xt7p8c9r349p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p8c9r349p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19340918  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 18, 1934 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 18, 1934 1934 2013 true xt7p8c9r349p section xt7p8c9r349p Best Copy Available
TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

Jfl

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXV.

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1934

VARSITY WORKS New Publication
Oil OFFENSIVE IN
KITTEN

OF

liJ
IftE

WILDCATS OPEN
GRID SEASON SEPT. 22
AGAINST MARYVILLE

TUSSLE

First Real Scrimmage With
Freshman Squad Is Held
Saturday

Portrays

Wildcats Go on Scoring Spree
in Second Half After
Kittens Weaken
In preparation for the opening
tussle of their new gridiron era, the
Wildcats were put through their
final real scrimmage Saturday afternoon on the practice field against
one of the most promising freshman
teams ever assembled at the University. The Cats were kept on the
offensive throughout the two-hotussle and succeeded m pushing
across some six or seven touchdowns.
For the first half hour the freshmen battled the varsity off their
feet, but the superior conditioning
of the Wildcat finally asserted itself
and the Big Blue went on a scoring
spree.
For a starting lineup In their first
game here this week the Chetmen
continue to mystify spectators as
Saturday's
well as sports scribes.
scrimmage found an entirely differany that has been
ent lineup from
used so far this year. The back-fiewas composed of McMillan at
ur

ld

Campus Ideals

BAND

1). K. Meeting

SPONSOR

"Educational Vistas" Is Pic
Election Necessary Because
toria' Review of Univerof Failure of Betty Sewell
sity Scenes
to Return to School
LEPERE
"Behind the brick, the stone, and
the mortar of the various buildings
of the University of Kentucky cam
pus, is an ideal."
In the hurry of campus life, one
la conscious of, but seldom stops to
reflect how much of an ideal it is, or
how much it shapes our lives, both
present and future. As a depiction,
an explanation, an elucidation of
this ideal, the publicity department
has prepared a booklet entitled,
"Educational Vistas."
Containing some 30 pages, the
booklet describes the various phases
of college life from the hesitating
freshman entrance to the glorious
repentant senior farewell. Probably
the best feature of the booklet Is
the fact that it deals with college life
at the University in pictures, a thing
that tells more than SO catalogues
combined.
There are the beauty
spots of rfie campus, strikingly familiar likenesses of the main buildings, and a general collection of
pictures of place3 of interest, the
browsing room in the library, the
Commons, the residence halls, the
new gymnasium, and Memorial hall.
Several pages are given over to
campus activities, with pictures of
the main student bodies. One of
the pages devotes itself to the musical activities, picturing both glee
clubs and the band. A double page
Is well made up of remembrances
of a wily frolicksome May Day parade; while another page depicts
the military forces in formation.
"Educational'Vistas" lacks nothing
of perfection so far as headlining
and copy 'is concerned. The ideal
that unfolds with the pages Is every
where present. A poignancy arises
like a mist over the picture of Dr.
James Kennedy Patterson; while a
sense of pride accompanies the pictures of the Wildcat teams. The
pictures filched out of last season's

