xt7p8c9r351j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7p8c9r351j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580725  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 25, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 25, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7p8c9r351j section xt7p8c9r351j Simmer Commencement

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University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, July 2.", 10"S

Vol. XLIX

et For Aiigo
The

List Minunrr commrncv

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A total of 31 per cent of UK's
students made below a 2.0 stand- 1ns during the spring semester, ac- cording to Charles F. Elton, dean
of admissions- - and registrar.
Of the 1.752 students In that
grouping, 888 were freshman and
433 were sophomores. Percentage
wise, 51 per cent oi tne tresnman
made below a 2.0. This is com- pared to 54 per cent who made
below a "C" average during the
fall semester.
also repcrted that 418 stu- were dropped from the Uni- dents

pro-Elto-

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M iss Lexington of 1938 Is Mary Mikell (Mike) Gorman who came to
tlie Bluegrass city she now represents from the town of Webster
SpriSS West Va. Mike is a senior here at I'K and will be entered
in competition tomorrow night at Henry Clay High School Auditorium
for the title of Miss Kentucky and a chance to represent the state in
the Miss America Contest.

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As is customary
summf
commencement, there will be iu
She graduate from Webster
Springs High School. Webster
baccalaureate service.
Springs, W. Va. UfflFFnow a resiDr. Chamberlain has been Tie
dent of Lexlngtrm-- . Last spring,
president"" of the I'nlversity slnc
Mike was a finalist in the Ken1946. He Joined the staff of L!C
tucky Derby Queen contest.
in 1919 as an assistant professor
She is a member of the English
of education. In 19.17 he became
Club and Guignol Players of UK.
registrar and he served as Dram
of the I'niversitv from 194! until
In the talent competition, she will
give either a dramatic or a humoAssociates and friends of the late 194fi.
rous reading.
The breakdown of candidates fir
Prof. Albert J. Olney have estabMike is in competition with four- lished an annual student award in decrees includes 244 candidate for
teen other beautiful girls from all honor of the late head of the Bachelor's degree. 191 for M ister's
over the state which promises to horticulture department.
decrees, and 13 for Doctor's
make the task of chosing a winner - The Albeit J. Olney Award will
a very difficult one for t lie judees. be presented at the end of each
There will be no reserved se.iti
An just who might the judges be?
year to a student complet- this summer as is the custom dur. . . . Why.
the public naturally. .school junior year in horticultural ing spring commencement. It will
ing
Yours will be just as big a vote as workhiswho has achieved an out- be first come,
anyone's in determining the win- standing record in scholarship.
ner if you can pay the price of ad
Prof. Olney died June 29, only
mission to the pagent. Proceeds
two days before his retirement was
from the contest go to charitable
to become effective. He was 70 and i
institutions supported by the
Jaycees, sponsors of the '.had been at the University since
1916.
Thursday. July 31. Alunml Semi
"Miss Kentucky" pagent.
Funds for the award will be pro- nar. Fine Arts and SUB. 8:30 a.tn
Festivites will begin Saturday
with a parade through downtown vided bv contributions from friends to 9:00 p.m.
Lexington at 2 p.m. Then at 7:30, land associates of the professor.
Friday. Aug. 1, Summer Schoi
have
the actual Judging will begin. The Many of his former studentsOlney. Commencement, Coliseum. 7:03
eventual winner will represent joined in the tribute to Dr.
fj).m.; Alumni Seminar. Fine' Arts
Kentucky in the "Miss America" Iniatiators of the award hope that and SUB. 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
jthe fund will reach sufficient, size
contest to be held in early fall.
Saturday, Aug. 2. Alumni
'in time for the first presentation nar. Carnahan Hou.e. 8:00Semiam.
In. addition -- to the- - honor of
made at the annual Honors
representing Kentucky in the "Miss ,lo. be.. program of the College of to LriXf p m.
.
Day
America" contest, the winner will Agriculture at the close of the
academic jear.
receive a $.500 scholarship from 1953-5- 9

