p.m. to midnight in Convention Hall at the
Phoenjx Hotel. The price will be $1 per man and the women will
be guests. Ray Rector will provide the music for the festivities.
The fraternities will be busy Saturday
Ings, buffet dinners, and open houses.

night with alumni meet

Contrary to the policy of past years, there will be no student
sponsored dance at Homecoming. It was felt that not enough students
will return to make it profitable.

'yrjt

3
Royalty Reigns
Itulini; over the 1"! Kentuckian yearbook is Miss June Moore,
senior mathematics major. She was crowned queen Friday night
in festivities at Memorial Hall.

* J -- THE KI NTl

( KY KFIINEI.,

21.

Tiifi;iy.'No.

11

r

Work Week Nol Unusual
lly DWII) SHANK
Writer
j Kernel Feature
While mast of us wrie
n qiliet Sunday In our room or
home. University President Frank
O. Dickey, along with Governor
Bert' Combs, traveled to Covington
to dedicate a new branch of the
fiehool.

president
Today the
will host the Kentucky Legislature
as iC visits the University campus.
Last week he spent three days
in Kansas City at a meeting of
the American Association of Land
Grant Colleges and State Universities, of which he is an executive
member; had a budget conference
with Governor Combs at Frankfort: attended a Board of Trustees
meeting; sat in on two committee
ENDS TONIGHT

"EXODUS"

TOMORROW

U , ELVIS
I'MWUE
PRESLEY.

1

IIMS.

rrnutimn inn
i mxi it tux

ENDS TONIGHT

"Man Trap" ond
"Angel Baby"
TOMORROW

r, HusniR
the
ROBERT

ROSSHiS

:inmaScopG

meetings niul went to a uirjht
meeting of the Saddle Horse
Breeder's Asociat;on. and filled in
the times between these activities
by diitatinsj letters and receiving
visitors to his office.
A seven-da- y
work week is nol
unusual for the energetic man
who's been UK's chief administrator since 1916.
During the week, when the
alarm clock at Maxwell Place
ring at 6:15, Dr. Dickey ran
8
count on having a
hour
day. His weekend hours are variable, depending upon the meetings and other functions which
may require his attendance.
a
Under these circumstances
daily homelife routine is impossible, comments Mrs. Dickey. Their
lives influenced by so many conferences, speaking engagements,
and meetings, "we Just have to
roll with the punch," she says.
Excluding weekends. Dr. Dickey's
engagements allow him to be home
for dinner only one or two nights
each week. "When he does make it
home for dinner, the kids converge
upon him for help with homework," Mrs. Dickey laughs.
The Dickey family attempts to
make Sunday evening "family
night" at Maxwell Place. If they
succeed in being able to stay at
home, it is then that Dr. Dickey is
most likely to relax for his favorite
recreation playing the piano.
"One of those unfulfilled desires from somewhere along the
line," is the way Dr. Dickey describes,' with a chuckle, his desire to play a piano in a. bar.
Each member of the Dickey
family has some muscial ability
and a Sunday evening may find
them gathered around Dr. Dickey
at the piano singing.
The couple, married 21 years ago
when the UK president was teaching at Morton Junior High School,
have three children: Frank Jr., 18,
a freshman at UK; Joseph, 1.5, a
junior at University High School;
Ann Elizabeth. 14. a freshman at
University High.
Dr. Dickey was born Dec. 1. 1917,
at Wagoner, Okla.. He attended
public schools, first in Wichita
Falls, Texas, later in Lexington.'
where he graduated from Henry
Clay High School in 1935.
He gained his A.B. degree from
College in 19.19
Transylvania
after majoring in Knglish and
history and minoring in music.
While a senior at Transylvania,