quarterback, Johnson and Farrls at
the halfback posts, and Hay at fullback. Janes took care of the center
position, with Anderson and Potter
as guards. Wagner and Olah held
down the tackle berths, with Gene
Bryant and Jimmie Long as flank-meThings hadn't gone very far
before Frank McCool, the blond Mississippi halfback aspirant, had been
sent into the fracas, and he immediately showed that he Is a serious
contender for a regular berth.
Johnson bore the brunt of the
varsity attack during the first half
of the scrimmage, but McCool, Ayres,
and Hay did plenty of work In the Kentuckian snapshot
section are
last half. Once McCool scooted well placed as a finale to this
through the line for 30 yards before booklet.
he was piled up, and Ayres followed
The booklet has been published by
sprint before he
with a nice
The Kernel press under the superwas downed.
publicity department,
of
The longest gain of the day, how- visionwill the
be sent to all prospective
pass and
ever, was a beautiful
students in the state. As yet it
from Johnson to McMillan, the Ten
costs nothing, and it might be well
nessee lad outrunning the frosh sec
ask for
at
ondary for 60 yards and a touch' to is a thingone keepthat department.
along with your
to
It
down.
Kentuckians
Bert Johnson scored the first remembrances and the other college
you have already colnuu-kp- r
of the afternoon when he
Any ideal
plowed Through tackle for 10 yards lected and want to keep. put
in pic
to cross the goal line. At this point Is hardIt to describe, but feel a pride
tures.
the frosh got down to business and in your clicks. You'll
University after reading
stopped many varsity attempts at
"Educational Vistas," if you never
the line of scrimmage. "Red" Hagen, did before.
St. Xavier star, broke
former
through the line at one time and
spilled a varsity ball toter for a 10- yard loss.
Punting continues to be the weakest department, and the chief worry
of Coach Wynne. Johnson Is im TO
proving with every practice, as are
Hay, McCool, and Red Sympson.
McCool seems to be the most con
sistant punter of the group. He gets Ninety Separate Courses Will
Be Given in Late Afterplenty of height but only about 35
noon, Nights, Saturdays by
or 40 yards m distance. Sympson
gets distance but lacks enough
Extension Department
height to enable the ends to get
down under them.
In a schedule Issued recently by
The Cats need a great deal of the University department of extentackling practice and defensive work sion, it was announced that a combefore they can expect to stop such plete set of 90 separate courses have
teams as North Carolina, Alabama, been organized for the coming seTulane, and Tennessee.
mester, all of which will be delivered
in the late afternoons, evenings, and
Saturdays. The classes were taken
from the Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Commerce, and Education
colleges and were organized for the
benefit of part time students, who
may register when they attend the
n.

Students

U. K. IS ELECTED

By LORRAINE

SPECTATORS STILL
REMAIN MYSTIFIED

WALKER AGAIN Wynne to Address
Thursday

rd

rd

BIG BLUE'S BAND TO
HAVE NEW UNIFORMS
Bob

McDowell and Harold
Stockton Chosen as
Drum Majors

Margaret Walker, Lexington, was
chosen sponsor of the University
Band at a meeting held yesterday
In the Music building, thus filling
the vacancy left by Betty Sewell,
who did not return to school.
Miss Walker, who has been band
sponsor before, is a member of the
Delta Delta Delta sorority. She is
also a member of WSOA, YWCA,

A dozen or more men, who are
interested in doing extra FERA
work, are requested to report to the
office of the dean of men.

PAT AND BOYD HALL
GIRLS TO BE FETED
All Patterson and Boyd hall girls
are to.be entertained by the YWCA
at a pajama party, at 0:30 p. in.
Tuesday in tha. rc) reatlon room of
"Pat" hall. A short varied program
of light entertainment is being
plaimed and light refreshments will

TAKE

GATS
ON

MARYVILLE

Highlanders Slated to Open
Grid Season Here Saturday; Have Never Won
From Big Blue
GAME IS 17TH MEETING
By JAY LUCIAN