Olney
Scholarship

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Fulbright Winners Named
Kentucky students have
baen named to receive Fulbright
scholarships for study abroad, it
was announced today by Dr. A. E.
Bis?e. chairman of the Fulbright
scholarship selection committee in
Kentucky.
The students are Ralph Allen
Hovermale, Route 3, Paris, a UK
graduate who will study chemistry at Albert Ludwigs University. Germany, and Edgar Albert
Wallace. Louisville, student at
Washington and Lee University,
who will study modern German
literature at the University of
Tuebingen, Germany.
Dr. Bigge, head of the department of modern foreign languages

and foreign students advisor at the
University of Kentucky, said the
students were selected in national
competition.
He also announced .competition
is underway for Fulbright grants
academic year.
for the 1959-6- 0
Deadline for applications is Oct.
31. Students enrolled at the University may make application with
Dr. Bigce and others may obtain
information from him on how to
apply.
Generally, the requirements for
application provide that students
be citizens of the United States; in
good health and under the a?e of
35. have completed undergraduate
work.

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will receive a Doctor of Las de
gree. A similar decree will oe conferred upon Bishop William T.
Mullov of the Covington Dinces) ;
of the Catholic Chrrh. Dr. Walter .
Pearson Kelley. a member of thi
faculty of the University of California, will receive a Doctor of
Science degree.
Candidates will assemble at 7:1?
Bottling Company, p.m. (COT) In the rlrrle behinf
the Pepsi-Col- a
who annually awards a scholarship the SUB. The processions will
to the "Miss Kentucky" winners.
start toward the Colisrum at 7:45.
Last year another UK student.
Dr. William Gardner, pastor of
Jane Marvin Brock. Casey County, the Lexington First Presbyterian
was selected as "Miss Lexington." Church, will deliver the invocation.
She went on to win the "Miss Ken- The benediction will be given b
tucky" title and represented the Dr. Donald Anderson, pastor of
state in the "Miss America" contest the Woodland Christian Church.
President Frank O. Dickey will delast fall at Atlantic City.
liver the annual charge to the
graduating class.

7:30 p.m.
Miss Gorman, who is president
of Chi Omega sorority, is being
sponsored by the Lexington Salesman Club.
Mike, as she is known to her
friends, is 20, 5' 6'i" and weighs

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speech

"Mind Thine Own Aims."
The University will confer thre
honorary degrees. Bishop Willt.im
T. .Wat kins of the Louisville Conference of the Methodist Churcli

DR. CHAMBERLAIN

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Chanitxrlain's

Mary Mikell (Mike) Gorman, a
UK senior, has been named "Miss
Lexington" and will represent this
city in the "Miss Kentucky" contest tomorrow night at the .Henry

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M.
hantSrrUln,
president of the Inlversitr, will
drllxrr the rnmmr nrrmrnt "address. He ha just returned front
Indonesia where he Inspertrd t'K'
contract teams at the fnivrrUtr
of Indonesia. The tonic of Ir.

Clay High School Auditorium at

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UK Coed Is Selected
1958's 'Miss Lexington'

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Four hundred anJ fiftv-thr- .
students are candidate for degrees The number falls .h"rt of
the record of 540 graduates set in

semester than for the first and
changes were greater in the num- bers than in the percentages,
During the fall semester 22 per
cent of the student body was on
probation. The spring semester
showed a slight decrease, when 18
per cent finished on probation.
The Elton retwrt showed that
combined totals of freshman and
sophomores who made below a 2.0
accounted for 78 per cent of the
total who failed, to make a "C"
average

versify for academic reasons last
semester.
The official figures show that
478, (27 per cent of the second
semester's freshman made below
the 1.4 minimum for probation,
Two hundred and ninety one UK
sophomores (23 per cent) made
Deiow me sopnomore pronation
standing of 1.6.
The figures released by Elton
show a decrease from the first
n
semester in both numbers on
percentages. The total
bation and
enrollment was less for the second

rim-ti-

June only.

Of Sludenis Fall Below 2.0

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UK Announces Plans For First Alumni Seminar
The dean of the University of
Kentucky Graduate School and a
distinguished professor of physics
will be among 11 speakers and discussion leaders at the first UK
Alumni Association Seminar on

"The American Political Tradition."
2.
July
They are Dean Herman E.
Spivey. who also is a professor of
English, and Dr. William S. Webb,
who headed the physics and - au- 30-Au-