he met Miss Hetty Drvmon of
Lexington, the woman who was
to become his wife.
At about this time Dr. Dickey
had to make an important decision.
He felt a strong Inclination to become a preacher but at the same
time he felt attracted to teaching.
After consideration he decided to
become a teacher, thinking that he
could have a broader influence as
a teacher.
After graduating from college,
Dr. Dickey taught at Bryan Station Senior ttigh School and later
at Morton Junior High School. At
the same time he entered UK
where he received his M.A. degree,
with a major in English, in 1942.
In 1943, he entered the army,
serving in Florida and California
until his discharge with the rank
of Master Sergeant in 1946.
He returned to UK and received
a Doctor of Education degree in
1947. He served as a faculty member of the College of Education
until he became its dean in 1949.
leave of abDuring a 1952-5- 3
sence Dr. Dickey did post doctoral work at Harvard I'niversity
with a major emphasis in administration.
In 1956 the UK Board of Trustees
received the retirement plans of
President H. L. Donovan and were
forced to begin a search for a new
UK president. From a group of
56 candidates the board selected
Dr. Dickey for the $21,000 post.
He became the school's fifth
president since its founding in
1865 and its youngest.
OPEN DAILY

"ADA"

Susan Hayward
Ralph Mackar
Joel McCrea
"WICHITA"
Vara

Martin
Miles

B
ADVF ttTIIN
RATE
rrnU prt
rent
rd:
minimum; i pprrrnl
dNroiinl If advrrtlrnirnt run 4 d
WANTK.U CLFKhour brfnrr
tnpj Itradllnr it Ml K POPH, 1MM tif.n only it eneiKClic.
dalr. I'hnnp
Iwrrn
p m. and 4 p.m.
Monday:

throuih Irlday.

Wallaca

Ford

THE NEW YORK LIFE
AGENT ON YOUR
CAMPUS IS A GOOD
MAN TO KNOW

.

Nmlitwi
S.ia.ter

K-

appl V

in:

ram

CO TO JAMAICA. Wet Indies, Aoes
mid all of Eastern Fuiope. for student
STl'DF.NTS-Inve- st
In life limirnnrr
rate. $HH0 round trip by air. summer of
now
while our premium rule Is low. 112. Also Nassau, spring vacation of
t'liiit.ut Ciene Cravens, New York t.ife 1.2 For Information tall Raleigh I.nn
at XI')
or
a
Agent.
fl)T house.
representing
8Ntt
or
UN4t CHI ton Ave.
coinp.uiv. Phone
V
Are you
KIDDIE KOI. LEGE Nl'RSF.R
FOR SALE
our
problems? Try Arhaving baby-sittcare
FOK SALE-Us- ed
F.lectrolux Vuruum professional for nny for all ages block
schedule. 4
cleaner with attachments.
Excellent rangements $2 00 per dav, hot lunch and
from UK.
condition. S23. 243 Cassldy Ave.
21Nlt planned schedule included. 4.H) E. Max14NU
well. Phone
NEED Christmas gift suggestions" Over
LOST
Men's black ulasses In grey case. SMI worth of values from leading Lex93.
between Funkhouser and McVey Hall. ington merchants. Onlv $6 Chi. Order
Room
HY MAIL from Sigma Delta
It found please phone
lSN2t
120. Journalism
loNxt
Building.
i:

Sterling silver Mexican charm
bracelet
Between McVev and Miller
Halls. KFWAHD. Call collect TE
3320
in Lawrencebui g.
1GN21
LOST

YOU

HAVE

21 N

It

deadline
lijNxt

Hotel

Kentuckion

BARBER SHOP

FOR 'RENT

157 Viaduct

Furnished basement apartment. 3 rooms, private shower, entrance. Utilities paid. Apply 2U0 South
Limestone.
21Nxt
FOK

older

RICK ABBOTT'S

Black suede purse. Social Science Bklg , Wednesday. Nov. 15 In afternoon. Keward. please phone
21N1
LOST

""""

Famll

Bet bargain on

Donovan

ld.
Cecil
Dion.
Hall. Call 8S8. Keward.

"

our

OHDF.RF.D

Fortune Checkbook"
campus. REMEMBER
Mondav. Nov. 20

KENT

Lexington,

SOUTH BROADWAY

A Complete Automotive Shop
Around Corner From Campus

Right

0

OP
321 VIRGINIA AVE.

PHONE
"Walking

Distance

of Campui"

.

SOUTH LIMESTONE

Friendly Service

...

AND THE MOST COMPLETE, TOO!
SIX LOCATIONS
North Broadway
Chevy Chase

Main at Upper
Short at Mill

-Southland
EattJand

First Security
&

-

TRUST COMPANY

NATIONAL BANK

MEMBER FDIC

Dance At

.