Maryville's Highlanders come here
Saturday for their 17th football engagement with Kentucky's Wildcats. The schools have played each
other more or less consecutively
since 1907. During all these years
Kentucky has scored a total of 479
points to Maryville's 19. The Highlanders have never won a game
from the 'Cats, although in 1917
they eked out a 6 to 6 tie which,
incidentally, is the most they ever
scored on Kentucky in one game.
On the other hand in 1914, although scoreless, they held Kentucky to 80 points. They didn't
play In 1913. With the succeeding
years the Highlanders improved
with age, and, although they never
were able to convert the point after touchdown, they did reduce
Kentucky's scoring totals to 68, 57,
40, 34 and so on down.
jfowever, these scores are no indication of the true caliber of the
Highlanders for Maryville always
classes.
Residence credits are offered and has been noted for its fighting
have been created for the benefit of spirit.
Maryville college, founded In 1819,
teachers, graduate students, and
and has an enpepole is
business and professional
who are otherwise occupied during rollment of 800 students with an
equals
the regular class sessions and who endowment that almost beautiful
It has a
desire to otain residence credit for Kentucky's.
view
campus of
either undergraduate or graduate Cumberland 275 acres In to the of the
north
mountains
work. No fee will be levied for late
registration, which will continue and the Smoky mountains to the
south.
until Monday, September 24.
About four hundred of the alumA complete schedule of courses
while
offered, may be obtained from the ni have entered the ministry, underand
extension department upon applica- over a hundred alumnior are misgraduates have been
tion.
in Japan, China, Slam,
Among the classes offered are sionaries Malayasla, India, Persia,
courses in the departments of an- Korea,
Philippines, Columbia,
atomy and physiology, art, bacteri- Africa, the Brazill,
Venezuela,
Costa Rica,
ology, English, geology, German, his- Chile, Cuba, Mexico and Porto Rico.
tory, mathematics, music, political
Maryville opened the season
science, sociology, and zoology.
against Kentucky again last year
and was repulsed to the tune of
Kentucky's
outstanding
46 to 2.
Time

be served.
The committee on arrangements
Includes; Anna Jeanne Blackburn,
chairman. Sara Whittlnghlll, Nancy
Trimble, Ruth Hallmark, and Thelitis Goodrich.
DEAN HOLME!) TO SPEAK

Mrs. Sarah Hojmes. dean of
women, will speak before the District
Houiemaker's association of Garrard
county tomorrow. Site will address
she Homemaker's association in Independence on Thursday, September 20.

Part

Workers

Given More Hours

Coach Chet A. Wynne, head
coach and athletic director of the
University, will address the Unl
verslty Athletic
association, com
posed of all students who have ac
quired student athletic books, at
7:30 Thursday night In Memorial
hall. Coach Wynne will be formal
ly presented to the student body
for the first time.
Short talks also will be made by
President Frank L. McVey, and
Professor Enoch Orehan, head of
the department of Journalism.
Dr. W. D. Funkhouser will report
on the business transactions of the
Athletic Council during the past
year, and the following members of
the council and coaching staff will
be presented:
Prof. M. E. Llgon,
Dean P. P. Boyd, Prof. E. A. Bu
reau, Mr. William Rhodes. Mr. Wal
lace Muir, Mr. Lewis Hlllenmeyer;
and coaches T. A. Toomey, Porter
Grant, D. L. Pribble, B. A. Shively,
and Frank Mosely.

ADULT SCHOOLS

BEJJFFERED

Faculty cars will be registered
Wednesday in the office of the Dean
of Men. Students will register cars
Thursday and Friday. A registration fee of 25 cents will be charged.

in

and WAA.
The band consists of approximately 80 men, and Is again directed by John Lewis, Jr. Drum majors will be Bob McDowell of Lexington, and Harold Stockton
of WOMEN STUDENTS
Ashland.
GET 93 FERA JOBS
This year will see a new deal on
the football field. The band, under
Ninety-thre- e
Jobs for University
new sponsorship, will wear new unl women under the FERA have been
forms. The cloth of the new uni- filed, according to an announce
forms will be of a lighter and more ment from the dean of women's ofcolorful hue than the dark blue fice. This Is the full quota of Jobs
ones they replace. The blouse of offered. Salaries are, on the aver
the uniform will be of navy blue. age, about $15 per month.
The trousers will be light blue, and
Over 400 applications for these
have an inch and a half stripe of positions have been received.
on the outer seam
white doeskin
Only 35 hours of work will be
A second pair of trousers will be allowed for the month of Septem
white, with a blue stripe. On the ber.
left shoulder of the blouse will be
worn a gold cord. Modified Persh
lng style caps and West Point belts
make up the rest of the outfit.
The military department Is re
sponsible for raising the funds
necessary for the letting of the
contract yesterday. To the cash in WILL OPEN SOON
their treasury was added funds col
lected from their dance last year.
to Sponsor Course
Donations also were received. There FERA
is still a deficit of $700. To offset
Which Will Be Given Unthis, the band Is sponsoring a dance
der Direction of Dr. H. II.
In the gym, on the night of Sep
Hill, City Superintendent
tember 26, following the Washing
ton and Lee football game. This
Dr. Henry H. Hill, city superintendance is the first on the social cal- dent of schools, announced today
(Oontlnued on Page Four)
that three adult opportunity schools
would be conducted during the current school term through the ausWILL
pices of the Federal Emergency Re-