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Dr. Spivey will speak on "The
American Political Tradition in
American Literature." at 2 p m.
I Thursday. July 31. in the University's Guignol Theatre. Dr. Webb
will conduct discussion on "The
Scientific Revolution an d the
American Political Tradition" at
9:30 a.m. Saturday at Carnahan
House on the Newtown Pike.
A highlight of the seminar will
j
be a banquet speech on "America's
Kise to World Leadership." by Dr.
Amry Vandenbosch, head of the
political science department, and
author of "Southeast Asia Amour
the World Powers." The event will
be held on Friday evening. Aug. I,
in the ballroom of the Student
I'nion IuilJing.
lecturers in the
2 will b3
seminar July
University graduates who have
gaiaed prominence in their re
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spective fields, according to Dr.
Carl Cone, professor of history and
coordinator of the seminar.
They are Dr. E. V. Murphee.
class of 1920. president of Esso
Research and Development Co.

science and author of "Southeast and Mrs. Dickey at Maxwell PUc
Asia Among the World Powers," at 3 p.m. Thursday. July 31. The
who will be principal speaker at a open house is intended to honor

and former president of the association; and Dr.
Richard M. Weaver, class of 1932.
professor of English, I'niversitv of
Chicago, and author of "Ideas
Have Consequences" and "The
Ethics of Rhetoric."
Other faculty members taking
part are Dr. J. Merton England,
professor of
and editor of
"Journal of Southern History";
Dr. Herman E. Spivey. professor of
English and dean of the Graduate
School; Dr. Amry Vimdeubwh.
ot political
distinguished prj.e-wj-

seminar.
The idea for the seminar was
broucht up by Helen King the University's alumni secretary after a
national meeting of alumni secretaries.
The entire proeram Is designed
to bring the alumni lno closer
contact with the academic side
of the University and to alow
them to become closer acquainted
with the faculty.
One function not mentioned In
thtt brochure is an op n
wlu.h Is i.t::.: h"K bv Pie dent

banquet on Friday. Au. 1.
and the members of
The use of University alumni the seminar
University's summer faculty.
as seminar speakers Is unique to the

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.seminar.--' 0:l
forzr.cr rhe5
ht .V.
Missile Program; Dr. For- members spoke at the previous
rest Pogue. class of 1932, director seminars such as the one at Yale
of the Marshall Research Center, University.
Lexington. Va.. and author of "The
Six thousand brochures and apSupreme Command."
plications have been mailed to the
Dr. Jesse W. Tapp. class of 19?0. active alumni of the University.
chairman of the board of directors. It has been emphasized.' however,
Hank of America, Los Angles, Cal.; that anyone interested can attend
William II. Townsend, class of 1912, the lectures that are being preLexington attorney, Lincoln histo- sented in conjunction with the

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-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. TrMiv. July 2". 1018

Writer Bids Farewell
To Hallowed UK Halls

athlete, and his mother is an alum
n.r DON D EAT ON
As collrpo days near nn end. what of the old sorority.
Arrividerci, pizza pies, with your
could be more appropriate than
one last nostalgic plance Into the hideous odor, which somehow flinds
past four years? As I reminisce, Us way into my room when you are
I see little that seems as insur- being eaten.
mountable as it did at the time.
Au revoir, Mimi, with your flowFor instance, there was my little
tiff with the French language. But ing black hair, your build, and your
then; Mtml couldn't speak English notification of probation from the
too well, either.
dean's office.
And then there was the ordeal
Thirty. Kernel, with your
.suffered in Elementary Geology, Wednesday night deadlines, which
which, fortunately, aJforded the somehow were seldom met.
wolves many fine opportunities to
Farewell, remnants of my youth.
throw little rocks at the
The world awaits me. Opportunity
girls In class.
passion
There was that Freshman Eng- beckons with a the limit. unsurI
passed. The sky's
lish class in which I copied a term work, work . . . work . . . workwill
paper, from the flies, which had
first been used by a fellow named . work . . .WORK????
Operator, would you connect me
Columbus.
There was the difficult assign- with the dean of the graduate
ment . of learning to sleep while school I would like to apply for
..
standing ' at parade rest in the admission. .... ...
military science parades. (I can
Greetings, football games, victory
still see those dements piling up.) parties, term papers, with your
But, somehow, as my college tendency to make students cheat.
career nears its end, I wonder if I
really want to leave. It brings
many questions to my troubled
"mind. Questions like: Who will
confer with the Dean of Men when
he can no longer call me in each
weels?' "Who will organize the
Dantv raids, which somehow never
materialized? Who will supervise
the work force in the SUB Grill?
good-looki-