.

.

Old Frankfort Pike

CRAVENS

THIS

Nylic
I

,

.

-- , HI,.

I

Large Enough to Serve You . . .
Small Enough to Know You
Complete
Banking
Service

t

if

LIFE

INSURANCE

ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS
INSURANCE

"202 Warren Building
Phone: 2 8959 or 2 2917

FRIDAY

Music

NEW YORK LIFE
Insurance Company

By

Charlie Bishop
$2.00 Per Couple

8:00 To 12:30
ALSO

AVAILABLE FOR PARTIES

Insured
To $10,000

Short and Upper

the popovcr

Don Myer Shoe Store

100o fleecy wool
that Meyers

with

in a bold Scotch plaid
look . . . the new-

est rage, not a sweater, and not a shirt,
r
of luxurbut a smartly styled
ious soft wool, with dashing Italian
worn
style collar and the new
outside . . . terrific for all Campus

In

pull-ove-

Southland Shopping Center
VELVET STEP SHOES
HAPPY HIKER
For Ladies and Girls

WESTBCRO SHOES
CITY CLUB
For Men and Boys
OPEN

FRIDAY

NIGHTS

'TIL 9 P.M.

wear.
park one hour
ree right across
the street while
shopping at
Meyers inc.
340 West Main

Ky.

"Every Haircut a Specialty"

DANCELAND
GENE

in

144t

MISCELLANEOUS

iNsi

1:30 P.M.

A vn i s C h vy Chuf
Kuril
LAST TIMES TONIGHT!

Dean

CLASSIFIED ADS

Price $11.95

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Nov.

Homecoming Comparisons
lie veal Tradition Changes

Tlir song lyrics ". . . she ain't what si if used to le . . ."
could vll he applied to recent I lomriominiis at UK.
The first Homecoming celebration, held in 1911, was a
lar cry from the Homecoming we know today.

Held

during commencement
werk
May, the 1911 Home- corninK could not have been term- ed a calibration. Its purpose was
acquaint friends and alumni
with the existing situation, the
woik beyiK done, and the aims and
iispirations of the University.
Aside from an alumni buncmet
j'.nd the regular coir.inencemcnt
week plot ram there was little activity.
The tradition of fall Homecoming began In 191 V It was at
tli is time that the football fame
became the center of Homecoming activities.
Early Homecoming Games were
usually held on Thdij.c-.eivtnDay.
At the first Homecoming. L'K
In

STARUTE
DRIVE-I- N
2401 Nicholosville Rood
At Stone Rood

SERVICE

Dining Room
Curb Service
Take-Hom-

Service

e

Dial

post

Each class had a special program
of its own, and all the visiting
alumni were entertained
at a
downtown hotel.

tickets are
Approximately
still available for the Homecoming Game.
They will be on sale at the
ticket office in Memorial Coliseum from 9 a. m. 5 p.m. each
day until all are sold, students
must present III cards. There is
a limit of two guest tickets a
student.
Students purchasing guest tickets must accompany
their
guests to the game.

SEA FOOD

k

Tennessee,
The 1915 Homecominn was pri-l- o
marily for the benefit of alumni,
B,ld thp,e uaH llule student par- oc'Pation
Alumni were spurred to attend
the fame because of the Wil0
dcat' famous
victory over
Purdue two weeks before. Special
interest was also aroused by the
large number of former Wildcats who were expected to be
present.
The feature of the celebration
was tiie reunion of six of the
"Immortals of 18!8." who had Die
fifst undefeated football season on
UK records.
Cars decora'ed in blue and white
and filled nh uluir.nl, formed a
parade through downtown Lexington. A big "K" parade was composed of every man who had won
a letter in any branch of athletics.
The halftime show consisted
of a snake dance led by the class
0
of 18!r:. The graduates from
years previous were the first
to throw their hats over the goal

or

We Are Still Here . . .
Serving The Best Foods

UNIVERSITY

supplement,
second section of today's Kernel,
was compiled and written by
members of the Business Administration staff.

HEIGHTS

CHURCH OF CHRIST
ONE BLOCK FROM U.K.