NIGHT GLASSES

Kampus
Kernels

Will Be Held
Memorial Hall at
7:30 p. m.

players

in

that

game were Bach,

Kreuter, McMillan, Kercheval,
Walker, Ayers and Hay. Five
University men and women, work- of these players are back, together
ing under the FERA, will be allowed with many who saw service in the
game. Maryville scored its two
35 hours for September instead of
points when a bad pass from Ken25, as was previously announced.
tucky's center man rolled into the
The dean of men wislies to obtain end zone.
a list of a dozen or more additional
A strange feature of last year's
men wlio will begin work at once and game was
that Kentucky never
who will be given the time not taken punted.
The Highlanders can be
by the regular men, since it is prob- depended upon to put a scrapping
able that all of the 188 men on teum on the field but the issue will
federal aid will not work Uieir full not be long In doubt. Led by the
quota of hours. University men de big "Tomcat" Captain Rupert and
siring aid should call at the dean Bill Jobe, the rest of the Wildcats,
of men's office.
who have spent a hard session of
Last year tlie University fell sliort claw sharpening on the grid-iro- n
of the full allotment of funds by grin J.st one, will claw the kilties olf
over H00.
the Highlanders in short order.
Cas-sad-

y,

lief Administration.
Plans have been made to open
classes Monday, September 17, at
Morton Junior, Lincoln and Dunbar
schools. They will be administrated
through the State Department of
Education and the Lexington board
of education.
Classes will meet for nine months
as authorized by federal authorities.
Twenty-seve- n
teachers have been
obtained for the faculty.
Enrollment will begin at 4:30 p. m.
Monday at the central unit of the
oportunity schools at Morton Junior
High school, which is located at
Walnut and Short streets.
The schools which were originated
for persons over 16 who were de
sirous of continuing their education
although financially unable to do so,
will Include In its curriculum such
courses as sewing, cooking, dramatics, public speaking, music, economics, sociology, current events,
business English, high and grade
school arithmetic, business courses
and various cultural subjects. Mr.
J. S. Johnson, Lexington, is the head
of the system.

Agriculture Grads
Lead Winning Teams
George Letton and Watson Arm
strong, alumni of the University,
and graduates of the Agriculture
college, coached the teams which
took first prize in the livestock
contest at the Kentucky State Fair
which was held in Louisville, Ky.
Mr. Letton's team from Stan
ford High school, took first prize
in all classes of livestock; while
e
Mr. Armstrong's team from
won first prize in dairy cat- tie. These teams will represent
Kentucky at the American Royal
Livestock Contest which will be
held at Kansas City in October.
Pica-dom-

GRADUATES APPOINTED
TO RESEARCH POST
Dean Wiest announces the ap
pointment of Mr. W. A. Tolman as

Instructor and research
worker in the Bureau of Business
Research.
The appointment of a
new memer of the staff was necessitated by leave of absence granted
James W. Martin.
Mr. Tolman received his master's
degree from the University in the
summer of 1931. He has taught ex
tension courses throughout the state
and was an educational director for
the CCC last year.
part-tim-

e

WOMEN WATC H VOIR BOXES.
The Women's

lc

Associ

ation requests that all women students visit their post office boxes
in McVey hall for possible notices.
Those who have not gotten their
boxes yet, are urged to procure
them at once. Residents of the
halls will receive their null at the

hulls.

