xt7p5h7bvv1s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p5h7bvv1s/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky. University of Kentucky 1976 1977 The University of Kentucky Gradute Schools course catalogs contain bound volumes dating from 1926 through 2005. After 2005, the course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Graduate School course catalogs University of Kentucky Graduate School Bulletin, 1976-1977 text University of Kentucky Graduate School Bulletin, 1976-1977 1976 2016 true xt7p5h7bvv1s section xt7p5h7bvv1s . - ,1 1.1'.'..‘1"-'1.“"'f ,".;~_.‘ 1%???" E
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' ,, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY x ' .* ,
' [,TlIEGRAduATE School r ‘ g
,_ - . BULLETIN l976-77 . ’
I I I , ~ volume 6B ‘A cooperative publication of the Graduate I l V ' '
-. , , - ' - April 1976 School and the Publications Bureau, Univer— ‘
(.5 _ g ' Number4 sity Infomation Services. _ " .
,i _ f - Unlvetsity AIChWCE I. . _ ,
I , V " " I Margaret l. King'lerOry ' North ,
l ‘ - -‘ . ‘ University olKentuckY .
v , , ‘ . ‘ I ‘ Lexington, Kentucky 40506 .
. i

 ~ CONTENTS
I I Calendar 3 ‘

I.TheyGraduate School 6

Programsand Directors of Graduate Studies 24

I The Graduate School PrOgrams 27

, f L, ’2 Gourse;yiLlistings_by Se’mesters 97
- , AdministrativeOrganization lOl
I lndexlO3 ~

 l
l
l
l
- l
‘ CALEN DAR l
l
1976 Fall Semester
June 1—Tuesday—Last date to Submit all required October 18—Monday—Last day to withdraw from
documents to Graduate Admissions Office for ad- the University and receive any refund 1
1 mission and readmission to the 1976 Fall Se- October 22———Friday—Last day to pay thesis and
mester dissertation fees in Billings and Collections Office l
August 23, 24—Monday and Tuesday~Classifica- for a December degree I
‘ tion, registration, and drop-add November 2—Presidential Election Day (Academic .
August 25——Wednesday——Class work begins Holiday)
AUQ'USt 31—Tuesday—Last day IO enter an 0'90” November 4—~Thursday——Last day to withdraw ‘
s nizecllgclasséfOIerialldSemef—ter . from a class before final examinations
efiZWdQ; — on ay— abor Day (Academic Noxzmber ;0-23~Wedn:sda;7t7hrsough Euesday— l
. vance registration or prin emester 3
September 7~—Tuesday—Last clap to drop a course November 25-27—Thursday through gSaturday— l
Withoutagrade Th k .. Hl'd (A d 'Hl‘d ) 1
September 24———Friday———Last day for filing applica- an sgivmg O I 0y CO emic 0' ays l
tion for a December degree in the Graduate December 2——Thursday—-—Last day to take a final i
School Office examination if you plan to get a December de~ l
September 24—Friday—Last day for payment of gree _ . l
registration fees in order to avoid cancellation of December 10—l-r1day—«Class work ends i
registration December 13-18—Monday through Saturday—
October 15—Friday—Last date to submit all re— Final examinations l
quired documents to Graduate Admissions Office December 18—Saturday—End of Fall Semester— l
for admission and readmission to the 1977 Spring All grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4 p.m.
Semester three days after final examination is administered
1977 Spring Semester
January 10, 1 1—Monday and Tuesday—Classifica- class before finals
tion, registration, and drop-add April 1——Friday—Last date to submit all required
January 12-Wednesday——~Class work begins documents to Graduate Admissions Office for
January 18—Tuesday——-Last day to enter an orga- admission and readmission to all 1977 Summer
nized Class for Spring Semester Sessions ,
January 24—Monday~——Last clay to drop a course April 11-22——-Monday through Friday—Advanced
without a grade registration for 1977 Fall Semester and all Sum-
‘ February 10—Thursday—Last day for filing ap- mer Sessions
plication for a May degree in the Graduate School. April 22—Friday—Last day to take a final exam-
‘ Office ination if you plan to get a May degree
1 February 10—Thursday—Last day for payment of April 30—Saturday—Last date for Kentucky Teach«
registration fees in order to avoid cancellation of ers to submit all required documents to Graduate
registration Admissions Office for admission and readmission
March 4—Friday—Last day to withdraw from the to all 1977 Summer Sessions
University and receive any refund April 30—Saturday——Class work ends
March 1 1———Friday—Last day to pay thesis and dis— May 2—7—Monday through Saturday—Final ex-
Sertation fees in Billings and Collections Office aminations
for May degree May 7—Saturday—~End of Spring Semester
March 14-19—Monday through Saturday—Spring May 8—Sunday—Commencement Day—All grades
Vacation (Academic Holidays) due in Registrar’s Office by 4 p.m. three days
March 28—Monday—Last day to withdraw from a after final examination is administered
3