328 CLIFTON

SUNDAY:
Closses For All

What's

Statei clrfeated

Homecoming Tickets
1.000

SANDWICHES
FOUNTAIN

,then Kentucky

Historical Supdement
The historical
the

WEDNESDAY:
Ladies' Bible Study
Classes For All

New?

10:00 a.m.
7:30 p.m.

HARMON CALOWELL, Evangelist (Phone

JUST ARRIVED

A New

Many wonderful giftt for Christmas.
Just the things for Dad, Brother! or
the Boy Friend. Shoo early for
Visit
Christmas.
Angelucci and
Hmgo't 123 Shop designed especially
for the young college man.

or

Testament Church with Nothing to Offer
Except the Teaching of Christ

OKI BAY

WOOL SPORT HATS
new shipment of wool sport hats
plaids and solids, with the tapered
crown and jaunty snap brims, goyly
decorated with sports emblems and
a colorful feather in the band. These
are smart with any outfit.
A

in

Priced

9:45 a.m.
10:45 a.m., 6:00 a.m.

Worship

I8VDC

at $5.95

JUST A REMINDER

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NO ADDED COST

Dress worm for the Homecoming
Come. We hare one of the most
complete seJectrons of cor coots in
town, with fine selection of scarves
and gloves and other accessories to
complete your outfit.

Angelucci and Ringo

123

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Phone

S,fbr Young

Men

15
Discount
Cosh & Carry

265 Euclid Ave.
Next to Coliseum

Angelucci

&

1966 Harrodsburg Road
880 East High Street

Ringo

123 West Main

Before You Go

.

.

.

Shop Josef's

LAURENCE'S

SANDWICH
SHOP
214 South Lime
BABY LOAF SANDWICH
Our National Priie Winner

SALE
Off and More
Values Up To
on Dresses, Coats, Suits, and Sportswear
SO, ON, ON, U OF

K

ON TO

We Are Famous For Our Chocolate Pie
and Homemade Bread

For SAFETY . . .
SATISFACTION
SERVICE

THE DOOR TO FASH'ON
819 Euclid Ave. Chevy Chase

.,.

P.S. Alums Welcome Too!

...

Look to:
SECOND NATIONAL
BANK and TRUST CO.
Complete Banking Services Including:
CHECKING ACCOUNTS
PERSONAL LOANS
TRUST FUNDS
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

Welcome Alums
While in town drop in to see us and
our fine selection of

MEN'S CLOTHING

"We take pride in your safety and satisfaction!"

i.fla.
-

i

'LI

4

riWM

UST TO
...i.ts

tf HUM'"

Across from

Cmta..,.

Member F.D.I.C. and Federal Reserve System

21, 1961 -- S

ami)

flEEB

* The Ken lucky Kernel
HSI

I

Entered nt (lie povl athve nl
I'nhhMird tnnr tinm a

I

I.iimtn. rn kv a
it nnnmi
MX 1KU.I.AHN

or

Kl'M

I

'( KY

nnd.T
In,
A

SCHOOL

r'pt
VKAH

Art of

during holidays

Mir, h 1, 1ST).
cvlni

aiul

Fd Van Hook, I'ditor

S( HH Aiirz, Society l.ditor
Ric k Mi.IUynolhs. Cartoonist
Arts l.dilor
Hohhii M

Jew

Dick Wallace. Advertising Manager
Hill IIoi.ton, Cin ulutU'ii Manager

so.

TUESDAY NEWS STAFF

June Chay, NYuj Editor

V.ditot

Wayne Ghecohy, Campu

KrttnY Town !., Managing Filitor
Hen Fitzpathk k. Snorts Editor

S(

Elpom Phili Irs, Associate

owe

ottie Melt, S;rM

'JEM

HE

Friendly Rivalry

Kcntuc ky's biggest rival comes to
town Saturday for a game which may
of a hattle.
prove to he a whing-dinAnd, UK will he observing its 19hl
Homecoming. This leads lis to some
thoughts about events at other schools
which wo hope will not happen here.
between Kentucky and
Pw'valry
Tennessee lias, in most cases, been
on a friendly, sportsmanlike basis. It
should stay this way. Although this
may sound a little like talking off
the top of our head, recent incidents
at other colleges make us wonder if
tee are above such juvenile and foolish things.
At one college, their mascot bear
was clubbed to death, supposedly by
a group of students from a rival
school. Why did this happen? Probably, it, started out as a prank, but
the little prank ended in a senseless,
stupid, idiotic act that could no longer
be called a prank.
At another college, fears were expressed in the school's newspaper