NEW SERIES NO. 2

Sixteen Fraternities List
Pledges; Rush Week Ends
Sixteen social fraternities presented a complete list of their fraternity
pledges late yesterday afternoon.
The boys were formally pledged to
the organizations at 8 p. m. Saturday, In accordance with temporary
rulings stating that Greek organizations need no longer wait until the
seventh day of classes to pledge, and
declining all FERA workers' fraternity bids.
Names of the fraternity pledges
will be turned in to the dean of men
within the week, after which the
men will be officially pledged.
The names and addresses of the
pledges to the various fraternities,
announced yesterday, follows:
Alpha Lambda Tau Wendell N
Harper, Lexington; Richard R. Cal-leBirmingham,
Ala.; John L.
Davis, Sparton, Ala.; James Wad- lington and Robert Prichard, Prince
ton; Stanley Van Oordcr, William
son, W. Va.; Earl Wilson, London;
Wallace Barron. Madisonvllle; Garland Lewis, Crothersvllle, Ind. ; Dave
Lawrence, Corinth; Collier Hall,
Catlettsburg; Lloyd Langston, Ash- vllle, N. C; Edward Oliver. Berea.
Alpha Sigma Phi Lloyd Owen,
Thomas Spellacy, Raymond St. John
and James Alrutz, Sennet tady, N. Y
Ernie Hatfield, Plkeville; Norman
Lewis, Ashland; Ralph Winfrey,
Somerset;
Russell Ellington and
James Qoforth, Louisville; Thomas
Nance, Owensboro; Guy Hale, Hick
man; Woodrow Holland, Whites-vlllWilliam Hund and H. Cole
man Saterfleld, Henderson; Malcolm
Shotwell, Corbln, and Harold Stoc- ton, Ashland.
Alpha Tau Omega Charles Guy,
Lloyd Mahan, Fred Fugazzi, John
Huston, Fred Thompson and Jesse
WBUmott,
Lexington ; Richard
Meade, J. T. Craig, Kenneth Darby,
Wendell Skaggs, Samuel Otis, Homer
Nichols and J. P. Rogers, Ashland;
Don Kelliher, Chicago; K. E. Rapp
Jr., Glasgow; William Amyx, Paris;
Richard Robinson, Richmond; John
Ewing Stewart, Russellville; Garrison Elliott, Lawrenceburg, Ralph
Congleton, Barbourville; Fred Fischer and Sibley Hughett, Louisville;
Robert
Williamson,
Jacksonville,
Fla.; Larry Bolland, Williamson, W.
Va.; Wallace Reece, Winchester; A.
L. Wllhoite, Youngstown, O.; James
Norvall, Perryville.
Delta Chi James Albert Lyle,
Lexington; Bill Foster, Easton, Pa.;
Jack Hoover and Richard Rag land,
Paducah; John Hardin and Sam
n,

e;

Stlth, Brandenburg; John Potter,

Clarence Brown, Bill Hoover and
James Harrllson, Owensboro; More- land Blaine, Dry Ridge; K. Cassidy,
Inez, and Bill I. Hughes, Lexington.
Phi Kappa Tau Ken Sylvester,
Dan Wallace, Clay Lancaster, Sam
McDonald, Bob Welsh, Al Roswell,
Lexington; Wade Aullck. Covington;
Dale Christopher,
Alvin Mullins,
Clarence Wolfe, Jenkins; Robert
Gum, Frankfort; Richard Roberts,
Fordsville; Jimmy Kellond. Louisville; R. T. Johnson, Auburn, Ala.;
Edwin Klngsburg, Billy Jones, Bob
Maloney, Covington and Perry Gard

History Department
Changes Announced
Prof. Paul H. Clyde Will Do
Research Work at
Washington

The department of history Issued
an announcement today concerning
certain changes in the curriculum of
the department. Several changes
have been made In Instructors, due
to the absence of assistant-professHall, who was been granted a leave
of absence to continue some work
at the University of Wisconsin, and
the departure of Prof. Paul H. Clyde
to Washington for a six months
or

period to complete

work on some

research material he compiled while
on a recent trip to the Orient.

Professor Hall's course In English
history will be taken by Doctor
Clark, while Professor Tuthill will
teach Professor Hall's class in English Constitutional history. Profes
sor Hall's class in the history of the
Bi itisn Empire will not be held until
his return.
Professor Clyde's courses as assigned in the schedule book have all
been cancelled for this semester but
will be taught as usual during the
spring semester.