ng

harass my fraternity
bull sesbrithers with
Who-- will

all-nig- ht

sions?
I suppose the University will
close up shop when I leave its hallowed campii.
But no matter. Memories, no
matter how fond. Will never bring
me back. I bid you all farewell.
Goodbye, ivied halls and fraternity house, with cavernous files,
with frolicking fellows, short sheets,
pledge paddling and beef stew on
Tuesdays.
Auf Wiedersen. Friday afternoon
sessions in the local
bistros, where the brief periods of
camaraderie were always present.
Au revoir, Mimi, with your voluptuous lips, your partying ways.
Sayonara, sorority houses, with
your wonderful sisterhoods which
prevent two members' dating the
same boy concurrently unless he is
rich, talented, handsome, witty, an
beer-drinki-

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Ily HARRV K. McUILMAMS
Puccini whose 100th anniversary
is being celebrated throughout the
world this year, is being especially
honored by the Cincinnati Opera
Association in the Cincinnati Zoo
during the fourth week of the 37th
season, beginning Sunday.
The week will open with Puccini's "La Boheme" with a
cast headed by Nadlne
Conner, Eva Llkova. Barry Morrell.

star-spangl- ed

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Frank Valentino, William Wilder-ma- n.
Napoleon Bisson, Wilfred
Engelman. Virginio Assandrl and
Edward Doe. Carlo Moresco will
'
conduct. "La Boheme" will be presented Sunday and repeated again
Friday.
"A Night of Puccini" will be presented Wednesday as the official
night celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great
composer. The night will be a real
gala celebration with many great,
Now You're Coohin9
artists singing the arias or, as
Anybody carrying a trch? . . . Get rid of it, you're out of date. Go Americans would say, "the hit
modern and switch to fas. Here's the best reason for the switch we songs" from most of his famous
ran think of, she's Kay Kennedy, Miss Kentucky LP Gas. Kay, a sen- and favorite operas. Selections to
ior at UK is shown at the opening of the Kentucky LP Gas Association be presented will include three
arias and a duet from "Tosea,"
meeting at the Phoenix Hotel.
two arias and a duet from "Manon
Lescaut," two arias and two duets
from "La Boheme," one aria and
one duet from "Madame Butterfly," an aria from "Gianni Schic-chi- ,"
two arias and a scene from
"Turandot" and an orchestral
"La Tregenda," from "Le

Botanist Gets Science Grant
To Study African Plant Life

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Puccini To Be Fclcd
At Cincinnati Opera

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Dr. Herbert P. Riley, head of the
University of Kentucky's botany
department, has been awarded a
$6,000 National Science Foundation
grant for a study of South African

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plant life.

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Dr. Riley, who has been professor and head of the botany department since 1942, was selected
as the "Distinguished Professor of
the Year" by the U. of K. Arts and
Sciences faculty for the academic
year 1953-5The botanist was most recently
recognized for his research activities when he was invited to serve
foreign advisory
on a
board for an international journal
of cytology to be published in
India.
The grant will be administered
by the Kentucky Research Foundation.

AUTO & HOME

tr7

RADIO

REPAIRS

R I PAIRS

TV

1.

Durin? the approximately two-- 1
year period of the research, he will
grow several hundred plants from
PACTS AND SERVICE FOR
seeds being collected for him in
ANY MAKE RADIO AND TV
South Africa. He will study the
While You Walt
'? number and structure of chromo- -somes in the plants and the bearing of the chromosome differences
Focititiei
Complete DriYt-lon their evolution. The plants will
Used Sett Bought, Sold and Traded
be grown under synthetic condi- -'
"tions in the U. of K. botany de- DAVIS
partment greenhouse.
Peanut-In 247 B.C.. the Carthage
SERVICE CENTER
The botanist, who also holds the
mournPhoat
417 S. Mill
rank of distinguished professor of ed the passing of Hannibal.
botany at the University, studied
succulent (water-stormnlants
of that area under a Fulbright
grant during the 1955-5- 6 academic''
.
year.
FREE
At that time he noted that little
PARKINS'
work had been done on South
,
African plants in general. In his
current research he will concenCITY BUI
trate on
plants,
SERVICE
! studying
their structure and gen
eral, form, of the chromosomes of;
the plants. This often gives clues '
PLAYGROUND OF THE BLUE GRASS
to the evolution of certain groups
of plants, he. said
I
He also plans to do research on
I a number of specific problems conit nected with the general study.
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DANCING EVERY
SATURDAY NIGHT

coot AIR. CONDITIONED
V3
WIDE
VISION
1
1 SCREEN
CentiMMi frtm

nvirift

2 PM

Friday-Saturda-

July

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25-2- 6

TOO MUCH, TOO SOON

LESSON!