it

that school spirit might become too
spirited during their homecoming
event.
Such incidents as fist fights, killing
mascots, and the numerous other uncalled-for
things that could happen
serve only to rellect on the students'
intelligence and maturity.
pranks cease to be pranks when a
mascot is clubbed to death or friendly
rivalry turns into open fights,
and the like.
YVe love school spirit. YVe love
good, sportsmanlike rivalry between
Kencollege foes of
tucky and Tennessee have for years
been strong rivals; we hope it continues, but we would hate to see
some stupid incident mar the record.
Let us le able to face ourselves
next week with the assurance that all
was fair and square during this 1901
Homecoming.
Have a sane, sober, and safe holiday. Drive carefully, for the life you
save mav be mine!
d

name-callin-

The Readers' Forum:

Vieivs On Kernel, Debaters, Sports, And Kernel
Wants Explanation

To The Editor:

has been the
Evidently anti-ar- t
Kernel's policy for the past week.
What seems to be the trouble, people?
First of all, the Kernel (Tuesday,
Nov. 14) misdated the Humanities
Club speech on "Tradition in Art,"
for Wednesday night, Nov. 13. I
wonder how many people were present to hear Prof. Frederic Thursz
speak Wednesday instead of the previously planned Tuesday, Nov. 14.
Secondly, what is "Art Initiation"
(Thursday, Nov. 16)?. Perhaps the
word was meant to read "imitation"
r
instead. Is it not the duty of a
to inform the people rather
than to leave them to draw their own
conclusions?
Who is your art interpreter? Is
there anyone on the Kernel stalf who
is qualified to read between the lines
of such an important and correct
.speech? bather than the
lead of the Kernel stating:
"Contemporary artists who are aware
of tradition are convinced that imitations of an art style is useless."
I
believe Prof. Thurs. actually
stated: "An awareness of tradition
will convince a contemporary artist
that imitation of a style is futile. Any
formal repetitions are debasements
of creativity, and refinement of a
prevalent form, abstract or representational leads to a mannered copy."
The two statements are quite unalike.
Since the alxve quote from Prof.
Thursz's speech is his opinion, is the
above quote from the Kernel their
opinion? If so, please so state.
in the
Another
Kernel was the paragraph beginning:
"Art was an imitation in Classical
times. . . ." Mr- Thursz stated: "In
news-pipe-

-

Classical times, art was imitation. Nature reflects the ideal and art is an
imitation of the world of appearances
of an idea. It held no higher rank lor
Plato. The work of art was just an
imitation of what is to be seen. It
was subordinate to the Coil it personified. The people of Greece, for
whom the art work was made, were
the Idolaters who admired facility in
these imitations."
It is now time for the Kernel to
realize that they are not art critics,
nor are they interpreters. They are not
even good newspaper people, where
accuracy is concerned. Is it not bad
work to misspell the name ol a
member? Just as it would be to
misspell anyone's name. No one
seemed to be able to check on the
fact that Mr. I.etliem spells his name
with two "e's," nor did you bother to
realize that Prof. Thursz spells his
first name: Frederic (no "K").
Ji dy Johnson'
lac-ult- y

tucky Home," that "certain provincialism," that our "cosmic attitude toward the rest of the world" becomes
woefully retarded if not stillborn
altogether.
The quaint reference to the Kentucky Uivcr and Fed's Creek, those
last bastions of bliss where true democracy still reigns as white supiem-acand corrupt school boards, shows
that the editor himself has not stopped
to calculate the "cosmic nature" of a
megaton.
Kentucky is a minutiae in the history of man. and to insist upon its
emphasis will keep our citizens in the
intellectual and physical caves of the
beginning of that history.
Hurrah lor Y'andenbosch!
v

HlCIIAHl)

Ml'MCIl

fully aware of the
"cosmic nature" ol a megaton, and,
like ail kcniuikians, he lives in an
age when lie has moie to fear than
lear itself. Hut, he does not suggest
that am one crawl hack into his
cac. He still contends theie
is a need lor Kentiuky history in the
Commonwealth's school system. Since
Mr. Munich belittles our idea for
"modernizing" the method of leaching Kentiuky history, mayle he
would suggest that United Stales liiv
lory he removed from the schools
since we have lost our identification as
Rendu kians anil Americans in our
one world ciar -- THE EDITOR.)