Local Enrollment
Is 3,100 Students
A total of approximately 3,100 students have enrolled in Lexington's
three colleges, the University of
Kentucky, Transylvania college, and
the College of the Bible.
The enrollment of the University
of Kentucky is 2,688. Transylvania
and the College of Bible, have

enrolled approxinuitely 475. Dr. Arthur Braden, president of Transylvania college, remarked that the
present enrollment at the institution
is the largest in modern times. Tius
Is the largest enrollment at these
institutions for a number of years.
Students entering the University
after Monday will be required to
pay a late registration fee of $5.
The last date on which a student
may register for credit, enter an
organized class, drop a subject without receiving a grade has been set
as September 24.

PAN-HELLEN- IG

ner, Dawson Springs.
Sigma Chi H. O. Skinner, Henderson Pierce, Fred Flowers, Worth ington Wllmott, Walter Rehm, Fred
Bringardner and Richard Johnson,
Lexington; Cliff Collins, Chicago
David Hale Tate, Monticello; Howard James, Cleveland, O.; Thomas
Now, Russellville; Jack Henard Hop- klnsville; Cloyd McAllister, Berea;
Henry Baker, Providence;
Kelly
Haley, Paris; William Butler and
Robert Butler, Lexington; Howard
Clay, Palntsvllle; Ed Alcorn,
and Jim Stephenson, Plkeville.
Delta Tau Delta Harlowe Dean
Steve Featherston, Robert Ellison.
John Holmes, Bill Left, Robert
John Chambers, Morton Potter
Bill Bryant, Bob Fish, Lexington;
David Donoho, Way land; Ed Norton,
Wichita, Kan.; Laine Smith, Sterns;
Chester Watson, Frankfort; Tom
Marshall,
Paducah; Joe Brown,
Bloomfleld; Robert Freeberg, Chicago; Lynn Barclay, Arlington; Oscar Miller, Kennedy Dickson and
Burt Hallenberg, Louisville; Morton
Kelley, Morton's Gap; Robert Travis,
Hickman; Eugene Combs, Combs,
and Leonard Carr, Ashland.
Kappa Alpha
Ben DeHaven,
Walter Stevens, Ethelbert Breckinridge and Billy Dennlston, Lexington; John Blackburn, Paducah; Jack
Shanklin, Clearwater, Fla.; Tobertt
Thomas, Henry Wallace, Carroll
English and Bill Rodman, Louisville;
Harris Rhodes, Stanford; Loren Williams, Glasgow; Hugh Wedding,
Cloverport; Gus Barnett, Shelby -vtlle; Bill Smith, Corbin; Blair Rat-lifCincinnati; Rudolph DeRode,
Berkley Heights. N. J.; Charles Hig-de- n
and Erbe Erdeman, Covington;
Perry Stevens, Owensboro; Elton
Fox, Winchester; Bill Edmonds, Buenos Aires, S. A.
Lambda Chi Alpha Edgar Stephens, Presto nsburg ; Don .Pennell,
Lakewood, O.; Ernie Smith, Lee
Bowling Jr., and Billy Jones, Harlan;
Bill Smith, Irvine; Jason Adams and
Charles Byrd Williams, Salyersville;
Follls Fields and Klalr Bach,
Whitesburg; Willet Edmonson and
William Farrell, Laurel, Miss.; Tom
Vannoy, Madisonvllle; Charles Hein-ricMt. Sterling, and Percy Lewis,
Ashland.
Phi Delta Theta Joe Wilson, Dick
Bush, Charles Vance, Jim McCoy,
John Serpell and Dan Scott, Lexington; Waddill Piatt and Railey
McConnell, Versailles; Orie LeBus
and Nelseon Maloney, Cynthiana;
Alex MacAvinche, Chicago; Joe
Schultz, Louisville; Wilson Huston,
Bloomfleld; Hugh Brent, Paris; Allen
Hieatt, Eminence; Charles Duerson,
Mt. Sterling; Tom Marshall and
Taber Brewer, Frankfort; Vvfrlter
Flippln, Somerset.
Gayle
Phi Sigma Kappa
and William Roberts, Lexington; Joe Toth, Bridgeport, Conn.;
Herman Pausett, Maysvllle; William
Chambers and Bob Scholl, Sharpies,
W. Va.; Ray Laythrem, Stamping
Ground; Buster Stacey, Salyersville;
(Continued on Page Four)