Dorothy Malone

he

Errol Flynn .

Also
SCARED STIFF

Jerry Lewis

Dean Martin

July

Sun.-Mon.-Tue- s.,

Prov

to Your

fit that

If you cm driv a cr, you can leam
bow to fly! To provt it to yourself,

malt your appointment now for your
FREE DEMONSTRATION FLYING LESSONt Sm how easy flying
mJly-b- u
Many ttudot-Kil- o
tfUr

Iy.it- hunf
-

flyinf.tiaMk

Also

Young and old

mm and women
thoiuandt tach ytar art making their
dreamt of flying com tru, ft taken
no. ipeeial talent. Out airplanet are
modern
our instructing techniques
Ike bettt

TOUCH OF EVIL
Charlton Helton Janet Leigh
Wed-Thu- rt.,

Eohnicr Flying Service
4-51-

45

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Color
Jennifer Jones

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Saturday Night

8-- 1

Club House For Rent Every Night

SUMMER MEANS EXTRA LAUNDRY . . .
EXTRA LAUNDERING MEANS BECKER!

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30-3-

HIGH COSTtOF LOVING
Jose Ferrer Gena Rowlands

(Incorporated)

Phone

July

FAREWELL TO ARMS

Rock Hudson

Due Grail Field

nlIU seiroellcetrs

29

GOD'S LITTLE ACRE
Robert Ryan Aldo Ray

Ltarn How to Fly I

You CAN

27-28--

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CORNER LIME AND EUCLID

We Serve the University"
SAVE 15
ON CARRY OUT
La
LAUNDERERS

1

DRY CLEANERS

* Till

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UK Agriculture Prof Six ROTC Cadets Will Get?
Gives Views Of India Commissions Next Friddy
M...r
By TOM
Horbihrr. formerly

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iindrr th- p.iir iJfparimeiil HI IT Intoiri.itlon.il (
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Davdreamer
Getting in the right, mood for
graduation can be quite a job. In
the ease of Dianne Perkins, it is
especially difficult since she is
only a sophomore. Undaunted,
however, Dianne, a home ec major from Florence, Ala., says she
likes to dream of the day when
she too will get her sheepskin.

UK Senior Honored
Martha Layne Hall, a senior

ma-

joring in home economics, has been
named "Miss Future Home Economist of 1958."
Her title was won over three
other Kentucky colleges. She was
crowned Monday night at a dinner
meeting of the Kentucky LP Gas
Association. She was awarded a
silver plate and a $100 cash award.

are (lie buffalos slaughtered and
consumed, but they produce more
'
milk and butter "for the Indian
people than cattle do.
"One of the most disturbing
things in India at the present is
its trends toward Communism."
stated Dr. llorladier. lie pointed
out that the state of Kerala, where
he Hved for a year, has had a
Communist government since
April, 1037, and Communists were
elected by the people over democratic parties. He said the way
in which Rtkhsia- has given eco
nomic and terhnfc.il assistance in
India has been very effective
According, to Dr. Horlacher,
there is an qtumishing number of
aid programs working in India. A
partial list, besides the State Department prouram. includes Russian assistance. United Nations
programs for health, food and
children care, Britain's Columbo
1 lan
KocKcxeuer ana roiu toun
dations and numerous religious
groups.
He found that for the most part
a neutral attitude existed toward
the United States. The people
were not strongly in favor of or
opposed to accepting money and
advice. However, Dr. Horlacher
pointed out that there is a feeling
of inferiority among the people
in accepting money as a personal
gift.

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Commissioning exercises for cadets of the University of Kentucky
Army Heerve Officers Training

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will be held at 10

pin. next

All student
who will rrrfivr
bachelor's degrees this summer
may pick up their Kentut KUn
in Ihr reading room of the Journalism II u I Id I n ( lYrdnriula
through Friday July 20. 31. aim
Aug. 1, between 1:20 and 4 pin.
Hooks Mill not lie distributed
nho have not paid their
graduation fees. A limited num
ber of books will be on sale fot
St apieer to students wh
havt
not yet purchased tine.