 l977 Four-Week lntersession
May l6—Monday—Registration May 3l—Tuesday—Last day to withdraw from a
May l7—Tuesday—Class work begins class before end of session
May 20—Friday—Last day to enter organized class June l—Wednesday—Last day to withdraw from
for Four—Week lntersession the University and receive any refund
May 27—Friday—Last day to drop a course without June l4—Tuesday—End of Four-Week lntersession
a grade . . _ June l4—Tuesday—Final Examinations
May 30——Monday——Memorial Day (Academic HOIF June l7—Friday—All grades due in Registrar’s Of-
day) fice by 4 p m 1
May 3l—Tuesday—Last day for payment of regis— ' ‘
tration fees in. order to avoid cancellation of
registration i
1977 Summer Session
(Eight-Week)
June l—Wednesday——Last date to submit all re- July 4—Monday—lndependence Day (Academic
quired documents to Graduate Admissions Of- Holiday)
fice for admission and readmission to the l977 July l5—Friday—Last clay to pay thesis and dis-
Fall Semester sertation fees in Billings and Collections Office
June l5—~Wednesday—Registration for an August degree
June lé—Thursday—Class work begins July l5—Friday—Last day to withdraw from the
June 20——Monday—Last day to enter an organized University and receive any refund
class for the l977 Summer Session July 28——Thursday—Last day to withdraw from a
June 28—Tuesday—Last day to drop a course class before final examinations
withouta grade August 3—Wednesday—Last day to take a final
June 29—Wednesday—Registration automatically examination if you planrto get an August degree
cancelled if fees not paid in full August 1 l—Thursday—End of Summer Session
June 30—Thursday—Last day for filing application August l l—Thursday—Final Examinations /
for an August degree in the Graduate School August l5—Monday—All grades due in Registrar’s /
Office Office by 4 p.m.
l
l
\
4

 H:— ‘ , U /’ / I! IF kl 0. o
yr /’ 3 / /" ' ‘ ‘ s , .‘s=“"¢2/,,$,,' ‘ ' ’ /‘
F I, , - 4:“ ' 'V " é a .
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36 O 5F 4‘: 45:)» 11]— , r‘ ,/ ET ” "”' ' ' . :“N-m-M
‘9 ....*‘;‘ ' 1“, '2 fl _ if; 4 ' wrung ' 9%;
r~~ n 5215‘ ,5; «$49.: _ 355/4411 L 4-3-»: “3L 4
O - " '1 ,, ‘13,! Il'  ‘ : ” I \;:, . "' _" 11»: JR"? .* V K .
3e w ,_ ‘. ‘ , . . . _
IS F W. 77 " L -- I _ L ~
L " L ,, Otis A. ,Singl’eto‘ry, Ph.D.-
4 _y * WImberlyC Royster, Ph.D., Deon , , ' ‘
fHérbertL.’ Ly¢h,, Ph.D., Associate Dean ,
4 H Wyr'han Borough; PhD., Associate Dean