TO BE OBSERVED
Formal Reception at Patterson Hall Opened Season
Week

Ist

SORORITY BIDDING
TO END SATURDAY
Women Greeks Warned About
Unethical Rushinsr

Practices

e,

Ol-ne-

T,

h,

De-Ca-

University Song,
"On, On, U. of K.,"
May Be Recorded
Under the direction of Elmer G.
Sulzer, head of the Publicity bureau,
and the sponsorship of Mr. Joe
Graves, of Graves, Cox and Co.,
plans have been formed for the production of a record of "On, On, U.
of K." and these plans will be carried through If the student body
seems sufficiently Interested In such
a record.
The record will be made by the
Gennett Electrical Transcription
company, Richmond, Ind. Mr. Sulzer will select a group of University
musicians and will direct them in
the playing of the school pep song.
The record will sell for $1, and to
cover expenses 200 records must be
sold. Those interested in procuring
this record should notify Mr. Sulzer
or The Kernel editor.

Opening Lecture
For Frosh Given
Matriculation Discus-FirstAttended bv Approx- ,
sion
imately 300 Frosh

Approximately

300

freshmen

in

the College of Arts and Sciences
attended their first matriculation

lecture at 10 a. m. Monday in Memorial hall.
The program was opened by the
singing of University or Kentucky
songs led by Miss Mildred Lewis.
"On On, U. of K." and the Kentucky
"Alma Mater" were sung by the
group with Elizabeth Hardin at the
piano.
Dean P. P. Boyd, of the Arts and
Sciences college, spoke to the freshmen, discussing the origin and departments of the college of which he
is dean. Dean Boyd advised students to study earnestly during their
first year, forming the habit which
would be carried with them through
their other year s of school. He also
of sorority or
stated the imixx-tancfraternity life of a student.
Preceding the program, Mrs. Lela,
Cuius played several selections at
tlie organ.
e

RULES

RUSHING

The women's
asso
ciation, composed of two represen
tatives from ench of the nine so
rorities on the campus, has set
down a strict set of rules to be observed during the sorority rushing
at the University. The rushing.
which began with a formal reception at Patterson hall last week,
will terminate with a bidding ceremony at Memorial hall at 8 o'clock
ic

Saturday night.
The purpose of these rules Is to
minimize unethical and unfair tactics and to aid new girls in making
their choice of the most congenial
groups. They provide for every
phase of rushing and penalties are
prescribed for violations
by both
the sorority and the rushee.
The procedure of the bidding
ceremony has been so arranged
that the rushee will not know
whether it is first, second, or third
choice. The bids of each chapter
must be submitted to the dean of
women by 4 p. m. Saturday, and
the rushees who receive bids will
be notified to appear at Memorial
hall. The rushee is allowed to
state in order her choice of soror
ity, and If possible, is given her
choice. If this is Impossible, however, she is given the bid to the
next possible choice. This must be
her final decision since under the
rules no changes are allowed during the year.
In accordance with the Pan-Hlenic rules, the opening formal reel