Friday in the Blue Orass Koom of
the Student Union Building.
Dr. J. K. Hernandez. UK professor of modern foreign language.-- ,
Pics Whelan and K. CI. l'lumrn r
who is also a Colonel in the US
cadet.-- set a new frosh nnle mark at r
Air Force, will address the
and present them with their com- night meet at Morchcad when the
missions.
tied for honors Willi a time of
The cadets will take their oath in 1957.

-

,

Home of the College Folks
"Air-Condition-

,

'

ed

For Your Comfort'
BREAKFAST

lis

LUNCH
683

DINNER
S. Broadway

PHONE

4-43-

73

Private Rooms for Parties
Reasonable Prices
"High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"

4
v

niert

Charles L. Wil.
Pmnkfortr and Italph O. WoKf,
Ft. Thomas.

'

In 1931, Hines Soup Company
catered to 5,967 &oup lines.

Sanders. Pans; Henrv It.

H.

Knufley. Stanford;
Mm,

farmers.
Dr. Horlacher staled that ado- quatc food .supply Is a major con ccrn. The principal crop and food
In India is rice. Although four
billion dollars of lice Is produced
annually, not enough can be grown
for India's 400 million population.'
In areas where rice cannot be
. grown, the
main food is jowar. a
ground sorghum, and bcngalam
beans.
Farm work is done mostly by
hand. Since rice is grown under
water, machinery could not be
used anyway, but most fields are
too small to make machinery prae- tical. Few farmers can afford to
buy farm equipment.
Because India has a wide variation in climate, there is diversified
farming. Annual rainfall averages
10 inches innorthern India to 400
incnes in tne southern region
India ranks second to the United
States in production of cotton and
is a leading producer of coconuts,
spices, tea and coffee.
"India has too many people and
cattle for resources of the country,"
Dr. Horlacher said. India has the
largest cattle population of any
country in the world, and 175 million head are of the Zebu breed.
Zebu cattle are sacred and cannot
be slaughtered for food consumption. There are 45 million head
of buffalo, a member of the ox
family and no relation to the
North American bison, which serve
as the work animal. They are extremely useful, he added. Not only

;

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Paul

lias

bom made in raising tlx country's .standard of living. Dr.
Horlaclicr said. Land used to Ik divided in GOO print rly states
which were owned and controlled hy the mahajaras or princes
among the Hindus. After India became an independent country, the land was bought by the .Indian government and now
consists of 11 .separate states. Although the state governments
still owns most of the land, some acreage has been sold to

.it- -.

I Mm f'.
of Wtiro fnm
Kx.uiv I he lnvvit'i'n will t
en by Ch.ipt.tln I.t Colt Al'X- under and Ivan M. M White of
the OUre of Arts and s inirf.v
will Introdiu e the
kern at;".
welcome guests.
Cadets to receive fnmml'-vliare: Herald I). Cyrus. I'i .tnkfor :

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* THE

4

K ENT

t J CK V RtRN ELL Friday. July' gS.JfcS

.

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The Kentucky Kernel
University or Kentvcxy
Kaar1

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Mm

Fart

Oto

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Lliitoti, ImhrW
S,
Art ol March
daring acbool

THREE DOLLARS

lxJMayi

A SCHOOL

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ai aerond

179.

Mid rsanM.

TEAR

JOHN EGCITON, Editor
ANDY EPTERflON, Manning Editor
BILL TOLLY, Makeup Editor
&AHDAJIA LAKE, Newt Editor
- LARRY VAN IIOOGX, OportJ
Editor
DON DEATON and DAN MILLOTT, Feature Editors
yrZUVT AGHLTT, But. Mgr.
NORMAN McMTJLLIN, Adv. Mgr.
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JOHN MITCHELL, Photographer

NEW MEDICAL CENTER

Swan Song
This is tbe swan song of the weekly Kentucky Kernel.
old rag
After 43 years of sound and fury, the battle-scarre- d
.herewith retires to the sidelines to lick its wounds and reminisce
about past months of glory.
This bit of news will sadden some, please others and make
o difference at all to still others among the students, past and
present, who have been exposed to the Kernel over the years.
The new daily paper which will appear this fall for the first
time is part of "the new look" at the University. The new medical college, increased enrollment and higher scholastic standards, an impressive list of new faculty and staff members, new
dorms and classroom buildings all of these are part of the face"

mm.