 - The Graduate School
The University of Kentucky began offering grad- Library Science Psychology
uate work in 1870 and awarded its first graduate Mathematics 500°,l°9y
degrees in 1876. The Graduate School became a mi; h gait: Arts
distinct unit in the University organization in l9l2. Political) SZience Zoology
The Graduate School is concerned with advanced
study, graduate instruction and research conducted . . l
Master of SCIence
by the faculty and students of all colleges and de-
partments. The total graduate resources of the Offered in “HOWE“?! fie'dS‘
University are merged under it for the purpose of Anatomy Pharmaceutical Science ‘
promoting the acquisition of knowledge in an figricurgral Ecommics EEYSSCT d B' h .
- . - nima Ciences y5io ogy an iop ysics
atmOSphere Of free and Ilvely inqwry. ‘ Biochemistry Health, Physical Education,
Graduate work is offered in most colleges in the Botany Recreation
University. A general description, tabulation of Chemistry Plant Pathology
courses, and name of the Director of Graduate Computer Science Plant Physiology
Studies for each of the various programs is given in cm" Science PSYCH°_I°QY
. . Economics SOIl Scrence
the Programs and Directors of Graduate Studies sec- E . .
_ . _ . ntomology Statistics
tion of this bulletin. Geology Toxicology
Mathematics Veterinary Science
The following advanced degrees are conferred: Microbiology Zoology
’ Pharmacology '
Doctor of Philosophy
Offered in following fields: Master of Science in Agriculture
Agricultural Economics Germanic Languages Offered in following fields:
Agricultural Engineering HiSlOI’Y Agricultural Economics Horticulture
Anatomy Mathematics Animal Sciences v Plant Pathology
Animal Sciences Mechanical Engineering CrOp Science Sociology
Anthropology Metallurgical Engineering Entomology Soil Science
Biology and Materials Science Forestry Veterinary Science
Biochemistry . Microbiology
Chemical Engineering Musicology
Chemical Physics Pharmaceutical Sciences Other Degrees
Chemistry Pharmacology
Civil Engineering Physics Doctor of Business Admin— ‘ Master of Science in Dentis-
Crop Science Physiology and Biophysics istration try With Specialty in
Diplomacy and International Plant Pathology DOCK)" Of Education Orthodontics
Commerce Plant Physiology Doctor of Musical Arts in Master of Science in Elec-
Economics Political Science Music Teaching trical Engineering
Educational Psychology Psychology Master of Arts in Education Master of Science in Engi—
Electrical Engineering Sociology Master of Science in neering Mechanics
Engineering Mechanics Soil Science Education Master of Science in Home i
English * Spanish Master of Business Admin- Economics l
Entomology Statistics istration Master of Science in Library v i
French Toxicology Master of Fine Arts Science i
Geography Veterinary Science Master of Music Master of Science in Me- '
Geology Master of Public chanical Engineering
Administration Master of Science in Medical
Master of Science in Radiation
Master Of Arts Accounting Master of Science in Metal-
. _ . Master of Science in Agri— lurgical Engineering
Offered m following fields: cultural Engineering Master of Science in Nuclear
AnthI‘OPOlOQY Economics Master of Science in Chem- Engineering
A” English ical Engineering Master of Science in Nursing
Botany French Master of Science in Civil Master of Science in Radio-
Classical Languages Geography Engineering logical Health
Communications German Master of Science in Clinical Master of Social Work
DiplOmaCY HiSfOI'Y Nutrition Specialist in Education
6