ception held last week, was attendrepresentated by the
ives, five representatives from each
sorority; members of the receiving
line and the girls being rushed by
the sororities. The rules further
stated that during the three days
following the reception .Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday, each soror
ity was allowed to entertain with
one tea. Rushing was prohibited
on Saturday and Sunday.
During the week, from Monday
a
through Saturday afternoon,
special schedule of dates and parties has been arranged. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, the sororities are permitted to have rush
dates from 4 to 6 p. m. Tuesday
and Thursday, the rushees may be
entertained with parties from 3 to
p. m, and on Saturday from 12
noon to 3 p. m.
Methods to be followed in extend
ing and receiving bids also have
been prescribed by the
association. To quote from the
rules: "Bids for engagements will
be placed in the University post
office and Patterson hall by rush
chairmen at 8 o'clock each morning.
The invitations will be received by
the rushees between 8 and 12 a.m.
each morning, and they may answer only the one Invitation that
they wish by writing "accepts" on
the Invitation, putting it in an envelope, and addressing it to the sorority. The rules state that "only
the name of the rush chairman,
the sorority, and the date and time
for the engagement will be printed
on these envelopes. The acceptances are placed in the Universtly
post office and turned over to the
sorority rush chairman.
"There shall be no communication between sorority women and
(Continued on Page Four)
ic

Pan-Helle-

TOTAL OF

2,688

ARE REGISTERED
Figure Exceeds Number Enrolled Last Year on 7th
Day by 241. Is 220 Over
Total for 1933-34

total of

and
had registered In the
University at the close of the office
of the Registrar yesterday afternoon,
figures show. Yesterday was the
seventh day of registration.
This total exceeds by 341 the number enrolled last year at the close of
the seventh day, and is 220 more
than the entire enrollment for this
semester last year. Complete statistics on the number of fresluneu and
Uie number enrolled in each coUegu
will not be available until the registration period is over. Next Monday,
September 24 will be the last day
on which a student may enter an
organized class for credit. Last year,
out of a total of 2.408 enrolled. 550
were freshmen. The Aits and Science college showed the largest enrollment of the colleges last year.
A late registration fee was placed
on those enrolling later than last
Thursday, September 14. This feu
is now $3 and cannot exceed this
A

2,688 freshmen

uu

Tien

amount.

A registration fee of 3 is being
charged special students and thus
wishing to audit classes, w ith an additional charge of $1 per credit hour
for each course. This fee was formerly 5.

V.

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two

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ARTHUR MUTH
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ASSISTANT
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riroim Tcrrrll
June

tiilnr

EDITORS

Jack Wild
Ben F Taylor
M

tf

Kfaaoolno

M.

EDITORS

Jack Wild
Hamilton

.Xiterary editor
WHALEN..
DOROTHY
LUCY JEAN ANDERSON
hit. Editor
Society Editor
WILLIE H. BMTTH
Editor
NANCY BECKER
Ant. Soct

Af.

WRITERS
Mary Chick
Bftty Anne Pennington
Virginia Bosworth
Charlotte Coffman
LORRAINE

Mar; Rett

LEPERE
feature Editor
WRITERS
Dr. H. L. Franklin
Land

ED SHANNON
ASSISTANT
Tom B. Atkins
Dave Salyers

NEWS

Newt editor
EDITORS
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Virginia Robinson

REPORTERS
Lawrence Edmonson
John Darnell
Betty Earle
Dorothy Wunderllch
Ed Lancaster
Miriam Rosen
Mary Sharberg
Quentln Houston
James Rash
Paul Ledrtdge
McNash
Capel
Ross Chepeleff
Theodora Nadelstein Margaret Cllnkscales

It has been known for years that
munition Interests In the United
States were partly responsible for
American participation In the World
War. It has also been known that
these Interests did their best to keep
foreign powers so well armed that
the war would not end too soon
yet not armed quite well enough so
that they could win.
This was generally accepted. But
that aviation companies, powder and
gas manufacturers, ship builders and
and munition makers are arming
foreign countries for another International conflict with the United
States, that they have amassed
countless thousands of dollars to defeat any attempt to prevent war to
wreck naval and peace conferences.
that they are sponsoring interna
tional spy rings to further their
cause, no one would believe.
The Senate munitions Investiga
tion his disclosed that munition in
terests of the United States are
playing the outstanding part of the
drama of rearmament throughout
the the world. They have contributed huge sums of money, indirectly.
to Fascist movements in European
countries hoping that these govern
ments might remain In power long
enough to return the loan by a siz
able order for war materials. And
they have. The orders from Germany and Italy have overshadowed
all other countries. That Germany
is violating the most Important pro