(The editor

is

's

Supports Dr. Vainlenlmsoh

To The Editor:
The basis upon which the Kernel
decides that Kentucky history is
needed easily ranks with the best
and
traditions of
1920 isolationism. In these times,
when, in fact, the world is too much
with us, it seems a particular inanity
and misconceived chauvinism "to
think of ourselves first as citizens of
Kentucky."
The problem w ith developing our
sense of oneness on this particular native ground is that one tends to forget that there is more than fast
women, good looking horses, and
homely politics. The trouble is that
we of Kentucky origin and education
are so saturated with "Mv Old Ken
narrow-mindedne-

Hacks League Mea

To The Editor:
Almost daily, in the past five or
six years, articles have appeared in
school, city, and statewide newsfootball
UK's
papers haranguing
shortcomings. 1 have yet to see any
of these articles attempt an udequate

solution. There is one exception, however; Dan Omlor's Nov. 13 sports
article presented the suggestion of
the Yanderbilt admissions director
for a new league.
It has been quite evident for many
years that top football prospects have
been enticed away from the type of
school which Is more interested in
academic standards to those schools
which are more interested in winning
teams. We have experienced this in
both basketball and football ourselves.

It is also quite plain that our
"brawny brothers," such as Alabama,
I.SU, and Mississippi, will continue
to attract these players and that we
will continue to be athletically frustrated.
A man at A'andy has clearly seen
through this problem. He has seen
schools
how the academically-inclinewill band together to form their own
league.
This raises a question: Where do
you suppose a high school talent
would attend college if he wanted
a meaningful degree in his chosen
field? Very shortly the academic:
standards of some schools would rise
more while others would drop because of the type of student enrolling. This in turn would fie clue to
the reputation of the school involved.
This movement of the more earnest schools joining together might
soon sweep the country, and I think
it is quite evident that as degrees from
these "other" schools lieconu less
meaningful their own individual systems will also become less meaningful, thus, making way for the more
earnest institutions of higher learning.
John V. Mason'
d

* TIIL TvLMl

Homecoming 'Spirits' Discussed

Ha. ha. ha. Oui, oui." Wh..t .1
Ky .rot: m iu.i ss
Hey, what's everyone
fullowhiK i.s a f.,blc. That's bonehead!
for 1n se of you tlio don't go to .standmt up for?
John: They're roIiir to sinit
Kentucky footb.ill (lamps. Forthosn
f you who tio
call it a fable if "My Old Kentucky Home." It's
a real pretty song. Too bad Ohio
you like.

Thr

Bud:

Domn it! Stop shoving,
fell off the stadium.
Md: Well, Ret off the lrclpe and
Hup waving your bottle. Every
lime you get fried you have to
ham It up.
Bud: The people love me.
Sid: All risht, the people love
you. Now sit down.
Bud: What same is this?
John: The Kentucky-Tennesse- e
fame.
Bud: The Kentucky-Tcnnes-e- e
f:ame! What are we doing here?
Who brought u here?
John: You did.
Bud: Why did you let me ci It?
I ll have the m rd peal Is and
chips off your pin for this.
Jl v 'did tliN happen, Sal?
We
Ml: Don't ou
Mrie at the I ouisvillt'-D.ivloand the liquor ran nut.
(.m.e
Someone told you they were bavins a hig blowout at Levinstein
and you got the linnliC idea tu
rome over and join the party.
Bud: Oh, my God! What are the
other brothers doing here?
Sid: You invited the rest of the
chapter along.
Bud: The whole chapter; Sid,
e're dished!
Jacques: Ha, ha, ha. ( "est drole.
Bud: What did the brat say?
Sid: He say the whole thing
Is good for laughs.
Bud: Oh. he did, did he? Well,
you can tell him to catch the first
for France in the morning.
He's done nothing but gum up the
chapter since we let him In. Who
rushed him anyway?
Sid: You did.
Bud: Oh.
Sid: The AMS is going to raise
hell about this. We'd better
think of something fast.
Bud: They've got a lot of nerve.
Jacques: Ha, ha, ha. C'est tres
Comiqur.
Bud: What did he say?
Sid: H says he thinks you're
funny.
Bud: Everything' funny to him.
That's all he says, "Oui, oui, ha,
ha, ha. C'est drole. C'est comique.