 Organization of the Graduate School Faculty meeting: They do not have voting priv-
ileges in the Gra uate Faculty. ‘
The Graduate Faculty consists of the Dean of The Administrative officers assigning teaching and .
Graduate School and all persons appointed thereto other duties to members of the Graduate Faculty
by the President of the University. As the chief who are taking an active part in the graduate pro- 1
University agency for the promotion of the ideals gram (i.e., are heavily engaged in directing theses, .
of graduate study, it determines the policies of The carrying on productive research, etc.) should make
Graduate School and makes recommendations to appropriate reduction in the duties required of such
the University Senate and to the President, or to teachers. ‘
, other administrative officials as appropriate. All
' roles affecting graduate work and the inauguration The Role of the Dean 1
; Ergjyatggagoucajfiyprograms must be approved by the The Dean of The Graduate School is charged with l
Any proposed change in the rules of The Graduate the administration Of the Whale? adopted by the l
Faculty must be included in the agenda of the meet- Graduate Faculty and the University Senate relating }
ing and circulated to the Graduate Faculty at least to graduate studies. He/she pre5ides over all meet- l
10 days prior to the meeting at which it is to be "‘95 Of the Graduate FOCUIW and calls meetings 0f l
considered. this faculty whenever he/she thinks it adVisable or
New Graduate Faculty members may be proposed whenever requested to do so by one-fourth'of the
to the Dean of The Graduate School atany time by membership. He/she makes . recommendations to
the college deans and department chairmen con- the Graduate Faculty respecting the requirements
cerned, or in the case of persons not attached to a for advanced degrees, the regulations necessary to
college faculty, by the Vice President for Academic insure a high standard Of graduate work, and all
Affairs of the Universit . Eli ibilit lificati n other aspects 0f the graduate program. He/she
y g y qua o s . .
are as follows: appomts a committee for each graduate student,
arranges for final examinations, advises students
1. The doctor’s degree or its equivalent in schol- with regard to their studies and the requirements of
arly reputation. The Graduate School, and in all other ways ad-
2. The rank of assistant professor (or equivalent), ministers the graduate program in the interests of .
or higher. efficient instruction and the highest attainment
3. Scholarly maturity and professional productiv-r possible on the part of each graduate student. He/
ity as demonstrated by publications, editorial she is responsible for determining and certifying to
services, research surveys, creative work, or the Registrar candidates who have fulfilled require-
patents; and research in progress at the time of ments for advanced degrees.
appointment. The President, Vice President for Academic Af-
4. Definite interest in graduate work and the will- fairs, and the Dean of the Graduate School are
ingness *0 participate in the graduate program. members ex officio of all committees of the Grad-
Appointment to the Graduate Faculty is made by uate Faculty.
the President of the University on nomination by the
. Dean of The Graduate School after he/she and the The Graduate C°““Cil
‘ Graduate Council have studied the credentials sub- The Graduate Council is composed of 13 mem-
l mitted in support 01‘ the proposed members. bers and the Dean of The Graduate School, who is
. , Associate members of the Graduate Faculty are chairman. There are eight elected faculty repre-
l appointed by the Dean of The Graduate School upon sentatives and three faculty members appointed by
‘ nomination by the Director of Graduate Studies. As- the Dean of The Graduate School. One of the
sociate membership includes non-tenured assistant elected members is from the College of Agriculture,
professors who hOld the doctorate, have been fUll- two from the College of Arts and Sciences, one from
time members of a faculty for at least one year, the College of Business and Economics, two from
and have initiated a significant research effort. It the College of Education, one from the College of
includes, also, certain other faculty members ap- Engineering, and one from the College of Medicine.
pointed by the Dean. This membership may con— The member or members from each of these col-
tinue no more than five years. Associate members leges are elected by the Graduate Faculty members
are authorized to teach graduate courses, direct in that college. Two graduate student members are
masters’ theses, serve on and cochair doctoral com— selected by the Council from a panel of four sub-
mittees, and attend and participate in Graduate mitted by the Graduate and Professional Student
7 ,:

 Association. The term of office of the elected and Establishment and Modification of Graduate Programs
appointed members is three years, and that Of the An area which wishes to establish a new graduate
graduate students is one year. No member may program or modify an existing one must submit its
succeed himself/herself- ”ht” three years have program to the Graduate Council, which will make
elapsed since the completion 0f his/her last term. recommendation concerning it to the Graduate Fac—
The Graduate Council approves or disapproves u|fy_ .
. proposals concerning courses offered for graduate
credit, and advises and lends-assistance to the Dean STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
In his/her execution of policies and regulations de- .
. termined by the Graduate Faculty. Specifically, the ll is the l’eSPOhSlbllllY Of The student to inform l
‘ Council: himself/herself concerning all regulations and pro-
cedures required by the course of study he/she is
1. Studies requests of departments relating to pro- pursuing. In no case will a regulation be waived or ,
: posed graduate programs. an exception granted because a student pleads
2_ Reviews existing programs and courses. ignorance of the regulation or asserts that he/she was
3. in cooperation with the Dean, initiates recom- hOt informed 0f '1 by his/her adviser or otherauthor-
mendations to the Graduate Faculty. (This pro- ity. Therefore, the student should become familiar
cedure is not intended to prevent a faculty mem— Wll'h' The Graduate School Bulletin, including (1) the
ber from bringing any recommendation or re- section presenting the requirements for the degree
quest directly before the Graduate Faculty.) Wh'Ch he/she plans to take, and 12) the offerings
‘ and requirements of his/her major department.
The Graduate Council has such authority as is The student should consult the Director of Grad-
herein granted, or such as the Dean or the Graduate uate Studies of the department in which he/she will
' Faculty may delegate to it. A majority of the do his/her work concerning course requirements, '
Graduate Council constitutes a quorum for the any deficiencies, the planning of a program, and
transaction of business. special .regulations. Departments may have degree
requirements that are not listed in the Bulletin.
Directors of Graduate Studies It is to be noted that the Graduate Dean inter-
A Director of Graduate Studies serves as adviser Erets the Graduate Bulletin. Only the Graduate
. . . . . ounc1| may waive requirements stated in this
to each student majoring in his/her area until the Bulletin
student has a thesis director. The Director of Grad— '
uate Studies then recommends that the thesis direc- . .
tor be appointed the student’s adviser or committee AdMISSIon
chairman. In areas where theses are not required, An applicant for admission to the University
the Director of Graduate Studies is the adv15er for all shall not be discriminated against because of race,
students not writing theses. All etudent schedules color, religion, sex, marital status, national origin,
must be endorsed by the student s advrser. age or beliefs.
If it is desirable, a Director of Graduate Studies Students seeking admission to the University of
may recommend that additional advisers in the area Kentucky Graduate School must ho|d a baccalau-
be clPPOlhled- A Director Of Graduate Studies who reate degree from a fully accredited institution of .
l5 10 be absent from the University for 05 long 05 higher learning. A minimum undergraduate grade- l
a semester must call this fact to the attention of point average of 2.5 on the basis of 4.0 is required
I the Dean 50 that Cl substitute may be appointed. by The Graduate School. Individual departments _ i
The Dean of The Graduate School, with the ad- may require a higher grade-point average. ’
vice of the college dean(s) and the approval of the All applicants for admission to degree programs
President, may recommend to the Graduate Faculty in The Graduate School must submit scores on the
the areas of graduate study and research into which verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate
the University may be divided. (The logical unit for Record Examination. The College of Business and
an area is a department. By common consent, how- Economics may substitute the Graduate Manage—
ever, certain departments may be grouped into an ment Admission Test for MBA, DBA and Ac-
area; and in exceptional cases a department may counting students. The Medical College Admission
be divided into two or more areas.) The Directors Test or the Dental College Admission Test may be
of Graduate Studies for the various areas are ap- substituted with the approval of the program can-
pointed by the Dean of The Graduate School. cerned.
8

 5 Application forms can be obtained by writing: tions for admission are not considered complete
te Graduate School Admissions without official scores for the verbal and quantita-
ts Room 304, Patterson Office Tower tive portions of the Graduate Record Examination