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lifting.

The new Kernel will offer four times as much to praise or
criticize, four times as much to champion or to wrap fish in.
It will no doubt still be involved in its share of campus controversy, and it will lay in crumpled heaps beneath the tables
of the SUB grill four times as orten.
At the same time, the new Kernel will record tbe progress
of "the new look."
It will be no easy task for the University to survive growing
pains and enhance its reputation at the same time. It's not easy
to convince people this isn't "the country club of the South,"
in spite of all the facts which refute it.
But par for the course here at "the club" is getting tougher.
A few champions among the new faces could make Kentucky
a leader of education's new look. The corrected errors, the additions and the improvements, no matter how small, will help to
fjoakerthe University a place where students who want to learn
t'aa be satisfied.
Tbe daily Kernel will be starting as a duffer in this new
game. It hopes to become one of the champions.

NEW PEOPLE

1
at

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r7

j

r

NEW RESEARCH

The New Look?

Letters From The Readers

Kernels:
Off The Cob

...

Sliively Replies

Don't condemn the judgment of
Office
banks lifting
the
the
another because it differs from ToWith Editor: to the letter from Bex same as the return Post
436
address.- - I
reference
your own. You both may be wrong. a UK
student printed in the July appreciate your calling this to my
18 issue of the Kernel, I wish to attenticn.
Three things are good in little present to your readers the followThe information sheet that was
measure and bad in large: salt, ing facts.
tent out with the calendars did not
yeast and hesitation.
The sports calendar in question state that it was a University of.
was published and sold last year Kentucky Athletics Department
The way to make a good im- by solicitation. There was no publication. In boli type we stated
pression is to try harder to make printed matter sent in connection that the calendar was produced by
good than to make an impression. with the calendar. This year, ap- the S. & S. Enterprises.
proximately 60 calendars with a
I believe thai the UK student
sales information sheet were sent (who wrote the letter to you) will
When0 two people agree on
everything, one ol them is un- to banks in the state of Kentucky. agree with me that the calendar is
On this sheet we listed the return excellent lree publicity for -.-t1
necessary.
address as Memorial Coliseum. University f Kentucky AthleCJ
The bad news is out. Half the freshmen in the University
This was definitely a mistake, and DepaxtaocDt.
4ast semester made below a standing of L0 aeeordintf to the
Bernie A. 3hi-w...
. And On The Level we are sending another sheet to
al
office.
report from the registrar's
This country is experiencing the
They're not alone at the bottom end of the scale. One-thir- d
great era of the goof-of- f,
the age
f the entire student body was below
level.
job. It is popu- To The Editor:
of the half-don- e
Strange as it may seem,
Becinninff this falL freshmen will have to make 2.0 or better lated with laundrymcn who won't praise the Kentucky Kernel. I would like te take thia opportunity t
iron shirts, with waiters who
rule will apply to all won't serve, with carpenters who
After theHerrible ruckus last semester about the "Hernel Kutie,"
stay in school. The following fall,-tha- t
will come around someday maybe, I think the Kernel has done a wonderful job of maintaining its standStudents.
with executives whose minds are ards while at the same time conforming to the current standards cf
If almost 2,000 students can't make the grade now, how many on the golf course, with teachers taste and decency.
who demand a single salary schedThe pictures you have used this summer could not iossib!y offend
vill be on the outside looking in in a couple of years? It looks ule so
that achievement cannot be even the most Victorian. You seem to have used some imagination in
like .the word "student" is about to be
around here. rewarded, with students who take selecting the pictures, and they have all teen fresh and lively. And the
cinch coursesThe iand from coast . frirls-- von have chosen tn rinse have rertninlv raicoH tfcuttanHarrtc f
to coast has been enjoying a' the Kernel Kuties." '
stampede away from responsidegree from the University of Kentucky.
Because of your thoughtfulness, perhaps in the future it will r- -!
A
bility.
be an honor to be asked to pose for the "Kernel Kutie.L
We helieve that it will.--- .' Charles Brower
A Coed
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Below "C" Level

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ii-annu-

Chee