I almost

doesn't have something like it.
Bud: Hey, brothers! . . . Eveiy- one sing along with the Kentucky
fans.
Sid: How's. it go?
Bud: I dunno . . . John, how's
it RO?
John: I dunno. Let's Just listen
to the words as the other fans
sine, and sing it with them.
Bud: Yeah, everyone si?ig with

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course those guys from Ohio can't
sing "My Old Kentucky Home."
But the Kentucky fans were pretty
tanked, too. Ju.it how tanked you
can't tell by the song, for no one
knows the words anyway. Just how
tanked you can tell by Koing to
Kentucky games. Ha, ha, ha. I'rst
drole, eh?

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Sid: Can't . .. . nobody else is.
Jacques: ("est drole, ha. ha,
HA! Bass ?e bottle. Kverybody

else ret.
I know what you're saying . . .
the whole thing is ridiculous. Of

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* 6-- TIIE

KENTt

CKY KERNEL,

Tuesday, Nov. 21, 1W1

Social Activities

YOUR

sorority plrdne Sharon Jo Gray, Edra Hamilton.
Kappa Alpha Theta Fault-onerHoli-maLexSidney Harrison, Francine
class are Barbara
Yvonne Hunt.
AtClub
ington, president: Oail Huitt,
Astronomy
Linda Jeffers, Joyce Latham.
Wardell
The Astronomy Club will meet lanta, Ga.. vice president;
Jacqueline Mcintosh, Marilyn Melit 7 p.m. today l:i Room 211 of the Block, Louisville, secretary.
redith. Sally Money. Ellen Pluck-net- t.
Journalism Building.
Mary Stuart McCabe, Lexington,
Linda Pruitt, Terry Read,
will be taken
chairman; Brenda
Yearbook pictures
scholarship
ic
Inga Riley, Pat Shinners, Nancy
Biummett, Bloominpton, Ind.,
at this meeting.
Strecker, Glynda Stephens, Catrepresentative; Gay
Dairy Club
Mary Ware, Virginia
Charleston, W. Va., social herine Ward, Susan Wetzel,
The Dairy Club will meet at
Wesche, and
Louis1 p.m. today in Room 113 or trie chairman; and Pat Tierney,
ratteraon Literary Society
ville, and Kay Stone, Louisville,
J)airy Science Building.
The Patterson Literary Society
song leaders.
Women's Residence Hall
has accepted the following new
The Women's Residence Halls
Sigma Nu
members: Nick Arnold. Lynn Coe.
sponsor a football and ba.sket-'ba- ll
Sigma Nu fraternity recently Robert Deitz, and Robert Half-hil- l.
discussion at 8 p.m. today In elected the following officers; Gary
the lower lounge of Keeneland Cranor, president; Hale Cochran,w
The next meeting of the Society
vice president; Mike Sells, secre-forva Fiipcauf. treasurer: Bill will be held November 28.
Speakers for the program will be
and
..the varsity coaches accompanied Oleason, social' chairman;
John Cowgill, rush chairman.
4by players.
Apiculture and Home F.conomicsDesserts
'r
The Agriculture and Home Economics Student Council recently
Delta
Kappa
the following officers: Fred
enter- -' elected
Kappa Delta sorority will
Shanks, president: Tom Price, vice
tain Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity president; Elizabeth Newell, secre- '
tonight at the chapter house.
tary; John Peters, treasurer; and
Founder's Day
Barbara Landrum. reporter.
Delta sorority will
Delta Delta
Alpha Lambda Delta
Founder's Day tonight
celebrate
Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman with a dinner at the chapter house.
women's honorary, recently elected the following officers: Inga RiElections
Glynda Stephens
DOWNTOWN
ley, president;
Thl Delta Theta
Nancy Stecker,
vice presid